Microsoft Windows 7: Illustrated Complete

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® ® Microsoft Windows 7 ILLUSTRATED Complete

Steve Johnson

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Copyright 2010 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part.

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Copyright 2010 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part.

Microsoft® Windows® 7—Illustrated Complete Steve Johnson Vice President, Publisher: Nicole Jones Pinard Executive Editor: Marjorie Hunt Associate Acquisitions Editor: Brandi Shailer Senior Product Manager: Christina Kling Garrett Associate Product Manager: Michelle Camisa Editorial Assistant: Kim Klasner Director of Marketing: Cheryl Costantini Senior Marketing Manager: Ryan DeGrote Marketing Coordinator: Kristen Panciocco Developmental Editor: Janice Jutras

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Contents Preface ............................................................................................................................................ xii

Windows 7 Unit A: Introducing Windows 7 ............................................................................................. Windows 1 Starting Windows and Viewing the Desktop ................................................................... Windows 2 Using and changing a password Using Pointing Devices .................................................................................................... Windows 4 Using the mouse with the Web style Using the Start Button ..................................................................................................... Windows 6 Using the Taskbar ............................................................................................................. Windows 8 Working with the taskbar Working with Windows ................................................................................................. Windows 10 Using scroll bars Using Menus, Toolbars, and Panes ................................................................................ Windows 12 Setting Accessibility for special needs Using Dialog Boxes ........................................................................................................ Windows 14 Using Windows Help and Support ................................................................................ Windows 16 Getting help online Shutting Down the Computer ....................................................................................... Windows 18 Working on a computer set up for multiple users Practice ........................................................................................................................... Windows 20

Unit B: Working with Windows Programs .......................................................................... Windows 25 Starting a Program.......................................................................................................... Windows 26 Creating documents in other languages Opening and Saving a WordPad Document .................................................................. Windows 28 Working with filename extensions Modifying Text in WordPad ........................................................................................... Windows 30 Setting paragraph tabs and indents Working with a Graphic in Paint ................................................................................... Windows 32 Copying Data Between Programs .................................................................................. Windows 34 Switching between files Embedding or Linking an Object................................................................................... Windows 36 Finding, changing, and breaking a linked object Printing a Document...................................................................................................... Windows 38 Creating an XPS document Playing a Video or Audio Clip........................................................................................ Windows 40 Playing media from other computers or the Internet

CONTENTS iii

Working with Windows Media ...................................................................................... Windows 42 Changing Windows Media Center settings Practice ........................................................................................................................... Windows 44

Unit C: Managing Files and Folders .................................................................................... Windows 49 Opening Windows Explorer........................................................................................... Windows 50 Opening a document with a different program Viewing Files and Folders ............................................................................................... Windows 52 Customizing Details view Navigating a Folders List ................................................................................................ Windows 54 Customizing the Favorites list Creating and Renaming Files and Folders ..................................................................... Windows 56 Changing the layout of Explorer windows Searching for Files and Folders....................................................................................... Windows 58 Saving a search Organizing Files and Folders .......................................................................................... Windows 60 Adding property tags to files Copying and Moving Files and Folders ......................................................................... Windows 62 Sending files and folders Deleting and Restoring Files and Folders ....................................................................... Windows 64 Recycle Bin properties Working with Libraries................................................................................................... Windows 66 Creating and working with shortcuts Practice ........................................................................................................................... Windows 68

Unit D: Customizing File and Folder Management ............................................................ Windows 73 Changing the Layout of Explorer Windows .................................................................. Windows 74 Changing Folder Options .............................................................................................. Windows 76 Changing File Details to List .......................................................................................... Windows 78 Moving columns in Details view Changing Search Options .............................................................................................. Windows 80 Modifying the index to improve searching Using Personal Folders ................................................................................................... Windows 82 Using the Shared Documents folder Customizing Personal Folders ........................................................................................ Windows 84 Customizing a library Displaying Disk and Folder Information ....................................................................... Windows 86 Compressing Files and Folders ....................................................................................... Windows 88 Managing Files and Folders on a CD or DVD ................................................................ Windows 90 Creating music CDs or DVDs Practice ........................................................................................................................... Windows 92

Unit E: Customizing Windows Using the Control Panel ..................................................... Windows 97 Changing the Desktop Background ............................................................................... Windows 98 Setting a picture as the desktop background iv CONTENTS

Changing the Desktop Screen Saver ............................................................................ Windows 100 Changing power settings Changing Desktop Screen Settings .............................................................................. Windows 102 Using more than one monitor Changing the Desktop Appearance ............................................................................. Windows 104 Adding sound effects Working with Fonts ..................................................................................................... Windows 106 Installing, removing, or hiding a font Changing the screen text size Customizing the Taskbar.............................................................................................. Windows 108 Pinning and unpinning items to the taskbar Customizing the Start Menu ........................................................................................ Windows 110 Working with Start menu items Working with Desktop Gadgets ................................................................................... Windows 112 Setting the Date and Time ........................................................................................... Windows 114 Adding and displaying another clock Practice ......................................................................................................................... Windows 116

Unit F: Securing Your Computer........................................................................................ Windows 121 Exploring the Action Center ........................................................................................ Windows 122 Protecting against malware Managing Windows Firewall ....................................................................................... Windows 124 Adding additional security at start-up Getting Automatic Updates ......................................................................................... Windows 126 Locking the computer Defending Against Malicious Software ........................................................................ Windows 128 Monitoring and managing programs using Windows Defender Setting Up Internet Security......................................................................................... Windows 130 Protecting Your Internet Identity................................................................................. Windows 132 Sending secure information using Windows CardSpace Protecting Your Internet Privacy .................................................................................. Windows 134 Providing security with the Information Bar Deleting Internet Information ..................................................................................... Windows 136 Encrypting files using BitLocker Setting Parental Controls ............................................................................................. Windows 138 Creating a new user account Practice ......................................................................................................................... Windows 140

Unit G: Exploring the Internet with Microsoft Internet Explorer ..................................... Windows 145 Connecting to the Internet .......................................................................................... Windows 146 Sharing an Internet connection Opening a Web Page and Following Links .................................................................. Windows 148 Understanding a URL Using Tabs to Browse Web Pages ................................................................................. Windows 150 Using InPrivate browsing CONTENTS v

Changing Your Home Page .......................................................................................... Windows 152 Viewing and maintaining a History list Searching the Web........................................................................................................ Windows 154 Previewing and printing a Web page Adding a Web Page and Slices to Favorites .................................................................. Windows 156 Using Suggested Sites Viewing and Subscribing to a Feed .............................................................................. Windows 158 Saving a Web page and a Web graphic Getting and Using Accelerators .................................................................................. Windows 160 Managing add-ons and using InPrivate Filtering Zooming in and out Blocking Pop-ups and Filtering Phishing..................................................................... Windows 162 Displaying security information in the Security Status bar Practice ......................................................................................................................... Windows 164

Unit H: Exchanging Mail and News ................................................................................... Windows 169 Starting Windows Live Mail ......................................................................................... Windows 170 Making Windows Live Mail your default e-mail program Understanding e-mail account information Exploring the Windows Live Mail Window ................................................................ Windows 172 Changing the Windows Live Mail layout Signing in to Windows Live Mail Adding a Contact to the Contacts ............................................................................... Windows 174 Printing contacts from Windows Live Contacts Composing and Sending E-mail .................................................................................. Windows 176 Attaching a file to an e-mail message Sending a photo file Retrieving, Reading, and Responding to E-mail ......................................................... Windows 178 Checking the spelling and content in e-mail messages Managing E-mail Messages .......................................................................................... Windows 180 Searching for a message Diverting incoming e-mail to folders Viewing and Subscribing to a Newsgroup ................................................................... Windows 182 Filtering unwanted newsgroup messages Reading and Posting a News Message .......................................................................... Windows 184 Deleting old newsgroup messages Scheduling an Appointment in the Calendar ............................................................. Windows 186 Creating multiple calendars Practice ......................................................................................................................... Windows 188

Unit I: Communicating over the Internet ......................................................................... Windows 193 Starting Windows Live Messenger ............................................................................... Windows 194 Exploring the Windows Live Messenger window Signing in to Windows Live Messenger in different ways Resetting a lost password vi CONTENTS

Working with Contacts and Categories ....................................................................... Windows 196 Managing contacts and categories Sending and Receiving Instant Messages..................................................................... Windows 198 Sending a file or e-mail during an instant message Formatting Instant Messages ....................................................................................... Windows 200 Creating and using groups Communicating with Video ........................................................................................ Windows 202 Sending a message to a mobile device Getting Remote Assistance........................................................................................... Windows 204 Sharing games and activities Personalizing Windows Live Messenger ...................................................................... Windows 206 Changing the layout Starting Windows Live Writer ...................................................................................... Windows 208 Creating a Blog Post ..................................................................................................... Windows 210 Inserting photos and videos in a blog Practice ......................................................................................................................... Windows 212

Unit J: Creating Movies and DVD Videos .......................................................................... Windows 217 Planning a Movie Maker Video.................................................................................... Windows 218 Sources of video and sound clips Starting Movie Maker and Viewing a Project .............................................................. Windows 220 Importing media directly from a device Creating a Movie Maker Project File ............................................................................ Windows 222 Importing photos and videos from Windows Live Photo Gallery Creating a movie using AutoMovie Organizing and Trimming Clips .................................................................................. Windows 224 Splitting a video clip Adding Transitions and Effects Between Clips ............................................................ Windows 226 Adding multiple visual effects Adding Titles and Credits............................................................................................. Windows 228 Creating a slide show Adding a Soundtrack .................................................................................................... Windows 230 Adjusting audio levels Recording sound clips Publishing and Viewing Your Movie ........................................................................... Windows 232 Adding and using publishing plug-ins Creating a DVD Video.................................................................................................. Windows 234 Creating a DVD slide show Customizing a DVD Practice ......................................................................................................................... Windows 236

Unit K: Working with Windows Media .............................................................................. Windows 241 Viewing Pictures ........................................................................................................... Windows 242 Selecting the appropriate file format Managing Pictures ........................................................................................................ Windows 244 Publishing pictures on the web CONTENTS vii

Fixing Pictures .............................................................................................................. Windows 246 E-mailing pictures Printing Pictures ........................................................................................................... Windows 248 Ordering photo prints from the Web Changing AutoPlay Settings ........................................................................................ Windows 250 Managing pictures on a digital camera Getting Pictures from a Digital Camera or Scanner .................................................... Windows 252 Scanning a picture Copying and Playing Music from a CD ....................................................................... Windows 254 Copying music to your portable device or CD Streaming Media .......................................................................................................... Windows 256 Setting streaming options Associating a Sound with an Event.............................................................................. Windows 258 Creating a sound file Controlling the volume Using the Pictures folder as a screen saver Practice ......................................................................................................................... Windows 260

Unit L: Managing Shared Files Using a Network .............................................................. Windows 265 Understanding Network Services ................................................................................. Windows 266 Exploring the Network and Sharing Center ................................................................ Windows 268 Setting network sharing options Examining Network Computer Properties................................................................... Windows 270 Viewing network connection properties Opening and Viewing a Network ................................................................................ Windows 272 Creating a network connection Creating a Shared Folder .............................................................................................. Windows 274 File permission properties Mapping a Network Drive ........................................................................................... Windows 276 Creating a shortcut to a network location Working with Shared Files ........................................................................................... Windows 278 Connecting to a network over the Internet Disconnecting a Network Drive ................................................................................... Windows 280 Network paths Using a Homegroup ..................................................................................................... Windows 282 Setting homegroup sharing options Practice ......................................................................................................................... Windows 284

Unit M: Going Mobile ........................................................................................................ Windows 289 Exploring the Windows Mobility Center .................................................................... Windows 290 Connecting to a network projector Managing Power Options ............................................................................................ Windows 292 Changing advanced power options Connecting to a Wireless Network .............................................................................. Windows 294 Setting up a wireless router or access point viii CONTENTS

Setting Up a Remote Computer ................................................................................... Windows 296 Connecting to and controlling a remote computer Marking Offline Files for Synchronization .................................................................. Windows 298 Synchronizing Offline Files.......................................................................................... Windows 300 Managing a wireless connection Setting Pen and Touch Options ................................................................................... Windows 302 Using Windows Touch Using the Tablet PC Input Panel .................................................................................. Windows 304 Using the Math Input Panel Handwriting with Windows Journal ........................................................................... Windows 306 Creating Sticky Notes Practice ......................................................................................................................... Windows 308

Unit N: Maintaining Your Computer ................................................................................. Windows 313 Improving Computer Performance.............................................................................. Windows 314 Improving performance and searches Formatting a Disk ......................................................................................................... Windows 316 Understanding disk file systems Finding and Repairing Disk Errors ............................................................................... Windows 318 Changing the size of virtual memory Boosting speed with removable media Defragmenting a Disk .................................................................................................. Windows 320 Setting start-up and recover options Cleaning Up a Disk ...................................................................................................... Windows 322 Scheduling tasks Restoring Computer Settings ....................................................................................... Windows 324 Deleting restore points Starting Windows when problems occur Removing or Repairing a Program ............................................................................... Windows 326 Terminating an inactive program Adding a Program ........................................................................................................ Windows 328 Getting older programs to run on Windows 7 Setting Default Programs ............................................................................................. Windows 330 Running MS-DOS programs and commands Practice ......................................................................................................................... Windows 332

Unit O: Backing Up and Restoring Your Files .................................................................... Windows 337 Exploring Backup and Restore ..................................................................................... Windows 338 Creating a backup strategy Backing Up Files ........................................................................................................... Windows 340 Managing and Changing Backups ............................................................................... Windows 342 Understanding permissions to back up files and folders Scheduling a Backup .................................................................................................... Windows 344 Rotating your backup Restoring Backed-Up Files ............................................................................................ Windows 346 CONTENTS ix

Restoring Previous File Versions .................................................................................. Windows 348 Restoring your computer Copying Files from a Backup ....................................................................................... Windows 350 Using advanced techniques to manage files and folders Deleting a Backup Set................................................................................................... Windows 352 Deleting backups in the Backup and Restore window Creating a System Repair Disc ..................................................................................... Windows 354 Creating a system image Practice ......................................................................................................................... Windows 356

Unit P: Managing Hardware .............................................................................................. Windows 361 Understanding Windows Hardware............................................................................. Windows 362 Understanding printers Installing a Printer........................................................................................................ Windows 364 Understanding USB ports Viewing Printer Properties ........................................................................................... Windows 366 Sharing a Printer........................................................................................................... Windows 368 Managing Printers and Print Jobs ................................................................................ Windows 370 Adding a separator page to print jobs Installing Hardware Devices ........................................................................................ Windows 372 Creating and viewing an XPS document Viewing System Hardware ........................................................................................... Windows 374 Getting system information Removing Hardware Devices ....................................................................................... Windows 376 Checking Windows Update Driver Settings ................................................................ Windows 378 Practice ......................................................................................................................... Windows 380

Appendix A: Setting Up Windows 7 .................................................................................. Windows 385 Identifying Windows 7 Editions .................................................................................. Windows 386 Identifying New Features in Windows 7...................................................................... Windows 388 Preparing to Install Windows 7 ................................................................................... Windows 394 Understanding activation and registration Installing Windows 7 ................................................................................................... Windows 396 Updating to a Windows 7 service pack Transferring Files and Settings from Another Computer ............................................ Windows 398 Setting Up a Computer for Multiple Users .................................................................. Windows 400 Setting Disk Quotas for Users....................................................................................... Windows 402 Exploring the Ease of Access Center ............................................................................ Windows 404 Listening to your computer with Narrator Using Speech Recognition ........................................................................................... Windows 406 Setting up Speech Recognition advanced options Using Windows Remote Assistance ............................................................................. Windows 408

Glossary ....................................................................................................................................Glossary 1 Index ............................................................................................................................................ Index 1 x CONTENTS

Acknowledgements Author Acknowledgements Steve Johnson The task of creating any book requires the talents of many hard-working people pulling together to meet impossible deadlines and untold stresses. I would like to thank the entire team responsible for making this book possible. I would like to especially thank Janice Jutras for making this book easier to read, understand, and follow. I would also like to thank the manuscript reviewers, John Freitas and Jeff Schwartz, for their helpful feedback during the writing process, and the project manager, Christina Kling-Garrett, for keeping this project on track. And, most importantly, I would like to thank my wife Holly, and three children, JP, Brett, and Hannah, for their support and encouragement during the project.

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Preface Welcome to Microsoft Windows 7—Illustrated Complete. If this is your first experience with the Illustrated series, you’ll see that this book has a unique design: each skill is presented on two facing pages, with steps on the left and screens on the right. The layout makes it easy to learn a skill without having to read a lot of text and flip pages to see an illustration.

Each two-page spread focuses on a single skill.

Windows 7

When you finish working on your computer, you need to make sure to turn off, or shut down, your computer properly. This involves several steps: saving and closing all open files, closing all open windows, exiting all running programs, shutting down Windows itself, and, finally, turning off the computer. Shutting down your computer makes sure Windows and all its related programs are properly closed; this avoids potential problems starting and working with Windows in the future. If you turn off the computer by pushing the power switch while Windows or other programs are running, you could lose important data. If a program is still open when you instruct Windows to shut down, you will be prompted to save the file and close the program before the shut-down process continues. You shut down your computer now.

STEPS

QUICK TIP To prevent other users from using your computer, you [L] to can press lock the computer and return to the Welcome screen. To unlock, move the mouse and log on at the Welcome screen.

QUICK TIP

What's New in this Edition Microsoft has made many changes and enhancements to Microsoft Windows 7 to make it the best ever. Here are some highlights of what's new: • Libraries—Libraries are special folders that catalog files and folders in a central location, regardless of where you actually store them on your hard drive. • Action Center—The Action Center allows you to set the system and security alerts you want to see, and hide the ones you don’t. If you’re attention is needed, the Action Center displays an icon in the notification area on the taskbar to make you aware of potential security risks, such as a new virus, out of date antivirus software, or if an important security option is turned off or other security related issues from Microsoft. • Internet Explorer 8—Internet Explorer 8 displays the information you want in your browser with features such as Accelerators and Web Slices. The redesigned xii

A case scenario motivates the the steps and puts learning in context.

Shutting Down the Computer

UNIT

A

This book is an ideal learning tool for a wide range of learners—the “rookies” will find the clean design easy to follow and focused with only essential information presented, and the “hotshots” will appreciate being able to move quickly through the lessons to find the information they need without reading a lot of text. The design also makes this a great reference after the course is over! See the illustration on the right to learn more about the pedagogical and design elements of a typical lesson.

Introduction briefly explains why the lesson skill is important.

If you have a mobile PC, set Power Options in the Control Panel to turn off your computer or put it to sleep by closing the lid.

1. If any windows or programs are open on your screen, click the Close button in the upper-right corner of each window on the taskbar, then point to the arrow next to the 2. Click the Start button Power button A submenu appears, displaying several options for turning off your computer, as shown in Figure A-15. See Table A-4 for a description of each option. The Power button (set by default to Shut down) provides easy access to your preferred shutdown option. Depending on your Windows settings, your shutdown options might be different.

3. If you are working in a lab, click the Windows desktop to cancel the task; if you are working on your own machine or if your instructor tells you to shut down Windows, click the Shut down button or menu option to exit Windows and shut down your computer 4. If you see the message “It’s now safe to turn off your computer,” turn off your computer and monitor Some computers power off automatically, so you might not see this message.

TABLE A-4: Shut down options

option

function

when to use it

Switch user

Maintains your session and changes users

When you want to continue working with Windows, yet allow another user to access another Windows session

Log off

Saves and leaves your session to disk and changes users

When you want to stop working with Windows, yet allow another user to access another Windows session

Lock

Maintains your session, while restricting access to Windows

When you want to stop working with Windows and you want to keep others from using Windows

Restart

Restarts the computer and reloads Windows

When you want to restart the computer and begin working with Windows again (when your programs might have frozen or stopped working)

Sleep

Maintains your session, keeping the computer running on low power

When you want to stop working with Windows for a few moments and conserve power (ideal for a laptop or portable computer); available when a power scheme is selected in Power Options (in the Control Panel)

Hibernate

Saves your session to disk so that you can safely turn off power; restores your session the next time you start Windows

When you want to stop working with Windows for a while and start working again later; available when the Power Options setting (in the Control Panel) is turned on

Shut down

Prepares the computer to be turned off

When you finish working with Windows and you want to shut off your computer

Windows 18

Introducing Windows 7

Tips and troubleshooting advice, right where you need it–next to the step itself.

Tables provide helpful summaries of key terms, buttons, or keyboard shortcuts.

Address bar with domain highlighting and compatibility view, and tabbed browsing with new tab options make it easier to display and work with Web pages. With InPrivate browsing and filtering, you can browse the Web without keeping track of your whereabouts and protect yourself from Web sites gathering information about you.

Large screen shots keep students on track as they complete steps

Windows 7

FIGURE A-15: Shut down menu

Arrow that displays the Shut down menu Power button; displays Shut down by default

Shut down menu

• Windows Live Essentials—Windows Live Essentials is a collection of programs available from Microsoft online that allows you to communicate on the Web and work with and share media. The Windows Live programs include Messenger, Mail, Photo Gallery, Toolbar, Writer, Family Safety, Movie Maker, and Microsoft Silverlight. Many of these programs came installed along with Windows Vista, however in Windows 7, you need to download and install them.

Assignments The lessons use Quest Specialty Travel, a fictional adventure travel company, as the case study. The assignments on the yellow pages at the end of each unit increase in difficulty. Data files and case studies provide a variety of interesting and relevant business applications. Assignments include:

Working on a computer set up for multiple users Many users may use the same computer, in which case each user has his or her own Windows identity, allowing them to keep their files completely private and customize the operating system with their own preferences. Windows manages these separate identities by giving each user a unique username and password. You set up user accounts during Windows 7 installation or by using User Accounts in the Control Panel, as shown in Figure A-16. When Windows starts, a Welcome screen appears, displaying user accounts. When a user selects an account and types a password (if necessary), Windows starts with that user’s configuration settings and network permissions. When you’re done using the computer, yet you want to leave it on for another person to use, you can choose the Switch user or Log off command from the Start menu. The Switch user command allows you to switch between users quickly without having to save your current settings, so you can switch back and continue working. The Log off command saves your current settings and exits you from Windows.

FIGURE A-16

• Concepts Review consist of multiple choice, matching, and screen identification questions. • Skills Review provide additional hands-on, step-by-step reinforcement. Introducing Windows 7

Clues to Use boxes provide useful information related to the lesson skill.

Windows 19

• Real Life Independent Challenges are practical exercises in which student perform activities to help them with their every day lives. • Advanced Challenge Exercises set within Independent Challenges provide optional steps for more advanced students. • Visual Workshops are practical, selfgraded capstone projects that require independent problem solving.

xiii

Instructor Resources The Instructor Resources CD is Course Technology’s way of putting the resources and information needed to teach and learn effectively into your hands. With an integrated array of teaching and learning tools that offer you and your students a broad range of technologybased instructional options, we believe this CD represents the highest quality and most cutting edge resources available to instructors today. Many of these resources are available at www.cengage.com/coursetechnology. The resources available with this book are: • Instructor’s Manual—Available as an electronic file, the Instructor’s Manual includes detailed lecture topics with teaching tips for each unit. • Sample Syllabus—Prepare and customize your course easily using this sample course outline.

available on the Instructor Resources CD-ROM, the Review Pack, and can also be downloaded from www.cengage.com/ coursetechnology. In this edition, we have included a lesson on downloading the Data Files for this book, see the inside back cover of this text.

• PowerPoint Presentations—Each unit has a corresponding PowerPoint presentation that you can use in lecture, distribute to your students, or customize to suit your course.

Instruct students to use the Data Files List included on the Review Pack and the Instructor Resources CD. This list gives instructions on copying and organizing files.

• Figure Files—The figures in the text are provided on the Instructor Resources CD to help you illustrate key topics or concepts. You can create traditional overhead transparencies by printing the figure files. Or you can create electronic slide shows by using the figures in a presentation program such as PowerPoint. • Solutions to Exercises—Solutions to Exercises contains every file students are asked to create or modify in the lessons and endof-unit material. Also provided in this section, there is a document outlining the solutions for the end-of-unit Concepts Review, Skills Review, and Independent Challenges. An Annotated Solution File and Grading Rubric accompany each file and can be used together for quick and easy grading. • Data Files for Students—To complete most of the units in this book, your students will need Data Files. You can post the Data Files on a file server for students to copy. The Data Files are

• ExamView—ExamView is a powerful testing software package that allows you to create and administer printed, computer (LAN-based), and Internet exams. ExamView includes hundreds of questions that correspond to the topics covered in this text, enabling students to generate detailed study guides that include page references for further review. The computer-based and Internet testing components allow students to take exams at their computers, and also saves you time by grading each exam automatically. • Supplemental Worksheets—New! The Instructor Resources now include Supplemental Worksheets for each Skills Review in the book. Asssign these worksheets so that students can answer questions as they complete each step of the Skills Review and submit it to you as a gradable assignment. Worksheets for each Visual Workshop provide instructions for how to use the Snipping Tool in Windows 7 to capture a screen shot of their work, which you can grade.

Learning on the Go. Always Available…Always Relevant. Our fast-paced world is driven by technology. You know because you are an active participant—always on the go, always keeping up with technological trends, and always learning new ways to embrace technology to power your life. Let CourseCasts, hosted by Ken Baldauf of Florida State University, be your guide into weekly updates in this ever-changing space. These timely, relevant podcasts are produced weekly and are available for download at http://coursecasts.course.com or directly from iTunes (search by CourseCasts). CourseCasts are a perfect solution to getting students (and even instructors) to learn on the go!

xiv

Read This Before You Begin Frequently Asked Questions What are Data Files? A Data File is a WordPad, Paint, Windows Media Player, or another type of file that you use to complete the steps in the units and exercises to create the final materials that you submit to your instructor. Each unit opener page lists the Data Files that you need for that unit.

Where are the Data Files? Your instructor will provide the Data Files to you or direct you to a location on a network drive from which you can download them. Alternatively, you can follow the instructions on the next page to download the Data Files from this book’s Web page.

What software was used to write and test this book? This book was written and tested using a typical installation of Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate Edition, with Aero turned on using the standard Windows 7 Aero theme. The browser used for any steps that require a browser is Windows Internet Explorer 8.

What software do I need to complete the steps and exercises in this book? The exercises in this book assume that your computer is using a typical installation of Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium Edition or higher, with Aero turned on using the standard Windows 7 Aero theme. The browser used for this book assumes that your computer is using Windows Internet Explorer 8, which comes installed with a typical Microsoft Windows 7 installation. The e-mail program used for this book requires the download and installation of Windows Live Mail from the Windows Live Essentials Web site; the program doesn’t come installed with a typical Microsoft Windows 7 installation.

Do I need to be connected to the Internet to complete the steps and exercises in this book? Some of the exercises in this book assume that your computer is connected to the Internet. If you are not connected to the Internet, see your instructor for information on how to complete the exercises.

xv

Downloading Data Files In order to complete many of the lesson steps and exercises in this book, you are asked to open and save Data Files. A Data File is a partially completed file that you use as a starting point to complete the steps in the units and exercises. The benefit of using a Data File is that it saves you the time and effort needed to create a file; you can simply open a Data File, save it with a new name (so the original file remains intact), then make changes to it to complete lesson steps or an exercise. Your instructor will provide the Data Files to you or direct you to a location on a network drive from which you can download them. Alternatively, you can follow the instructions in this lesson to download the Data Files from this book’s Web page.

1. Start Internet Explorer, type www.cengage.com/coursetechnology/ in the address bar, then press [Enter] 2. Click in the Enter ISBN Search text box, type 9780538749046, then click Search 3. When the page opens for this textbook, click the About this Product link for the Student, point to Student Downloads to expand the menu, and then click the Data Files for Students link 4. If the File Download – Security Warning dialog box opens, click Save. (If no dialog box appears, skip this step and go to Step 6) 5. If the Save As dialog box opens, click the Save in list arrow at the top of the dialog box, select a folder on your USB drive or hard disk to download the file to, then click Save 6. Close Internet Explorer and then open Computer on the Start menu or Windows Explorer on the taskbar and display the contents of the drive and folder to which you downloaded the file 7. Double-click the file 749046.exe in the drive or folder, then, if the Open File – Security Warning dialog box opens, click Run 8. In the WinZip Self-Extractor window, navigate to the drive and folder where you want to unzip the files to, then click Unzip 9. When the WinZip Self-Extractor displays a dialog box listing the number of files that have unzipped successfully, click OK, click Close in the WinZip Self-Extractor dialog box, then close Windows Explorer You are now ready to open the required files.

xvi

UNIT

A Windows 7

Introducing Windows 7

Files You Will Need:

Microsoft Windows 7 is an operating system, a computer program that controls the op-

No files needed.

applications, help you accomplish specific tasks, such as sending and receiving electronic

eration of your computer and the programs you run on it. Programs, also known as mail and managing files on your computer. When you work with Windows 7, you will notice icons and thumbnails, which are small pictures on your screen intended to be meaningful symbols of the items they represent. You will also notice windows (thus the name of the operating system), which are rectangular frames on your screen that can contain icons, the contents of a file, or other usable data. A file is a collection of information that has a unique name, distinguishing it from other files. This use of icons, thumbnails, and windows is called a graphical user interface (GUI, pronounced “gooey”), meaning that you interact (“interface”) with the computer through the use of graphics. Windows 7 provides two distinct GUI experiences: a “basic” experience for entry-level systems and a more visually dynamic experience called Windows Aero for high-level systems. Windows Aero provides expanded visual effects, such as glasslike interface elements that you can see through, subtle window animations, window colors, and live thumbnails that you can display on the taskbar.

OBJECTIVES

In this unit, you will be introduced to basic Windows skills.

Start Windows and view the desktop Use pointing devices Use the Start button Use the taskbar Work with windows Use menus, toolbars, and panes Use dialog boxes Use Windows Help and Support Shut down the computer

UNIT

A Windows 7

Starting Windows and Viewing the Desktop When you first start Windows 7, you see the Welcome screen, a way to identify yourself on the computer, or log on. After you log on, you see the Windows desktop, as shown in Figure A-1. The desktop is the graphical background on screen that represents a desk. It contains windows, icons, files, and programs, which you can use to access, store, organize, modify, and share information. The horizontal bar at the bottom of your screen is called the taskbar; it allows you to start programs and switch among currently running programs. At the left end of the taskbar is the Start button, which you use to start programs, find and open files, access Windows Help and Support, and much more. Next to the Start button are taskbar-pinned programs, which you use to quickly start your Internet browser, Windows Explorer, and Windows Media Player. At the right end of the taskbar is the notification area (also known as the system tray), which displays the program-related icons, time and date, and the Show the desktop button (the blank button next to the time and date). If you upgraded your computer to Windows 7 from a previous version of Windows, your desktop might contain additional desktop icons, toolbars, and other elements, such as miniprograms called gadgets. Gadgets provide easy access to frequently used tools and information, such as news headlines. Windows 7 automatically starts when you turn on your computer. If your computer is not on, you turn it on now.

STEPS 1. Turn on your computer and wait for Windows to start Windows automatically starts and displays a security prompt, the Welcome screen, or the desktop. The security prompt provides an additional step to prevent unauthorized users from accessing your computer. If the security feature is turned on, Windows 7 asks you to press several keys at the same time to continue. If the security prompt appears, continue to Step 2; if the Welcome screen appears, skip to Step 3; and if the desktop appears, skip to Step 4.

2. If prompted on the screen, press and hold [Ctrl] and [Alt] with one hand, then press [Del] with the other to display the Welcome screen At the Welcome screen, you select your username and enter a password to identify yourself on the computer. If you share the computer with other users, you see multiple usernames on the Welcome screen. TROUBLE If you are new to using the mouse, read through the next topic, “Using Pointing Devices.”

3. In the Welcome screen, click your username, if necessary, type your password, then press [Enter] A password prevents other users from accessing your computer files without proper authorization. Windows passwords are case sensitive, which means that Windows makes a distinction between upper- and lowercase letters and nonalphabetic characters (numbers and symbols). Only bullets appear as you type the password. This helps to prevent other people from learning your password. Once the password is accepted, the Windows desktop appears on your screen, as shown in Figure A-1.

4. If a message pops up in the notification area, as shown in Figure A-1, click the Close button in the upper-right corner of the pop-up to dismiss it

QUICK TIP To open the Getting Started window later, click the Start button, point to All Programs, click Accessories, then click Getting Started.

Windows 2

A pop-up notification is an informational message that appears when you need it. For example, when Windows 7 detects the need for updates on your computer, a pop-up notification appears, letting you know. If you don’t dismiss a notification, it will fade away on its own. When you start Windows 7 for the first time, the Getting Started window appears, displaying icons for easy access to common options, such as Go online to find out what’s new in Windows 7, Personalize Windows, and Transfer files and settings from another computer, to help you get started using Windows 7.

5. If the Getting Started window appears, click the Close button corner of the Getting Started window The Getting Started window closes.

Introducing Windows 7

in the upper-right

Recycle Bin icon; your desktop might contain additional icons Gadgets

Windows 7

FIGURE A-1: Windows 7 desktop

Pointer

Windows desktop; your background might differ

Pop-up notification

Taskbar Notification area

Start button

Using and changing a password You can set up your computer to require users to log on with a username and password to use it. You specify a username and password when you install Windows 7, or an instructor or technical support person (the person in charge of computers at your school or business) assigns you a username and password on a computer owned by the school or business. If you own your own computer and you want to change your password, or if you don’t have one and want to set one up, click the Start button, then click Control Panel. This opens the Control Panel window. Click User Accounts and Family Safety, then click Change your Windows password. The window changes to display the heading “Make changes to your user account.” Click Change your password or Create a password for your account, then follow the instructions provided. If you have forgotten

your password, you can click Reset password on the Welcome screen to start the Forgotten Password Wizard. The Forgotten Password Wizard takes you step-by-step through a series of instructional windows to help you recover user account information (username and password) and personalized computer settings. To use the Forgotten Reset Wizard, you need to insert a password reset disk into a disk drive or USB drive. To create a password reset disk, return to the Make changes to your user account window in the Control Panel, then click Create a password reset disk in the left pane in the window. Follow the instructions provided. Never write down your password on paper or let someone look over your shoulder as you log on to the computer. Always be sure to log off or shut down when you walk away from your computer.

Introducing Windows 7

Windows 3

UNIT

A Windows 7

Using Pointing Devices A pointing device is hardware connected to or built into the computer you use to position the pointer, the small symbol on the screen that indicates the pointer’s position. The most common pointing devices are a mouse, as shown in Figure A-2, for desktop computers and a touch pad for laptop or notebook computers. When you move the mouse across a flat surface (such as a desk or a mouse pad), or place your finger on the touch pad and drag across it, the pointer on the screen moves in the same direction. The shape of the pointer changes to indicate different activities. Table A-1 shows some common pointer shapes. Once you move the pointer to a desired position on the screen, you use the buttons on the mouse or touch pad to “tell” your computer what you want it to do. If your mouse has a scroll wheel between the two buttons, you can roll the wheel backward (toward you) or forward (away from you) to scroll through windows. Other available pointing devices include trackballs, which function similarly to the mouse, and stylus pens, which work with a tablet pad to move the pointer and enter handwritten information. You want to use the mouse to become familiar with these navigational skills. The steps in this lesson refer to a mouse; if you have another pointing device, use it instead.

STEPS 1. Place your hand on the mouse, locate the pointer mouse back and forth across your desktop TROUBLE If the pointer changed to a pointing finger when you pointed to the Recycle Bin and a window opened when you clicked it, your system is set up in Web style. See the Clues to Use box in this lesson for more information.

TROUBLE If the icon jumps back to the left edge of the screen, Auto arrange icons is turned on. Position the pointer anywhere on the desktop, press the right mouse button, point to View on the menu that appears, then click Auto arrange icons to deselect it.

QUICK TIP You can also press [Esc] to close a shortcut menu without executing a command.

As you move the mouse, the mouse pointer moves correspondingly.

2. Move the mouse to position the pointer over any icon in the notification area Positioning the mouse pointer over an icon or over any specific item on the screen is called pointing. When you point to an item, Windows often displays a ScreenTip, identifying the item or displaying status information, as shown in Figure A-3.

3. Locate the Recycle Bin on the desktop (the default position for this icon is in the upperleft corner of the screen), position the pointer over it, then press and release the left mouse button The act of pressing a mouse button once and releasing it is called clicking. The icon is now highlighted, or shaded differently from the other icons. The act of clicking an item, such as an icon, indicates that you have selected it. To perform an operation on an icon, such as moving it, you must first select it.

4. Point to the Recycle Bin, press and hold down the left mouse button, move the pointer to the center of the desktop, then release the mouse button The icon moves with the mouse pointer. This is called dragging, which you use to move Windows elements. If the icon jumps a little when you release the mouse, the desktop is set to align icons automatically with an invisible grid.

5. Point to the Recycle Bin, then press and release the right mouse button Clicking the right mouse button is known as right-clicking. Right-clicking an item displays a shortcut menu, shown in Figure A-4. Shortcut menus display the commands most commonly used for the item you clicked. When a step tells you to “click,” it means to click the left mouse button. If you are supposed to click the right mouse button, the step will instruct you to “right-click.”

6. Click anywhere outside the menu to close the shortcut menu without choosing a command 7. Drag the Recycle Bin back to its original position on the desktop 8. Point to the Recycle Bin, then click the left mouse button twice quickly The Recycle Bin window opens. It might be empty or it might contain file icons that you or someone else wants to delete. (You’ll learn more about the Recycle Bin in Unit C.) Clicking the mouse button twice in a row is known as double-clicking, and it allows you to open a window, program, or file that an icon represents.

9. Click the Close button Windows 4

on the desktop, then move the

Introducing Windows 7

in the upper-right corner of the window to close it

Scroll wheel

Windows 7

FIGURE A-2: Typical mouse

Right mouse button

Left mouse button FIGURE A-3: ScreenTip in notification area

ScreenTip

FIGURE A-4: Shortcut menu

Pointer Selected icon Commands displayed by right-clicking

Active items appear black in your Recycle Bin menu; inactive ones appear gray

TABLE A-1: Common mouse pointer shapes

shape

used to Select items, choose commands, start programs, and work with programs Position the mouse pointer for editing or inserting text; called the insertion point or cursor Indicate Windows is busy processing a command Position the mouse pointer on the edge of a window to change its size Position the mouse pointer to select and open Web-based content

Using the mouse with the Web style In the default setup for Windows, you click an item to select it, and you double-click an item to open it. However, as you probably are aware, when you use Web sites on the Internet, you don’t need to double-click items to open them; you point to them, the pointer changes to , and you click once. You can choose whether you want to extend the way you click while using the Internet to the rest of the work you do on your computer so that you single-click icons to open items. This is known as Internet or Web style;

double-clicking to open icons is known as Classic style. To change from one style to the other, click the Start button on the taskbar, click Control Panel, click Appearance and Personalization, click Specify single- or double-click to open, click the Single-click to open an item (point to select), or Double-click to open an item (singleclick to select) option button, then click OK. Windows 7 is set by default to double-click to open items, and the steps in this book assume you are using this setting.

Introducing Windows 7

Windows 5

UNIT

A Windows 7

Using the Start Button The key to getting started with the Windows desktop is learning how to use the Start button on the taskbar. Clicking the Start button on the taskbar displays the Start menu, a list of commands that allows you to start a program, open a document, change a Windows setting, find a file, or display support information. Table A-2 describes the available commands on the Start menu that are installed with Windows 7. As you install more programs on your computer, finding them on the Start menu can sometimes be difficult. Windows 7 allows you to search the Start menu to find installed programs and other Windows items, such as Control Panel programs, documents, music, Web sites you have visited, contacts, e-mail messages, and appointments. To search the Start menu, click in the Search box on the Start menu, and then start typing the search text you want. As you type, the Start menu filters out items to show you possible results, with priority given to the programs you use frequently. As you become more familiar with Windows, you might want to customize the Start menu to include additional items that you use most often. You want to view the Start menu, perform a Start menu search, and open the Control Panel, a window containing various programs that allow you to specify how your computer looks and performs.

STEPS QUICK TIP To add or remove a program from the pinned items list, right-click the program on the Start menu, then click Pin to Start Menu or Unpin from Start Menu. To remove a program from the Start menu, rightclick the program on the Start menu, then click Remove from this list.

1. Click the Start button

on the taskbar

The Start menu opens, as shown in Figure A-5. The left column of the Start menu is separated into two lists: pinned items above the separator line and most frequently used items below. The pinned items remain on the Start menu, like a piece of paper held by a push pin on a bulletin board, until you remove them. The most frequently used items change as you use programs: Windows keeps track of the programs you use and displays them on the Start menu for easy access. When a program or Windows item, such as Getting Started, appears on the Start menu with an arrow, the submenu displays a list of recently opened files for the program known as a jump list for easy access. The top of the right column in the Start menu indicates the name of the person currently logged on to the computer. Below the username are commands that provide easy access to folders, Windows settings, Help information, and search functionality.

2. Point to All Programs The All Programs submenu opens on top of the left column on the Start menu. An arrow next to a menu item indicates a cascading menu or submenu, which is a list of commands for that menu item. Pointing at these menu items displays another list from which you can choose additional commands. The All Programs submenu provides you access to common programs and accessories that come installed with Windows 7.

3. Click Back in the left column on the Start menu The All Programs submenu closes and the original left column of the Start menu reappears. If you find it difficult to locate a program or Windows item, you can use the Search box on the Start menu to help you find it.

4. Click in the Search box at the bottom of the left column on the Start menu, then type control

QUICK TIP To pin an item on the Start menu, click the item on the Start menu, then drag it to a new location at the top. A black horizontal bar indicates the new location.

Windows 6

As you type, the Start menu filters out items to show you possible results, with priority given to the programs you use frequently. The search results continue to narrow as you type your topic. If you don’t find what you are looking for during a search, you can click “See more results” on the Start menu to display Windows 7 search results or expand the search to other areas, or click the Close button in the Search box to cancel the search.

5. In the Search box, click the Close button The Start menu reappears.

6. In the right column, click Control Panel The Control Panel window opens, containing categories and icons for various programs that allow you to specify how your computer looks and performs.

Introducing Windows 7

Windows 7

FIGURE A-5: Start menu

Arrow to jump list

Current user; yours will differ

Pinned items

Most frequently used items; your list might differ

Your Start menu commands and items might differ

Arrow indicates submenu Start button

Search box

TABLE A-2: Start menu commands

command

description

Specific Program

Opens a specific program or submenu; displays pinned and frequently used items on the Start menu

All Programs

Opens a list of all the programs installed on your computer

Search box

Searches the Start menu for installed programs and other Windows items

Username

Opens the personal folder for the current user, where you store personal folders, such as Contacts, Desktop, Downloads, and Favorites

Documents

Opens the Documents folder, where you store and manage files

Pictures

Opens the Pictures folder, where you store and manage photos, images, and graphic files

Music

Opens the Music folder, where you store and manage sound and audio files

Games

Opens the Games folder, where you start and play games, such as Hearts and Minesweeper

Computer

Opens the Computer window, where you access information about disk drives and other hardware devices

Control Panel

Provides options to customize the appearance and functionality of the computer

Devices and Printers

Opens the Devices and Printers window, where you can display and manage currently installed devices, such as monitors, printers, and faxes, and add new devices

Default Programs

Opens the Default Programs window, where you set default programs and computer defaults and associate a file type with a program

Help and Support

Displays Windows Help topics, tutorials, troubleshooting, support options, and tools

Power button (Shut down)

Exits Windows and turns off the computer

Arrow next to Power button

Provides commands to switch users, log off from the computer, lock the computer, restart the computer, or set the computer in sleep or hibernate mode

Introducing Windows 7

Windows 7

UNIT

A Windows 7

Using the Taskbar The taskbar is the horizontal bar at the bottom of the desktop. The taskbar includes the Start button on the left end, program buttons and open window buttons in the middle, and the notification area on the right end. The taskbar allows you to start programs and switch among currently running programs and open windows. When you start a program or open a window, a corresponding button appears on the taskbar. If the taskbar becomes too crowded with buttons for open windows, then buttons associated with the same program automatically group together into a single button to conserve space. When you rest the pointer over a taskbar button, Windows Aero displays a live thumbnail, showing the content of that window. Windows Aero provides two other ways to manage windows: Windows Flip 3D and Windows Flip. Windows Flip 3D creates a view of open windows in a three-dimensional stack on your desktop. Windows Flip allows you to flip through open windows (by using [Alt][Tab]), providing a live thumbnail of each window. You want to use the taskbar to open and switch between windows.

STEPS QUICK TIP To pin a program to the taskbar, rightclick a program icon, then click Pin this program to taskbar or Pin to Taskbar. To unpin a program from the taskbar, right-click a program icon on the taskbar, then click Unpin this program from taskbar.

1. With the Control Panel window still open, point to the Windows Explorer button the taskbar

on

A ScreenTip appears, displaying the name of the item. This ScreenTip indicates the item is not opened or started. Similar to the Start menu, the taskbar allows you to pin items (to the right of the Start button) to it for easy access. The pinned items remain on the taskbar until you remove them. By default, the pinned items on the taskbar include Internet Explorer, Windows Explorer, and Windows Media Player; your items might differ.

2. Click the Windows Explorer button on the taskbar The Windows Explorer window opens in front of the Control Panel window. The Windows Explorer window allows you to navigate to different locations on your computer and manage files. The Windows Explorer window is now active, which means that any actions you perform take place in this window. The taskbar button for the active window (in this case, the Windows Explorer button) is also highlighted.

3. Point to the Control Panel button on the taskbar For Windows Aero, a live thumbnail appears, displaying a miniature version of the Control Panel window, as shown in Figure A-6. When you point to the thumbnail, a Close button appears in the thumbnail and the window temporarily appears on the screen.

4. Click the Control Panel button on the taskbar The Control Panel window moves in front of the Windows Explorer window. The Control Panel window is now active.

5. Press and hold

with one hand, then press [Tab], but do not release

Windows Flip 3D displays the windows in a stacked format. The window that is currently active—the Control Panel—appears in the front of the stack.

6. Still holding down

, press [Tab] again

The Windows Explorer window appears in the front of the stack, as shown in Figure A-7, while the Control Panel window moves to the back.

7. Release The Windows Explorer window is now active. QUICK TIP When you select the Desktop icon in the Windows Flip pop-up window, all open windows are minimized.

Windows 8

8. Press and hold [Alt] with one hand, then press [Tab], but do not release [Alt] Windows Flip displays a pop-up window with button icons for the open windows, including the desktop.

9. Release both keys simultaneously The Control Panel window is now active. As you continue to press [Tab], Windows Flip cycles through the icons. In Windows Aero, the selected window appears with the other windows transparent. To display the window represented by the currently selected thumbnail, release both keys. The Control Panel window is now active.

Introducing Windows 7

Windows 7

FIGURE A-6: Live thumbnail

Active window

Live thumbnail

Taskbar buttons

FIGURE A-7: Windows Flip 3D

Stacked window display

Working with the taskbar Similar to the Start menu, the taskbar allows you to pin programs or files to it for easy one-click access. After you pin a program to the taskbar or open a program, you can right-click the taskbar button to display a jump list of recently opened files for the program. The taskbar also provides you with several options for arranging open windows. If you want to show all open windows stacked side by side or overlapped (known as cascading), you can right-click the taskbar, then click the option you want. If you prefer using a mouse, you can drag a window to the side of the screen (where the mouse touches the edge) to resize it for side-by-side comparison. The taskbar is locked by default, so it cannot be accidentally resized or moved. You can unlock

the taskbar to resize and move it. To unlock the taskbar, right-click a blank area on the taskbar, then click Lock the taskbar on the shortcut menu to deselect the option. You can move the taskbar by dragging it to any edge (right, left, top, or bottom) of the desktop. You can also change the size of the taskbar in the same way you resize a window by dragging its edge. In addition to buttons, you can also show or hide toolbars on the taskbar. Right-click a blank area of the taskbar, point to Toolbars, then select a toolbar. To create a new toolbar with items from a folder, right-click a blank area of the taskbar, point to Toolbars, click New toolbar, select the folder you want to use, then click Select Folder.

Introducing Windows 7

Windows 9

UNIT

A Windows 7

Working with Windows One of the powerful things about the Windows operating system is that you can open and work with more than one window or program at once. That means, however, that the desktop can get cluttered with many open windows for the various programs. You can identify a window by its name on the title bar at the top of a program window or in the Address bar of a Windows Explorer window, which you also use to navigate to different locations on your computer. To organize your desktop, you must sometimes change the size of a window or move it to a different location. Each window, no matter what it contains, is surrounded by a border that you can drag to resize or move the window. Each window also has three buttons in the upper-right corner that allow you to control the size of the window or to close it. In addition to using the resizing buttons in a window, you can also drag a window to the top or side of the screen to resize it. When you have one or more windows open and you want to display the desktop, you can click the Show desktop button (the blank button) located at the right end of the taskbar to minimize all open windows or point to the Show desktop button in Windows Aero to make all open windows transparent to quickly see your desktop. You want to try moving and resizing windows.

STEPS QUICK TIP Right-click the Show desktop button, and then click Peek at desktop to turn off peeking.

1. Point to the Show desktop button in the lower-right corner of the taskbar to show window transparency, click the Show desktop button to show the desktop, then click the Show desktop button again to display the Windows Explorer and Control Panel windows The Show desktop button gives you two ways to view your desktop. Point to the button to temporarily peek at your desktop with transparent windows (in Aero), or click the button to minimize all open windows.

2. Click anywhere in the Windows Explorer window on the desktop The Windows Explorer window moves in front of the Control Panel window to become active. QUICK TIP You can also click a taskbar button for an active window to minimize the window.

3. Click the Minimize button

in the upper-right corner of the Windows Explorer window

The window no longer appears on the desktop, but you can still see a button named Windows Explorer on the taskbar. When you minimize a window, you do not close it but merely reduce it to a button on the taskbar so that you can work more easily in other windows.

4. Point to the bar at the top of the Control Panel window, click and hold the left mouse button, then drag the window to center it on the desktop The window is relocated. This action is similar to dragging an icon to a new location.

5. Position the pointer on the lower-right corner of the Control Panel window until it changes to , then drag the corner up and to the left about two inches The window is now resized smaller. If you resized it small enough, scroll bars—bars with small arrows at either end and a rectangle in the middle—appear on the right and bottom edges of the window, as shown in Figure A-8. You can resize windows by dragging any corner or border. QUICK TIP Double-click the bar at the top of a window to switch between maximizing and restoring the size of a window.

QUICK TIP You can also rightclick a taskbar button, then click Close window to close an open window.

Windows 10

6. Click the Maximize button in the upper-right corner of the Control Panel window or drag the bar at the top of the window to the top of your screen and release the mouse When you maximize a window, it fills the entire screen. When a window is maximized, the Maximize button is replaced by the Restore Down button.

7. Click the Restore Down button

in the upper-right corner of the Control Panel window

The Restore Down button returns a window to its previous size. The Restore Down button appears only when a window is maximized. When you finish using a window, you can close it with the Close button.

8. Resize the Control Panel window large enough that the scroll bar doesn’t show 9. Click the Close button in the upper-right corner of the Control Panel window, then click the Windows Explorer button on the taskbar The Control Panel window closes, and the Windows Explorer window returns to its original size.

Introducing Windows 7

Windows 7

FIGURE A-8: Window controls in the Control Panel

Address bar Minimize button Close button Maximize button Up scroll arrow

Scroll box Down scroll arrow

Vertical Drag corner scroll bar to resize the window

Show desktop button

Using scroll bars When you cannot see all of the items available in a window, scroll bars appear on the right and bottom edges of the window. Scroll bars allow you to display the additional contents of the window. The vertical scroll bar moves your view up and down through a window; the horizontal scroll bar moves your view from left to right. There are several ways you can use the scroll bars. When you need to scroll only a short distance, you can use the scroll arrows. When you need to scroll more quickly, you can click in the scroll bar on either side of the scroll box to move the view up or down one window’s height or left or right one window’s width. Dragging the scroll box moves you even more

quickly to a new part of the window. The scroll box, the box in the middle of the scroll bars, indicates your relative position within the window. The size of the scroll box indicates the amount of information available to scroll. A small scroll box indicates a lot of information, whereas a large scroll box indicates a small amount. If you have a mouse with a scroll wheel between the left and right buttons, you can roll the wheel button to scroll up and down quickly, or click the wheel button and move the mouse in any direction. When no scroll bars appear in a window, it means that all the information fits completely in the window.

Introducing Windows 7

Windows 11

UNIT

A Windows 7

Using Menus, Toolbars, and Panes A menu is a list of commands that you use to accomplish certain tasks, such as when you used the Start menu to open a window or program. A command is a directive that provides access to a program’s features. Each Windows program has its own set of menus, which are usually located on a menu bar. The menu bar organizes commands into menus, or groups of related operations, such as File or Help. To access the commands in a menu, you click the name of the menu. You can also carry out some of the most frequently used commands by clicking a button on a toolbar. A toolbar contains buttons that display menus, select options, or perform commands. For example, the Organize button displays a menu, whereas the Views button displays a list of options. Note that some buttons have arrows next to them; clicking the button itself causes a default action, whereas clicking the arrow next to the button opens a menu. For example, when you click the Views button arrow, a list of options appears, and when you click the Views button, the next view in the list displays. Other buttons toggle options on and off. For example, when you click the Preview Pane button on the toolbar, it shows or hides the pane; it works like a light switch in your home. You want to use menus, toolbar buttons, and commands to change how the Windows Explorer window contents appear.

STEPS 1. With the Windows Explorer window open, point to the Organize button toolbar

on the

When you position the pointer over a button, a description of the action associated with the button appears as a ScreenTip. You can use the ScreenTip feature to explore buttons on a toolbar. QUICK TIP If a command on a menu includes a keyboard reference, known as a keyboard shortcut, you can quickly perform the action by pressing and holding the first key, and then pressing the second key.

TROUBLE If you don’t see the menu bar, the menu bar was already enabled. Repeat Steps 2 through 4.

TROUBLE If the status bar is not visible on your screen, the status bar was already enabled. Click View on the menu bar, then click Status bar again to enable it.

2. Click the Organize button on the toolbar A menu of commands appears. Just like on the Start menu, when an arrow appears on the right side of a menu command, pointing to that command opens a submenu.

3. Point to Layout The Layout submenu appears, displaying commands, as shown in Figure A-9. A pane is a frame within a window where you can quickly access commands or display information. The Layout submenu allows you to show or hide the menu bar and window panes. On a menu, a check mark identifies a currently selected feature, meaning that the feature is enabled, or turned on. To disable, or turn off the feature, you click the command again to remove the check mark. Menu bar is currently disabled. The icons next to the panel commands on the Layout submenu indicate the same thing.

4. Click Menu bar on the submenu A new menu bar appears at the top of the window.

5. Click View on the menu bar The View menu appears, displaying the View commands. In the View menu, the bullet indicates the current view—the way the files are displayed in the window. A bullet next to a command indicates that the option is enabled. To disable a command with a bullet mark next to it, however, you must select another command (within the menu section, separated by gray lines) in its place.

6. Click Status bar to enable it, then click View on the menu bar again The status bar appears at the bottom of the Windows Explorer window, and Status bar on the View menu now has a check mark next to it. A description of the View menu appears in the status bar. See Figure A-10.

7. Click Status bar The status bar is turned off.

8. Click the Organize button on the toolbar, point to Layout, then click Menu bar The menu bar is removed from the window.

9. Click the Close button

in the upper-right corner of the Windows Explorer window

The Windows Explorer window closes. Windows 12

Introducing Windows 7

Toolbar

Windows 7

FIGURE A-9: Organize button in the Libraries window

Preview Pane button Views button Disabled option

Arrow indicates submenu

Submenu Enabled option

Commands on menu Details pane

FIGURE A-10: View menu open with the status bar visible

Menu bar Commands on your screen might differ

Check mark

Bullet Navigation pane

Description of menu in status bar

Setting Accessibility for special needs If you have difficulty using a mouse or typing, have slightly impaired vision, or are deaf or hard of hearing, you can adjust the appearance and behavior of Windows 7 to make your computer easier for you to use. The Accessibility Wizard takes you step-by-step through a series of instructional windows to help you configure Windows for your vision, hearing, and mobility needs. The Accessibility Wizard also enables you to save your settings in a file that you can use on another computer. To open the Accessibility Wizard, click the Start button on the taskbar, click Control Panel, click Ease of Access, then click Ease of Access Center. A window opens with verbal instructions for using the Ease of Access

Center and commands to adjust the way your keyboard, display, and mouse function to suit various vision and motor abilities. Some of the accessibility tools available include Sticky Keys, which enables simultaneous keystrokes while pressing one key at a time; Filter Keys, which adjusts the response of your keyboard; Toggle Keys, which emits sounds when you press certain locking keys; Sound Sentry, which provides visual warnings for system sounds; Narrator, which instructs programs to provide captions; High Contrast, which improves screen contrast; and Mouse Keys, which enables the keyboard to perform mouse functions.

Introducing Windows 7

Windows 13

UNIT

A Windows 7

Using Dialog Boxes A dialog box is a window that contains options for completing a task. A dialog box opens when you choose a button on a toolbar or menu command that is followed by an ellipsis (. . .). The ellipsis on a menu command indicates that you must supply more information before the program can carry out the command you selected. Dialog boxes open in other situations as well, such as when you open a program in the Control Panel. You can also access a dialog box from the notification area on the taskbar. When you click an icon in the notification area, such as the date and time, a menu appears with links or commands to open a dialog box or Control Panel window. In a dialog box, you specify the options you want using a variety of elements. See Figure A-11 and Table A-3 for some of the typical elements of a dialog box. You practice using a dialog box to control your mouse settings.

STEPS TROUBLE If your dialog box differs from Figure A-12, read through Steps 2–4 and do not perform any actions, then continue with Step 5.

1. Click the Start button , click Control Panel, click Hardware and Sound, then click Mouse under Devices and Printers The Mouse Properties dialog box opens, as shown in Figure A-12. The options in this dialog box allow you to control the configuration of the mouse buttons, select the types of pointers that appear, choose the speed of the mouse movement on the screen, and specify what type of mouse you are using. Tabs at the top of the dialog box separate these options into related categories. The tabs in the dialog box vary depending on the mouse installed on the computer.

2. Click the Buttons tab, if necessary This tab has two or more sections. The contents of the sections vary depending on the type of computer you use. For example, a desktop might be different from a laptop. In this case, the first section, Button configuration, has options you can select to make the mouse easier to use for a right-handed or left-handed person. The second section, Double-click speed, has a slider for you to set how fast the mouse pointer responds to double-clicking. The slider lets you specify the degree to which the option is in effect. The third section, ClickLock, allows you to highlight or drag without holding the mouse button when you select the ClickLock option.

3. In the Double-click speed section, drag the slider to the right to position it about halfway between its current position and the right end of the slider bar Now the mouse pointer is set to respond to a fast double-click. TROUBLE If nothing happens when you doubleclick the test area, try double-clicking faster, with less time between each click.

4. Double-click the test area to the right of the slider until the graphical icon moves As you double-click the test area, the folder icon opens or closes. The test area allows you to try out the adjusted settings.

5. Click the other tabs in the Mouse Properties dialog box, and examine the available options in each category The two most common command buttons are OK and Cancel. Clicking OK accepts your changes and closes the dialog box; clicking Cancel leaves the original settings intact and closes the dialog box. Many dialog boxes, including this one, contain a third command button—Apply. Clicking Apply executes the options you selected but keeps the dialog box open so that you can select additional options.

6. Click Cancel to leave the original settings intact and close the dialog box 7. Click the Close button in the upper-right corner of the Control Panel window to close the window

Windows 14

Introducing Windows 7

Windows 7

FIGURE A-11: Dialog box elements

Check box

Option button

Up and down arrows

Text box Command buttons

FIGURE A-12: Mouse Properties dialog box

Tabs; yours might differ

Test area Slider

TABLE A-3: Typical items in a dialog box

item

description

Check box

A square box that turns an option on when the box is checked and off when the box is blank

Command button

A rectangular button with the name of the command on it; it carries out a command in a dialog box

List box

A box containing a list of items; to choose an item, click the list arrow, then click the desired item

Option button

A small circle that selects a single dialog box option (you cannot check more than one option button in a group)

Up and down arrows

A box with two arrows and a text box you can scroll through to choose from numerical increments or type a number

Slider

A shape that you drag to set the degree to which an option is in effect

Tab

A place where related options are organized; similar to tabs on file folders

Text box

A box in which you type text

Introducing Windows 7

Windows 15

UNIT

A Windows 7

Using Windows Help and Support When you have a question about how to do something in Windows 7, you can usually find the answer with a few clicks of your mouse. Microsoft Help and Support is a complete resource of information, training, and support to help you learn and use Windows 7. Help and Support is like a book stored on your computer with additional links to the Internet, complete with a search feature, and a table of contents to make finding information easier. If you have an Internet connection, you can get online help from a support professional at Microsoft or from other users on the Windows newsgroup (an electronic forum where people share information), or invite a friend with Windows to chat with you, view your screen, and work on your computer to provide remote support. You want to use Help and Support to learn more about Windows 7.

STEPS TROUBLE If your dialog box differs from Figure A-13, click the lowerright button, then click Get online Help.

QUICK TIP To get help on a specific program, you can click Help on the program’s menu bar or click the Help button on the toolbar.

QUICK TIP To print a Help topic, click the Print button on the toolbar at the top of the Windows Help and Support window.

1. Click the Start button

on the taskbar, then click Help and Support

The Windows Help and Support window opens with a list of Help and Support categories, as shown in Figure A-13. Help windows always appear on top of the currently active window, so you can see Help topics while you work. You can find answers from the main categories (How to get started with your computer, Learn about Windows Basics, or Browse Help topics), or go online to the Microsoft Web site to get more information, downloads, and ideas. If you need additional help, you can display more support options to ask others online for help.

2. Click in the Search box, type help, then press [Enter] A list of the best results possible displays. See Figure A-14. To display more results, scroll to the bottom of the window, and then click the more results link. When you point to a Help category or a search result, the pointer changes to , and the Help text becomes underlined to indicate that more information is available by clicking. A single-click opens the Help category or topic. This is similar to the way selecting a hyperlink on the Internet works.

3. In the results list, click Getting help The Help topic appears in the window. Read the information on getting help.

4. Click the Help and Support home button Help and Support window

on the toolbar at the top of the Windows

The main Help and Support window appears again. Now you will display a search pane with more topics.

5. Click Browse Help topics to open the list of main Help topics, click Getting started, then click Shutting down Help topics in the Shutting down category appear. The list of contents organizes the online Help topics and allows you to browse your way around the Help topics you want to view. QUICK TIP To receive help in a dialog box or window, click the Help in the button upper-right corner of the dialog box or window. The Help and Support window opens, displaying Help information related to the options in that dialog box.

6. Click Turning off your computer properly The Help topic appears in the window. You can move back and forth between Help topics you have already visited by clicking the Back button and the Forward button on the toolbar.

7. Click the Back button Help screen

on the Help and Support toolbar to return to the previous

Help topics in the Shutting down category appear.

8. Click the All Help link below the Help and Support toolbar to return to the main Help topic list in the upper-right corner of the Help and Support window 9. Click the Close button The Help and Support window closes.

Windows 16

Introducing Windows 7

Windows 7

FIGURE A-13: Windows Help and Support

Help toolbar Back and Forward buttons

Search box

Help categories

Online information Click to set Help settings

FIGURE A-14: Help topic

Search text

Help topic search results; your results may vary

Getting help online If you need additional help and have an Internet connection, you can use Windows Help and Support to get online help from a support professional at Microsoft or from other users in Windows communities, or you can invite a friend to chat with you, view your screen, and work on your computer to provide remote support. To get help from a friend or offer help to a friend, you use Windows Remote Assistance, which connects two computers over the Internet so that one person can help

troubleshoot or fix problems on the other person’s computer. While the computers are connected, the person providing assistance can view the other person’s screen or take control of the computer to perform a fix. To do this, in Windows Help and Support, click the Ask button on the toolbar at the top of the Windows Help and Support window, click Windows Remote Assistance under Ask a person for help, and follow the step-by-step instructions provided.

Introducing Windows 7

Windows 17

Shutting Down the Computer

UNIT

A Windows 7

When you finish working on your computer, you need to make sure to turn off, or shut down, your computer properly. This involves several steps: saving and closing all open files, closing all open windows, exiting all running programs, shutting down Windows itself, and, finally, turning off the computer. Shutting down your computer makes sure Windows and all its related programs are properly closed; this avoids potential problems starting and working with Windows in the future. If you turn off the computer by pushing the power switch while Windows or other programs are running, you could lose important data. If a program is still open when you instruct Windows to shut down, you will be prompted to save the file and close the program before the shut-down process continues. You shut down your computer now.

STEPS

QUICK TIP To prevent other users from using your computer, you [L] to can press lock the computer and return to the Welcome screen. To unlock, move the mouse and log on at the Welcome screen.

QUICK TIP If you have a mobile PC, set Power Options in the Control Panel to turn off your computer or put it to sleep by closing the lid.

1. If any windows or programs are open on your screen, click the Close button in the upper-right corner of each window on the taskbar, then point to the arrow next to the 2. Click the Start button Power button A submenu appears, displaying several options for turning off your computer, as shown in Figure A-15. See Table A-4 for a description of each option. The Power button (set by default to Shut down) provides easy access to your preferred shutdown option. Depending on your Windows settings, your shutdown options might be different.

3. If you are working in a lab, click the Windows desktop to cancel the task; if you are working on your own machine or if your instructor tells you to shut down Windows, click the Shut down button or menu option to exit Windows and shut down your computer 4. If you see the message “It’s now safe to turn off your computer,” turn off your computer and monitor Some computers power off automatically, so you might not see this message.

TABLE A-4: Shut down options

option

function

when to use it

Switch user

Maintains your session and changes users

When you want to continue working with Windows, yet allow another user to access another Windows session

Log off

Saves and leaves your session to disk and changes users

When you want to stop working with Windows, yet allow another user to access another Windows session

Lock

Maintains your session, while restricting access to Windows

When you want to stop working with Windows and you want to keep others from using Windows

Restart

Restarts the computer and reloads Windows

When you want to restart the computer and begin working with Windows again (when your programs might have frozen or stopped working)

Sleep

Maintains your session, keeping the computer running on low power

When you want to stop working with Windows for a few moments and conserve power (ideal for a laptop or portable computer); available when a power scheme is selected in Power Options (in the Control Panel)

Hibernate

Saves your session to disk so that you can safely turn off power; restores your session the next time you start Windows

When you want to stop working with Windows for a while and start working again later; available when the Power Options setting (in the Control Panel) is turned on

Shut down

Prepares the computer to be turned off

When you finish working with Windows and you want to shut off your computer

Windows 18

Introducing Windows 7

Windows 7

FIGURE A-15: Shut down menu

Arrow that displays the Shut down menu Power button; displays Shut down by default

Shut down menu

Working on a computer set up for multiple users Many users may use the same computer, in which case each user has his or her own Windows identity, allowing them to keep their files completely private and customize the operating system with their own preferences. Windows manages these separate identities by giving each user a unique username and password. You set up user accounts during Windows 7 installation or by using User Accounts in the Control Panel, as shown in Figure A-16. When Windows starts, a Welcome screen appears, displaying user accounts. When a user selects an account and types a password (if necessary), Windows starts with that user’s configuration settings and network permissions. When you’re done using the computer, yet you want to leave it on for another person to use, you can choose the Switch user or Log off command from the Start menu. The Switch user command allows you to switch between users quickly without having to save your current settings, so you can switch back and continue working. The Log off command saves your current settings and exits you from Windows.

FIGURE A-16

Introducing Windows 7

Windows 19

Practice Concepts Review

For current SAM information including versions and content details, visit SAM Central (http://samcentral.course.com). If you have a SAM user profile, you may have access to hands-on instruction, practice, and assessment of the skills covered in this unit. Since we support various versions of SAM throughout the life of this text, you will want to check with your instructor for instructions and the correct URL/Web site to access those assignments.

Match the statements below with the elements labeled in the screen shown in Figure A-17. FIGURE A-17

f

a b

c

d

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

e

Which element points to an icon on the desktop? Which element points to a toolbar? Which element points to the notification area? Which element points to a gadget on the desktop? Which element points to a live thumbnail? Which element points to taskbar buttons?

Match each term with the statement that describes its function. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Start button Recycle Bin Mouse Address bar Sizing buttons Taskbar

Windows 20

a. b. c. d. e. f.

Allows you to minimize, maximize, and restore windows Holds the Start button and buttons for currently open programs and windows Where the name of a Windows Explorer window appears Used to point at screen elements and make selections Where deleted files are placed The item you click first to start a program

Introducing Windows 7

Windows 7

Concepts Review (Continued) Select the best answers from the following lists of choices. 13. Moving an item to a new location on the desktop is called: a. Dragging. c. Pointing. b. Restoring. d. Clicking. 14. Which screen element allows you to perform a search? a. Desktop c. Taskbar b. Start menu d. Notification area 15. The Maximize button is used to: a. Scroll slowly through a window. c. Return a window to its original size. b. Reduce a window to a button on the taskbar. d. Expand a window to fill the entire screen. 16. The Minimize button is used to: a. Scroll slowly through a window. c. Return a window to its original size. b. Reduce a window to a button on the taskbar. d. Expand a window to fill the entire screen. 17. The menu provides access to a program’s functions through: a. Commands. c. Toolbar buttons. b. Dialog box elements. d. Scroll buttons. 18. An ellipsis after a menu command indicates: a. Another menu will display. c. The menu command is not currently available. b. A keyboard shortcut to that command. d. A dialog box will open. 19. Which shutdown option turns off your computer and reloads Windows? a. Shut down c. Hibernate b. Restart d. Sleep

Skills Review 1. Start Windows and view the desktop. a. Start Windows and log on, if necessary. b. Identify and write down as many desktop items as you can, without referring to the lesson. c. Compare your results with Figure A-1. 2. Use pointing devices. a. Move the mouse on your desk, and watch how the mouse pointer moves across the screen. b. Point at an icon on the desktop. c. Click the icon once. Notice the icon’s highlighted title. d. Press and hold down the mouse button, then drag the icon to the opposite side of the desktop. (Hint: release the mouse button when you finish dragging.) e. Drag the icon back to its original location. f. Double-click the Recycle Bin icon. g. Close the Recycle Bin. 3. Use the Start button. a. Open the Start menu. b. Open the All Programs submenu. c. Display the list of programs in the Accessories folder. d. Return to the Start menu. e. In the Search box, type access to find Ease of Access Center. f. Close the search. g. Open the Control Panel window. 4. Use the taskbar. a. Open the Recycle Bin window. b. Make the Control Panel window active.

Introducing Windows 7 Copyright 2010 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part.

Windows 21

Skills Review (Continued)

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

c. Display live thumbnails on the taskbar. d. Use Windows Flip 3D to display the Recycle Bin window. e. Use Windows Flip to display the Control Panel window. Work with windows. a. Show the desktop, then display the Recycle Bin and Control Panel windows. b. Make the Recycle Bin window active. c. Minimize the Recycle Bin window. d. Resize the Control Panel window to make it smaller. e. Drag the Control Panel window to the center of the desktop. f. Maximize the Control Panel window. g. Restore the Control Panel to its original size. h. Close the Control Panel window. i. Restore and close the Recycle Bin window. Use menus, toolbars, and panes. a. Open the Games window using the command in the right column on the Start menu. b. Display the menu bar. c. Click View on the menu bar, then click Content. d. Click View on the menu bar, then click Tiles. e. Hide the menu bar. f. Click the Views button arrow on the toolbar to display a list of all the views. g. Click Large Icons on the Views button menu. h. Close the Games window. Use dialog boxes. a. In the Control Panel window, click Change desktop background (under Appearance and Personalization). b. Click a background. c. Change the Picture position to Center. d. Minimize the window and view the changes to the desktop. e. Maximize the Control Panel window, then click Cancel. f. Close the Control Panel window. Use Windows Help and Support. a. Click the Start button on the taskbar, then click Help and Support. b. In the Search text box, type computer, then press [Enter]. c. In the list of search results, click a Help topic, then read the Help topic in the window. d. Click the Print button, select a printer, then click Print. e. Click the Help and Support home button. f. Click the Help and Support window Close button. Shut down the computer. a. Click the Start button on the taskbar, then point to the arrow next to the Power button. b. If you are not working in a lab or if your lab manager approves of shutting down the computer, click Shut down. Otherwise, click a blank area of the desktop.

Independent Challenge 1 You are a student in a Windows 7 course and want to find out what’s new in Windows 7. Use the Getting Started window to access the latest online information about Windows 7 and manage the open windows. a. Open the Start menu, type Getting Started in the Search box, then click Getting Started in the search results on the Start menu. You can also click the Start button, point to All Programs, click Accessories, then click Getting Started.

Windows 22

Introducing Windows 7

b. Make sure you are connected to the Internet, click the Go online to find out what’s new in Windows 7 icon, then click Go online to learn more in the upper-right area of the window. c. Drag the title bar to the top of the screen or use the Maximize button to maximize your browser window. d. Read the Windows 7 Web page to learn more about Windows 7. e. Drag your browser window to either side of the screen to resize it for comparison or use the Restore Down button. f. Activate the Getting Started window. g. Right-click a blank area of the taskbar, then use commands to show windows side by side, show windows stacked, and cascade windows. h. Use Windows Flip and Windows Flip 3D to display the different open windows. i. Show the desktop to minimize all open windows, then show all the open windows. j. Close your Web browser and the Getting Started window.

Windows 7

Independent Challenge 1 (Continued)

Independent Challenge 2 Windows 7 provides extensive online help and support. At any time, you can select Help and Support from the Start menu and get the assistance you need. Explore more of the topics available in Help and Support. a. Start Help and Support. b. Click a link in the main Help and Support window to Learn about Windows Basics. c. Use the Search text box to search for information about Windows keyboard shortcuts and customer support. Print the information about keyboard shortcuts. d. Click a link in the main Help and Support window to Browse Help topics, then find information about accessibility features. Use the list of categories in Help Contents. Click Customizing your computer, then click Ease of Access (Accessibility). Click and read the information on two or more topics. Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ In the main Help and Support window, click the More support options button (at the bottom of the window) or Ask button on the toolbar. ■ Make sure you are connected to the Internet, click the Microsoft Customer Support link (under Ask a person for help) to open your browser and access Microsoft Help and Support with more technical help and support information. ■ Type Windows 7 help in the Search box, then click Search Site to display links to Windows 7–related help and support topics. ■ View the topics, then click a link to a topic. ■ When you’re done, click the Close button to exit your browser, then close all tabs. e. Close the Help and Support window.

Independent Challenge 3 You can customize many Windows features to suit your needs and preferences. One way you do this is to change the items that appear in the notification area on the desktop. Another way is to change the desktop background. a. Open the Control Panel window, click Appearance and Personalization, click Customize icons on the taskbar (under the Taskbar and Start Menu heading), then click Turn system icons on or off. b. Click the Behaviors list arrow for Clock, Volume, Network, and Power (if possible), then set them to Off. What happens in the notification area? c. Click the Behaviors list arrow for the same options, set them back to On, then click OK twice. d. Go Back to the main Control Panel window. e. In the Control Panel window, click Change desktop background (under Appearance and Personalization). In the Choose your desktop background screen, click various backgrounds to change the display behind the Control Panel window. f. Click Cancel.

Introducing Windows 7

Windows 23

Independent Challenge 3 (Continued) Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ In the Control Panel window, click Change the theme (under Appearance and Personalization). ■ In the themes list, click Windows Classic (under Basic and High Contrast Themes) to apply it. ■ Click Desktop Background, select a different color to see it applied, then click Cancel. ■ In the themes list, click Windows 7 (under Aero Themes) to apply it. g. Close the Control Panel window.

Real Life Independent Challenge Many people move through different time zones as they travel, either on vacation or business. It is usually a good idea to set up your computer to reflect local time. You can do this in the Control Panel window. a. b. c. d. e.

Open the Control Panel window, click Clock, Language, and Region, then click Change the time zone. On the Date and Time tab in the Date and Time dialog box, click Change time zone. In the Time Zone Settings dialog box, click the Time zone list arrow. Note the current time zone on your computer, and then scroll through the list of time zones. Select a time zone for a location you have visited (or would like to visit) for vacation or business from the list (scroll if necessary). Note that a line is added below the Current date and time in the dialog box telling you what the date and time will be after you apply the new time zone setting. f. Click OK. Note the changed time in the notification area. g. Restore the original time zone setting, then close the Date and Time dialog box. h. Close the Control Panel window.

Visual Workshop Re-create the screen shown in Figure A-18, which shows the Windows desktop with the Libraries and the Control Panel open. FIGURE A-18

Windows 24

Introducing Windows 7

UNIT

B Windows 7

Files You Will Need:

Working with Windows Programs Now that you know how to work with common Windows graphical elements, you’re ready to work with programs. A program is software you use to accomplish specific tasks, such as word

WIN B-1.rtf

processing and managing files on your computer. Windows comes with several accessories—

WIN B-2.bmp

built-in programs that, although not as feature-rich as many programs sold separately, are ex-

WIN B-3.wmv WIN B-4.wma WIN B-5.wmv

tremely useful for completing basic tasks. In this unit, you work with some of these accessories. You’re a tour developer for Quest Specialty Travel, a growing company that uses

WIN B-6.wmv

Windows 7 on its computers. You want to prepare a document outlining ideas for travel pack-

WIN B-7.rtf

ages, so you plan to use two Windows accessories, WordPad and Paint, to create it. You also

WIN B-8.bmp

want to use two other multimedia accessories, Windows Media Player and Windows Media

WIN B-9.rtf

Center, to play travel videos and sound clips and to create a travel movie.

WIN B-10.bmp WIN B-11.wmv WIN B-12.wmv

OBJECTIVES

Start a program Open and save a WordPad document Modify text in WordPad Work with a graphic in Paint Copy data between programs Embed or link an object Print a document Play a video or audio clip Work with Windows media

UNIT

B Windows 7

Starting a Program A Windows program is software designed to run on computers using the Windows operating system. The most common way to start a Windows program is to use the Start menu, which provides easy access to programs installed on your computer. Clicking the Start button on the taskbar displays the Start menu, which lists common and recently used programs, and the All Programs submenu, which you can click to list all the programs installed on your computer. In this lesson, you start a Windows accessory called WordPad, a word-processing program that comes with Windows. A word processor is a program that you use to enter, edit, and format text and graphics. As you look for WordPad on the All Programs submenu under Accessories, you might notice an accessory called Notepad. The accessory names are similar, and both programs work with text. Notepad is a text editor, in which you can enter and edit text only with basic document formatting. With both programs, you can open only one document per open program window at a time. Before you can use WordPad to prepare a text document of tour package ideas, you need to start the program.

STEPS 1. Click the Start button

on the taskbar

The Start menu opens. If you frequently use a program, it appears on the left column of the Start menu for easy access. When a program, such as WordPad, appears on the Start menu with an arrow, the submenu displays a list of recently opened files for the program known as a jump list for easy access. If the program you want to start doesn’t appear in the frequently used list, you can use the Search box at the bottom of the Start menu, or you can use the All Programs submenu to locate and start it. QUICK TIP If a scroll bar appears on the right side of the All Programs submenu, scroll up or down the menu to view more elements.

2. Point to All Programs on the Start menu The All Programs submenu opens, listing the programs and subfolders for programs installed on your computer. WordPad is in the folder called Accessories.

3. Click Accessories on the All Programs submenu The Accessories folder list opens, as shown in Figure B-1. The Accessories folder contains several programs to help you complete common tasks. The All Programs submenu remains open and displays the Back command at the bottom.

4. Point to Back on the All Programs submenu The Start menu reappears, displaying the recently used programs in Windows 7.

5. Click All Programs on the Start menu, then click WordPad on the All Programs submenu under Accessories Your mouse pointer changes momentarily to , indicating that Windows is starting the WordPad program. The WordPad window then opens on your screen. TROUBLE If the ruler or status bar does not appear, click the View tab on the Ribbon, then click the element you want to activate so that a check mark appears.

Windows 26

6. Click the Maximize button necessary

in the upper-right corner of the WordPad window, if

The WordPad window expands to fill the screen, as shown in Figure B-2. The WordPad window includes a title bar at the top with the filename (currently untitled with the name “Document”) and program name, a customizable toolbar, called the Quick Access toolbar, the WordPad button to select file-related commands, a Ribbon with two tabs—Home and View—to quickly select document-related commands, as well as the ruler, the work area, and the status bar. A blinking line, known as the insertion point, appears in the work area of the WordPad window, indicating where new text will appear. A button, called a taskbar button, appears on the taskbar. Taskbar buttons represent open windows on the desktop. In the next lesson, you open and save a document in WordPad.

Working with Windows Programs

Windows 7

FIGURE B-1: Starting WordPad using the Start menu

Accessories folder list; yours might differ

WordPad on the Start menu

FIGURE B-2: Windows desktop with the WordPad window open

WordPad button

Title bar Ribbon Ruler

Quick Access toolbar Insertion point

Work area

WordPad taskbar button Status bar Zoom controls

Creating documents in other languages You can install multiple languages on your computer, such as Hebrew, Arabic, Japanese, French, Spanish, German, and many others. You can choose which language you want to use when you create a document, then Windows makes the characters for that language available. To install additional languages, click the Start button, click Control Panel, then click Change keyboards or other input methods (under Clock, Language, and Region) to open the Region and Language dialog box. Click Change keyboards to open the Text Services and Input Languages dialog box with the General tab on top, then click Add to open the Add Input Language dialog box. The languages you can add appear in a list. Scroll down the list, click the plus sign next to the language you want to add, click the plus sign next to Keyboard or Speech, then click the check box next to the language element you

want to add. If you have more than one language installed, the Language bar allows you to select the language you want to use. To set Language bar settings, click the Language Bar tab in the Text Services and Input Languages dialog box, and then click the option to display the Language bar, either Docked in the taskbar or Floating On Desktop. The Language bar will not appear unless you have more than one language installed. To compose a document that uses more than one language, click the Input language button on the Language bar, click the language you want to use in the list that opens, then type your message. The language setting remains in place until you change it or shut down your computer. Any recipient of multilanguage documents must also have the same languages installed on their computer to read and edit the documents.

Working with Windows Programs

Windows 27

UNIT

B Windows 7

Opening and Saving a WordPad Document A document is a file you create using a word-processing program, such as a letter, memo, or resume. When you start WordPad, a blank document opens which is known as the document window. You can enter information to create a new document and save the result in a file, or you can open an existing file and save the document with changes. Until you save a document, it is stored in the computer’s random access memory (RAM), temporary storage whose contents are erased when you turn off the computer. To store a document permanently, you save it as a file. The first time you save a file, you need to specify a filename and folder in the Save As dialog box. The next time you save, the program saves the file with the same name in the same folder. If you want to change a file’s name or location, you can use the Save As dialog box again to create a copy of the original file. You have been brainstorming some new tour ideas. Rather than typing the information from scratch, you open an existing document. You want to preserve the original tour ideas so you save it with a new name before making changes to it.

STEPS QUICK TIP To quickly open a recently used file, point to the WordPad button, then click a file in the right column of the menu.

TROUBLE In this book, files are displayed with file extensions. Your display might differ.

TROUBLE If there aren’t any filenames in the file list, click the Files of type list arrow, then click Rich Text Format (*.rtf).

1. Click the WordPad button

, then click Open

The Open dialog box opens. You use the Open dialog box to locate and choose the file you want to open. The Navigation pane, located on the left side of the dialog box, is used to navigate to common locations and recently used files and folders. The Address bar at the top of the dialog box indicates the current folder location. The folder location, which appears as a series of links separated by arrows, creates a path from the drive to the folder. You select a location by clicking a drive or folder location name in the Address bar, or by clicking a link arrow to the right of the location to select a subfolder location.

2. Click Computer in the Navigation pane, or click the leftmost link arrow in the Address bar and click Computer, then, in the window, double-click the drive and folder where you store your Data Files A list of files and folders appears in the file list, as shown in Figure B-3. The files shown are determined by the option chosen in the Files type list. The Files type list box indicates that the documents shown in this list are in the All Wordpad Documents (.rtf), the default format for WordPad files. Rich Text Format (RTF) is a file format that includes formatting for text files and can be opened and read by many other programs.

3. In the list of files, click WIN B-1.rtf, then click Open The WIN B-1.rtf file is a document that contains your tour package ideas. The only way to prevent accidental changes from occurring to an original document is to save it in another file with a new name.

4. Click the WordPad button , point to Save as, click Rich Text document, then click Browse Folders, if necessary, to expand the dialog box The Save As dialog box opens, as shown in Figure B-4. You use the Save As dialog box to save an existing document with a new name and in a different folder or drive. The Save as submenu allows you to select a file format for the new document. In addition to RTF, you can also save documents in Office Open XML Document (DOCX), which is for Microsoft Word 2007, OpenDocument Text (ODT), which is for exchanging Office documents, and Text Document (TXT), which is for plain text.

5. Type Tour Ideas in the File name text box As soon as you start typing, the text you type replaces the selected text in the File name text box. When you type a name in the File name text box, AutoComplete suggests possible matches with previous filename entries. You can continue to type or click the File name list arrow, then click the correct filename from the list.

6. Click Save The file is saved as Tour Ideas.rtf in the same folder and drive as the WIN B-1.rtf file. Windows 28

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FIGURE B-3: Open dialog box

Address bar Link arrows File list; extensions might not appear

Click to access your Data Files Navigation pane

FIGURE B-4: Save As dialog box

Folder save location

File name list arrow

File name text box

Save as file format

Toggles between Browse Folders and Hide Folders

Working with filename extensions The program Windows uses to open a document depends on a three- or four-letter extension to the document’s filename, called a filename extension. You might have never seen a document’s filename extension because your system might be set up to hide it. The filename extension for simple text files is “.txt” (pronounced “dot t-x-t”), and many graphic filenames have the extension “.bmp.” This means that the full name for a text file named Memo is Memo.txt. If you double-click a document whose filename ends with the three-letter extension “.txt,” Windows automatically opens the document with Notepad, a text-only editor. If you want to display or change filename extension settings, open the Control Panel,

click Appearance and Personalization, then click Folder Options. If you want to display filename extensions in dialog boxes and windows, click the View tab in the Folder Options dialog box, then click the Hide extensions for known file types check box to deselect it in the Advanced settings list box. If you want to change the program Windows automatically starts with a given filename extension, right-click the file that you want to change, point to Open with, click Choose default program, then click the program you want to use to open this file. If you want all files of that type to open with the same program, select the Always use the selected program to open this kind of file check box, then click OK.

Working with Windows Programs

Windows 29

UNIT

B Windows 7

Modifying Text in WordPad When you use a word-processing program, you can edit, or change, the contents of the document without re-creating it. You can move text from one place to another using the Cut and Paste commands or the drag-and-drop method, which allows you simply to drag text from one location to another. When selected text is cut from a document, Windows removes it from the document and places it on the Clipboard, a temporary storage place where it remains available to be pasted elsewhere. You can also change the format, or the appearance, of the text and graphics in a document so that the document is easier to read or more attractive. For special emphasis, you can combine formats, such as bold and italic. In addition, you can change the font style and size. A font is a set of characters with the same typeface or design, such as Arial or Times New Roman, that you can increase or decrease in size. Font size is measured in points; one point is 1/72 of an inch high. You want to add an introduction and modify and move text in the Tour Ideas document, then make the document more attractive.

STEPS 1. Press [ ] three times to place the insertion point in the fourth line, type Quest Specialty Travel (QST) takes the toil out of travel and puts the thrill back in! Each tour includes adventure, culture, and education (ACE)., then press [Enter] WordPad keeps the text on multiple lines together in the same paragraph, using a process called word wrap. The text wraps to the edge of the window or to the right margin of the ruler depending on your word-wrap settings. When you press [Enter], you create a new paragraph. To correct a mistake or to change text, press [Backspace] to delete the character to the left of the insertion point until you delete the text, then retype the text.

2. Move the pointer in the margin to the left of “Live your dreams with Quest Specialty Travel!,” so that the pointer changes to , then click When the pointer is in the left margin, clicking selects the entire line. Table B-1 describes several methods for selecting text in a document. QUICK TIP When the pointer is positioned in the WordPad work area, it changes to , which you can click to reposition the insertion point.

3. Click the Cut button on the Home tab on the Ribbon, click after the space after the word “world.” in the last sentence, then click the Paste button on the Home tab The text you selected in Step 2 is cut from the document, placed on the Clipboard, and is now pasted at the location of the insertion point.

4. Double-click the word French in the fourth item in the bulleted list to select the entire word, then click the selection and drag it to the left of the word “farm” As you drag the pointer, a vertical line next to the pointer indicates where the selection will be placed.

QUICK TIP To change text color, select the text, click the Text color button on the Home tab, then select a color.

QUICK TIP To add buttons to the Quick Access toolbar, click the Customize Quick Access Toolbar button on the Quick Access toolbar, then click a button to select it.

5. Position to the left of the first character in the line “Quest Specialty Travel” at the top of the document, then click and drag to the end of the line The text you dragged over is selected.

6. Click the Center button

, the Bold button

, and the Italic button

on the Home tab

The title is now centered and in bold and italic. Note that the Center button is selected (“turned on”), and the Align Left button is deselected (“turned off”). Related buttons on a toolbar, such as Align text left, Center, and Align text right, act like options in a dialog box—click one to turn it on, and the other related ones turn off. Some buttons, such as Bold, Italic, Underline, and Start a list, act as toggle switches—click once to turn the format feature on, click again to turn it off.

7. Click the Undo button

on the Quick Access toolbar

Italics are removed from the selected text. The Undo command reverses the last change made.

8. Click the Font list arrow on the Home tab, scroll down the font list, on the Home tab, click 18, click Times New Roman, click the Font Size list arrow on the Quick Access toolbar then click the Save button The size of the selected text changes to 18-point Times New Roman, as shown in Figure B-5.

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FIGURE B-5: Editing and formatting a WordPad document

Undo button Home tab on the Ribbon Alignment buttons

Selected Bold button

Your line wrap might differ

Unselected Italic button Click the left margin to select the line

TABLE B-1: Methods for selecting text

to select

do this

A single word

Double-click the word

A single line

Click the left margin to the left of the first character in the line

A single paragraph

Triple-click a word within the paragraph or double-click in the margin to the left of the paragraph

Any part of a document

Drag the pointer over the text you want to select

A large selection

Click at the beginning of the text you want to select, press and hold [Shift], then click at the end of the text you want to select

The entire document

Triple-click in the left margin, press [Ctrl][A], or click the Select all button on the Home tab

Setting paragraph tabs and indents Tabs set how text or numerical data aligns in a document. A tab stop is a predefined stopping point along the document’s typing line. Default tab stops are set every half-inch on the ruler, but you can set multiple tabs per paragraph at any location. Each paragraph contains its own set of tab stops. The default tab stops appear as small hash marks below the ruler, and the manual tab stops appear as dark marks on the ruler itself. To display the tab stops for a paragraph on the ruler, click any word in the paragraph. To set a tab stop, click the ruler where you want to set it. Once you place a tab stop, you can drag the tab stop to position it where you want. To delete a tab stop, drag it off the ruler. If you want to add or adjust tab stops in multiple paragraphs, simply select the paragraphs first. When you indent a paragraph, you move its edge in from the left or right margin. You can indent the entire left or right edge of a paragraph or just the first line. The markers on the ruler

control the indentation of the current paragraph. The left side of the ruler has three markers. The top triangle, called the first-line indent marker , controls where the first line of the paragraph begins. The bottom triangle, called the hanging indent marker , controls where the remaining lines of the paragraph begin. The small square under the bottom triangle, called the left indent marker , allows you to move the first-line indent marker and the left indent marker simultaneously. When you move the left indent marker, the distance between the hanging indent and the first-line indent remains the same. The triangle on the right side of the ruler, called the right indent marker , controls where the right edge of the paragraph ends. You can also click the Paragraph button on the Home tab to open the Paragraph dialog box and manually set paragraph indents.

Working with Windows Programs

Windows 31

UNIT

B Windows 7

Working with a Graphic in Paint Paint is a Windows accessory you can use to create and work with graphics or pictures. You can open and save pictures created in, or for, other graphics programs and the Internet using several common file formats, such as .bmp, .tiff, .png, .gif, or .jpeg. A bitmap file is a map of a picture created from small dots, or pixels. The value of each dot is stored in one or more bits. One bit is used to represent a dot in black and white, or monochrome graphics, whereas multiple bits are used to represent a dot in graphics with color or shades of gray. With a 4-bit graphic, you can use 16 unique colors, an 8-bit graphic 256 colors, and a 24-bit graphic 16 million colors. To draw or modify graphics in Paint, you use buttons, including those in the Tools and Shapes groups, on the Home tab on the Ribbon, and described in Table B-2. The Colors group on the Home tab allows you to select the colors you want to use in Paint. You can open more than one Windows program at a time, called multitasking, so while WordPad is still running, you can open Paint and work on drawings and pictures. You decide you want to include the Quest logo in the Tour Ideas document you created. However, you need to modify it before you can insert the logo.

STEPS 1. Click the Start button on the taskbar, point to All Programs, click Accessories, click in the Paint window, if necessary Paint, then click the Maximize button The Paint window opens and is maximized in front of the WordPad window. The Paint window includes a title bar at the top with the filename (currently “Untitled”) and program name, a customizable toolbar called the Quick Access toolbar, the Paint button used to select file-related commands, and a Ribbon with two tabs—Home and View—to quickly select document-related commands. In addition, the Paint window contains the status bar and the canvas area. The canvas area, or work area, is the white drawing area within the Paint window that doesn’t include the gray area.

2. Click the Paint button

, then click Open

The Open dialog box opens with all the picture files in the selected folder listed. QUICK TIP To change the file format, click the Save as type list arrow, select the format you want, then click Save.

QUICK TIP To resize the canvas, drag the white resize handle in the lowerright corner of the canvas.

QUICK TIP To set a picture as your desktop background, click the Paint button, point to Set as desktop background, then click an option.

3. Navigate to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files, click WIN B-2.bmp in the file list, then click Open The file named WIN B-2.bmp, which is a logo, opens in the Paint window, as shown in Figure B-6.

4. Click the Paint button , click Save as, then save the file as QST Logo.bmp to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files As you type the new name of the file, Windows automatically determines the file type and changes the format in the Save as type list. In this case, the format changes to 24-bit Bitmap.

5. Click the Magnifier tool

on the Home tab, then click the canvas area

Notice that the pointer changed to when you positioned it over the canvas area. The image magnifies to display the logo larger. A tool remains turned on until another tool is selected.

6. Click the Fill with color tool on the Home tab, click Color 1 on the Home tab if necessary, click the fourth small square from the left in the first row of the Color Box, then move the pointer into the canvas area The pointer changes to . Color 1 indicates the foreground color and Color 2 indicates the background color. If you want to change the background color, click Color 2 instead of Color 1 before you select a color.

7. Position so that the pour tip of the icon is in the right unfilled section of the top part of the compass, then click The closed area you clicked filled with red, the current foreground color. See Figure B-7.

8. Click the Save button

on the Quick Access toolbar

Now you can use the recolored logo in other documents. Windows 32

Working with Windows Programs

Windows 7

FIGURE B-6: Company logo in Paint

Color Box; yours might display at the bottom

Home tab on the Paint Ribbon

Logo

FIGURE B-7: Company logo with a new color fill

Click to select red Fill with color button

Background color (white)

Fill bucket pointer Click in here to fill with color

Foreground color (red)

TABLE B-2: Tools on the Home tab

tool

used to

tool

used to

Paste

Paste Clipboard or file to the canvas

Eraser/Color Eraser Erase or color part of a drawing

Cut

Remove selection to the Clipboard

Color picker

Pick up a color from the picture for drawing

Copy

Copy selection to the Clipboard

Magnifier

Magnify part of an image

Crop

Remove contents outside selection

Brush

Draw a brush stroke using a brush with the selected size and shape

Resize

Resize or skew selection

Shapes

Draw a shape

Rotate

Rotate or flip selection

Shape outline

Draw a shape with an outline color or brush

Rectangular selection Select a square or rectangular shape

Shape fill

Draw a shape with a fill color or brush

Free-form selection

Select a free-form or irregular shape

Size

Draw a shape with a line thickness

Pencil

Draw a freehand line

Color 1

Select a foreground color

Fill with color

Fill a closed shape with the current color or texture

Color 2

Select a background color

Text

Enter text in drawings

Edit colors

Change the selected color

Working with Windows Programs

Windows 33

UNIT

B Windows 7

Copying Data Between Programs One of the most useful features Windows offers is the ability to use data created in one file in another file, even if the files were created in different Windows programs. To work with more than one program or file at a time, you simply need to open both of them. To switch from one open window to another, click the correct taskbar button. If you tile, or arrange open windows on the desktop so that they are visible, you can switch among them simply by clicking in the window in which you want to work. You can use the Cut, Copy, and Paste commands to move and copy data between different files. You want to add the company logo, which you modified in Paint, to the Tour Ideas document containing your ideas for travel packages.

STEPS TROUBLE If your windows aren’t tiled, click the taskbar buttons and ensure that both windows are maximized, then repeat Step 1.

TROUBLE If you have trouble selecting the logo, click the Zoom in button on the status bar to display 100%, then repeat Step 3.

1. Place the mouse pointer on an empty area of the taskbar, right-click, then click Show windows side by side on the shortcut menu The windows (Paint and WordPad) are tiled next to one another vertically, so you can maneuver quickly between them while working. Neither window is active at the moment.

2. Click the QST Logo.bmp – Paint taskbar button on the taskbar Clicking a taskbar button makes the window associated with that button the active window, so the Paint program window becomes the active window.

3. Click the Image button on the Home tab if necessary, click the Select tool button arrow on the Home tab, click Rectangular selection, position the cursor in the upper-left corner of the canvas, click, then drag around the QST logo to select it Dragging with the Select tool selects an object in Paint for cutting, copying, or performing other modifications.

4. Click the Clipboard button on the Home tab, then click the Copy button A copy of the logo is placed on the Clipboard, but it also remains in its original place in the file.

5. Click anywhere in the WordPad window to make it active, then click at the top of the WordPad document, above the first line of text Clicking in an inactive window is another way to make that window active. The WordPad program becomes active, and the insertion point is blinking near the left margin in the first line on the Tour Ideas document page, where you want the logo to appear.

6. Click the Clipboard button on the Home tab, if necessary, click the Paste button the WordPad window, then click the logo to select it

in

The logo is pasted into the document. A selection rectangle with resize handles, as shown in Figure B-8.

7. Click the Maximize button in the WordPad window, click the Center button the Home tab, then click a blank area of the document window, if necessary

on

The logo is deselected, and is now centered horizontally on the page.

8. Click the Save button

on the Quick Access toolbar in the WordPad window

You’re finished working with Paint. To close a program and any of its currently open files, click Exit on the Paint menu or click the Close button in the upper-right corner of the program window.

9. Click the QST Logo.bmp – Paint taskbar button on the taskbar, click the Save button in the Paint window then click the Close button

Windows 34

Working with Windows Programs

,

Windows 7

FIGURE B-8: Logo copied from one program to another

WordPad and Paint windows side by side Logo selected in Paint document

Logo pasted in WordPad document

Taskbar buttons for WordPad and Paint

Switching between files When you open many file and program windows, the taskbar groups windows from the same program together in one taskbar button to reduce the clutter on the taskbar and save space. For example, if you have five windows open, and two of them are WordPad files, the two WordPad files are grouped together on the taskbar within the one button named WordPad. When you click the WordPad button on

the taskbar, a thumbnail appears for each open WordPad file, from which you can choose the file you want to view, as shown in Figure B-9. You can point to the thumbnail to temporarily view it or click the thumbnail to switch to it. (To open more than one WordPad window, you need to start two versions of the program using the Start menu.)

FIGURE B-9: WordPad taskbar buttons grouped on taskbar

Working with Windows Programs

Windows 35

UNIT

B Windows 7

Embedding or Linking an Object Object Linking and Embedding (OLE) is a way to share information—an object—between two programs. An object can be a picture from a graphics program, a chart from a spreadsheet program, a video clip, text, or almost anything else you can create on a computer. The program that creates the object is the source program; the program that creates the file into which you want to insert the object is the destination program. Likewise, the file that originally contained the object is called the source file, and the file where you want to insert the object is called the destination file. With embedding, a copy of the object becomes part of the destination file, which also increases the size of the file. If you want to edit the object, you make changes in the destination file using the source program, and the original file remains intact. With linking, a representation of the object appears in the destination file, but the object is actually stored in the source file. Because a linked object is not stored in the destination file, the object doesn’t increase the size of the destination file. If you want to edit the linked object, you make changes in the source file, and the changes will be reflected in the other file the next time you open or update it. The company logo is not final yet, so you want to link the source file to the document. Then, you can quickly update the document once the logo is finalized.

STEPS QUICK TIP To create a new object from Paint, click the Paint drawing on the button Home tab, draw the image you want, click the Paint but, then ton click Exit and return to document. Double-click the object to edit it.

QUICK TIP When you open a destination file with a linked object, the destination program checks the source file location to reestablish the link. If it doesn’t find the file, it displays an alert, asking you to locate it and reestablish the link.

TROUBLE If your circle doesn’t match Figure B-12, use the Undo button on the Quick Access toolbar, then repeat Step 8.

1. In the WordPad document, click the QST logo image to select it, then press [Delete] The nonlinked logo is now deleted from the Tour Ideas document.

2. Click the Insert object button on the Home tab to open the Insert Object dialog box, then click the Create from File option button 3. Click Browse to open the Browse dialog box, navigate to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files, click QST Logo.bmp, then click Open The file you selected is listed in the Insert Object File text box. So far, you have completed the same steps to insert a new version of the logo as a linked file that you would have done if you planned to embed the object.

4. Click the Link check box to select it, as shown in Figure B-10, then click OK The two files are now linked. The linked object—the QST logo—remains outlined on the WordPad page.

5. Right-click the QST logo image, then click Links The Links dialog box opens, as shown in Figure B-11. The box lists the linked objects in the document; in this case, it contains just one—the logo.

6. Click the Manual option button, then click Close The Links dialog box closes. Now the linked logo will be updated only when you choose to do so.

7. Double-click the QST logo image in WordPad The QST Logo.bmp file is opened in Paint, and the Paint window becomes the active window.

8. Maximize the Paint window, click the Oval tool in the Shapes Box, select the second color in the second row in the Colors Box, drag to draw a circle around the logo, then save the image and close Paint 9. Right-click the QST logo image, then click Links, click Update Now, click Close, then save your changes and deselect the logo WordPad updates the QST logo from the Paint file. See Figure B-12.

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Working with Windows Programs

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FIGURE B-10: Insert Object dialog box

Your file location might differ Select to link the file

FIGURE B-11: Links dialog box

Click to update the link Click to open the source file

Select to change the update status of the link to manual

Your source file location might differ

FIGURE B-12: WordPad document with updated linked object

Linked Paint object

Finding, changing, and breaking a linked object Instead of opening the source file to make changes to a linked object, you can open a linked object from within the destination file using the Open Source button in the Links dialog box. The Open Source button finds the source file containing the linked object and opens that file. The Links dialog box keeps track of the source file location. You can change the source file to a different file or location by using the Change Source button. If you want to disregard a link and change

it to an embedded object, right-click the linked object in the destination file, click Object properties to open the Linked Bitmap Image Properties dialog box, click the Link tab, click Break Link, click Yes in the message box, then click OK. On the Link tab in the Linked Bitmap Image Properties dialog box, you can also open or change the source file, change update options, and update the source for the selected object.

Working with Windows Programs

Windows 37

UNIT

B Windows 7

Printing a Document Printing a document creates a printout or hard copy, a paper document that you can share with others or review as a work in progress. Most Windows programs have print options that you can set using a Print dialog box. Although printing options vary from program to program, the process works similarly in most of them. Typically, you can access the Print dialog box using a Print command on a menu. If you want to use the current print options and bypass the Print dialog box, you can use the Quick Print command on the Print submenu. It is a good idea to use the Print Preview feature to look at the layout and formatting of a document before you print it. You might catch a mistake, find that the document fits on more pages than you wanted, or notice formatting that you want to do differently. Making changes before you print saves paper. You decide to preview the Tour Ideas document to ensure you are satisfied with how it looks before printing it. When satisfied with the result, you print the Tour Ideas document.

STEPS 1. In the WordPad window, add your name to the bottom of the document, click the , point to Print, then click Print preview WordPad button The Print preview window opens and a reduced but proportionate image of the page appears in the Print preview window, as shown in Figure B-13.

2. Move the pointer over the logo so that the pointer changes to

, then click the screen

The preview image of the page zooms in to appear larger. Note the size of the margin, which is the space between the text and the edge of the document.

3. Click the Page setup button

QUICK TIP To print a document with the default settings in the Print dialog box, click the WordPad button, point to Print, then click Quick print.

TROUBLE If a printer is not available, doubleclick the Add Printer icon and answer a series of questions using the Add Printer Wizard to install one.

Windows 38

on the Print preview tab

The Page Setup dialog box opens. In this dialog box, you can change the margin setting to decrease or increase the area outside the dotted rectangle. You can also change other printing options, including the paper size and page orientation. Page orientation describes the direction text is printed on the page. When the page is taller than it is wide, its orientation is portrait; when the page is wider than it is tall, its orientation is landscape.

4. If necessary, drag to select the number in the Left text box, type 1, select the number in the Right text box, type 1, then click OK The document appears in the Print preview window with the smaller page margins.

5. Click the Print button

on the Print preview tab

The Print dialog box opens, as shown in Figure B-14, showing various options available for printing.

6. Select the printer you want to use if necessary, then click Print The Tour Ideas document prints. While a document prints, a printer icon appears in the notification area of the taskbar that you can point to in order to get status information. The Print preview window closes, and you return to the Tour Ideas document.

7. Click the Save button

, then click the Close button

in the WordPad window

WordPad saves your changes in the documents and the program closes.

Working with Windows Programs

Click to open Page setup dialog box

Click to close Print Preview

Windows 7

FIGURE B-13: WordPad document in Print Preview

Click to open Print dialog box Click to magnify the view

FIGURE B-14: Print dialog box

Double-click icon to add a printer

Printer Information

Selected printer; your name and view might differ

In a multiple page document, set which pages to print

Creating an XPS document XML Paper Specification (XPS) is a secure fixed-layout format— similar to an Adobe PDF file—developed by Microsoft that retains the format you intended on a monitor or printer. An XPS document is useful when you want to create a document primarily intended to be read and printed, not modified. Windows 7 allows you to save a document as an XPS file, which you can send to others for review

in an e-mail. To create an XPS file, select the Microsoft XPS Document Writer in the Print dialog box instead of a printer, click Print, specify a filename and location, then click Save. To view an XPS file, you need to have a viewer—free downloadable software from Microsoft Office Online—installed on your computer.

Working with Windows Programs

Windows 39

UNIT

B Windows 7

Playing a Video or Audio Clip Windows 7 comes with a built-in accessory called Windows Media Player, which you can use to play video, audio, and mixed-media files, known as clips, stored on your computer, a CD, a DVD, a local network, or the Internet. You can also copy, or rip, individual music tracks or entire CDs to your computer and create your own jukebox or playlist of media. In addition, you can create, or burn, your own audio CDs or data DVDs, and copy music and videos to portable digital audio players and PCs, such as an MP3 player, cell phone, or mobile device. You can also access online stores to purchase music and other media. With Windows Media Player, you can modify the media, control the settings, and change the player’s appearance, or skin. Windows 7 comes with Windows Media Player version 12; however, new versions are periodically released. To check online for the most recent version of Windows Media Player, right-click the taskbar in Windows Media Player, point to Help, then click Check for updates. You want to learn how to use Windows Media Player to play travel video and audio clips for customers.

STEPS TROUBLE If a dialog box opens asking you to choose Recommended settings or Custom settings, click the option you prefer, then click Finish. If you are working in a lab, ask your instructor or technical support person for help.

1. Click the Windows Media Player button on the taskbar, then click the Maximize in the Windows Media Player window, if necessary button The Windows Media Player window opens. A taskbar with tabs is at the top of the window and player controls that look and function similarly to those on a CD or DVD player are along the bottom. The Library window opens by default, as shown in Figure B-15, displaying the media you currently have stored on your computer.

2. Right-click a blank area of the Windows Media taskbar, point to File on the menu, click Open, navigate to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files, click WIN B-3.wmv, then click Open A video clip of wildflowers appears in the Now Playing window, a smaller more compact window, as shown in Figure B-16. The video clip plays once.

3. Click the Switch to Library button QUICK TIP To play an audio track from the Library, double-click the track you want to play.

QUICK TIP To play a music CD, insert the CD in the disc drive and wait for Windows Media Player to start playing the CD.

in the upper-right corner of the Now Playing window

The Library window opens in Windows Media Player.

4. Right-click a blank area of the Windows Media taskbar, point to File on the menu, click Open, navigate to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files, if necessary, click WIN B-4.wma, then click Open The video clip is closed and the audio clip plays once. You can play the media clip continuously, or loop.

5. Click the Turn repeat on button at the bottom of the Media Player to turn on the option, at the bottom of the Media Player window then click the Switch to Now Playing button The Now Playing window opens. When you play audio in the Now Playing window, you can display a visualization (a visual effect), which displays color and shapes that change with the beat of the sound.

6. Right-click a blank area of the window, point to Visualizations, point to Battery, then click eletriarnation The visual effect continuously displays while the audio plays. The Play tab from the Library window can be accessed from the Now Playing window as well.

7. Right-click a blank area of the window, then click Show list The Play tab from the Library window opens in the Now Playing window.

8. After the audio repeats several times, click the Stop button Windows Media Player window

at the bottom of the

You can control the playback of media in the Now Playing window.

9. Right-click a blank area of the window, then click Hide list, click the Switch to Library , click the Turn repeat off button to turn off the option, then click the button in the Windows Media Player window Close button Windows 40

Working with Windows Programs

Windows Media taskbar

Navigation pane; your contents might differ

Use the Search box to locate media

Local media

Windows 7

FIGURE B-15: Library window in Windows Media Player

Address bar Streaming media from another computer

Play tab in the List pane; your contents might differ

Repeat button Shuffle button Switch to Now Playing button

Play/Pause button FIGURE B-16: Playing a video clip in the Now Playing window

Media information

Switch to Library button Resize window to view more playback controls

Video clip

Press and hold to rewind

Press and hold to fast-forward Mute button

Stop button

Volume button

Drag to review or forward media

Play/Pause button

Playing media from other computers or the Internet You can use Windows Media Player to play media available on the Internet or from other networked computers, such as videos, live broadcasts, and music tracks. You can stream the media directly from another computer on your network or over the Internet or from a Web site, or you can download the media file to your computer. Delivering highquality, continuous video, live broadcasts, sound, and music playback is known as streaming media. When you stream the media, the video or music starts playing while the file is transmitted to you from another networked computer or over the Internet. The streaming media is not stored on your computer. If you have media on another computer over a network, HomeGroup (a home-sharing network), or the Internet, you can use commands on the Stream menu to allow access and control of the media on your computer. You can access the streaming media from

the Navigation pane just your like local media. You can also use the Media Guide button in the Windows Media Player to help you find media—music, movies, and radio—on the Internet. To stream media from the Internet, locate the Web site that contains the media you want to play, click the link to the media, then wait for Windows Media Player to start (if necessary) and the first data bits to be transmitted to a temporary memory storage area called a buffer and for the media to start playing automatically. The buffer continues to download the media until it’s done as Windows Media Player plays the media in the buffer. When you download a media file, you wait for the entire file to be transferred to your computer. To download a file, use a Web browser to locate the media you want to download from the Internet, then click the download link to download and save it locally.

Working with Windows Programs

Windows 41

UNIT

B Windows 7

STEPS TROUBLE If you’re asked to set up Windows Media Center, click Continue, choose Express Setup, and follow the on-screen instructions.

QUICK TIP If you prefer a desktop view, you can use Windows Media Center as a desktop gadget.

Working with Windows Media If you have Windows Home Premium, Professional, or Ultimate edition you can use Windows Media Center to play and work with media. Windows Media Center is an entertainment system integrated into your computer that lets you watch live or recorded TV or Netflix movies, play video and look at pictures, listen to music and radio using an FM tuner or the Internet, play and burn CDs and DVDs, browse online media, and play games. Windows Media Center is designed with a display and navigation unlike other Windows programs. When you start Windows Media Center, the program window fills the entire screen and no menus or toolbars are displayed. You navigate by scrolling through a list of main categories, and then scrolling through commands for the selected category. Play, Record, and other VCR/DVD type commands are available when you move the pointer to display them. In addition to the pointer, you can use a remote control or a touch screen to navigate the system and play the media you want. To play FM radio or watch TV, you need to have an FM tuner and a TV tuner card installed on your computer. After creating a DVD for the latest marketing promotion, you want to use Windows Media Center to play it.

1. Click the Start button Media Center

on the taskbar, point to All Programs, then click Windows

The Windows Media Center window opens with its categories listed. When you move your mouse, the Home button moves to the upper-left corner along with the Back button. The Home button brings you back to the main menu screen. The lower-right corner displays VCR and TV tuner controls.

2. Click the Maximize button if necessary, point to the list in the middle of the start screen, then move the pointer to the top or bottom edge of the screen above or below the list to display an arrow and scroll the list You can click the up or down arrow to scroll categories one at a time.

3. Click the up or down arrow to scroll to the Tasks category, as shown in Figure B-17, click the settings command, then click the Media Libraries command The settings command allows you to customize Windows Media Center and add media libraries.

QUICK TIP To play music, click Home button, click the Music category, click music library, scroll left or right, select an album, select a track, then click play song.

4. Click the Videos option, click Next, click the Add folders to the library option, click Next, click the destination option where you store your Data Files, click Next, navigate to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files, select the UnitB check box, click Next, click the Yes, use these locations option, click Finish, then click the Back button The media files in the UnitB folder are added to their respective libraries, available for use. The Windows Media Center Home screen window opens.

5. Press [Up Arrow] or [Down Arrow] to scroll to the Pictures + Videos category The category is selected with the picture library, play favorites, and video library commands displayed.

TROUBLE If you’re asked to add more videos to Media Libraries, click Cancel.

6. Click the video library command The video library category is now active. The Data Files from UnitB are cataloged in the video library.

7. Click at the top of the video library category screen, if necessary, click UnitB, point to WIN B-5, then click the thumbnail After a moment, the video plays, as shown in Figure B-18. If the playback and navigation controls autohide, move the mouse to display them again.

8. Move the pointer to display the controls, then click the Home button The Windows Media Center Home screen window reopens. If the video has not completed playing, the Home screen controls display with the video playing in the background.

9. Click the Close button Windows 42

Working with Windows Programs

in the Windows Media Center window

Windows 7

FIGURE B-17: Navigating in Windows Media Center

Close button

Back button Home button

Category

Commands in a category Playback controls

FIGURE B-18: Playing a video in Windows Media Center

Playback controls

Changing Windows Media Center settings You can set up and customize Windows Media Center by selecting the Tasks category on the Home screen, and then selecting the settings command. You can set general options for Windows Media Center and specific options for each of the media types, including TV, Pictures, Music, and DVD. You can also set options for extenders and libraries. A Windows Media Center Extender is a device you connect to your computer, such as a TV, DVD player, digital camera, or Xbox 360.

When you connect an extender, you can control the device from Windows Media Center within a networked environment. Before you get started with Windows Media Center, it’s a good idea to set general options, which include startup and window behavior, visual and sound effects, program library options, Windows Media Center setup, parental controls, automatic download options, optimization, and privacy.

Working with Windows Programs

Windows 43

Practice

For current SAM information including versions and content details, visit SAM Central (http://samcentral.course.com). If you have a SAM user profile, you may have access to hands-on instruction, practice, and assessment of the skills covered in this unit. Since we support various versions of SAM throughout the life of this text, you will want to check with your instructor for instructions and the correct URL/Web site to access those assignments.

Concepts Review

Match the statements below with the elements labeled in the screen shown in Figure B-19. FIGURE B-19

a

g f

b

c

e

d

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Which element points to the Ribbon? Which element points to the Quick Access toolbar? Which element points to the active window? Which element points to the nonactive window? Which element points to the copied logo? Which element points to the original logo? Which element points to a taskbar button?

Match each term with the statement that describes its function. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Copy Cut Embed Link OLE

a. b. c. d. e.

Removes selected text or an image from its current location and places it on the Clipboard Copies selected text or an image from its current location and places it on the Clipboard Copies a representation of an image from its current location into a file Copies an image from its current location into a file A way to share information between programs

Select the best answers from the following lists of choices. 13. RAM stands for: a. Random access memory. b. Random available memory. Windows 44

Working with Windows Programs

c. Regular access memory. d. Regular available memory.

Windows 7

Concepts Review (Continued) 14. What program can save a file in the Rich Text Format (.rtf) file format? a. Notepad c. Paint b. WordPad d. Windows Media Player 15. What program can save a file in the bitmap (.bmp) file format? a. Notepad c. Paint b. WordPad d. Windows Media Player 16. When WordPad automatically moves words to the next line, it is called: a. Word wrap. c. Margin. b. Format insert. d. Tab. 17. What program command makes a copy of a file? a. Duplicate c. Copy b. Save d. Save As 18. What is the name of the Windows location that stores cut or copied information? a. Hard drive c. Start menu b. Clipboard d. Paint 19. Which of the following is not a way to select text? a. Click the left margin in a line of text. c. Drag over the text. b. Double-click a word. d. Click File on the menu bar, then click Select. 20. What type of object is stored in its destination file? a. A linked object c. A text placeholder b. An embedded object d. None of the above 21. Which type of object is stored only in its source file? a. A linked object c. A text placeholder b. An embedded object d. None of the above 22. Which of the following is true about linked objects? a. To edit a linked object, you must open its source file. b. A linked object is an independent object embedded directly into a document. c. You can access a linked object even when the source file is not available. d. A linked object substantially increases your destination file size. 23. Which of the following controls the size of the empty border around a document? a. Print Preview c. Paper Size b. Margins d. Orientation

Skills Review 1. Open and save a WordPad document. a. Start WordPad. b. Open the WordPad file named WIN B-7.rtf from the drive and folder where you store your Data Files. c. Save the file as QST Company Info.rtf to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files. 2. Modify text in a WordPad document. a. Insert the name Derek Opazo after the text “Tour Developer, the Americas:” b. Change the CEO name “Holly Todd” to Jessica Long. c. Move the paragraph “VP, Finance: ...” below the paragraph “CEO: ...”. d. Select all the title text “Company Information Sheet”. e. Center the text, change the text font to Georgia (or another available font), and change its size to 16 points. f. Use the Underline button on the Home tab to underline the text “Corporate Office Location,” “Internet,” and “Executive Staff”; use the Text color button list arrow on the Home tab to change the color of the three headings to Professional red; then change the font to Georgia, the point size to 12, and the style to bold. g. Click anywhere in the WordPad window outside of the selected text, then save the document.

Working with Windows Programs

Windows 45

Skills Review (Continued) 3. Work with a graphic in Paint. a. Start Paint, then open the file WIN B-8.bmp from the drive and folder where you store your Data Files. b. Save this file as QST Logo 2.bmp to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files. c. Draw a green circle around the logo. d. Fill the top unfilled section of the left point with the light blue color (third small square from the right in the second row of the Colors Box). e. Save the file. 4. Copy data between programs. a. Arrange the WordPad and Paint windows side by side. (Hint: Maximize both windows first.) b. Copy the logo in the Paint window to the Clipboard. c. In WordPad, position the insertion point in the blank line at the beginning of the document, then maximize the WordPad window. d. Paste the logo in the blank line, then FIGURE B-20 center it. e. Save the QST Company Info.rtf file. Close the QST Logo 2.bmp file, then close Paint. 5. Embed or link an object. a. Click the QST logo in the WordPad document, then delete it. b. Insert the QST logo as a linked object using the file QST Logo 2.bmp. c. Change the link update option to manual. d. Open the linked file in the source program. e. Change the color of the lower-left section in the bottom point in the logo to green. f. Save the logo document and close Paint. g. Manually update the linked file in WordPad. Compare your final document with Figure B-20. h. Save the document. 6. Print a document. a. If necessary, change the left and right margins to 1 inch in the QST Company Info.rtf file. b. Add your name to the bottom of the document. c. Preview and print the document, then save the document. d. Close all open documents, then close WordPad. 7. Play a video or audio clip. a. Start Windows Media Player. b. Open the file named WIN B-4.wma from the drive and folder where you store your Data Files. c. Play the audio clip, set the audio to repeat, then switch to Now Playing view. d. Change the visualization to Ocean Mist (in the Bars and Waves category). e. Stop the playback, then close Windows Media Player. 8. Work with Windows media. a. Start Windows Media Center. b. Open the video library. c. Display the videos for UnitB. d. Play the video WIN B-6.wmv. e. Close Windows Media Center.

Windows 46

Working with Windows Programs

You own a bookstore that specializes in international books, and you need to create a list of international titles that you want to recommend to customers. Use WordPad to create a document that lists your favorite international books in stock. In the document, include the name of your bookstore and its street address, city, state, zip code, and phone number, and for each book, the author’s name (last name first), title, and publication date. You will make up this information.

Windows 7

Independent Challenge 1

a. Start WordPad, then open the file WIN B-9.rtf from the drive and folder where you store your Data Files. b. Insert a blank line and then enter the heading (the name of your bookstore, and the address, city, state, zip code, and phone number), pressing [Enter] after the name, address, and zip code. c. Center the heading information. d. Change the Font for the heading to Verdana. Format the name of the bookstore so it is 14 points and italic. e. Insert a blank line, then enter the title Bestsellers List below the heading you just entered, center it, then change the font size to 18 point. Insert another blank line between this title and the table. f. Italicize the title of each book, then format the last and first names of each author with boldface. Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Add color to the title (Bestsellers List). ■ Underline the entire line containing the column headings, make this text bold, then add a color to this text. ■ Change the second column tab stops to 2 inches and the third column tab stops to 4 inches. g. If necessary, change the top and bottom margins to 0.75, then add your name to the end of the document. h. Save the list as Bestsellers List.rtf to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files. i. Preview and print the document, then close WordPad.

Independent Challenge 2 As vice president of Things That Fly, a kite and juggling store, you need to design a new type of logo, consisting of three simple circles, each colored differently. You use Paint to design the logo, then you paste the logo into a WordPad document. a. Start Paint, then create a small circle, using the [Shift] key and the Ellipse tool. b. Select the circle using the Select tool, then copy the circle. c. Paste the circle from the Clipboard in the Paint window, then use the mouse to drag the second circle below and a bit to the right of the first. d. Paste the circle again, then use the mouse to drag the third circle below and a bit to the left of the first. e. For each circle, use the Fill with color tool on the Home tab, select the color in the Colors Box you want the circle to be, then click inside the circle you want to fill with that color. f. Using the Select tool, select the completed logo, then copy it. g. Save the Paint file as Stationery Logo.bmp to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files. h. Open WordPad, place the insertion point on the first line, center it, then press [Enter]. i. Paste the logo in the document, deselect the logo, press [Enter] twice, then type Things That Fly. j. Change the text to 18-point boldface, then format each word in a different color; make sure the colors you choose coordinate with the logo, then add your name to the end of the document. k. Save the WordPad document as Stationery.rtf to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files. l. Preview the document, make any changes necessary, print the document, then close WordPad and Paint.

Independent Challenge 3 You are the president of Garfield Graffiti Removal, Inc. The company’s patented RemoveX system removes paint from all types of surfaces. After removing the paint, GGRI restores surfaces with PreventX, a special clear coating that makes graffiti easier to clean up in the future. Write a letter to persuade your city or town council to award GGRI the contract to remove graffiti from city property. Open and view a short video of the graffiti problem in Windows Media Player that you might send along with the letter. a. Start Paint, then create a logo for GGRI. b. Save the logo as GGRI Logo.bmp (24-bit Bitmap file format) to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files, then close Paint. Windows 47 Working with Windows Programs

Independent Challenge 3 (Continued) c. Start WordPad, then write a letter to convince the city council to award GGRI the contract, and format the letter as needed, then add your name at the end of the document. d. Save the document as Graffiti.rtf to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files. e. In your letter, link the file GGRI Logo.bmp from the drive and folder where you store your Data Files. f. Start Paint and open the GGRI Logo.bmp. g. Add graffiti to the GGRI Logo.bmp using the Airbrush tool (fourth brush in the first row of the Brushes palette), then close Paint. h. Update the linked file in your document. i. Preview and print the document, save the file, then close WordPad. j. Start Windows Media Player, open the file WIN B-11.wmv from the drive and folder where you store your Data Files to play it, then close Windows Media Player.

Real Life Independent Challenge You and some of your friends want to have a party. Using WordPad, you want to create an invitation. Using Paint, you then want to paste a map of the party location onto the invitation. a. Start WordPad, then type the information for the invitation, which includes the invitation title; date, time, and location of the party; directions; your name and phone number; and the date to respond by. b. Change the title text to a larger size, boldface, center align, then add color. c. Change the rest of the text to a smaller size and a different font type. d. Save the WordPad document as Invitation.rtf to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files. e. Start Paint, then open the file WIN B-10.bmp from the drive and folder where you store your Data Files. f. Copy the map to the Clipboard. g. Place the insertion point above the instructions in the invitation, then paste the map into the WordPad document. h. Add your name to the end of the FIGURE B-21 document. i. Save the document, preview the document, make any necessary changes, then print the document. j. Close WordPad and Paint. Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Open Windows Media Center. ■ Add a folder with a family video to the media library. (If you don’t have one, you can use WIN B-12.wmv in the Unit B folder.) ■ Open the video library, then navigate to the family video. ■ Play the video in Windows Media Center. ■ Close Windows Media Center.

Visual Workshop Create a document that looks like the example in Figure B-21. Use WordPad as the destination program and Paint as the source program; use linking to save disk space. Add your name to the end of the document. Save the document as Accident Report.rtf and the map you create as Accident Map.bmp to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files. Print the document. Windows 48

Working with Windows Programs Copyright 2010 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part.

UNIT

C Windows 7

Files You Will Need: Quest Travel (folder) Advertising (folder) QST Ad Copy.rtf Company (folder) QST Company Info.rtf QST Fact Sheet.rtf QST People.rtf QST Press Release.rtf Letters (folder) Business Letters (folder) C&N Printing.rtf IRS Letter.rtf Personal Letters (folder) Eric Schubel.rtf Tracy Teyler.rtf Marketing (folder) QST Focus.rtf QST Logo.bmp QT New Logo.bmp Tours (folder) QST Tours.rtf To Do List.rtf

OBJECTIVES

Managing Files and Folders File management is organizing and keeping track of files and folders. Working with poorly managed files is like looking for a needle in a haystack—it is frustrating and time consuming to search through irrelevant, misnamed, and out-of-date files to find the one you want. Windows allows you to organize folders and files in a file hierarchy, imitating the way you store paper documents in real folders. Just as a filing cabinet contains several folders, each containing a set of related documents and several dividers grouping related folders together, a file hierarchy allows you to place files in folders, then place folders in other folders, so that your files are organized and easier to find. Windows 7 provides you with a main file management window called Windows Explorer. Windows Explorer provides access to files, folders, drives, and disks on your local, Homegroup (a shared home network), and network computers.

You have just been hired as a marketing special-

ist. Ron Dawson, the vice president of Marketing, wants you to review the files on your computer and organize them for some upcoming projects.

Open Windows Explorer View files and folders Navigate a folders list Create and rename files and folders Search for files and folders Organize files and folders Copy and move files and folders Delete and restore files and folders Work with libraries

UNIT

C Windows 7

Opening Windows Explorer The keys to organizing files and folders effectively within a file hierarchy are to store related items together and to name folders informatively. Proper hierarchy and relevant names allow you to get a good idea of what’s on your system just by looking at the higher levels of your file hierarchy; you don’t have to examine every individual file or memorize a coding system. Drives, folders, and files are represented by icons. Table C-1 lists the typical drives on a computer and how you use them. Each drive is assigned a drive letter, denoted with parentheses and a colon to help make it easier to identify. Typically, the hard drive is listed as Local Disk (C:), while the CD or DVD is (D:). If your computer includes additional hard or removable drives, they are assigned letters by your computer in alphabetical order. Windows Explorer provides access to files, folders, drives, and disks on your local, Homegroup (a shared home network), and network computers. The Windows Explorer window contains a toolbar, a Navigation pane, a Details pane, a menu bar (which might not be visible), a status bar (which might not be activated) providing information about the contents of the window, and a list of contents. The Navigation pane displays links to common folder and drive locations, including Favorites, Libraries, Homegroup, Computer, and Network. Libraries are special folders that catalog files and folders in a central location, regardless of where you actually store them on your hard drive, to make finding files easier. A library can contain links to files, other folders, and other subfolders anywhere on your computer. The file hierarchy on your disk contains several Quest Specialty Travel folders and files organized by topic. You want to open the Windows Explorer window and review its organization to see if it needs changes.

STEPS QUICK TIP To display disks and drives, click the Start button on the taskbar, then click Computer.

1. Click the Windows Explorer button

on the taskbar

The Windows Explorer window opens, displaying the contents of the Libraries folder. Windows 7 comes with four default libraries: Documents, Music, Pictures, and Videos.

2. Point to Libraries, click the Expand indicator next to Libraries if necessary to expand the list, then click Documents in the Navigation pane under Libraries The contents of the Documents library folder open in your Windows Explorer window.

TROUBLE If your Data Files are not stored on a USB drive, locate the drive where you store your Data Files, and substitute that drive for “USB drive” in the steps in this unit.

3. If you want to save your Data Files to a USB drive, make sure the USB drive where you store your Data Files is plugged into your computer, then click Computer in the Navigation pane The Computer window opens, displaying the contents of your computer, including all disk drives, removable storage devices, and network locations.

4. Click the drive where you store your Data Files The bottom pane of the Computer window changes to display details about the selected drive, as shown in Figure C-1. This figure shows a USB drive labeled “Removable Disk (G:),” which might be different on your computer. Because computers differ, the contents of your Computer window are also probably different from the figure. If you selected a hard drive, the Details pane displays additional information, including free space and total disk size.

5. Double-click the drive where you store your Data Files

TROUBLE If Microsoft Word or another wordprocessing program is installed on your computer, your document icons might differ.

Windows 50

The folders contained on the disk drive open in the Computer window. When you open a disk drive or folder, the Address bar adds the new location to the list. In this example, Removable Disk (G:) is listed in the Address bar after Computer.

6. Double-click the UnitC folder, then double-click the Quest Travel folder The files and folders in the Quest Travel folder are represented by icons that indicate the application they were created with. For example, the To Do List.rtf file was created in WordPad.

7. Double-click the Company folder The Company folder opens, displaying four files, which were created in WordPad.

Managing Files and Folders

Windows 7

FIGURE C-1: Computer window

Computer in the Address bar

Hard Drive

CD Drive

DVD RW Drive

Removable Disk

Navigation pane

Network Drive Your devices may differ

Details pane with information about the selected disk drive TABLE C-1: Typical disk drives on a computer

icon

type

description

Local

A hard magnetic disk on which you can store large amounts of data. The disk is typically not removable from the computer.

Removable

A removable disk on which you can store computer data, such as a Flash memory card or Flash or USB drive.

Compact Disc-Read-Only Memory (CD-ROM)

An optical disc on which you can stamp, or burn, up to 1 GB (typical size is 650 MB) of data in only one session. The read-only disc cannot be erased or burned again with additional new data.

Compact Disc-Recordable (CD-R)

A type of read-only CD on which you can burn up to 1 GB of data in multiple sessions. The disc can be burned again with additional new data, but cannot be erased.

Compact Disc-Rewritable (CD-RW)

A type of CD on which you can read, write, and erase data, just like a removable or hard disk.

Digital Video Disc (DVD)

A type of read-only optical disc that holds a maximum of 4.7 GB, enough for a full-length movie.

Digital Video Disc-Recordable (DVD-R)

A type of read-only DVD on which you can burn up to 4.7 GB of data in multiple sessions. The disc can be burned again with new data, but cannot be erased.

Digital Video Disc-Rewritable (DVD-RW)

A type of DVD on which you can read, write, and erase data, just like a hard disk.

Network drive

A location on a network drive.

Opening a document with a different program Most documents on your desktop are associated with a specific program. For example, if you double-click a document whose filename ends with the three-letter extension “.txt,” Windows automatically opens the document with Notepad, a text-only editor. There are situations, though, when you need to open a document with a program other than the one Windows chooses, or when you want to choose a

different default program. For example, you might want to open a text document in WordPad rather than Notepad so that you can add formatting and graphics. To do this, right-click the document icon you want to open, point to Open with on the shortcut menu, then click the application you want to use to open the document, or click Choose default program to access more program options.

Managing Files and Folders

Windows 51

UNIT

C Windows 7

Viewing Files and Folders Once you have opened more than one folder, the Address bar helps you move quickly between folders in a window. When you open a folder, Windows keeps track of where you have been. To go back or forward to a folder you already viewed, click the Back or Forward button to the left of the Address bar. To go to a folder you viewed two or more locations ago, click the Recent Pages list arrow next to the Forward button to display a menu of places you viewed. The Address bar displays the path you have taken, separated by arrows, to get from a disk drive to your current folder location. To quickly go back to a folder within the path, click the folder name in the Address bar or click an arrow to view the contents of each folder. When you view a folder, you can use the Views button on the toolbar to change the way you view file and folder icons. The available views include Extra Large, Large, Medium, and Small Icons, and List, Details, Tiles, and Content. Icon views display icons in different sizes, sorted alphabetically in horizontal rows, with the name of the file or folder below each icon. When you view files using one of the Icon views, some file types, such as a bitmap, display Live icons (or thumbnails), which display the first page of documents, the image of a photo, or the album art for individual songs, making it easier to find exactly what you are looking for. The other views—Details, Tiles, and Content—display additional information, such as file type, date modified, and size, about the file or folder. As you continue to browse company files and folders, you want to move between them and, depending upon the information you need, change the way you view your files and folders.

STEPS TROUBLE If your window view is not Tiles, click the Views button arrow, then click Tiles.

1. Click the Back button

to the left of the Address bar

The contents of the Quest Travel folder open in the Quest Travel window in Tiles view, as shown in Figure C-2. Each time you click , you are brought back to the previous folder or drive you viewed.

2. Click the drive where you store your Data Files in the Address bar In this example, Removable Disk (G:) is listed in the Address bar after Computer. The contents of the drive open in the window, which includes the UnitC folder. Instead of continuously double-clicking between folder icons, the will return you to the previous folder you viewed.

QUICK TIP You can also press [Backspace] to go back to a previous folder you viewed.

3. Click

to the left of the Address bar

The Quest Travel folder and its contents open in the Computer window.

4. Double-click the Advertising folder in the window The contents of the Advertising folder open in the window. Instead of using the Back button, you can use the Recent Pages list arrow to display a list of the drives and folders you recently viewed.

5. Click the Recent Pages list arrow

between the Forward button and the Address bar

The Recent Pages menu opens, displaying a list of drives and the folders you viewed recently.

6. Click Quest Travel in the menu The contents of the Quest Travel folder reopens in the window.

7. Click the Views button arrow

on the toolbar, then click Details

The Quest Travel window changes to Details view, which shows the name, the date that each file or folder was last modified, and the type and size of file, as shown in Figure C-3. TROUBLE If the double arrow is not in the Address bar, click the leftmost arrow next to the folder icon in the Address bar, then click Computer.

8. Click the Views button

on the toolbar, then click

again

The display changes to Tiles view, which is the next view in the Views menu, then changes to Content view. When you click the Views button, you cycle through the following five views: List, Details, Tiles, Content, and Large Icons. The Tiles and Content views display summary information next to each icon.

9. Click Computer in the Address bar or click the double arrow the Address bar and then click Computer

next to the folder icon in

The Computer window opens. The icon in the Address bar indicates the path is too big to fit in the Address bar, similar to the way the ellipse (. . .) works in a limited space with text. Windows 52

Managing Files and Folders

Windows 7

FIGURE C-2: Viewing files and folders in Tiles view

Back button

Views button arrow

Forward button

Views button

Recent Pages list arrow

FIGURE C-3: Viewing files and folders in Details view

Views button arrow Files and folder details; yours might differ Details view

Customizing Details view When you view files and folders in Details view, a default list of file and folder information appears, which consists of Name, Size, Type, and Date Modified. If the default list of file and folder details doesn’t provide you with the information you need, you can add and remove any file and folder information from Details view. If you need to change the way Windows sorts your files and folders, you can use the column indicator buttons in the right pane of Details view. Clicking one of the

column indicator buttons, such as Name, Size, Type, or Date Modified, in Details view sorts the files and folders by the type of information listed in the column. To change the details shown, right-click a column heading in Details view, and then click the detail you want to show or hide. To see more details or to change the list order, right-click a column title, then click More. You can also drag a column heading to move it quickly to a new position.

Managing Files and Folders

Windows 53

UNIT

C Windows 7

Navigating a Folders List If you are working in Windows Explorer, you can use the Navigation pane to display and manage files and folders. Windows Explorer splits the window into two panes, or frames, as shown in Figure C-4, which allows you to view information from two different locations. The Navigation pane on the left displays all drives and folders on your computer or network, and the right pane displays the contents of the selected drive or folder. This arrangement enables you to view the file hierarchy of your computer or network and the contents of a folder simultaneously. The Navigation pane is organized into five categories: Favorites, Libraries, Homegroup, Computer, and Network. The Navigation pane displays the file hierarchy of the drives and folders for each category in a folders list. Using the Expand indicator and Collapse indicator to the left of an icon in the Navigation pane allows you to display different levels of the drives and folders on your computer without opening and displaying the contents of each folder. With its split window, the folders list in the Navigation pane makes it easy to copy, move, delete, and rename files and folders. In an effort to learn how to manage company files effectively, you want to use the folders list in the Navigation pane to quickly move to folders within folders without opening and displaying the contents of each folder in the file hierarchy.

STEPS QUICK TIP To change the size of the Navigation pane, place the mouse pointer on the vertical bar separating the two window panes so that it , changes to then drag to change the size of the panes.

QUICK TIP To automatically expand folders in the Navigation pane, right-click a blank area in the Navigation pane, then click Expand to current folder to display a check mark.

1. Click the Back button to the left of the Address bar, then click the Views button on the toolbar until Tiles view appears The Quest Travel folder opens, displaying folders and files in Tiles view.

2. Point to Computer in the folders list, then click the Expand indicator to it, if necessary

that appears next

The Computer folder expands to display its folder structure in the Navigation pane. The Navigation pane displays a file hierarchy of the currently selected folder or disk. You can access all folders and drives from the folders list in the Navigation pane. Note that the contents of your folders list will vary, depending on the programs and files installed on your computer and where Windows is installed.

3. Click the Expand indicator in the folders list to display the folder where you store your Data Files, then continue to click the Expand indicator to display the Letters folder The Letters folder expands to display its folder structure, as shown in Figure C-4. The Expand indicator changes to the Collapse indicator , indicating the subfolders on the drive or in the folder are displayed. When neither nor appears next to an icon, the item has no folders in it. However, it might contain files, whose names you can display in the right pane by clicking the folder name. Because you did not click the folder icon, the right pane still displays the contents of the Quest Travel folder as it did before.

4. Click Business Letters in the folders list under Computer When you click a folder or drive in the folders list, its contents open in the right pane. Figure C-5 shows the contents of the Business Letters folder in the right pane.

5. Click

next to the Letters folder in the folders list under Computer

The folders in the Letters folder collapse and no longer appear in the folders list. Because you did not click the Letters folder icon, the right pane still displays the contents of the Business Letters folder. QUICK TIP To show all folders in the Navigation pane, right-click a blank area in the Navigation pane, then click Show all folders to display a check mark.

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6. Click Letters in the folders list under Computer The right pane shows the contents of the Letters folder.

7. Double-click the Business Letters folder in the right pane The right pane now displays the contents of the Business Letters folder. When you double-click a drive or folder in the right pane, the right pane of the window shows the contents of that item. When you double-click a file, the program associated with the file starts and opens the file in the program window.

Managing Files and Folders

Windows 7

FIGURE C-4: Folders on the Removable drive

Removable drive Expand indicator

Contents of Quest Travel window; yours might differ

Collapse indicator

Folders list under Computer; yours might differ

FIGURE C-5: Business Letters folder

Contents of Business Letters folder

Business Letters folder in the folders list

Customizing the Favorites list The Favorites list in the Navigation pane provides links to commonly used folders and saved searches to reduce the number of clicks it takes to locate a file or folder. Windows provides a default list of Favorites, including Desktop, Downloads, and Recent Places. You can customize the Favorites list in the Navigation pane to include the folders or saved searches you want for your everyday use. You can move current links, add or rename folders, save searches, or remove an item. To move a link, drag an item in the Navigation

pane to a higher or lower position. To add a link to the Favorites list, drag an item from its original location in a folders list or in the Folder window to a position in the Favorites list. You can also rename or remove a link. Right-click the link, then click Rename or Remove on the shortcut menu. If the Navigation pane gets cluttered, you can restore it back to the original default items and start from there. Right-click Favorites in the Navigation pane, then click Restore favorite links on the shortcut menu.

Managing Files and Folders

Windows 55

UNIT

C Windows 7

Creating and Renaming Files and Folders A hierarchy allows you to place files in folders, then place folders in other folders, so that your files are organized and easier to find. To create a hierarchy, you create new folders within disks or folders and you store files within them. To create a folder, you select the location where you want the new folder, create the folder, then name the folder. You should name each folder meaningfully, so that just by reading the folder’s name you know its contents. After you name a folder or file, you can rename it at any time. You decide to create a set of new folders to hold the files for the Quest Travel Spring Specials and to rename at least one file with a more appropriate name.

STEPS 1. Click Quest Travel in the folders list under Computer The Quest Travel folder opens. To create a new folder, you use the New folder button on the toolbar. TROUBLE If the folder name is not highlighted, click the folder, then click New folder so that a rectangle surrounds it and the folder name is highlighted.

QUICK TIP To create a new file, right-click a blank area in Windows Explorer, point to New, then click the type of file you want.

2. Click the New folder button on the toolbar A new folder, temporarily named New folder, appears highlighted with a rectangle around the title in the right pane of the window, as shown in Figure C-6. To enter a new folder name, you simply type the new name; the text you type replaces the selected text.

3. Type Spring Specials, then press [Enter] The Spring Specials folder appears in both panes. When you create a new folder, the icon for the new folder is placed at the end of the list of files and folders in the right pane. You can rearrange, or sort, the icons in the folder to make them easier to find.

4. In the right pane, double-click the Spring Specials folder Nothing appears in the right pane because the folder is empty; no new files or folders have been created or moved.

5. Right-click anywhere in the right pane, point to New on the shortcut menu, click Folder, type Spring Ad Pages as the new folder name, then press [Enter] When you right-click, the commands on the shortcut menu differ, depending on the item you right-click or the Windows features installed on your computer. The folder is now named Spring Ad Pages. Notice when you point to the Spring Specials folder in the folders list that the Expand indicator appears, indicating that this folder contains other folders or files.

6. Click Quest Travel in the Address bar The Quest Travel folder opens. If a filename is not useful, you use the Rename command to change it. QUICK TIP To quickly change a file or folder name, select the icon, click the name, then type a new name.

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7. Right-click the To Do List file in the right pane, then click Rename on the shortcut menu The filename appears highlighted, while the extension doesn’t, as shown in Figure C-7.

8. Type Important, then press [Enter] The file is renamed Important as a Rich Text Document.

Managing Files and Folders

Windows 7

FIGURE C-6: Creating a new folder

New folder button

Temporary name of new folder

Date and time folder was created; yours will differ

FIGURE C-7: Renaming a file

Filename selected using the Rename command

Changing the layout of Explorer windows Windows gives you the option to customize the layout for each Explorer window depending on the information the window contains. The layout for each Explorer window can include a menu bar, Details pane, Preview pane, and Navigation pane. The Details and Navigation panes appear by default. The Organize menu shows or hides the layout elements. If you prefer working with menus like the previous version of

Windows, you can show the menu bar and use traditional menus. To change the Explorer layout, open the folder window you want to change, click the Organize button on the toolbar, point to Layout, then select the layout item you want to show or hide: Menu bar, Details pane, Preview pane, or Navigation pane. Layout options vary depending on the type of Explorer window.

Managing Files and Folders

Windows 57

UNIT

C Windows 7

Searching for Files and Folders Sometimes remembering precisely where you stored a file can be difficult. Windows provides a Search box and Search Results folder to help you find and view all of the files or folders that meet your search criteria in one place. The Search Results folder provides easy access to all of your files, such as documents, pictures, music, and e-mail, and folders that match search criteria you set in a single view. Items that match the search criteria appear highlighted. If you don’t find the files or folders you’re looking for, you can perform an advanced search. An advanced search gives you the option to find files or folders by other criteria, such as name, title, author, location, date (taken, modified, or created), size, or tags, which are user-defined file properties. The Search Results folder is accessible from any folder window with the Search box to help you locate files and folders on your computer, Homegroups, and Internet. You want to find a file you created several months ago with preliminary notes for the Spring Specials, so you can move it to the Spring Specials folder. You cannot remember the exact title of the file or where you stored it, so you perform a search.

STEPS 1. Click in the Search box to the right of the Address bar

QUICK TIP Use the * (asterisk) symbol in a filename when you’re unsure of the entire name. For example, type “S*rs” to find all files beginning with “S” and ending with “rs,” such as Stars and Sports cars.

QUICK TIP To delete an entry on the Search box menu, point to the entry on the menu, then press [Delete].

QUICK TIP To expand the search to other locations or perform a search, scroll to the bottom, then click a search option, such as Libraries, Homegroup, Computer, Internet, File Contents, and Custom (for location change).

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A Search box menu opens, displaying recently performed searches and advanced search options, known as filters. A filter narrows the search to display only items that meet the criteria. After a moment, the menu closes. By default, a search occurs in the folder that is currently open, as well as any subfolders in it, but you can specify any location on your computer to search. Just type the name of the folder or file you want to find or the part you know for certain in the Search box. If you didn’t know the name of the file, but did know some text contained in the file, you could enter that text. You want to search in the Quest Travel folder, which is the current folder.

2. Type qst in the box As you type, files that contain the text you typed as part of their filename display highlighted in the window, as shown in Figure C-8. You don’t have to press [Enter]. If any folders in the Quest Travel folder or its subfolders had names that contained QST, their names would appear as well. Notice that the Address bar displays “Search Results in Quest Travel” to indicate the location of the search. If you don’t find the file you want, you can perform an advanced search.

3. Click in the Search box A Search box menu opens, displaying recent searches and filter search options at the bottom. The current menu displays Date modified and Size.

4. Click Size at the bottom of the Search box menu The Search box menu now lists size options, which include Empty (0 KB), Tiny (0–10 KB), Small (10–100 KB), Medium (100 KB–1 MB), Large (1–16 MB), Huge (16–128 MB), and Gigantic (>128 MB).

5. Click Medium (100 KB–1 MB) on the Search box menu for Size You have specified that you only want to find document files that are larger than 100 KB, yet smaller than 1 MB in size. Once you select a search criteria filter, the Search program finds and lists all the corresponding files and folders that meet the criteria. See Figure C-9. Notice that the criteria in the Search box changes to “qst size:medium” to reflect the search options in the Quest Travel folder.

6. Click the Close button

in the Search box

The search criteria are removed from the Search box. Windows Explorer displays all the files and folders in the Quest Travel folder.

Managing Files and Folders

Address bar changes to indicate search results

Search criteria Filter options

Windows 7

FIGURE C-8: Performing a search

Files with “qst” in their filenames

Highlighted search results

FIGURE C-9: Results from a filtered search

Filtered search criteria

Close button in Search box Filtered search results Search location options

Saving a search If you frequently perform the same search, you can save your search results like any file and perform or modify the search again later. Once your search is completed, click the Save search button on the toolbar to open the Save As dialog box. The default file type in the Save as type box is Saved Search (*.search-ms). Type a name for the search, then click Save. The search is saved by default in the Searches folder, which

you can open by clicking Favorites or Searches in the Navigation pane. To run a saved search, double-click it in the Searches window or click it in the Navigation pane. Like any file or folder icon, you can move a saved search from the Searches folder to the Favorites section in the Navigation pane to make it more accessible. When you no longer need a saved search, you can select it, press [Delete], then click Yes to confirm.

Managing Files and Folders

Windows 59

UNIT

C Windows 7

Organizing Files and Folders In Explorer windows, files appear in lists with headings at the top. You can use the headings to change how files are displayed in the window. There are several ways to organize your files by using file list headings, including sorting, filtering, and grouping. Sorting displays files and folders in alphabetical order, either A to Z or Z to A. Filtering displays only files and folders with the properties you select by heading type. When you apply a filter to a heading, a check mark appears in the column heading, indicating a filter is enabled. If a filter doesn’t display the files you want in the selected folder, you can use the Subfolders option to include them in an expanded search. You want to use sorting and filtering to help you find specific Quest Specialty Travel files.

STEPS 1. Click the Views button arrow, then click Details, if necessary The contents of the Quest Travel folder open in Details view.

2. Click the Name column heading to sort the list The file list is sorted in alphabetical order from Z to A. When you click a column heading, the file list is sorted in order by that column. Clicking the column toggles between sorting the list in ascending to descending order and descending to ascending order.

3. Click the Name column heading again to re-sort the list The file list is sorted in alphabetical order from A to Z. Notice that a list arrow appears at the end of the Name column heading. The list arrow allows you to access additional filtering and grouping commands.

4. Point to the Name column heading, then click the Name column heading list arrow A shortcut menu opens, as shown in Figure C-10. The menu displays commands to filter files and folders to help you find what you’re looking for. If you only want to view files in a certain group, you can select one of the filtering options.

5. On the shortcut menu, click the I - P check box to select it, then click off the menu to close it The window displays only the files that meet the I - P filter, as shown in Figure C-11. A check mark appears in the column heading to indicate a filter is applied to the view.

6. Click Subfolders at the bottom of the window A search is applied to the I - P filter to include any files and folders in the Quest Travel subfolders. In this case, the IRS Letter.rtf file appears at the bottom of the list in Contents view. The Address bar displays “Search Results in Quest Travel > I - P” to indicate the results of the search along with the I - P filter.

7. Click the Back button , click the Name column heading check mark, click the I - P check box to clear it, then click off the menu to close it All of the search results for the Quest Travel folder open in Details view.

8. Click Quest Travel in the folders list, then change the view to Tiles, if necessary The file list in the Quest Travel folder is restored back to its original state.

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Managing Files and Folders

Click to sort by heading type

Name column heading list arrow

Windows 7

FIGURE C-10: Menu to filter files and folders

Menu to filter files and folders

FIGURE C-11: Filtering files and folders

Check mark indicates a filter is applied

Files and folders in the filtered list Extends the filter to subfolders in the Quest Travel folder

Adding property tags to files When you create a file, Windows automatically adds properties to the files, such as the filename, creation date, modified date, and size. These properties are important to Windows; however, they might not be useful when you are searching for a file. You can create your own custom properties called tags to make it faster and easier to locate files in the future. A tag can be anything you choose, such as “QST” or “Important.” You can add or modify tag properties for most files.

However, there are some exceptions, such as plain text (.txt) or Rich Text Format (.rtf) files. You can add or modify properties using the Tags box in the Details pane in an Explorer window, the Details tab in the Properties dialog box, or in the Save As dialog box. If you want to remove some or all of the property information in a file, you can quickly remove it using the Properties dialog box. To open the Properties dialog box for a file, right-click the file, then click Properties.

Managing Files and Folders

Windows 61

UNIT

C Windows 7

Copying and Moving Files and Folders Sometimes you will need to move or even copy a file from one folder to another. This can be accomplished using a variety of methods. If the file or folder and the location where you want to move it are visible in a window or on the desktop, you can simply drag the item from one location to the other. Moving a file or folder on the same disk relocates it, whereas dragging it from one disk to another copies it so that it appears in both locations. One way to make sure that you move or copy an item properly is to right-click the file or folder, drag the item to the destination location while still holding down the right mouse button, then choose the appropriate command from the shortcut menu. When the destination folder or drive is not visible, you can use the Cut, Copy, and Paste commands on the Edit menu or the Organize button on the toolbar. As you continue to organize Quest Specialty Travel files, you want to remove some files you no longer need, then make a copy of another file and place it in a folder.

STEPS QUICK TIP To select files or folders that are not consecutive, press and hold [Ctrl], then click each item in the right pane.

1. Click Company in the folders list The contents of the Company folder open in the window. When moving or copying files or folders, make sure the files or folders you want to move or copy appear in the right pane. To move a file, you drag it from the right pane to the destination folder in the folders list.

2. Drag the QST Press Release.rtf file in the right pane across the vertical line separating the two panes to the Marketing folder in the folders list, as shown in Figure C-12, then release the mouse button Once you release the mouse button, the QST Press Release.rtf file is relocated to the Marketing folder, which is a more appropriate location for this type of information. If you decide that you don’t want the file moved, you could move it back easily using the Undo command on the Organize button menu.

3. Click Marketing in the folders list Notice that the QST Press Release file is now stored in the Marketing folder.

4. Point to the QST New Logo.bmp file, press and hold the right mouse button, drag the file across the vertical line separating the two panes to the Advertising folder, then release the mouse button As shown in Figure C-13, a shortcut menu appears, offering a choice of options. QUICK TIP To copy a file quickly from one folder to another on the same disk, select the file, press and hold [Ctrl], then drag the file to the folder.

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5. Click Copy here on the shortcut menu The original QST New Logo file remains in the Marketing folder, and a copy of the file is in the Advertising folder. Another way to copy or move the file to a new location is by right-clicking a file in the right pane, then clicking the Copy or Cut command on the shortcut menu.

6. Click Advertising in the folders list A copy of the QST New Logo file is now located in the Advertising folder.

Managing Files and Folders

Windows 7

FIGURE C-12: Moving a file from one folder to another

File being moved

File moved to Marketing folder

FIGURE C-13: Copying a file from one location to another

Command to copy the file

File copied to Advertising folder

Command to move the file

Sending files and folders When you right-click most objects on the desktop or in the Windows Explorer window, the Send to command is one of the choices on the shortcut menu. This command enables you to move a file or folder to a new location on your computer. For example, you can send a file or folder to a USB drive to make a quick backup copy of the file or folder,

to a mail recipient as an electronic message, or to the desktop to create a shortcut. You can also use the Send to command to move a file or folder to the Documents folder. To send a file or folder, right-click the file or folder you want to send, point to Send to on the shortcut menu, then click the destination you want.

Managing Files and Folders

Windows 63

UNIT

C Windows 7

Deleting and Restoring Files and Folders When you organize the contents of a folder, disk, or the desktop, you might find items that you no longer need. You can delete, or remove, these items from the disk. If you delete a file or folder from the desktop or from the hard drive, it goes into the Recycle Bin. The Recycle Bin, located on your desktop, is a temporary storage area for deleted files. The Recycle Bin stores all the items you delete from your hard disk, so that if you accidentally delete an item, you can remove it from the Recycle Bin to restore it. If the deletion is a recent operation, you can also use the Undo command on the Organize button menu to restore a deleted file or folder. Be aware that if you delete a file from a removable disk, such as a USB drive, it is permanently deleted, not stored in the Recycle Bin. Table C-2 summarizes deleting and restoring options. You decide to delete some files from the Quest Travel folder you no longer need. When you delete a file by mistake, you use the Recycle Bin to restore it.

STEPS TROUBLE If not visible, click the Expand indicator next to the Letters folder.

1. If necessary, move and resize the window so that you can see the Recycle Bin icon on the desktop, then click Personal Letters in the folders list Because you cannot restore files deleted from a removable disk, you start by copying a file from the drive where your Data Files are located to the desktop.

2. Point to the Eric Schubel.rtf file in the right pane, press and hold [Ctrl], drag it to the desktop, then release [Ctrl] The Eric Schubel file is copied to the desktop, as shown in Figure C-14. TROUBLE If a message box appears, click Yes to confirm the deletion.

3. Drag the Eric Schubel.rtf file from the desktop to the Recycle Bin The Recycle Bin icon looks like it contains paper.

4. Click the Minimize button in the Personal Letters folder window 5. Double-click the Recycle Bin icon on the desktop The Recycle Bin window opens, containing the Eric Schubel.rtf file and any other deleted files. Like most other windows, the Recycle Bin window has an Address bar, a Search box, a toolbar, and the Details pane. Your deleted files remain in the Recycle Bin until you empty it, permanently removing the contents of the Recycle Bin from your hard drive.

6. Select the Eric Schubel.rtf file in the Recycle Bin window, as shown in Figure C-15, then click the Restore this item button on the toolbar The file is restored back to its previous location on the desktop. It is intact and identical to the form it was in before you deleted it.

7. Click the Close button button on the taskbar

in the Recycle Bin window, then click the Personal Letters

The Recycle Bin window closes, and the desktop opens with the Eric Schubel.rtf file and the Personal Letters window restored.

8. Select the Eric Schubel.rtf file on the desktop, press [Delete], then click Yes in the dialog box that opens The Eric Schubel.rtf file is again moved to the Recycle Bin.

9. Right-click the Recycle Bin, click Empty Recycle Bin, then click Yes in the dialog box that opens The Eric Schubel.rtf file is permanently deleted from the Recycle Bin and your computer.

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Managing Files and Folders

Recycle Bin

Windows 7

FIGURE C-14: Selecting a file to drag to the Recycle Bin

Selected file copied from the Personal Letters folder to the desktop

FIGURE C-15: Deleted file from the desktop in the Recycle Bin

Empty the Recycle Bin button

Restore this item button Contents of the Recycle Bin; yours might differ

TABLE C-2: Deleting and restoring files

ways to delete a file or folder

ways to restore a file or folder from the Recycle Bin

Select the file or folder, click the Organize button, then click Delete

Select the file or folder, then click a Restore button: Restore this item, Restore the selected items, or Restore all items

Select the file or folder, then press [Delete]

Click the Organize button, then click Undo

Right-click the file or folder, then click Delete

Right-click the file or folder, then click Restore

Drag the file or folder to the Recycle Bin

Drag the file or folder from the Recycle Bin to any location

Recycle Bin properties You can adjust several Recycle Bin settings by using the Properties option on the Recycle Bin shortcut menu. For example, if you do not want to place files in the Recycle Bin when you delete them, but, rather, want to delete them immediately, right-click the Recycle Bin, click Properties, then click the “Don’t move files to the Recycle Bin. Remove

files immediately when deleted.” option. Also, if you find that the Recycle Bin is full and cannot accept any more files, you can increase the amount of disk space allotted to the Recycle Bin by changing the value in the Maximum size text box.

Managing Files and Folders

Windows 65

UNIT

C Windows 7

Working with Libraries Libraries are special folders that catalog files and folders in a central location, regardless of where you actually store them on your hard drive. A library can contain links to files, other folders, and other subfolders anywhere on your system. You can also share entire libraries as easily as you can share individual directories or files. Windows 7 comes with four libraries already in place: Documents, Music, Pictures, and Videos. You can create additional ones at any time. After you have a library in place, you can use your mouse or the Properties dialog box to include or remove folders and set options to optimize, share, and display the library. After you add one or more folders to a library, Windows 7 tracks your selected folders and updates them automatically in libraries whenever you change their contents. When you open a library, a detailed grouping view of the library indicates the files and subfolders within the monitored folders, letting you easily browse for the file or folder you want to open. You access the same Quest Specialty Travel company files on a regular basis. Rather than locating the folder using the traditional method, you decide to create a library and place the folder in it for easy access and use.

STEPS 1. Click UnitC in the folders list, then drag the Quest Travel folder to the desktop A duplicate of the Quest Travel folder appears on the desktop. QUICK TIP To restore default libraries, right-click Libraries in the Navigation pane, then click Restore default libraries.

2. Click Libraries in the folders list, click the New library button on the toolbar, type Business, then press [Enter] The new Business library appears in both panes, as shown in Figure C-16.

3. Right-click the Quest Travel folder on the desktop, point to Include in library, then click Business The Business library window opens, displaying the contents of the library in a detailed grouping view, as shown in Figure C-17. If you’re not sure where a file is located, you can use the Arrange by option to group and display the library contents by folder, date modified, tag, type, or name. Grouping displays a sequential list of all of the files by heading type.

4. Click the Arrange by button in the upper corner of the right pane, then click Name All the files within the Quest Travel folder appear in an alphabetical list. TROUBLE Depending on your file association settings, another word-processing program might open instead of WordPad.

5. Double-click the IRS Letter.rtf file, change the year from 2010 to 2011, click the Save in the button on the Quick Access toolbar, then click the Close button upper-right corner of the WordPad window The updated file and the WordPad program both close.

6. Double-click the Quest Travel folder on the desktop, double-click the Letters folder, double-click the Business Letters folder, double-click the IRS Letter.rtf file to see the change, add your name to the bottom of the document, print it, click the Save button, then click the Close button in WordPad and the Business Letters folder windows The file change you made appears when you access the file from the original or library location. The file and the WordPad program close.

7. Right-click the Quest Travel folder in the Business library in the Navigation pane, click in the Business window Remove location from library, then click the Close button The folder location monitored in the Business library is removed from the library.

8. Click the Business library in the Navigation pane, press [Delete], then click Yes The Business library is permanently deleted from your computer.

9. Click the Quest Travel folder on the desktop, press [Delete], click Yes to confirm the deletion, then click the Close button in the Libraries window The Quest Travel folder on the desktop is deleted and the Libraries window closes. Windows 66

Managing Files and Folders

Copy of Quest Travel folder on the desktop

Windows 7

FIGURE C-16: Creating a library

New library button

New library

FIGURE C-17: Adding a folder to a library

Library name Arrange by button Actual location of the Quest Travel folder Contents of Business library

Creating and working with shortcuts It could take you a while to access a file or folder buried several levels down in a file hierarchy. You can create shortcuts to the items you use frequently. A shortcut is a link that you can place in any location to gain instant access to a particular file, folder, or program on your hard disk or on a network just by double-clicking. The actual file, folder, or program remains stored in its original location, and you place an icon representing the shortcut in a convenient location, such as a folder or the desktop. To create a shortcut, right-click an icon, then click Create shortcut. All shortcuts are named the same as the files to which they link, but with the word “Shortcut” at the end of the original name and the file icon includes an arrow. You can also place shortcuts to

frequently used files, folders, and programs on the Start menu or taskbar. To do this on the Start menu, simply drag the shortcut file, folder, or program to the Start button, wait until the Start menu opens, drag the shortcut to a place on the Start menu or to the All Programs submenu, wait until the submenu opens, then drag the shortcut to the appropriate place on the menu. You can drag a shortcut to the taskbar using the same method. When you release the mouse, the item appears on the menu or toolbar. To run a program when Windows starts, right-click the Startup folder on the All Programs submenu, click Open, then drag the shortcut to the program into the Startup folder.

Managing Files and Folders Copyright 2010 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part.

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Practice Concepts Review

For current SAM information including versions and content details, visit SAM Central (http://samcentral.course.com). If you have a SAM user profile, you may have access to hands-on instruction, practice, and assessment of the skills covered in this unit. Since we support various versions of SAM throughout the life of this text, you will want to check with your instructor for instructions and the correct URL/Web site to access those assignments.

FIGURE C-18

a b g c f d e

Label each component of the desktop personal computer shown in Figure C-18. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Which element holds items to be deleted or restored? Which element is copied or moved to the desktop? Which element do you click to collapse a folder? Which element do you click to expand a folder? Which element do you click to change the view? Which element is stored in its original location? Which element is stored in a library?

Match each term with the statement that best describes it. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Recycle Bin Filtering Grouping Computer window Explorer window

a. b. c. d. e.

A display of drives and disks A display of files and folders A storage area for deleted files A display of library files A display of files by properties

Select the best answer from the list of choices. 13. The Windows Explorer window is used to: a. Delete files. c. Manage drives and disks. b. Add folders. d. All of the above 14. Which of the following is NOT an available view in Windows Explorer? a. Content c. Icon b. Tiles d. List Windows 68

Managing Files and Folders

15. Which of the following is NOT a column heading in Details view? a. Content c. Type b. Size d. Date Modified 16. Which of the following is NOT a layout pane? a. Details c. Preview b. Search d. Navigation 17. Which of the following displays only files and folders with properties you select by heading type? a. Sort c. Filter b. Group d. Stack 18. Which of the following is a method for copying a file or folder? a. Press and hold [Ctrl], then drag the folder or file. c. Double-click the folder or file. b. Drag the folder or file on the same disk drive. d. Click the folder or file, then click Copy. 19. Which of the following locations is NOT a valid place from which to delete a file and send it to the Recycle Bin? a. Removable disk c. Hard drive b. Explorer window d. Computer window 20. Which of the following is NOT a default library? a. Documents c. Movies b. Music d. Pictures

Windows 7

Concepts Review (Continued)

Skills Review 1. Open Windows Explorer. a. Open Windows Explorer using the taskbar, then display the Music library. b. If you want to save your Data Files to a USB drive, make sure it’s plugged in. c. Display the Computer window, then navigate to the Quest Travel folder on the drive. d. Double-click the Letters folder, then double-click the Personal Letters folder. 2. View files and folders. a. Change to List view. b. Click the Back button to the left of the Address bar, then open the Business Letters folder. c. Click the Quest Travel list arrow in the Address bar, then click Tours. d. Click the Recent Pages list arrow, then click Quest Travel. e. Change to Details view, then change to Content view. f. Change to Tiles view without clicking the Views button arrow. 3. Navigate a folders list. a. Collapse the folders list for the drive under Computer. b. Expand the folders list for the drive, then click the drive where you store your Data Files. c. Expand the UnitC folder in the folders list, then click the Quest Travel folder in the folders list. d. Double-click the Marketing folder in the right pane. 4. Create and rename files and folders. a. In the Marketing folder, right-click a blank area of the window, point to New, then click Folder. b. Name the new folder Sales & Marketing. c. Rename the Sales & Marketing folder to Sales. d. Rename the file QST Focus.rtf to About QST.rtf. 5. Search for files and folders. a. Search in the Quest Travel folder for files or folders that are named or contain the word “logo” as part of the filename. b. Narrow down the search to only files with a size greater than 1 MB (Large). c. Click the Close button in the Search box to clear the search criteria.

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Skills Review (Continued) 6. Organize files and folders. a. Display the Marketing folder in Details view. b. Filter the Name column by Q–Z. c. Search subfolders review results, then click the Back button. d. Sort the contents of the window alphabetically. e. Remove the filter Q–Z, then display the Marketing folder. 7. Copy and move files and folders. a. Select QST New Logo.bmp in the right pane, click the Organize button on the toolbar, then click Copy. b. Display the Company folder, click the Organize button on the toolbar, then click Paste. c. Move the copy of the QST New Logo file into the Tours folder. d. Move the Tours folder into the Marketing folder. 8. Delete and restore files and folders. a. Open the Quest Travel folder, then resize it, if necessary, to display part of the desktop. b. Move the Marketing folder from the drive where you store your Data Files to the desktop. c. Drag the Marketing folder from the desktop to the Recycle Bin, then click Yes to confirm the deletion, if necessary. d. Double-click the Recycle Bin. Right-click a blank area of the taskbar, then click Show Windows Side by Side. e. Click Empty the Recycle Bin on the toolbar in the Recycle Bin window, then click No to cancel the action. f. Drag the Marketing folder back to the Quest Travel folder to restore it, then close the Recycle Bin window. 9. Work with libraries. a. Open the Marketing folder, then drag the Marketing folder to an empty area of the desktop. b. Display the Libraries folder, then create a library named Business. c. Include the Marketing folder on the desktop in the Business library. d. Arrange the library contents by Type. e. Remove the Marketing folder from the library, then delete the Business library. f. Delete the Marketing folder on the desktop, then close the Windows Explorer window.

Independent Challenge 1 You are vice president of a packaging manufacturing company, Xpress Packaging, and you need to organize your Windows files and folders. In addition to folders for typical business-related functions, such as correspondence, contracts, inventory, and payroll, you have folders related to company functions, such as manufacturing and material suppliers. a. Create a new folder named Xpress Packaging on the desktop within which the files and folders for this independent challenge will reside. b. Open Windows Explorer, display Libraries, then create a library named Xpress. c. Include the Xpress Packaging folder in the Xpress library. d. Create folders in the Xpress Packaging folder named Manufacturing, Material Suppliers, East Coast, and West Coast. e. Move the East Coast and West Coast folders into the Material Suppliers folder. f. Create a blank file using WordPad, add your name, print, and save it as Suppliers Bid.rtf in the Manufacturing folder. g. Move the Suppliers Bid.rtf file into the Material Suppliers folder. h. Copy the Suppliers Bid.rtf file into the Manufacturing folder and rename the copied file Manufacturing Bids.rtf, then display the Manufacturing folder. Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Display the contents of the Xpress Packaging folder in the Explorer window, then drag the Manufacturing folder onto the Favorites list in the Navigation pane. ■ Drag the Manufacturing folder link in the Favorites list to a new location in the Favorites list. ■ Right-click the Manufacturing folder link in the Favorites list, then click Remove on the shortcut menu. i. Copy the Xpress Packaging folder to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files. Windows 70

Managing Files and Folders

Independent Challenge 2 You are the president of MO PC, a mobile computer accessories company, and you use Windows to organize your business files. You want to create folders to keep your computer organized. As you create files, you save them in the appropriate folders.

Windows 7

j. Remove the Xpress Packaging folder from the Xpress library, then delete the Xpress library. k. Delete the Xpress Packaging folder on the desktop, then close the window.

a. Create a new folder named MO PC on the desktop within which the files and folders for this independent challenge will reside. b. Open Windows Explorer, display Libraries, then create a library named Company. c. Include the MO PC folder in the Company library. d. Create folders in the MO PC folder named Advertising and Customers. e. Use WordPad to create a letter welcoming new customers. Add your name, print, and save it as Customer Letter.rtf in the Customers folder. f. Use WordPad to create a list of five business management tasks to do. Save it as Business Plan.rtf in the MO PC folder. g. Use Paint to create a simple logo, add your name, print, and save it as MO Logo.bmp in the MO PC folder. h. Move the MO Logo file into the Advertising folder. i. Create a shortcut to the MO Logo file in the MO PC folder. j. Delete the Business Plan file, then restore it. k. Copy the MO PC folder to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files. l. Remove the MO PC folder from the Company library, then delete the Company library. m. Delete the MO PC folder on the desktop, then close the window.

Independent Challenge 3 As a human resources manager at Just in Time Books, you need to organize the folders and files on the company’s computer for new employees at store locations around the world. Your job is to create and organize company files and folders. a. Open the Computer window, open the drive and folder where you store your Data Files. b. Create a new folder named Just in Time Books on the desktop within which the rest of the organization of files and folders for this independent challenge will reside. c. Open Windows Explorer, display Libraries, then create a library named JITB. d. Include the Just in Time Books folder in the JITB library. e. Create a file using WordPad listing at least six international store locations (city and country). Save it as New Store Locations.rtf in the Just in Time Books folder. f. Create a file using WordPad listing at least four employee names with your name being the last one. Print and save it as Employee App.rtf in the Just in Time Books folder. g. In the Just in Time Books folder, create folders named Store Locations and Employees. h. In the Employees folder, create four new folders with employee names, one of which is yourself. i. Copy the Employee App.rtf file into each of the employee folders, then rename each file as Employee Name.rtf, replacing “Name” with each employee’s name. j. In the folder named Store Locations, create a new folder named New Stores. k. Move the New Store Locations file to the New Stores folder. l. Display the contents of the Just in Time Books folder in the Explorer window, then search for “Employee.” m. Create an advanced search using the Date modified option as it relates to when you created the files. Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Save the search as JITB Employees in the Just in Time Books folder. ■ Switch to the Just in Time Books folder, then display the saved search file using the Navigation pane. (Expand the folders list if necessary.) ■ Run the saved search. ■ Switch to the Just in Time Books folder, then delete the saved search in the folder and Favorites list.

Managing Files and Folders

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n. Copy the Just in Time Books folder to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files. o. Remove the Just In Time Books folder from the JITB library, then delete the JITB library. p. Delete the Just in Time Books folder on the desktop, then close the window.

Real Life Independent Challenge Many people have collections of something—recipes, books, music, DVDs, and so on. Take something you have collected and organize the different items into categories to help keep files and folders organized in the future. a. Create a new folder named My Collection within which the files and folders for this independent challenge will reside. Replace the word “Collection” in the folder name with the items you collect; for example, if you collect books, name the folder My Books. b. Open Windows Explorer, display Libraries, then create a library named Collections. c. Include the My Collection folder in the Collections library. d. Create four files using WordPad, add your name to them, print them, and save them with names relating to your collection in the My Collection folder; for example, a collection of recipes might include files named French Bread.rtf, Torte.rtf, Sweet Bread.rtf, and 7-Layer Chocolate.rtf. e. In the My Collection folder, create at least two folders related to your collection; for example, if you collect DVDs, you might create folders named Comedies and Thrillers. Move the files into the appropriate folders. f. Open one of the folders, then create at least two subfolders. g. Move files into the subfolders if appropriate. h. Copy the My Collection folder to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files. i. Remove the My Collection folder from the Collections library, then delete the Collections library. j. Create a shortcut on the desktop to one of the files in the My Collection folder. k. Drag the My Collection folder on the desktop to the Recycle Bin. l. Open the Recycle Bin, then restore the folder. m. Delete the My Collection folder and the shortcut file, then close the Computer window.

Visual Workshop Re-create the screen shown in Figure C-19, which displays the Search Results window with files from the drive and folder where you store your Data Files. FIGURE C-19

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UNIT

D Windows 7

Files You Will Need: Quest Travel (folder) Advertising (folder) QST Ad Copy.rtf Company (folder) QST Company Info.rtf QST Fact Sheet.rtf QST People.rtf QST Press Release.rtf Letters (folder) Business Letters (folder) C&N Printing.rtf IRS Letter.rtf Personal Letters (folder) Eric Schubel.rtf Tracy Teyler.rtf Marketing (folder) QST Focus.rtf QST Logo.bmp QT New Logo.bmp Tours (folder) QST Tours.rtf To Do List.rtf

OBJECTIVES

Customizing File and Folder Management As you work with files and folders, you’ll discover that navigating through a long list of folders can be time consuming. To be more efficient, you can customize the way you work with files and folders to save time and effort and to suit your personal needs and preferences. In this unit, you’ll learn how to change the layout of Windows Explorer windows, change folder view options to display the file and folder information you need, view the contents of personal folders, create a personal folder and customize the view options, display disk and folder size information, compress files and folders to save disk space, and use a CD or DVD to back up and store files for later use in case of problems.

As a new

employee of Quest Specialty Travel, you want to customize some file management tasks so you can work more effectively.

Change the layout of Explorer windows Change folder options Change file details to list Change search options Use personal folders Customize personal folders Display disk and folder information Compress files and folders Manage files and folders on a CD or DVD

UNIT

D Windows 7

Changing the Layout of Explorer Windows Windows 7 gives you the option to customize the layout for each Explorer window depending on the information the window contains. The layout for each Explorer window includes a menu bar, Details pane, Preview pane, and Navigation pane, but only the Details and Navigation panes appear by default. If you prefer working with menus like the previous version of Windows, you can show the menu bar and use traditional menus. The Details pane displays information about the selected file, folder, or disk at the bottom of the window, whereas the Preview pane displays the contents of a selected file on the right side of the window. The Navigation pane displays Favorite links and the folders list. For some Explorer windows, such as the personal folder labeled with your user account name, the layout also includes the Search pane, which displays basic and advanced search options to help you find the files you’re looking for. If you open the Explorer window in one of the library folders, you can also use the Library pane, which displays the current library name, included folder locations, and an arrange by option. Instead of opening a file on your computer to determine its contents, you want to display the Preview pane for the Quest Travel folder, so you can quickly determine the contents of a selected file.

STEPS 1. Click the Start button

on the taskbar, then click Computer

The Computer window opens, displaying the contents of your computer, including all disk drives and common folders.

2. Navigate to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files, double-click the UnitD folder, then double-click the Quest Travel folder The Quest Travel window opens, displaying the contents of the Quest Travel folder. The folder includes five folders (Advertising, Company, Letters, Marketing, and Tours) and one file (To Do List).

3. Double-click the Marketing folder, click the Views button arrow then click Tiles if necessary

on the toolbar,

The Marketing window opens, displaying the contents of the Marketing folder.

4. Click the Organize button on the toolbar, then point to Layout The Organize menu opens, displaying the Layout submenu, as shown in Figure D-1.

5. Click Preview pane The Preview pane displays on the right side of the window.

6. Click the QST New Logo.bmp file A preview of the new Quest Specialty Travel logo opens in the Preview pane, as shown in Figure D-2.

7. Click the QST Focus.rtf file A preview of the QST Focus.rtf file opens in the Preview pane.

8. Click the Preview Pane button

on the toolbar

The Preview pane is hidden and the Marketing window becomes active.

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Windows 7

FIGURE D-1: Explorer window layout options

Layout option in Organize menu Windows Layout submenu; your list might differ

FIGURE D-2: The Preview pane in an Explorer window

Preview pane displaying the contents of the selected file; your pane size might differ

Navigation pane

Details pane

Customizing File and Folder Management

Windows 75

UNIT

D Windows 7

Changing Folder Options When you work with files and folders, Windows displays folder contents in a standard way, known as the default. The default folder view settings (expect for libraries) are as follows: Tiles view displays files and folders as icons; folders show Details and Navigation panes; folders open in the same window; and items open when you double-click them. Depending on previous installations or users, your folder view settings might differ. Instead of changing the folder view to your preferred view—one of the icon or list views, or Details view—each time you open a folder, you can change the view permanently to the one you prefer. In addition to the defaults, you can change options such as folder settings to show or hide file name extensions for known file types, show or hide hidden files and folders, show or hide protected operating system files, and show pop-up descriptions of folders and desktop items. If you don’t like the options you set, you can restore the settings to Windows default settings. You’re finding it hard to view files with extensions on the end, so you want to hide file extensions and customize folder settings to suit your needs.

STEPS 1. In the Marketing folder, click the Views button arrow on the toolbar, then click Details, if necessary The files and folders in the Marketing folder appear in Details view. QUICK TIP You can restore the Folder Options dialog box settings to the Windows default settings by clicking Restore Defaults.

2. Click the Organize button on the toolbar, then click Folder and search options The Folder Options dialog box opens, displaying the General tab, as shown in Figure D-3. In this case, the default options are selected.

3. Click the Open each folder in its own window option button to select it This option enables each folder to open in a separate window. Up to this point, each folder has opened in the current window.

4. Click the View tab The View tab options display, as shown in Figure D-4. QUICK TIP To restore all folders to the original Windows settings, click Reset Folders.

5. Click Apply to Folders, then click Yes in the Folder Views dialog box that opens to accept the folder views change The Apply to Folders feature sets all the folders of this type on your computer to match the current folder’s view settings, which is currently Details view. The Advanced settings section at the bottom of the dialog box lists additional options relating to the way files and folders appear in the Computer and Windows Explorer windows.

6. In the Advanced settings list box, click the Hide extensions for known file types check box to select it, if necessary This option hides the file name extension, such as .rtf.

7. In the Advanced settings list box, click the Always show menus check box to select it This option shows menus in Explorer windows, which provides access to additional commands.

8. Click OK The dialog box closes and the Marketing window opens without extensions at the end of file names and with the menu bar displayed.

9. Click Quest Travel in the Address bar, then double-click the Marketing folder The Marketing folder opens in its own window, displaying the contents of the folder in Details view, as shown in Figure D-5. Based on the new folder option settings, all folders appear in Details view with the menu bar displayed and file name extensions hidden.

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Windows 7

FIGURE D-3: Folder Options dialog box with the General tab displayed

Folder window options

Navigation pane options

FIGURE D-4: Folder Options dialog box with the View tab displayed

Use buttons to apply or reset the view for folders

Select options to show or hide folder features

FIGURE D-5: Marketing folder with new folder options applied

Menus show

File name extensions no longer appear

Folder opens in a separate window

Customizing File and Folder Management

Windows 77

UNIT

D Windows 7

Changing File Details to List You can display files and folders in a variety of different ways, depending on what you want to see and do. When you view files and folders in an Explorer window with any view, a default list of file and folder information opens, which consists of Name, Date modified, Type, and Size. If the default list of file and folder details doesn’t provide you with the information you need, you can add and remove the file and folder information you want, to and from the Details view. To do this, you use the Choose details command or right-click a column header to make changes to the details list. As you manage files, you find it easier to identify them by using more than the standard file details. You decide to add both the owner of a file and image size of picture files to the details list in Details view.

STEPS 1. In the Marketing folder window, click View on the menu bar, then click Choose details The Choose Details dialog box opens, as shown in Figure D-6. The selected check boxes indicate the current columns shown in the Explorer window. The unchecked items indicate items not used. The unchecked items are listed in alphabetical order. QUICK TIP When you set the default view to Details view, the items you add or remove from the Choose Details dialog box are not included in Details view.

2. In the Details box, scroll down, then click the Owner check box to select it This option adds a column to the Explorer window that lists the owner (the person who can make changes) of files.

3. In the Details box, scroll up, then click the Dimensions check box to select it This option adds a column to the Explorer window that lists the size of image files in pixels. A pixel, short for picture element, is a single point in a graphic image.

4. Click OK, then click the Maximize button

in the Marketing folder window

The additional columns are displayed in Details view, as shown in Figure D-7. QUICK TIP From the shortcut menu, you can select More to open the Choose Details dialog box.

5. Right-click any column header A shortcut menu opens, as shown in Figure D-8. The columns that appear in the window have a check mark next to them.

6. Click Date modified on the shortcut menu to deselect it, if necessary The shortcut menu closes and the Date modified column is removed from Details view.

7. Right-click any column header, then click Date modified on the shortcut menu to select it The Date modified column is added back to Details view.

8. Right-click any column header, click More on the shortcut menu, click the Dimensions check box to clear it, click the Owner check box to clear it, then click OK The Dimensions and Owner columns are removed from the window.

9. Click the Close button

in the Marketing window

The Marketing window closes and the Quest Travel window becomes active.

Moving columns in Details view When you display files and folders in an Explorer window, you can change the order of the column details to make it easier to locate the information you need to find. You can change the order of columns by using the Choose Details dialog box or the mouse pointer. The easiest way to move a column detail a short distance on the screen is to drag the column indicator button between the two columns where you want to place the column. As you drag the column indicator button,

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Customizing File and Folder Management

the column moves to display the new arrangement of the columns. If you need to move a column several columns across the screen, the best way to move it is to use the Choose Details dialog box. Open the Choose Details dialog box, click the column detail you want to move, then click Move Up or Move Down. When you’re done, click OK to close the dialog box.

Windows 7

FIGURE D-6: Choose Details dialog box

Column details in order of appearance

Column details not used; sorted in alphabetical order

FIGURE D-7: Columns added in Details view

Column headers Column details added; your column location might differ Your name will differ

FIGURE D-8: Columns modified in Details view

Column header

Column details options Click to display complete list of details

Customizing File and Folder Management

Windows 79

UNIT

D Windows 7

Changing Search Options The Search box at the bottom of the Start menu and at the top of every Explorer window filters out items that don’t match the text you type. The search includes text in the file name, text in the file, tags, and other file properties, such as the file type. You can also select options that appear below the list of results to search file contents or perform an advanced search. In the Search box, you can also perform advanced searches by specifying multiple keywords or properties connected by Boolean filters, such as AND, NOT, OR, Quotes, Parentheses, ., or ,. For example, the advanced search kind: (Rich Text Document OR Bitmap Image) finds all files with the type Rich Text Document or Bitmap Image. Windows also provides an option to perform a natural language search, which allows you to perform the same property or Boolean search, using a more intuitive form. Instead of typing kind: (Rich Text Document OR Bitmap Image), you can type rich text or bitmap. Before you can use natural language, you need to enable it on the Search tab in the Folder Options dialog box. On the Search tab, you can also set options to specify what searches to perform and how to perform them. You can specify whether to search indexed locations or everywhere, or to include subfolders or find partial matches. An indexed location is a file that Windows has kept track of and stored information about using an index to make locating files faster and easier. Your manager asks you to find a company document and logo file for a project, so you want to change search options to make it easier to find files using advanced search techniques.

STEPS 1. Click the Organize button on the toolbar, then click Folder and search options The Folder Options dialog box opens, displaying the General tab.

2. Click the Search tab The Folder Options dialog box reopens displaying the Search tab, as shown in Figure D-9. In this case, the default options are selected.

3. Click the Always search file names and contents option button This option expands the search to all folders on your computer.

4. Click the Use natural language search check box to select it, then click the Find partial matches check box to select it, if necessary This option turns on the Use natural language search feature and Find partial matches search option, which enables you to match text within text. For example, you can get a match with “rich text document” when you enter “rich.”

5. Click OK The new search options are set. TROUBLE If you have Microsoft Office Word or another word processor installed on your computer, the file type for rich text files might be “Rich Text Format.”

6. Click in the Search box in the Quest Travel window, then type rich text or bitmap The documents with the type Rich Text Document or Bitmap Image appear in the search results, as shown in Figure D-10. Because you changed default settings, you restore the computer to its default state.

7. Click the Organize button on the toolbar, then click Folder and search options The Folder Options dialog box opens, displaying the General tab.

8. Click Restore Defaults, click the View tab, click Reset Folders, if available, click Yes in the warning dialog box to confirm the reset for all folder views, click Restore Defaults, click the Search tab, then click Restore Defaults The folder and search options are restored to the Windows default settings. Because the figures in this book show file name extensions, you restore that option.

9. Click the View tab, click the Hide extensions for known file types check box to deselect it, then click OK 10. Click the Close button in the Search Results in Quest Travel window The Search Results window closes and the desktop displays. Windows 80

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Default set to search locations and names only in nonindexed locations

Windows 7

FIGURE D-9: Folder Options dialog box with the Search tab displayed

Search file names and contents in all folder options Find partial matches feature

Use natural language search method

FIGURE D-10: Search results using a natural language search

Search box

Search results highlighted; your order might differ

Advanced search location options

Modifying the index to improve searching If you don’t find the files you’re looking for in an indexed location search, you can modify the index to customize and improve searching for your computer to make locating files faster and easier. By default, indexed locations include personal folder, e-mail, and offline files and exclude program files and system files. To change indexed locations, use Indexing Options in the Control Panel to view, add, remove, and modify indexed locations, indexed file types, and other advanced index settings. For example, if a file type is not recognized by the index,

you can add it, or if you’re having problems with the search index, you can rebuild or restore it. Click the Start button, click Control Panel, click in the Search box, type index, click Indexing Options, then click Modify. If you don’t see all the locations, click Show all locations. If a folder location contains subfolders, you can double-click the folder to expand it. Select or clear the check box next to the folder locations you want to add or remove from the index. Click OK, then click Close.

Customizing File and Folder Management

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UNIT

D Windows 7

Using Personal Folders Windows 7 comes with a personal folder that stores your most frequently used folders in one location. The personal folder appears on the Start menu with the name of the person logged on to the computer. The personal folder only contains files and folders associated with the user account, and it is unique for each user. The personal folder includes a variety of subfolders, such as Contacts, Desktop, Downloads, Favorites, Links, My Documents, My Music, My Pictures, My Videos, Saved Games, and Searches. Depending on previous installations, devices installed, or other users, the names and types of personal folders might differ. The My Documents, My Music, My Pictures, and My Videos folder are included folders by default in their respective library folders, so when you save files into a library folder, they’re actually stored in your personal folders. For example, when you save a file into the Documents library folder, it’s actually saved in the My Documents folder. Windows 7 creates personal folders identified by each username on your computer to make sure the contents of personal folders remain private, unless you decide to share the contents with others who use your computer or network. If you and a friend use the same computer, there are two sets of personal folders, one with your name and another with your friend’s name. When you log on to the computer, your personal folders open, but you cannot access your friend’s personal folders. Your manager asks you to delete old files left over from the previous user of the computer, so you want to open the personal folders to see what’s there.

STEPS 1. Click the Start button on the Start menu

on the taskbar, then click the name at the top of the right column

The personal folder window opens, as shown in Figure D-11. The name displayed in the Address bar corresponds to the user account name when you logged on. QUICK TIP To view included folders in a library, display the library folder, then click the locations link under the library name.

2. Double-click the My Pictures folder, then click the Pictures library folder in the Navigation pane The My Pictures window opens and then the Pictures library window opens, displaying the contents of the folder. Because the My Pictures folder is included in the Pictures library folder, the same pictures that appear in the My Pictures folder appear in the Pictures library folder. The Sample Pictures folder is included in the Pictures library folder by default.

3. Double-click the Sample Pictures folder, then click any of the images Large Icons view displays each picture as a thumbnail miniature image of the contents of a file; thumbnails are often used to browse through multiple images quickly. If the folder doesn’t contain images, icons representing the file type are displayed instead of thumbnails. Folders that contain pictures have buttons on the toolbar tailored specifically for working with pictures, such as Slide show, as shown in Figure D-12. Another button, the Preview button, becomes available after you select a picture file.

4. Click the Slide show button on the toolbar, wait and watch the slide show or click the screen to view each slide, then press [Esc] to discontinue The slide show closes and the Sample Pictures folder appears. QUICK TIP To change the save location for a library, display the library folder, click the Organize button on the toolbar, click Properties, select the folder you want, click Set save location, then click OK.

5. Click the Videos library folder in the Navigation pane, then double-click the Sample Videos folder The Sample Videos folder opens, displaying the contents of the folder as large icons. For videos, a frame, typically the first one, appears in the thumbnail.

6. Click a video to select it, then click the Play button on the toolbar Windows Media Player opens and plays the sample video.

7. When the video is finished, click the Close button in the Windows Media Player window, then click Computer in the Navigation pane Windows Media Player closes and the Computer window becomes active.

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FIGURE D-11: Personal folder

Your name will differ

Personal folders; yours might differ

FIGURE D-12: Sample Pictures folder

New buttons specific to working with pictures

Sample pictures

Using the Shared Documents folder The contents of your personal folders are private, unless you decide to share the contents with others who use your computer. If you want the other users on your computer or network to have access to files, you can place those files in a shared folder called the Public folder. To access the Public folder, click Computer in the Navigation pane, double-click the main hard drive icon, double-click the Users folder, then double-click the Public folder. Like personal folders, the Public folder contains subfolders to help you organize the files you are sharing, including Public Documents, Public Downloads, Public Music, Public Pictures, Public Recorded

TV, and Public Videos. If you’re connected to a network, the files in the Public folder are available to network users. You can also designate any folder on your computer as a shared folder. When you specify a folder as a shared folder, you can set access permission levels for a person or group. Select the folder you want to share, click the Share with button on the toolbar, click Specific person, type a name or group, or select one from the list arrow, click Add, click the Permission Level list arrow, select a permission level, then click Share. To stop sharing, select the folder, click the Share with button on the toolbar, then click Nobody.

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UNIT

D Windows 7

Customizing Personal Folders The My Pictures, My Music, and My Videos folders located in your personal folder include specialized buttons on the toolbar for working with pictures, music, or videos. For example, the My Pictures folder includes a Slide show button to display the pictures in the folder as a full screen slide show. The My Music and My Videos folders include various Play buttons to play the music or videos in the folder. You can customize a new or existing folder for documents, pictures, music, and videos by applying a folder template, which is a collection of toolbar options for working with specialized content. Windows 7 comes with five folder templates: General Items, Documents, Music, Pictures, and Videos. After you apply a folder template to a folder and put related files in the folder, such as pictures in a folder with the Pictures template, the toolbar displays the specialized buttons, such as Slide show and Preview. Windows also comes with four libraries: Documents, Music, Pictures, and Videos. Each of these libraries applies the same type of folder template, which you can also change, to use a specialized toolbar. As a marketing specialist, you’re going to be working with a lot of graphics, so you want to customize the Marketing folder for pictures.

STEPS TROUBLE If your Data Files are stored in one of the Windows library folders, you can’t customize the folder because it’s a specialized folder. Skip to Step 6.

QUICK TIP To choose the picture that displays on a folder icon in an icon view, click Choose File on the Customize tab of the Properties dialog box, navigate to the picture, then double-click it.

1. Navigate to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files, double-click the UnitD folder, double-click the Quest Travel folder, then double-click the Marketing folder The Marketing folder opens, displaying WordPad and Paint files. The toolbar displays the Organize, Share with, Burn, New folder, Views, Preview Pane, and Help buttons.

2. Right-click a blank area of the folder window to display a shortcut menu, as shown in Figure D-13, then click Customize this folder The Marketing Properties dialog box opens, displaying the Customize tab.

3. Click the Optimize this folder for list arrow, then click Pictures When you choose a template, you apply specific features to your folder, such as specialized task links and viewing options for working with pictures, music, or videos. The Pictures folder type is a good choice to select as a template for the Marketing folder.

4. Click the Also apply this template to all subfolders check box to select it The template now will be applied to all subfolders within the Marketing folder. See Figure D-14.

5. Click OK Notice that the Slide show button has been added to the toolbar. This command appears on the toolbar for folders based on the Pictures template.

6. Click the Close button

in the Marketing window

The Marketing window closes.

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FIGURE D-13: Customize this folder command on the Shortcut menu

Toolbar

Tiles view; your view might differ

Customize this folder command on the shortcut menu

FIGURE D-14: Marketing Properties dialog box with the Customize tab displayed

Folder template Applies folder template to all subfolders

Customizing a library Windows 7 comes with four default libraries: Documents, Music, Pictures, and Videos. Libraries are special folders that catalog files and folders in a central location, regardless of where you actually store them on your hard drive. A library can contain links to files, other folders, and other subfolders anywhere on your system. You can customize a library folder by using the Properties dialog box where you can include or remove folders and set options to optimize, share, and display the library.

The Optimize this library command in the Properties dialog box works just like the Optimize this folder command and lets you customize the library window to include specialized buttons on the toolbar. You can also set the save folder location where you want to save a file when a library is selected. To change the location, open the library, select a linked folder location at the top of the Properties dialog box, then click Set save location. A check mark appears next to the new saved location.

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UNIT

D Windows 7

Displaying Disk and Folder Information When you create a file, it takes up space on a disk. Files that contain only text are smaller than files that contain only graphics. The size of a file is measured in bytes. A byte is a unit of storage capable of holding a single character or pixel. It’s the base measurement for all other incremental units, which are kilobyte, megabyte, gigabyte, and terabyte. A kilobyte (KB) is 1,024 bytes of information while a megabyte (MB) is 1,048,576 bytes, which is equal to 1,024 kilobytes. A gigabyte (GB) is equal to 1,024 megabytes, and a terabyte (TB) is equal to 1,024 gigabytes. A disk that can store 1.44 megabytes of data, for example, is capable of storing approximately 1.4 million characters, or about 3,000 pages of information. As you work with files, folders, and programs, it’s important to know the size of the disk and how much space remains available. A disk can store only a limited amount of data. You can use the Properties command on a disk to display the disk size, used and free space, and change a disk label, which is a name you can assign to a hard or removable disk. When you label a hard disk or removable drive, the label appears in the Computer and Explorer windows. Besides checking hard disk drive or removable disk information, you can also use the Properties command on a folder to find out the size of its contents. You have been adding Quest Specialty Travel files to your removable disk and want to find out how much space is available. You also want to determine the size of a folder’s contents to see if it will fit on your removable disk.

STEPS 1. Click the Start button

on the taskbar, then click Computer

The Computer window opens, displaying the disk drives available on your computer. TROUBLE If your Data Files are not stored on an external drive, rightclick the icon for the drive where they are stored.

TROUBLE If you are working in a lab and your Data Files are located on a hard or network disk, skip Step 4.

2. Right-click the icon for the drive where you store your Data Files 3. Click Properties on the shortcut menu, then click the General tab, if necessary A Properties dialog box opens, displaying the General tab, as shown in Figure D-15. Your dialog box will differ depending on the drive or disk where your Data Files are stored. A pie chart indicates the amount of space being used relative to the amount available for the disk or drive that you are using. In the example shown in Figure D-15, 693 megabytes are used and 3.05 gigabytes are free.

4. Click in or select all the text in the text box if necessary, then type DataDisk A disk label cannot contain any spaces, but can be up to 11 characters long.

5. Click OK to close the Properties dialog box 6. Double-click the DataDisk icon or the drive where your Data Files are stored The DataDisk window (or corresponding window where your Data Files are stored) opens displaying the contents of your drive.

7. Navigate to the folder where you store your Data Files, then double-click the UnitD folder The contents of the UnitD folder open in the Computer window.

8. Right-click the Quest Travel folder, click Properties on the shortcut menu, then click the General tab, if necessary The Quest Travel Properties dialog box opens, displaying the General tab, as shown in Figure D-16. The Properties dialog box displays the size of the folder (Size) and the actual amount of disk space used by the folder (Size on disk). The actual amount of disk space used is either the cluster size or compressed size of the selected folder. A cluster is a group of sectors on a disk. A sector is the smallest unit that can be accessed on a disk. A sector on a disk cannot always be filled, so the amount is generally higher. If the file or folder is compressed, the Size on disk amount is the compressed size.

9. Click OK to close the Properties dialog box Windows 86

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Location for your drive might differ

Windows 7

FIGURE D-15: Disk Properties dialog box with the General tab displayed

Text box might contain a name

Space available on your disk or drive; yours will differ Blue indicates used disk space Purple indicates free disk space

FIGURE D-16: Quest Travel Properties dialog box with the General tab displayed

Folder name Size of file or folder

Actual amount of disk space used

Number of files and folders stored in this folder (includes hidden system files)

Your options might differ

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UNIT

D Windows 7

Compressing Files and Folders You can compress files and folders in special folders that use software to decrease the size of the files they contain. Compressed folders are useful for reducing the file size of one or more large files, which frees disk space and reduces the time it takes to transfer files to another computer over a network or the Internet. A compressed folder is denoted by a zippered folder icon. When a file is compressed, a copy is used in the compression, and the original file remains intact in its original location. You can compress one or more files in a compressed folder by simply dragging them onto the compressed folder icon. You can uncompress, or extract, a file from the compressed folder and open it as you normally would, or open a file directly from the compressed folder by double-clicking the compressed file icon. When you open a file directly, Windows extracts the file when it opens and compresses it again when it closes. You want to compress the files in the Quest Travel folder as a backup copy.

STEPS 1. Point to the Quest Travel folder A ScreenTip appears, displaying information about the folder, including its size, 3.48 MB.

2. Right-click the Quest Travel folder, then point to Send to on the shortcut menu The Send to submenu opens, displaying the Compressed (zipped) folder command, as shown in Figure D-17.

3. Click Compressed (zipped) folder A dialog box briefly opens showing an animation of the compression progress, and then a new folder named Quest Travel.zip opens in the window. The file name of the new folder is selected (the extension is not selected) so that you can easily rename it.

4. Type Compressed QST, then click a blank area of the window to deselect the folder The Compressed QST.zip folder appears in the Explorer window, as shown in Figure D-18.

5. Point to the Compressed QST.zip folder A ScreenTip opens. Note that the compressed size of the folder is 116 KB.

6. Double-click the Compressed QST.zip folder The Compressed QST.zip folder opens and functions as a normal folder. The contents of the compressed folder are located in the Quest Travel folder. Note that a new button, Extract all files, appears on the toolbar in the window. QUICK TIP To extract individual files, click the file, then drag it from the compressed folder to another noncompressed folder or cut the file from the compressed folder and then paste it into a noncompressed folder.

7. Click the Extract all files button on the toolbar The Extract Compressed (Zipped) Folders dialog box opens, as shown in Figure D-19.

8. In the text box that lists the path, select Compressed, type Extracted, click the Show extracted files when complete check box to deselect it, if necessary, then click Extract A dialog box opens showing an animation of the extraction progress, and then closes when the extraction process is finished. The files and folders are extracted into a folder named Extracted QST in the drive and folder where you store your Data Files.

9. Click UnitD in the Address bar The folder Extracted QST appears in the UnitD folder. You can treat a compressed folder as an ordinary folder; for example, you can delete a file from a compressed folder without extracting it first.

10. Double-click the Compressed QST.zip folder, double-click the Quest Travel folder, click To Do List.rtf, press [Delete], then click Yes to confirm the deletion The file To Do List.rtf is deleted from the compressed Quest Travel folder. Windows 88

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FIGURE D-17: Creating a compressed folder

Select to compress the selected folder

FIGURE D-18: A compressed folder in an Explorer window

Uncompressed folder

Compressed folder

Your view might differ

FIGURE D-19: Extract Compressed (Zipped) Folders dialog box

Path to location where you store your Data Files; yours might differ

Compressed extraction location

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UNIT

D Windows 7

Managing Files and Folders on a CD or DVD A compact disc (CD) and digital video disc (DVD) are optical discs used to store large amounts of information. Typically, CDs hold 700 MB, while DVDs hold 4.7 GB. The low cost and convenient size of CD/DVDs and the popularity of disc recording hardware make them an effective media for file management. You can copy, or burn, files and folders to a CD or DVD recordable (CD-R or DVD-R) or a CD or DVD rewritable (CD-RW or DVD-RW). With CD or DVD-Rs, typically you can write files and folders only once, read them many times, but can’t erase them. With CD or DVD-RWs, you can read, write, and erase files and folders many times. To create a CD or DVD, you must have a CD or DVD recorder and blank CDs or DVDs. You can burn a disc using two formats. The Live File System format (like a USB flash drive) allows you to copy files to a disc at any time, while the Mastered format (with a CD/DVD player) needs to copy them all at once. If the disc you are creating will be used only by computers running Windows XP or later, the Live File System is the best choice. When you need a disc compatible for use on older computers, the Mastered format is the better choice. You have to send out marketing materials on CD or DVD, so you want to burn the Quest Travel folder to a disc to practice performing this procedure.

STEPS If you don’t have a CD-RW or DVD+/-RW drive and a blank recordable CD or DVD, close the UnitD window, then read the steps but do not perform any actions. QUICK TIP Do not copy more files and folders to the disc than it will hold; anything beyond the limit will not be copied to the disc. Use the Properties dialog box to compare sizes.

1. Click UnitD in the Address bar, click the Minimize button then insert a blank CD or DVD into the CD or DVD drive

in the UnitD folder window,

The AutoPlay dialog box opens by default unless the feature is turned off.

2. If the AutoPlay dialog box opens, click Burn files to disc; otherwise, click the UnitD button on the taskbar, click the Quest Travel folder, then click the Burn button on the toolbar The Burn a Disc dialog box opens with the current date listed as the default disc title. Before you burn a disc, it’s important to give it a title, which is limited to 17 characters.

3. Type QST Backup in the Disc title text box, click the With a CD/DVD player option button, as shown in Figure D-20, then click Next The CD or DVD disc drive window opens showing a temporary area where files are held before they are burned to the CD or DVD. QUICK TIP If a pop-up notification opens, pointing to an icon in the notification area and indicating you have files waiting to be written to the disc, you can click the pop-up to open the disc recording drive.

4. Click the UnitD button on the taskbar, if necessary, move and resize the two windows as needed to display both windows, then drag the Quest Travel folder from the Navigation pane to the Disc drive window The Quest Travel folder opens in the CD or DVD window where you intend to burn the folders and files, as shown in Figure D-21.

5. Click the Burn to disc button on the toolbar The Burn to Disc dialog box opens, asking you to specify the disc title and recording speed. You already named the disc, and the default speed for recording is fine.

6. Click Next to continue A progress meter opens while the wizard writes the data files to the CD. When the process of writing folders and files to a CD or DVD finishes, the disc is ejected from the drive and the Burn to Disc dialog box opens again.

7. Click Finish to close the Burn to Disc dialog box 8. Click the Close button in the UnitD window Windows 90

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FIGURE D-20: Burn a Disc dialog box

Windows 7

Disc title

Burn formats

FIGURE D-21: Contents of burned DVD disc

Original folder

Burn to disc button

Contents of this window will be burned to a DVD

Creating music CDs or DVDs With Windows Media Player, you can create your own CDs or DVDs from music tracks you have stored in Media Library. To create a music disc, you must have a disc recorder and blank recordable CDs or DVDs. You can copy music files in the Windows Media (.wma), .mp3, and .wav formats from a media library to a disc. If you want to copy music from a CD to your computer, insert the CD into the CD disc drive,

select the files you want, then click the Rip CD button on the toolbar. To burn a music disc, insert a blank recordable disc in the CD or DVD disc drive, then click Burn tab. Songs in the library appear in the center pane, and a blank burn list appears in the right pane. Drag the music tracks or playlist you want to copy from the library to the burn list. When you’re done, click Start burn.

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Practice

For current SAM information including versions and content details, visit SAM Central (http://samcentral.course.com). If you have a SAM user profile, you may have access to hands-on instruction, practice, and assessment of the skills covered in this unit. Since we support various versions of SAM throughout the life of this text, you will want to check with your instructor for instructions and the correct URL/Web site to access those assignments.

Concepts Review

Match the statements below with the elements labeled in the screen shown in Figure D-22. FIGURE D-22

f

a

e

d c b

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Which element is not a compressed file or folder? Which element points to the Details pane? Which element points to the Navigation pane? Which element contains compressed folders or files? Which element is a compressed file or folder? Which element contains personal folders or files?

Match each term with the statement that best describes it. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

Compressed folder Pixel Byte Extract Personal folder

a. b. c. d. e.

A place to store files A point in an image A place to decrease file sizes A term for uncompressing files A unit of storage

Select the best answer from the list of choices. 12. Which of the following is a default element of an Explorer window layout? a. Menu bar c. Default pane b. Preview pane d. Search pane

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13. Which of the following is not a personal folder? a. My Documents c. My Pictures b. Programs d. My Music 14. Which of the following is a folder template? a. General c. Music icons b. Videos d. Music Details 15. Which of the following folder sizes is the largest? a. 1 megabyte c. 1 gigabyte b. 2,000 kilobytes d. 1,248,896 bytes 16. Which of the following is equal to 1,024 megabytes? a. 1 kilobyte c. 1 gigabyte b. 1 megabyte d. 1 terabyte 17. A cluster is a group of: a. Sectors. c. Folders. b. Files. d. Bytes. 18. Extract is another name for: a. Uncompress. c. Compress. b. Expand. d. Zipped. 19. Which of the following can read, write, and erase files and folders? a. CD-ROM c. CD-RW b. CD-R d. DVD

Windows 7

Concepts Review (Continued)

Skills Review 1. Change the layout of Explorer windows. a. Open the Computer window. b. Navigate to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files. c. Open the UnitD folder, open the Quest Travel folder, then open the Company folder. d. Display the Preview pane. e. Preview the QST People.rtf file in the Preview pane. f. Hide the Preview pane, then display the contents of the Quest Travel folder. 2. Change folder options. a. Change the view to Details, if necessary. b. Change the folder option to open each folder in its own window. c. Change the folder option to hide extensions for known file types. d. Open the Company folder to verify the new folder options. 3. Change file details to list. a. Change the Company folder to Details view, if necessary. b. Add Date accessed and Folder path to Details view. c. Remove the Date accessed and Folder path columns from Details view. 4. Change search options. a. Change the search options to Always search file names and contents and Use a natural language search. b. Display the Quest Travel folder. c. Perform a natural language search for ceo or vice in the file contents. d. Restore all folder and search option defaults and reset all folders. e. Show file extensions for known file types. f. Close the Search results window.

Customizing File and Folder Management Copyright 2010 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part.

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Skills Review (Continued) 5. Use personal folders. a. Open your personal folder, then open the My Pictures folder, the Pictures library folder, and the Sample Pictures folder. b. View the graphics in the folder as a slide show. c. Display your personal folder, open the My Music folder, open the Music library folder, then open the Sample Music folder. d. Click the Play all button on the toolbar to start Windows Media Player and play all the music in the folder. e. Close Windows Media Player. 6. Customize a personal folder. a. Open the Quest Travel folder window, create a new folder named Travel Music, then open it. b. Copy three songs from the Sample Music folder to the Travel Music folder. c. Customize the Travel Music folder with the Music folder template. d. Verify that the Play all button opens on the toolbar in the Travel Music folder. e. Display the Quest Travel folder. 7. Display disk and folder information. a. In the window displaying the contents of the Sample Music folder, open the Computer folder, then display disk size information for any drive on your computer. b. Start WordPad, and in the document, note the disk capacity, how much is in use, and how much is available for further use. c. Display folder size information for the Quest Travel folder. d. Note the size and actual size on disk in the WordPad document. e. Add your name to the document, print it, then save the WordPad file as Disk Info.rtf to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files. f. Close the WordPad window. 8. Compress files and folders. a. In the current window, open the Quest Travel folder, then compress the Company folder and name it Compressed Company.zip. b. Open the compressed folder, then open the Company folder. c. Drag the QST Press Release.rtf file from the Compressed Company.zip folder to the Marketing folder in the Quest Travel folder using the Folders list. d. Open the Marketing folder to verify that the QST Press Release.rtf file was placed there. e. Extract the Compressed Company.zip folder into the Quest Travel folder with the name Extracted Company.zip. f. Close the Compressed Company.zip folder window. 9. Manage files and folders on a CD or DVD. a. Insert a blank recordable CD or DVD into the disc drive, then burn the Advertising and Letters folders located in the Quest Travel folder to the disc using the Mastered option. Name the disk Advertising and Letters. b. Verify that the folders appear on the disc. c. Close all open windows.

Independent Challenge 1 As manager of the summer program at a day camp, you need to keep your files and folders organized. a. Open the Computer folder, navigate to the UnitD folder in the drive and folder where you store your Data Files, then create three folders named Day Camp, Campers, and Activities. b. Move the file named Camper Data.rtf from the UnitD folder into the folder named Campers. c. Move the file named Activities Overview.rtf from the UnitD folder into the folder named Activities. d. Move the Activities folder and the Campers folder into the Day Camp folder. e. Apply the following settings to all folders of this type: Details view and hide extensions for known file types.

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f. g. h. i. j. k.

Windows 7

Independent Challenge 1 (Continued) Open the Campers folder, then copy the Camper Data.rtf file into the Activities folder. Open the Day Camp folder. Perform a natural language search to find the files used in this independent challenge. Restore search options to default settings. Restore folder options to default settings, then show extensions for known file types. Close the Computer window.

Independent Challenge 2 You own a sewing machine repair business, and you want to use Windows to organize your documents. a. Open the Computer folder, navigate to the UnitD folder in the drive and folder where you store your Data Files, then create a new folder named Sewing Works. b. In the Sewing Works folder, create three new folders: Letters, Contacts, and Accounts. c. Expand the Sewing Works folder in the Folders list in the Navigation pane. d. Move the file named Wilson Letter.rtf from the UnitD folder to the Letters folder, the file named Suppliers.rtf to the Contacts folder, and the file named Bills.rtf to the Accounts folder, then display the files named Wilson Letter and Suppliers in the Preview pane. e. Display the file size in the Details pane for the files named Wilson Letter and Suppliers. f. Close the Computer window.

Independent Challenge 3 The summer fine arts program you manage has different categories of participation for young adults, including two- and fourweek programs. To keep track of who participates in each program, you must organize two lists into folders. When you’re done, burn the information to a recordable disc to take the files with you to the program. a. Open the Computer folder, navigate to the UnitD folder in the drive and folder where you store your Data Files, then create a folder named Summer Program. b. In the Summer Program folder, create a folder named Fine Arts. c. In the Fine Arts folder, create two other folders named 2 Weeks and 4 Weeks. d. Move the files 2 Weeks Art.rtf and 4 Weeks Art.rtf from the UnitD folder into their respective folders: 2 Weeks and 4 Weeks. e. Change folder options to Details view and open each folder in its own window. Apply to all folders, then display the contents of the 4 Weeks folder. f. Compress the Summer Program folder, and name the compressed file Compressed Summer Program.zip. g. Burn the compressed folder onto the recordable disc. h. Restore the folder setting defaults, then show file extensions for known file types. Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Copy two music files to a new folder named Camp Music in the UnitD folder, then add them to your Library. (Use two of the sample music files if you don’t have any of your own.) ■ Burn a music disc. ■ Play the music from the disc. i. Close the Computer window.

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Real Life Independent Challenge Organizing digital photographs on a computer is important if you want to be able to locate specific photos in the future. Organize your photographs into folders that you create to describe categories. Use descriptive names for the folders, and then move your photographs into the appropriate folders. When you’re done, compress the folders and files. a. In the UnitD folder in the drive and folder where you store your Data Files, create a folder called Photographs, then copy at least six photographs into the folder. b. Open the Computer window, navigate to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files, then create at least three different folders with descriptive category names in the Photographs folder. c. Move the photograph files in the Photographs folder into the appropriate folders to organize them. d. Customize the folders for Pictures, if necessary. e. Display a slide show for each of the folders. f. Compress the Photographs folder with the name My Photographs.zip. Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Share the Photographs folder with specific people on your network. ■ Add a specific person to share with. ■ Add the Read/Write permission to the shared folder. ■ When you’re done, set the folder sharing to Nobody. g. Close the Computer window.

Visual Workshop Re-create the screen shown in Figure D-23, which displays the desktop and a compressed folder with all the pictures from the Sample Pictures folder in the personal folder on the hard disk. Store the compressed file in the UnitD folder in the drive and folder where you store your Data Files. (Make sure you delete the compressed file from the personal folder after you copy it.)

FIGURE D-23

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UNIT

E Windows 7

Customizing Windows Using the Control Panel If you are concerned about changing the aspects of Windows 7 and do not want to customize, simply read through this unit without completing the steps, or in any dialog box where you make a change, click the Cancel button instead of clicking the Apply button when instructed.

Files You Will Need:

In this unit, you customize Windows 7 to suit your personal needs and preferences. You

No files needed.

changing Windows settings. The Control Panel contains several links, each of which

can adjust most Windows features through the Control Panel, a central location for opens a dialog box or window for changing the properties, or characteristics, of a specific element of your computer, such as the desktop, the taskbar, or the Start menu. Before you can run Windows Aero, you need to set the proper settings in the Control Panel. Your computer at Quest Specialty Travel runs Windows Aero. You recently bought a new home computer with the capability to run Windows Aero so you can seamlessly work from home. You want to view and customize your settings in order to use them to enable Windows Aero.

OBJECTIVES

Change the desktop background Change the desktop screen saver Change desktop screen settings Change the desktop appearance Work with fonts Customize the taskbar Customize the Start menu Work with desktop gadgets Set the date and time

UNIT

E Windows 7

Changing the Desktop Background The desktop background, or wallpaper, is a picture that serves as your desktop’s backdrop, the surface on which icons and windows appear. You can select a background picture and change how it looks using the Desktop Background window. You can select one or more background pictures provided by Windows 7 or use ones stored in the Pictures Library folder or one you select on your computer. If you select more than one, you can display a slide show and shuffle the pictures. You can also display the desktop background on the screen several ways, including Fill, which displays the picture to fill the screen; Fit, which resizes the picture and displays it to fit the size of the screen; Stretch, which resizes the picture to fill the screen; Tile, which displays the picture in small boxes that fill the screen; and Center, which displays the picture in the center of the screen. Instead of selecting a background picture, which can sometimes make icons on the desktop difficult to see, you can also change the background to a color. You don’t like the current background on your new home computer, so you want to choose a different background for your desktop.

STEPS QUICK TIP To quickly find a Control Panel option, type the name of the option in the Search Control Panel box.

1. Click the Start button

on the taskbar, then click Control Panel

The Control Panel window opens, as shown in Figure E-1. Each option represents an aspect of Windows that you can change to fit your own working habits and personal needs.

2. Click the Restore Down button in the Control Panel window, if necessary, then resize the Control Panel window so you can see the desktop behind it 3. Click the Appearance and Personalization link The Appearance and Personalization window opens, displaying Windows customization options. The name of the current window, Appearance and Personalization, appears as the rightmost label in the Address bar.

QUICK TIP To open the Personalization window from the desktop, rightclick an empty area on the desktop, then click Personalize.

4. Click the Change desktop background link under Personalization The Desktop Background window opens with the currently selected background highlighted.

5. Scroll through the Background list, point to one of the available backgrounds, click the background image, then click the background image check box to select it, as shown in Figure E-2 This selects the background check box and displays a preview of the background on the desktop to show how the background will look on your screen. When you select multiple background pictures, additional options appear to specify a time interval to change the picture, shuffle the pictures, and save power.

6. Click the Picture position list arrow, then click Center The background picture appears centered on the desktop. Depending on the original size of the image and your screen size, the background might be larger than your screen, which is the case with all the background images installed by Windows 7 on a 1280 by 800 pixel screen. The Picture location list arrow allows you to select pictures from other locations, such as the Sample Pictures folder, or select a solid color from a list. Windows Desktop Backgrounds is the default folder. QUICK TIP To display the next background, rightclick a blank area of the desktop, then click Next desktop background.

7. Click the Picture location list arrow, then click Solid Colors A list of available colors appears in the Desktop Background window.

8. Click any color in the list The color you selected appears on the desktop.

9. Click Cancel The changes to the desktop background do not take effect, the Desktop Background window closes, and the Appearance and Personalization window reopens.

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Customizing Windows Using the Control Panel

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FIGURE E-1: Control Panel window

Control Panel links

FIGURE E-2: Desktop Background window

Window name

Picture location list arrow New background selected

Available background pictures; yours might differ

Default background

Options for multiple backgrounds

Picture position options

Setting a picture as the desktop background Instead of using one of the pictures in the Background list in the Desktop Background window, you can select a picture on your hard drive or from a Web page as the desktop background. To set a picture as the background, right-click the picture you want to use in a Windows Explorer window or a Web page, then click Set as desktop background or Set as Background on the shortcut menu. Acceptable formats for background files include bitmaps (the format of a Paint file) and JPEGs (the format of an Internet graphic file). You can use

Paint or any graphics program to create new background designs or change existing ones. After you set a specific picture as the desktop background, it is added to the list of available backgrounds in the Desktop Background window. To manage the files in the list of backgrounds, display the contents of your hard drive in a Windows Explorer window, open the Windows folder, the Web folder, then, finally, the Wallpaper folder, where you can remove, rename, or modify the wallpaper files.

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Changing the Desktop Screen Saver If you frequently leave your computer idle, with no movement on your screen for a long time, you should select a screen saver. A screen saver, a continually moving display, protects your monitor from burn-in, a condition that occurs when the same display remains on the screen for extended periods of time and becomes part of the screen. In addition to protecting your computer monitor, screen savers can also be used as a security measure. You can set an option in the Screen Saver Settings dialog box to resume computer usage with the Windows 7 logon screen, which can require users to specify a username and password. You want to set a screen saver to start when your computer remains idle for more than five minutes to keep company information confidential.

STEPS QUICK TIP When (None) is the selected screen saver, a screen saver will not appear, no matter how long your computer remains idle.

QUICK TIP To create your own screen saver slide show, click Photos in the Screen saver list, then click Settings to specify the location for the pictures.

1. Under Personalization, click the Change screen saver link in the Appearance and Personalization window The Screen Saver Settings dialog box opens, displaying various screen saver options.

2. Click the Screen saver list arrow, then click 3D Text The 3D screen saver appears in the preview window of the Screen Saver Settings dialog box, as shown in Figure E-3.

3. Click Settings The 3D Text Settings dialog box opens, as shown in Figure E-4, displaying the 3D screen saver options. Not all screen savers have settings. Some screen savers require settings whereas others don’t.

4. Click the Rotation Type list arrow, then click Wobble The Rotation Type option for the 3D Text screen saver is set to Wobble, which makes the 3D text move back and forth on the screen.

5. Click OK The 3D Text Settings dialog box closes and the Screen Saver Settings dialog box reappears.

6. In the Wait box, click the up arrow or down arrow until it reads 5 The Wait box option is set so that your computer will begin the screen saver if it doesn’t detect any mouse or keyboard activity for five minutes.

7. Click Preview The 3D Text screen saver previews on the screen. QUICK TIP To display the logon screen when you resume using your computer after the screen saver is activated, click the On resume, display logon screen check box to select it.

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8. Move the mouse or press any key to stop the preview The preview ends and the Screen Saver Settings dialog box reappears.

9. Open the 3D Text Settings dialog box, change the Rotation Type back to Spin, click OK to close that dialog box, then click Cancel in the Screen Saver Settings dialog box The Screen Saver Settings dialog box closes and the changes to the screen saver settings do not take effect. The Appearance and Personalization window reopens.

Customizing Windows Using the Control Panel

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FIGURE E-3: Screen Saver Settings dialog box

Window containing 3D Text screen saver Preview button Settings button Length of inactivity before screen saver begins

FIGURE E-4: 3D Text Settings dialog box

Screen saver settings for 3D Text

Rotation Type list arrow

Changing power settings From the Screen Saver Settings dialog box, you can change power options properties for a portable or laptop computer to reduce power consumption and maximize battery life. For example, if you often leave your computer for a short time while working, you can set your computer to sleep, or standby, a state in which your monitor and hard disks turn off after being idle for a set time. If you are often away from your computer for an extended time, you can set it to go into hibernation, a state in which your computer first saves everything in

memory on your hard disk and then shuts down. To set power options, you can choose one of the power plans included with Windows or modify one to suit your needs. A power plan is a predefined collection of power usage settings. In addition, you can set power options for how you want the computer power button and closing a laptop lid to work, whether to require a password on wake up, and screen brightness settings. Windows detects and makes available your power options based on your computer’s hardware configuration.

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Changing Desktop Screen Settings If you find yourself frequently scrolling within windows as you work or squinting to read small text, you might want to change the size of the desktop on your monitor. A monitor displays pictures by dividing the display screen into thousands or millions of pixels, arranged in rows and columns. The pixels are so close together that they appear connected, forming the image you see on the monitor. The screen resolution refers to the number of pixels on the screen, which determines the amount of information your monitor displays. A low screen resolution setting, such as 640 by 480 pixels (width by height), displays less information on the screen, but the items appear relatively large, while a higher setting, such as 1024 by 768 pixels, displays more information, but the items on the screen appear smaller. Many monitors have different shapes and sizes, so you can adjust the screen orientation to suit your needs. Landscape, the default, appears as 1024 by 768 pixels, which would be 768 by 1024 in Portrait. Another factor in making text and graphics easy to read on screen is the color quality. The higher the color quality, the more colors are displayed, but this requires greater system memory. The most common color quality settings are 16-bit, which displays 768 colors, and 24-bit and 32-bit, both of which display 16.7 million colors. You want to view color and monitor settings and change the resolution of the desktop so the screen is easier to read.

STEPS QUICK TIP To display Control Panel icons instead of links, open the Control Panel, click the View by list arrow, then click Small icons or Large icons.

1. Under Display, click the Adjust screen resolution link in the Appearance and Personalization window The Screen Resolution window opens, as shown in Figure E-5. This dialog box allows you to change the appearance of several desktop elements at once.

2. Click the Advanced settings link, then click the Monitor tab The Properties dialog box for your monitor opens. See Figure E-6. The Monitor tab allows you to change the screen refresh rate. To use Windows Aero, the monitor refresh rate must be higher than 10 Hertz. Hertz is a unit of frequency to measure a monitor display. The higher the refresh rate, the better the display. A typical refresh rate is 60 Hertz.

3. If necessary, click the Colors list arrow, then click a 32-bit option The color quality is set to True Color (32-bit). To use Windows Aero, the number of colors for your monitor must be set to 32-bit.

4. If necessary, click the Screen refresh rate list arrow, select a rate higher than 10 Hertz, then click OK The dialog box for your monitor closes and the Screen Resolution window reappears.

5. Note the current screen resolution, click the Resolution list arrow, drag the screen resolution slider to a lower setting, if possible, then click off the menu to close it TROUBLE If you accidentally change your resolution to one outside of the monitor’s capabilities, the monitor will go dark and not display anything. Don’t touch the screen; the resolution will revert to its previous setting in 15 seconds.

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The preview at the top of the dialog box increases in size based on your new screen resolution setting.

6. Click Apply The resolution of your screen changes to the new setting, and a warning dialog box opens asking you to confirm the change and warning you that the resolution will revert to its original setting in 15 seconds. Use the Apply button when you want to test your changes and keep the dialog box open, and the Keep changes button when you want to keep your changes and close the dialog box.

7. Click Revert in the warning dialog box to disregard the change The warning dialog box closes. The screen resolution setting returns to its original setting.

8. Click Cancel The Screen Resolution window closes, and the Appearance and Personalization window reopens.

Customizing Windows Using the Control Panel

Preview of monitor size; your display might differ

Windows 7

FIGURE E-5: Screen Resolution window

Selected display monitor; yours might differ Resolution list arrow

Orientation list arrow

Link to color and screen refresh rate settings

FIGURE E-6: Properties dialog box with the Monitor tab displayed

Your Properties dialog box name might differ

Screen refresh rate list arrow

Colors list arrow

Using more than one monitor You can increase the size of your workspace on the desktop by adding another monitor to your computer. With two monitors, you can work on a document in WordPad while you search for Web content in your Web browser. One monitor functions as the primary monitor, which displays the dialog boxes that appear when you start your computer and most programs, while the other is the secondary monitor, which displays windows, icons, and programs you drag to it from the primary monitor. To use a second monitor, you need to install another display adapter, a hardware device that allows a computer to communicate with its monitor, on your computer that supports multiple monitors. Many laptops already have this capability built into the computer; check your documentation for more information. After you install the

display adapter according to the manufacturer’s instructions and restart the computer, Windows detects the new device and installs the related software. In the Control Panel, click the Adjust screen resolution link under Display, click the monitor icon that represents the secondary monitor that you want to use, click the Multiple displays list arrow, click Extend these displays or another display option, then click Apply to use the secondary monitor options. To make the secondary monitor your primary monitor, click the Make this my main display check box to select it. To arrange multiple monitors, click the monitor icons and drag them in the preview window to the positions you want. You can set different display, screen resolution, orientation, and advanced settings for each monitor.

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Changing the Desktop Appearance You can change the entire appearance of the desktop by using themes. A theme changes the desktop background, screen saver, mouse pointers, sounds, icons, and fonts to coordinating colors and designs. You can use one of the predefined desktop themes, either an Aero Theme or Basic and High Contrast Theme, or create your own. If a theme isn’t exactly what you want, you can change the appearance of colors, fonts, and sizes used for major window elements such as title bars, icons, menus, borders, and the desktop itself. To do this, you use a scheme, which is a predefined combination of settings that ensures visual coordination of all items. Windows includes many predefined schemes, or you can create your own. The predefined schemes allow you to switch between Windows 7 Basic and Windows Aero, the two user experiences provided by Microsoft Windows 7. When you create a custom scheme or modify an existing scheme, you save your changes with a unique name. You want to set theme, color scheme, and transparency settings to use Windows Aero and change the desktop appearance to a more casual look.

STEPS 1. Under Personalization, click the Change the theme link in the Appearance and Personalization window The Personalization window opens, as shown in Figure E-7. With a theme, you can change the appearance of several desktop elements at once.

TROUBLE If the Window Color and Appearance dialog box opens with a window color scheme, Aero is not enabled. Click Cancel. To enable Aero, click a theme under Aero Themes, then repeat Step 6. If your machine is not capable of using Aero, read, but do not perform, the rest of the steps in this lesson.

2. Under Basic and High Contrast Themes, scroll down if necessary, then click Windows Classic in the Themes list 3. Wait while Windows applies the Windows Classic theme The Windows Classic theme is applied to the desktop. To use Windows Aero, the theme must be Windows 7.

4. In the Themes list, click Windows 7 under Aero Themes, then wait while Windows applies the Windows 7 theme The Windows 7 theme is applied to the desktop.

5. Click the Window Color link The Window Color and Appearance window opens, similar to the one shown in Figure E-8, displaying color variations for Windows Aero. Within this window, you can change the color of windows, the Start menu, and the taskbar. Other options allow you to enable transparency and change color intensity.

6. If necessary, click the Enable transparency check box to select it Enabling the transparency option allows you to achieve the Windows Aero transparent look.

7. Click any color square, then drag the Color intensity slider left and right The color of the window border changes to reflect the new color you selected, and it grows lighter and darker as you drag the slider. In the Figure E-8 example, the Sky blue color square is selected and the slider was dragged to the right to intensify the color. QUICK TIP If Aero is enabled and you want to turn the Aero interface off, click a theme under Basic and High Contrast Themes in the Personalization window.

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8. Click Cancel, then click the Back button

in the Personalization window

The color settings do not take effect and the Window Color and Appearance window closes. The Appearance and Personalization window reappears.

Customizing Windows Using the Control Panel

Windows 7

FIGURE E-7: Personalization window

Link to download more themes from the Web

Themes list

Window Color link

FIGURE E-8: Window Color and Appearance window

Window colors

Enable transparency check box Color intensity slider Link to change the color scheme

Adding sound effects Besides customizing the desktop appearance of Windows 7, you can also add sound effects to common Windows commands and functions, such as starting and exiting Windows, printing complete, opening and closing folders, or emptying the Recycle Bin. To add sound effects, click the Appearance and Personalization link in the Control Panel, then click the Change sound effects link. The events that happen in Windows to which sounds can be attached are listed in the Program Events list. Windows comes with sound schemes,

which contain related sounds for the events. To apply a new sound to an event, in the Program Events list, click the event to which you want to apply a sound, such as System Notification. Click the Sounds list arrow, then click the sound you want to link to the event. To hear the sound, click Test to the right of the Sounds list arrow. To save your settings as a sound scheme, click Save As, type a name, then click OK. When you’re done, click OK to apply the sound effect changes to Windows.

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Working with Fonts Everything you type appears in a font, or typeface, a particular design set of letters, numbers, and other characters. The height of characters in a font is measured in points, each point being approximately 1/72 inch. You might have heard common font names, such as Times New Roman, Arial, Courier, or Symbol. Windows has a variety of fonts for displaying text and printing documents created with programs that are part of Windows, such as WordPad and Paint. Using the Fonts window, you can view these fonts, compare them to each other, see a sample of how a font appears when printed, and even install new fonts. The Fonts window lists the fonts available on your system and indicates whether each is a TrueType, OpenType, or screen font. TrueType and OpenType fonts are outline (sometimes called vector or scalable) fonts based on a mathematical equation that creates resizable, or scalable, letters with smooth curves and sharp corners. OpenType is a newer technology and an extension of TrueType, and it provides features such as multiplatform support and support for international characters. A screen font, also known as raster, consists of bitmapped characters, which are small dots organized to form a letter. TrueType and OpenType fonts are designed for quality screen display and desktop printer output at any size, whereas screen fonts are designed for quality screen display and desktop printer output at only the font sizes installed on the computer. Besides the scalability, the main advantage of outline fonts is that they look better at high resolutions. The disadvantage of outline fonts is that small outline fonts do not look very good on low-resolution devices, such as display monitors. If you’re having problems seeing the text on your monitor, ClearType makes on-screen text clearer, smoother, and more detailed. You want to examine the fonts on your computer to make sure the ones you like to use in your reports are installed.

STEPS QUICK TIP To enable ClearType, click the Adjust ClearType text link in the Fonts window, click the Turn on ClearType check box to select it, click Next, then follow the on-screen instructions.

1. Click the Fonts link in the Appearance and Personalization window, then click the in the Fonts window, if necessary Maximize button The Fonts window opens.

2. Click the Views button arrow, then click Large Icons, if necessary The Fonts window displays the different types of fonts listed alphabetically, as shown in Figure E-9.

3. Right-click a blank area in the Fonts window, point to Group by, click More, click the Font type check box to select it, click OK, right-click a blank area again, point to Group by, then click Font type The Fonts window groups the fonts by type, including OpenType and Raster. Your font types might differ depending on what fonts are installed on your computer.

4. Double-click the Arial font icon The Arial window opens, displaying font family details for the Arial font.

5. Click the Arial Black icon, then click the Preview button on the toolbar The Arial Black (OpenType) window opens, displaying information about this font and showing samples of it in different sizes, as shown in Figure E-10.

6. Click Print in the Arial Black (OpenType) window, then click Print in the Print dialog box The Print dialog box closes and the samples for the Arial Black font print. QUICK TIP To show and hide fonts based on language settings, click the Font settings link in the Fonts window, select the options you want, then click OK.

7. Click the Close button button

in the Arial Black (OpenType) window, then click the Back

The Arial Black (OpenType) window closes and the Fonts window reappears.

8. Right-click a blank area in the Fonts window, point to Group by, then click (None) 9. Click , click the Restore Down button , then click the Minimize button in the Appearance and Personalization window The Appearance and Personalization window minimizes to the taskbar.

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Customizing Windows Using the Control Panel

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FIGURE E-9: Fonts window

Views button arrow

Black color indicates shown font

Installed fonts; your might differ

Grey color indicates hidden font

FIGURE E-10: Arial Black (Open Type) window

OpenType font type Print button Font characters

Boldfaced font samples

Installing, removing, or hiding a font Although many fonts come with Windows, you can purchase and install additional fonts. To install a new font, drag the font into the Fonts window or right-click the font in a Windows Explorer window, then click Install. This installs the new font so that it’s available in the Fonts window and to all your Windows programs. To remove a font, select the

font in the Fonts window, then click the Delete button on the toolbar. You can also hide/show a font in your programs; select the font (grayed out are hidden) in the Fonts window, then click the Hide or Show button on the toolbar.

Changing the screen text size If text and other items, such as icons, on the screen are not large enough for you to comfortably view, you can customize the screen to display items larger. Windows 7 allows you to increase the screen scaling option, known as the dots per inch (dpi) scale, which is the number of dots that a device can display or print per linear inch. The greater

number of dots per inch, the better the resolution. To change the screen size, click the Change font size link in the Fonts window. To set a custom DPI setting, click the Set custom text size (DPI) link in the Display window.

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Customizing the Taskbar The taskbar is located at the bottom of the Windows desktop by default, and is most often used to switch from one open program or window to another. As with other Windows elements, you can customize the taskbar; for example, you can change its size and location, customize its display, or add or remove toolbars, such as the Address bar toolbar, to help you perform the tasks you need to do. If you need more room on the screen to display a window, the Auto-hide feature can be used to hide the taskbar automatically when it’s not in use. You can also customize the notification area. If icons in the notification area are hidden when you want to see them, you can customize the notification area to always show the icons you want to use. When you hide an icon, you can choose to hide or show any notification alerts that go with it. In addition, you can lock and unlock the taskbar, keep the taskbar visible, use small icons, change the taskbar desktop location, combine similar taskbar buttons together in one button, and use or not use Aero Peek to preview the desktop with the Show desktop button. You want to customize your taskbar on the desktop so you can work more efficiently.

STEPS QUICK TIP To open the Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog box from the desktop, right-click an empty area of the taskbar, then click Properties.

1. Position the pointer in an empty area of the taskbar, right-click the taskbar, then point to Toolbars The Toolbars submenu opens, as shown in Figure E-11.

2. Click a blank area of the desktop to close the menu The Address toolbar appears on the taskbar to the right of the Start button.

3. Click the Appearance and Personalization taskbar button, then click the Taskbar and Start Menu link in the Appearance and Personalization window The Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog box opens, displaying the Taskbar tab, as shown in Figure E-12.

4. Click the Auto-hide the taskbar check box to select it, then click Apply The taskbar scrolls down out of sight. QUICK TIP To hide system icons in the notification area, click the Turn system icons on or off link in the Notification Area Icons dialog box, set the icons to Off, then click OK twice.

5. Click Customize The Notification Area Icons dialog box opens, which allows you to specify the behavior you want for a taskbar icon. For example, you can always show or hide icons and notifications, or only show notifications to display the amount of information you want.

6. Under Behaviors, click the Volume list arrow, as shown in Figure E-13, click Hide icon and notifications if necessary, then click OK The Notification Area Icons dialog box closes and the Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog box reappears. The Volume icon you selected will now be hidden in the notification area.

7. Move the mouse pointer to the bottom of the screen to display the taskbar, then click the Show hidden icons button in the notification area The taskbar scrolls up into view, and the Volume icon you set to hide no longer appears in the notification area. While the mouse pointer is at the bottom of the screen, the taskbar appears. When you move the mouse pointer up, the taskbar is hidden. The Show hidden icons button provides access to hidden icons.

8. Click Customize in the Notification window, click the Volume list arrow, click Show icon and notifications, then click OK The Volume icon reappears in the notification area and any related notifications will appear. QUICK TIP To view transparent windows in Aero with Aero Peek, point to the Show desktop button at the end of the taskbar.

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9. Click the Auto-hide the taskbar check box to deselect it, then click OK The Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog box closes and the Appearance and Personalization window reappears.

10. Click the Minimize button

in the Appearance and Personalization window

Customizing Windows Using the Control Panel

Your add or remove a toolbar options might differ Show hidden icons button Notification icons

Shortcut menu

Windows 7

FIGURE E-11: Taskbar with the Toolbars submenu displayed

FIGURE E-12: Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog box with the Taskbar tab displayed

Auto-hide the taskbar check box

Customize button

FIGURE E-13: Notification Area Icons dialog box

Volume list arrow

Link to show or hide system icons Link to set default options

Pinning and unpinning items to the taskbar The taskbar allows you to start programs, and open files and windows. The taskbar comes with three pinned default programs: Internet Explorer, Windows Explorer, and Windows Media Player. The pinned items remain on the taskbar, like a push pin holds paper on a bulletin

board, until you unpin them. To pin a program to the taskbar, open the program, right-click the icon on the taskbar, then click Pin this program to taskbar. To unpin it, right-click the pinned icon, then click Unpin this program from taskbar.

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Customizing the Start Menu The Start menu is the beginning point for accessing most programs and features in Windows 7. Customizing the Start menu can save you time and effort. You can add shortcuts to programs, files, or folders to the Start menu or customize the way the Start menu looks and functions. The left column of the Start menu is separated into two lists: pinned items above the separator line and most frequently used programs below. The pinned items remain on the Start menu, like a push pin holds paper on a bulletin board, until you unpin them. The right column of the Start menu provides easy access to folders, Windows settings, devices and printers, help information, and shutdown options. You can customize the right column on the Start menu to display additional menu items or extend a submenu from the Control Panel, Documents, or Personal folder menu items for easy access. Because you work often with the Windows Media Center program, you decide to add it to the Start menu for easy access.

STEPS 1. Click the Start button on the taskbar, point to All Programs, then point to Windows Media Center, but do not click it The Start menu appears with the Windows Media Center program highlighted. QUICK TIP To remove an unpinned item from the Start menu, right-click the item, then click Remove from this list.

2. Right-click Windows Media Center, as shown in Figure E-14, click Pin to Start Menu on the shortcut menu, then point to Back at the bottom of the Start menu The Windows Media Center program appears above the separator line on the Start menu in the pinned items section. The Windows Media Center menu item will now always appear at the top of the Start menu until you unpin it.

3. Click outside the Start menu to close it, click the Appearance and Personalization taskbar button, then, under Taskbar and Start Menu, click the Customize the Start menu link The Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog box opens, displaying the Start Menu tab, which allows you to choose the Start menu style you want.

4. Click Customize The Customize Start Menu dialog box opens, as shown in Figure E-15. The Customize Start Menu dialog box allows you to modify the way links, icons, and menus appear on the Start menu. You can also indicate the number of recently used programs you want to appear on the Start list.

5. Under Control Panel, click the Display as a menu option button, click OK, then click Apply in the Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog box The customized Control Panel option is applied to the Start menu; the Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog box remains open.

6. Click

on the taskbar, then point to Control Panel

A submenu listing the various Control Panel options displays. These options correspond to the items in the Control Panel window. QUICK TIP To change the function of the Power button, right-click the Start button, click Properties, click the Power button action list arrow, click a power option, then click OK.

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7. Right-click Windows Media Center on the Start menu, then click Unpin from Start Menu The Windows Media Center program is unpinned from the Start menu.

8. Click outside the Start menu to close it, click Customize in the Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog box, click the Display as a link option button under Control Panel, then click OK twice Both dialog boxes close, and the Start menu is restored to its original settings. The Appearance and Personalization window reappears.

Customizing Windows Using the Control Panel

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FIGURE E-14: Adding a program to the Start menu

Shortcut menu to add a program to the Start menu

Pin to Taskbar command

Pinned programs

Pin to Start Menu command

Recently used programs

Separator line

FIGURE E-15: Customize Start Menu dialog box

Display as a menu option

Start menu options

Start menu size options; specify the number of items or programs to display

Working with Start menu items In addition to tracking frequently used programs, Windows also tracks recently opened files, known as jump lists. When you point to a program on the Start menu with an arrow next to it, a list of recently opened files or folders and related tasks appear for easy access. You can also pin recently opened files to the Start menu that you want to use on a regular basis. When you display a list of recently opened files, you can

point to a file to display a pin icon, which you can click the icon to pin the file to the top of the submenu. You can also point to a pinned item, then click the icon to unpin the file. If you want to clear all recently opened documents from the Start menu, clear the Store and display recently opened items in the Start menu and the taskbar check box on the Start Menu tab in the Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog box.

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Working with Desktop Gadgets Instead of opening a program, such as your Web browser, to get information, you can use your Windows 7 desktop to get quick access to gadgets such as news headlines and updates, weather information, traffic maps, Internet radio streams, and slide shows of online photo albums. Gadgets are miniapplications that can connect to Web services, such as an RSS (Really Simple Syndication) feed (which automatically delivers Web content, such as headline news, to your desktop), or integrate with many of your applications, such as viewing your calendar or e-mail and browsing the Web. You can move gadgets anywhere on your desktop to suit the way you work—for example, whether you want them to appear above or below maximized windows. Windows 7 comes with a set of gadgets to get you started, including one for Windows Media Center. However, you can easily download more gadgets from an online gadget gallery. See Table E-1 for specific ways to work with desktop gadgets. Because you frequently travel, you want to add the Weather gadget to the desktop so you can easily check the weather.

STEPS QUICK TIP To quickly open the Gadget Gallery window, right-click a blank area of the desktop, then click Gadgets.

QUICK TIP To download more gadgets, click the Get more gadgets online link in the Gadget Gallery window, find the gadget you want, then download it.

1. Under Desktop Gadgets, click the Add gadgets to the desktop link in the Appearance and Personalization window The Gadget Gallery window opens, as shown in Figure E-16.

2. Double-click the Weather gadget icon or drag it to the upper-right corner of the desktop The Weather gadget is added to upper-right corner of the desktop. After a moment, the gadget accesses the Internet for weather-related information.

3. Click the Close button in the Gadget Gallery window, then click the Minimize in the Appearance and Personalization window button The Gadget Gallery window closes and the Appearance and Personalization window minimizes to the taskbar.

4. Point to the Weather gadget, click the Larger size button then click the Options button

to the right of the gadget,

The Weather dialog box opens, as shown in Figure E-17, displaying options to customize the gadget.

5. Click in the Select current location text box, type your city followed by a comma, press [Spacebar], type your state, click the Search button, select the nearest location, if necessary, then click OK The Weather dialog box closes and the Weather gadget displays the current temperature for the specified city, as shown in Figure E-18.

6. Point to the Weather gadget, then click the Close button The Weather gadget is removed from the desktop.

7. Click the Appearance and Personalization taskbar button on the taskbar The Appearance and Personalization window reopens.

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Windows 7

FIGURE E-16: Gadget Gallery window

Weather gadget Windows 7 default gadgets; yours might differ

Link to download more gadgets from the Web

FIGURE E-17: Weather dialog box

FIGURE E-18: Weather gadget

Close button Smaller size button Options button Drag gadget button

Weather gadget Current location; your location might differ

Current location and weather; your information will differ

Select current location text box

Gadget options

TABLE E-1: Working with desktop gadgets

to:

do the following:

Close a gadget

Point to the gadget you want to close, click the Close button gadget, then click Close Gadget if a dialog box opens.

Change gadget options

Point to the gadget you want to change, click the Options button the gadget, select the options you want, then click OK.

Move a gadget

Point to the gadget, then drag it or

Resize a gadget

Point to the gadget, then click the Smaller size button to the right of the gadget.

in the small bar that appears to the right of the in the small bar that appears to the right of

to another location on the desktop. or Larger size button

in the small bar that appears

Customizing Windows Using the Control Panel

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UNIT

E Windows 7

Setting the Date and Time The time appears in the notification area. When you click or hover over the clock in the notification area, the date appears. Programs use the date and time to establish when files and folders are created and modified. To change the date and time, you modify settings in the Date and Time dialog box. When you modify the time, it’s important also to verify or update the time zone setting in the Time Zone Settings dialog box, which is used to accurately display creation and modification dates and send e-mail with the accurate date and time in different time zones. With an Internet connection, you can synchronize your clock to a computer on the Internet that keeps accurate time. In addition to changing the date and time, you can also change their format. This is handy if you work on documents from a different country or region of the world. To change the date and time display, you modify the settings on the Formats tab in the Region and Language dialog box. You want to work on an international document so you decide to change the date and time settings so the document is easier for them to read.

STEPS QUICK TIP To open the Date and Time dialog box quickly, click the time in the notification area on the taskbar, then click the Change date and time settings link.

QUICK TIP If you have a connection to the Internet, you can click Change settings on the Internet Time tab and then click Update now to update the time on your computer with an accurate time on the Internet.

1. Click Control Panel in the Address bar, click the Clock, Language, and Region link in the Control Panel window, then click the Set the time and date link under Date and Time The Date and Time dialog box opens, displaying the Date and Time tab, as shown in Figure E-19.

2. Click Change date and time, then click Continue in the security dialog box, if necessary, to get permission to make changes The Date and Time Settings dialog box opens, displaying a calendar and clock. You can use the calendar to select a month using the left and right arrows, or select a day by clicking a date, and use the clock to change the time in hours, minutes, or seconds.

3. Click another date in the calendar, double-click the current minute in the text box in the Time section, click the up arrow three times, then click OK The new date that you clicked and the new time—three minutes later—appear in the clock in the Date and Time dialog box and in the notification area.

4. Click Change time zone, note the current time zone in the Time Zone Settings dialog box, click the list arrow, click (UTC) Dublin, Edinburgh, Lisbon, London, then click OK The adjusted time appears in the clock in the dialog box and in the notification area.

5. Change the time zone back to the original time zone, change the current time and date back to the correct time, then click OK in the Date and Time dialog box The Date and Time dialog box closes, and the Clock, Language, and Region window is visible again.

QUICK TIP To change the regional format by language and country, click the Format list arrow, then click a language.

6. Click the Change the date, time, or number format link under Region and Language The Region and Language dialog box opens, displaying the Formats tab, which shows the language format, short and long date, short and long time, first day of the week, and examples of each.. See Figure E-20.

7. Click the Short date format list arrow, then click dd-MMM-yy The short date format is changed and appears as 06-Mar-12, for example, in the Short date text box on the Formats tab.

8. Click Cancel, then click the Close button window

in the Clock, Language, and Region

The Region and Language dialog box and the Control Panel window close.

9. Point to the time and date in the notification area to display a ScreenTip of the date and time, click the time and date in the notification area to display a calendar and clock, then click a blank area of the desktop The Calendar and clock window closes.

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Windows 7

FIGURE E-19: Date and Time dialog box with the Date and Time tab displayed

Current date and time; your information will differ Change date and time button Change time zone button

FIGURE E-20: Region and Language dialog box

Format list arrow

Date and time format options

Links to number, date and time formats customization options

Adding and displaying another clock If you need to know the time in other time zones, you can add one or two additional clocks using the Additional Clocks tab in the Date and Time dialog box. After you add a clock, you can display both clocks by clicking or hovering over the taskbar clock. See Figure E-21. To add a clock, click the taskbar clock, click the Change date and time settings link, click the Additional Clocks tab, select the Show this clock check box, select a time zone, enter a display name, then click OK.

FIGURE E-21: Added clock display from the taskbar

Customizing Windows Using the Control Panel

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Practice

For current SAM information including versions and content details, visit SAM Central (http://samcentral.course.com). If you have a SAM user profile, you may have access to hands-on instruction, practice, and assessment of the skills covered in this unit. Since we support various versions of SAM throughout the life of this text, you will want to check with your instructor for instructions and the correct URL/Web site to access those assignments.

Concepts Review

Match the statements below with the elements labeled in the screen shown in Figure E-22. FIGURE E-22

f e

a

b

d c

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Which element points to an expanded menu? Which element points to a gadget? Which element points to the desktop background? Which element points to pinned programs? Which element points to a toolbar? Which element points to recently used programs?

Match each term with the statement that best describes it. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

Start menu Screen saver Control Panel Color schemes Wallpaper

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a. b. c. d. e.

Preset designs for the desktop Used to start programs and open documents Used to change properties of various elements of a computer Preset combinations of desktop colors Used to prevent damage to the monitor

Customizing Windows Using the Control Panel

Select the best answer from the list of choices. 12. Which of the following is NOT an acceptable format for a desktop background? a. JPEG c. PNG b. TIF d. RTF 13. To customize the appearance of the desktop, you need to open the: a. Desktop Settings window. c. Personalization window. b. Appearance and Personalization window. d. Appearance window. 14. A Paint file used as a background is called (a): a. Display. c. Picture. b. Shortcut. d. Wallpaper. 15. Which of the following screen resolutions displays screen elements the largest? a. 640 by 480 pixels c. 1280 by 1024 pixels b. 1024 by 768 pixels d. 1600 by 1200 pixels 16. Which of the following color quality values displays the smallest number of colors? a. 16-bit c. 32-bit b. 24-bit d. The same number of colors is displayed with all three values. 17. Which of the following changes the background, screen saver, mouse pointers, sounds, icons, and fonts? a. Theme c. Desktop b. Scheme d. Gadget 18. Which of the following fonts consists of bitmapped characters? a. TrueType c. OpenType b. Screen d. Outline 19. Where does a gadget appear? a. Control Panel c. Start menu b. Desktop d. Taskbar 20. A gadget is a: a. Miniapplication. c. Utility. b. Full application. d. Program.

Windows 7

Concepts Review (Continued)

Skills Review 1. Change the desktop background. a. Open the Control Panel window. b. Open the Desktop Background window. c. Add the Penguins background in the Pictures Library to the list, minimize the Desktop Background window to view the desktop slide show, display the Desktop Background window, then cancel the change. (Hint: Click the Picture location list arrow to locate the Pictures Library folder.) d. Close the Desktop Background window. 2. Change the desktop screen saver. a. Open the Screen Saver Settings dialog box. b. Select the Bubbles screen saver, then preview it. c. Close the Screen Saver Settings dialog box without saving the change. 3. Change desktop screen settings. a. Open the Screen Resolution window. b. Open the Advanced Settings dialog box for your monitor. c. Display the Monitor tab, note the screen refresh rate. d. Make sure the Colors option is set to True Color (32-bit), then close the dialog box. e. Change the Screen resolution to a different setting, then apply the change. f. Restore the resolution to its original setting, then close the Screen Resolution window.

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Skills Review (Continued) 4. Change the desktop appearance. a. Open the Personalization dialog box. b. Change the theme to Windows Classic. c. Change the theme to Windows 7, then close the window. d. Open the Window Color and Appearance window. e. Select a color, then change the color intensity. f. Cancel the changes you made and close the Window Color and Appearance window. 5. Work with fonts. a. Open the Fonts window. b. Display the size and style samples for a Times New Roman font. c. Print the Times New Roman font information. d. Close the Times New Roman and Fonts windows. 6. Customize the taskbar. a. Open the Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog box. b. Set the option to Auto-hide taskbar. c. Set any notification icon in the list to Hide icon and notifications, then apply the changes. d. Display the hidden taskbar, then show the hidden icons. e. Deselect the Auto-hide feature, then restore the notification icon to its default setting to Show icon and notifications. f. Apply the changes, then close the Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog box. 7. Customize the Start menu. a. Point to the Paint program on the Accessories submenu on the Start menu. b. Pin the Paint program to the Start menu. c. Open the Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog box, then display the Customize Start Menu dialog box. Show Pictures as a menu on the Start menu, then apply the change. d. Display the Start menu with the changes. e. Unpin the Paint program from the Start menu, then change the Pictures menu to display as a link. f. Close the Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog box. 8. Work with desktop gadgets. a. Open the Gadget Gallery window, then add the Slide Show gadget to the desktop. b. Close the Gadget Gallery window. c. Open the Slide Show Options dialog box. d. Change the Show each picture time to 10 seconds. e. Select a transition between pictures, then click OK. f. Watch the slide show in the gadget, then close the gadget. 9. Set the date and time. a. Open the Date and Time dialog box. b. Change the time to three hours ahead, then apply the change. c. Change the time zone to International Date Line West time. d. Change the time zone back to the original time zone. e. Change the current time back to the correct time. f. Close the Date and Time dialog box. g. Close the Control Panel, if necessary.

Independent Challenge 1 You just got a new computer for your birthday, and you want to set up Windows Aero and customize the desktop. Before you can run Windows Aero, you need to make sure Windows 7 contains the proper settings. Make sure the color is set to 32-bit, the monitor refresh rate is higher than 10 Hertz, the theme is set to the Windows 7 Aero theme, and the window transparency is turned on. Windows 118

Customizing Windows Using the Control Panel

a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h. i.

Windows 7

Independent Challenge 1 (Continued) Open the Appearance and Personalization window from the Control Panel. Open the Screen Resolution window. Make sure the color is set to 32-bit. Make sure the monitor refresh rate is set to higher than 10 Hertz. Close the Screen Resolution window. Change the theme to Windows Classic. Change the theme to Windows 7. Enable transparency, if necessary. Change the color used for your window borders, Start menu, and taskbar.

Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Select a picture of your own to use as the desktop background. ■ Select Photos as the screen saver, and specify the picture location you want to use. ■ Select a slide show speed and select to shuffle contents. ■ Display the screen saver. ■ Restore the desktop background and screen saver back to their original state. j. Restore the original settings, then close the Control Panel.

Independent Challenge 2 As a reporter for a local newspaper, you are continually looking for possible news stories that affect local readers and keep notes you can refer to later. To accomplish this task, you need to add the Feed Headlines gadget and display headlines (if necessary), add the Large Notes gadget (available online) to the desktop, and type new notes in the Large Notes gadget. a. Open the Desktop Gadget Gallery window. b. Add the Feed Headlines gadget if necessary, then, if necessary, click View Headlines in the gadget on the desktop to display feeds. c. Go online to the Personalization Gallery, then click the Desktop gadgets tab. d. Download and add the Large Notes gadget to the desktop. If the gadget is not available, select another online gadget to download and install. e. Type the title of a current news feed in the Large Notes gadget. f. Click the plus sign to create a new note pad page, then type another news feed title. g. Remove the Feed Headlines and Large Notes gadgets from the desktop.

Independent Challenge 3 You accepted a temporary consulting job in Rome, Italy. After moving into your new home and unpacking your stuff, you decide to set up your computer. Once you set up and turn on the computer, you decide to change the date and time settings and other region and language options to reflect Rome, Italy. a. b. c. d. e.

Open the Control Panel, then open the Date and Time dialog box. Open the Time Zone Settings dialog box. Change the time zone to (UTC 101:00) Amsterdam, Berlin, Bern, Rome, Stockholm, Vienna. In the Date and Time dialog box, change the month and year to June 2010, then click OK. Display the Internet Time tab, then update the time if you have an Internet connection. Otherwise, change the time back three hours manually.

Customizing Windows Using the Control Panel

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Independent Challenge 3 (Continued) Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Display the Additional Clocks tab, enable a clock, select the time zone from your previous location, then enter a name for the clock. ■ Apply the changes, then point to the time in the Notification area to display both clocks. ■ Disable the secondary clock. f. Close the Date and Time dialog box. g. Open the Region and Language dialog box. h. On the Formats tab, set the language formats to Italian (Italy). i. Restore the original date and time zone settings and the regional and language options to English (United States). j. Close the Control Panel window.

Real Life Independent Challenge People often work on specific projects for a length of time. You can make it easier to work on your project if you customize your desktop for the specific needs of the project. For instance, you can pin the programs you use on a regular basis on the Start menu, rearrange them in the order you want, and display any toolbars you need. a. b. c. d. e. f.

Pin at least two programs to the Start menu. Rearrange the order of the pinned programs. Customize the Start menu to display the Control Panel as a menu. Change the taskbar to auto-hide. Add the Address (bar) toolbar to the taskbar. Restore the Start menu and taskbar to their original states.

Visual Workshop Re-create the screen shown in Figure E-23, which displays the Windows desktop. Your username on the Start menu and the list of games on the submenu might differ. FIGURE E-23

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UNIT

F Windows 7

Files You Will Need: WIN F-1.cer WIN F-2.cer WIN F-3.cer

Securing Your Computer To perform some of the lessons in this unit, you need to use the administrator password or use an administrator account. See your instructor or technical support person for more information. Windows 7 makes communicating with other computers over the Internet more secure and easier than ever. The Action Center enables you to manage computer security by providing a single place to view alerts and take actions about security and maintenance issues with your computer. The Action Center makes it easy to find information about the latest virus or security threat, check the status of essential security settings, quickly get support from Microsoft for a security-related issue, and access the Control Panel utilities that allow you to set additional security and privacy settings.

You are an IT computer specialist at Quest Specialty

Travel. As part of your job, you need to make sure company computers are protected from outside threats, so you want to make sure computer security settings are properly set.

OBJECTIVES

Explore the Action Center Manage Windows Firewall Get Automatic Updates Defend against malicious software Set up Internet security Protect your Internet identity Protect your Internet privacy Delete Internet information Set Parental Controls

UNIT

F Windows 7

Exploring the Action Center The Action Center is divided into two main areas: Security and Maintenance. In the Security area, you can view settings relating to network firewall, Windows Update, virus protection, spyware and unwanted software protection, Internet security settings, User Account Control, and Network Access Protection. In the Maintenance area, you can view and change settings relating to Windows Update, Windows Backup, and system maintenance. The Action Center displays important and recommended alerts to help protect your computer and keep Windows running smoothly. As you work, Windows 7 displays security alerts and icons in the notification area on the taskbar to make you aware of potential security risks, such as a new virus, out-of-date antivirus software, if an important security option is turned off, or other security-related issues from Microsoft. To open the Action Center, you can click on an alert, access it from the Control Panel or click the Action Center icon in the notification area on the taskbar. When you click the Action Center icon, a small window with a list of alert messages appears that you can click to address the issue. In the Action Center, you can also find links to troubleshooters and system restore tools. As the IT specialist, you want to check out the current security settings on your computer to make sure Quest Specialty Travel company information is safe.

STEPS 1. If available, click the Action Center icon

in the notification area on the taskbar

A message window appears with links to important and recommended alerts. In the window, some options have a security icon next to it, as shown in Figure F-1. When you see the security icon next to any option within Windows 7, it means that you need permission to access the settings. To access the settings, you need to enter an administrator password. This adds an additional level of security on your computer. QUICK TIP To change User Account Control settings, click the Change User Account Control settings link in the task pane, drag the slider for the notification level you want, then click OK.

2. Click the Open Action Center link if available, or click the Start button on the taskbar, click Control Panel, then click Review your computer’s status link under System and Security The Action Center window opens, displaying the essential security areas and their current status, as shown in Figure F-2. In this case, there are two important issues for no virus protection software and a problem with Windows Update and two recommended issues for unreported problems and no backup. You can click the Expand button or anywhere on the bar to show information about that security area; click the Collapse button or the bar again to hide it. You can use the options available to install and update any needed protection software.

3. Click the Expand button

for Security

A list of security information and links to specific security options appear.

4. In the task pane, click the Change Action Center settings link The Change Action Center settings dialog box opens, displaying security and maintenance message options. You can turn alert messages on or off.

5. Click Cancel The current alert message settings remain the same. The Action Center window reopens. QUICK TIP To view archived messages to past solutions, click the View archived messages link in the task pane. Double-click a manually archived message to view information.

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6. In the task pane, click the Change User Account Control settings link The User Account Control Settings dialog box opens, displaying a notification slider option you can set to help prevent potentially harmful programs from making changes to your computer.

7. Click Cancel The current User Account Control settings remain the same. The Action Center window reopens.

8. Click System and Security in the Address bar The System and Security window opens, displaying system-, security-, and maintenance-related options, such as Action Center, Windows Firewall, System, Windows Update, Power Options, and Backup and Restore.

Securing Your Computer

Windows 7

FIGURE F-1: Alert messages from the Action Center

Alert messages; yours will differ Security icon; need permission to access

Open Action Center link Action Center icon

FIGURE F-2: Action Center window

Security status; yours might differ Expand button for the Security area Task pane options to access other security settings or information Action Center options for the Security and Maintenance areas; yours might differ

Protecting against malware A computer virus is a program that attaches itself to a file, reproduces itself, and then spreads to other files. A virus is typically “caught” from programs and files downloaded from the Internet, electronic mail attachments, or shareware discs containing free or inexpensive software or illegally obtained pirated software. When you open a program or file with the computer virus, the computer becomes infected with the virus and can corrupt or destroy data, or disrupt program or Windows functionality. Many viruses stay dormant on a computer before doing any damage, so catching and destroying these viruses before they cause damage can prevent computer disaster. A worm is like a virus, but it can spread without human action across networks. For example, a worm might send e-mail copies of itself to everyone in your e-mail

Address Book. A worm can consume memory, causing your computer to stop responding or even take it over. A Trojan horse, like its mythological counterpart, is a program that appears to be useful and come from a legitimate source, but actually causes problems, such as gathering personal information or deleting files. Antivirus software, or virus detection software, examines the files stored on a disk to determine whether they are infected with a virus, then destroys or disinfects them. Antivirus software provides protection when you start Windows and checks for viruses whenever your computer is on. Popular antivirus software, which needs to be purchased from a software retailer, includes Norton AntiVirus and McAfee VirusScan. New viruses appear all the time, so it is important that your antivirus software be kept up to date.

Securing Your Computer

Windows 123

UNIT

F Windows 7

Managing Windows Firewall If your computer is directly connected to the Internet, you need a firewall program. A firewall is a protective barrier between your computer or network and others on the Internet. Windows Firewall protects your computer from unauthorized access from others on the Internet by monitoring communication between your computer and the Internet and preventing unsolicited inbound traffic from the Internet from entering your private computer. Windows Firewall discards all unsolicited communications from reaching your computer unless you specifically allow them to come through. Windows Firewall is enabled by default for all Internet and network connections. However, some computer manufacturers and network administrators might turn it off, so you need to check it before you start using the computer. When Windows Firewall is enabled, you might not be able to use some communication features, such as sending files with a messaging program or playing an Internet game, unless the program is listed in the Allowed Programs window in Windows Firewall. If you use multiple Internet and networking connections, you can enable or disable the specific individual connections or modify firewall settings for each type of network location you use. Because firewall protection is an essential aspect of computer protection, you want to make sure your Windows Firewall is running so Quest Specialty Travel company information is safe.

STEPS 1. In the System and Security window, click Windows Firewall The Windows Firewall window opens, as shown in Figure F-3, displaying the current firewall settings. In this case, for the Home or work networks, Windows Firewall is turned on, inbound connections are blocked, and display notification when a program is blocked is enabled. QUICK TIP To restore default settings, click the Restore defaults link in the task pane, click Restore defaults, then click Yes to confirm.

2. In the left pane, click the Turn Windows Firewall on or off link The User Account Control window might open, asking you for permission to make changes to the security or personal settings.

3. If prompted, click Continue, or type the administrator password and click OK The Customize Settings window opens, as shown in Figure F-4.

4. Click the Turn on Windows Firewall option button if necessary under Home or work (private) network location settings This enables Windows Firewall to prevent hackers or malicious software from accessing your computer.

5. Click Cancel The current firewall settings remain the same and the Windows Firewall window opens. Some programs, such as Remote Assistance (a program that allows you to control another computer over the Internet), need to communicate through the firewall, so you can create an exception to allow them to work, yet still maintain a secure computer. QUICK TIP If you’re having connection problems, click the Troubleshoot my network link in the task pane to access troubleshooting wizards.

6. In the task pane, click the Allow a program or feature through Windows Firewall The Allowed Programs window opens, displaying the current programs or connection ports allowed to communicate through the firewall. A port is the actual connection on your computer that links to devices, such as a printer.

7. Scroll down the list, then click the Windows Media Player Network Sharing Service (Internet) check box to select it Selecting this option enables the Windows Media Player program to freely communicate over the Internet for network-sharing purposes through the firewall.

8. Click OK The change that you made to the firewall is applied and the Windows Firewall window reopens.

9. Click System and Security in the Address bar The System and Security window reopens. Windows 124

Securing Your Computer

Windows 7

FIGURE F-3: Windows Firewall window

Help button

Collapse button for Public networks

Turn Windows Firewall on or off link

Current firewall settings; yours might differ

FIGURE F-4: Customize Settings window

Turn on Windows Firewall option button

Block all incoming connections, including those in the list of allowed programs check box Firewall settings for your Public network

Adding additional security at start-up For added security, you can require users to press [Ctrl][Alt][Delete] before they can select a user account and enter a password when they turn on the computer. This prevents programs, such as spyware or a virus, from stealing your username and password when you enter it on your computer. When you lock your computer or switch users, this security option also requires users to press [Ctrl][Alt][Delete] to log back on. To set the Ctrl+Alt+Delete

option, click the Start button, point to All Programs, click Accessories, click Run, type NetplWiz.exe, then click OK. In the User Accounts dialog box, click the Advanced tab, click the Require users to press Ctrl+Alt+Delete check box to select it, then click OK. You can also access the User Accounts dialog box from the “Enable or disable secure logon (CTRL + ALT + DELETE)” help topic in Windows Help and Support.

Securing Your Computer

Windows 125

UNIT

F Windows 7

Getting Automatic Updates Automatic updating provides protection when you update your Windows software to make sure it’s up-to-date and safe. It provides a central location where you can view currently installed updates and install new Windows features, system and security updates, and device drivers. Windows Update can review device drivers and system software on your computer, compare those findings with a master database on the Web, and then recommend and install updates specifically for your computer. You can also restore a previous device driver or system file using the uninstall option. Because Microsoft provides updates on a regular basis over the Internet, it is important to check for new content and other updates. If you want to be notified when updates occur, you can set up Windows 7 to let you know as soon as they happen. The default setting is to have Windows check the site every day. You’re not sure how long it’s been since your computer at Quest Specialty Travel has been updated with the latest Windows 7 software. You want to check your computer for updates and current settings.

STEPS If you’re working on a network run by an administrator, do not install any software without permission. 1. In the System and Security window, click Windows Update The Windows Update window opens, as shown in Figure F-5, displaying information and the current settings for Windows Update. Windows Update is turned on by default and set to automatically check for and install updates at a regular time every day.

2. In the task pane, click the Change settings link The Change settings window opens, displaying the Windows Update notification settings, as shown in Figure F-6. These settings allow you to automatically check for important updates and install them.

3. Click Cancel The current Windows Update notification settings remain the same and the Windows Update window reopens.

4. In the task pane, click the View update history link

QUICK TIP To remove an installed update, click Installed Updates in the task pane in the Windows Update window, select the update, then click Uninstall.

QUICK TIP If you want to install any updates during future use, click the check boxes next to the updates you want to install, click OK, then click Install updates.

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The View update history window opens, displaying a list of your computer’s complete update history. The history includes the update name, installation status and date, and importance to your system, either Important, Recommended, or Optional.

5. Click OK The Windows Update window reopens.

6. Click the Installed Updates link at the bottom of the task pane The Installed Updates window opens, displaying a list of the currently installed Windows Updates on your computer that you can uninstall.

7. Click the Back button link in the task pane

to the left of the Address bar, then click the Check for updates

The Installed Updates window closes and the Windows Update window reopens. Windows Update checks your computer to see if it needs any updates. If it detects that updates are necessary, Windows Update indicates how many updates are available and the importance of each.

8. In the task pane, click the link for important or optional updates, if available The Select updates to install window opens.

9. Click OK, then if necessary, click System and Security in the Address bar The System and Security window reopens.

Securing Your Computer

Windows 7

FIGURE F-5: Windows Update window

Current Windows Update settings and information; yours might differ Windows Update links in the Task pane

Check for updates button

Installed Updates link

FIGURE F-6: Change settings window

Windows Update notification settings

Locking the computer If you are working on sensitive material and need to leave your computer unattended, you can lock it so that no one can use it without your permission. While your computer is locked, all your programs continue to run, as opposed to shutting down, but it is password protected. When you return to your computer, you can access it in the same way you normally start Windows. If the Ctrl+Alt+Del option is

enabled, you need to press [Ctrl][Alt][Delete] before you can enter a password. To lock your computer, click the Start button, point to the arrow next to the Power button, then click Lock or press [ ] + L to lock the computer. At the Welcome screen, click your name (if prompted), type your password, and then press [Enter].

Securing Your Computer

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UNIT

F Windows 7

Defending Against Malicious Software Malware protection provides information and security against malware, which is malicious software, such as viruses and spyware that can delete or corrupt files and steal personal information. Spyware is software that attempts to collect your personal information or change computer settings without your consent. Typically, spyware is downloaded without your knowledge and installed on your computer along with free software you willingly accept, such as freeware, games, or music file-sharing programs. Spyware is often associated with adware software that displays advertisements, such as a pop-up ad. Windows Defender uses alerts to protect your computer from malware, spyware, and any other potentially harmful software that attempts to install itself or run on your computer. When you receive an alert of a potential problem, you can use the Microsoft SpyNet community to help you determine if the software is alright to run. Windows Defender determines if there are potential problems by using definitions. A definition provides instructions on how to defend against malware software. Because software dangers continually change, it’s important to have up-to-date definitions, which you can get online. If Windows Defender finds a problem, it quarantines the software, which prevents it from running. You can then decide if it is software you indeed want to run. You want to continue checking security settings on Quest Specialty Travel computers to make sure company information is safe.

STEPS

TROUBLE If Check for Updates Now is not available, click the Help button arrow, then click Check for updates to check for Windows Defender and definition updates.

QUICK TIP You can click the Scan button to start a quick scan.

1. Click in the Control Panel Search box, type Windows Defender, then click Windows Defender in the System and Security window The Windows Defender window opens, displaying status and information about your computer’s current protection against malicious software. In Figure F-7, the user is being asked to check for new definitions.

2. Click Check for Updates Now if available The User Account Control window opens, asking you for permission to make security changes.

3. Click Continue, or type the administrator password, then click OK Windows Defender checks for definitions and installs any updates. Upon completion, status information at the bottom of the window is updated with the definition version and date and time.

4. Click the Scan button arrow at the top of the window, then click Quick scan Windows Defender scans the essential files on your computer, as shown in Figure F-8. Upon completion, scan statistics appear, including start time, elapsed time, and number of objects scanned. Status information at the bottom of the window is also updated. The status information includes scan schedule, which you can modify.

5. Click the Tools button at the top of the window The Tools and Settings window opens, displaying links for Options, Microsoft SpyNet, Quarantined items, Allowed items, Windows Defender website, and the Microsoft Malware Protection Center website.

6. Click Microsoft SpyNet The Join Microsoft SpyNet window opens. This window provides a description of how SpyNet works. SpyNet allows Windows Defender to send Microsoft information to help identify and stop spyware infections.

7. Click Cancel The Join Microsoft SpyNet window closes and the main Windows Defender window reopens.

8. Click Quarantined items The Quarantined items window opens, displaying any items identified as potential problems.

9. Click the Close button in the Windows Defender window, then click the Close button in the Control Panel Search box The System and Security window reopens. Windows 128

Securing Your Computer

Windows Defender buttons

Scan button arrow

Windows 7

FIGURE F-7: Windows Defender window

Check for Updates Now button

Current security status information; yours will differ

FIGURE F-8: Scanning for malware

Progress meter during the malware scanning process

Monitoring and managing programs using Windows Defender You can use Windows Defender to monitor all the programs on your computer or just specific ones. In the Windows Defender window, click the Tools button to open the Tools and Settings window. To remove or restore quarantined programs, click the Quarantined items link, select a

program, then click Remove or Restore. To remove a program from the allowed items (not monitored) list, click the Allowed items link, select a program, then click Remove from list.

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UNIT

F Windows 7

Setting Up Internet Security Windows provides Internet security options to prevent users on the Internet from gaining access to personal information without your permission, such as credit card information, while you shop online. In addition, Windows security options protect your computer from unsafe software downloaded or run from the Internet. Internet security is divided into zones, or Web site areas, to which you can assign different levels of security. There are four security zones: Internet, Local intranet, Trusted sites, and Restricted sites. See Table F-1 for a description of each security zone. When you access a Web page or download content from a site, Internet Explorer checks its security settings and determines the Web site’s zone, which displays on the right side of the Internet Explorer status bar. All Internet Web sites are by default assigned to the Internet zone until you assign individual Web sites to other zones. In addition to security zones, you can also control the Web content that appears on your computer with the Content Advisor. The Content Advisor allows you to prevent access to Web sites that contain material you deem inappropriate, due to elements such as language or violence. This is a helpful feature for protecting children from inappropriate content. You can create a supervisor password to prevent other users from making changes to the Content Advisor settings. Your manager has asked you to check Internet security settings to make sure company computers are secure for Internet use.

STEPS QUICK TIP To customize a security level for a selected zone, click Custom level on the Security tab, select the settings you want, then click OK.

TROUBLE If the slider is not available, click Default level to change the security level to Medium and display the slider.

1. In the task pane, click the Network and Internet link, then click Internet Options The Internet Properties dialog box opens, displaying the General tab.

2. Click the Security tab The Internet Properties dialog box reopens, displaying the Security tab with the Internet zone and its current security level, as shown in Figure F-9. The security levels are High, Medium-high, and Medium. You can move the slider up for a higher level of security or down for a lower level of security.

3. Drag the slider up or down to adjust the security level, then click Yes if a Warning message dialog box opens A detailed description appears next to the security level, which changes as you adjust the security level.

4. Under Select a zone to view or change security settings, click the Trusted sites icon The security-level information for Trusted sites appears, where you can add and remove trusted sites or change the security-level settings. The security levels are Low, Medium-low, Medium, Medium-high, and High.

5. With the Internet Properties dialog box still open, click the Content tab The Content tab opens, displaying settings to control Internet content. You can set parental controls and content ratings for viewing Internet content, protect your Internet identity using certificates, suggest content entries using AutoComplete, and access Web site content using feeds.

6. Under Content Advisor, click Enable The Content Advisor dialog box opens, as shown in Figure F-10. This dialog box allows you to make changes to security or personal settings. QUICK TIP To create a password to change Content Advisor settings, click the General tab in the Content Advisor dialog box, click Create password, type and confirm a password and related hint as indicated, then click OK.

7. If prompted, click Continue, or type the administrator password and click OK The Content Advisor dialog box opens, displaying the Ratings tab with current rating levels for the ICRA3 (Internet Content Rating Association) service, as shown in Figure F-10. You can select any of the categories to change their rating levels independently of the others. The rating levels specify what users are allowed to see and range from None to Unrestricted.

8. Drag the slider to adjust the content rating level for the selected category When you change the rating level, the detailed description below the rating level changes.

9. Click Cancel in the Content Advisor dialog box, then click Cancel in the Internet Properties dialog box The Network and Internet window opens.

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Windows 7

FIGURE F-9: Internet Properties dialog box with the Security tab displayed

Trusted sites icon Internet zones

Current security settings for the Internet zone; yours may differ

Security level slider

FIGURE F-10: Content Advisor dialog box

Rating service Ratings categories

Rating level slider

More Info button

TABLE F-1: Security zones in Internet Explorer

zone

description

default setting

Internet

Contains all Web sites that are not assigned to any other zone

Medium-high

Local intranet

Contains all Web sites that are on your organization’s intranet and don’t require a proxy server

Medium-low

Trusted sites

Contains Web sites that you trust not to threaten the security of your computer

Medium

Restricted sites

Contains Web sites that you believe threaten the security of your computer

High (blocks all cookies)

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Windows 131

UNIT

F Windows 7

Protecting Your Internet Identity To further protect your privacy, you can use certificates to verify your identity and protect important information, such as your credit card number, on the Internet. A certificate is a digitally signed statement verifying the identity of a person or the security of a Web site. A certificate is also known as a Digital ID in other programs, such as Microsoft Outlook. For normal transactions over the Internet in which you provide personal information, you won’t have to think about certificates. When you visit a secure Web site (one whose address often starts with “https” instead of “http”), it automatically sends you its certificate. When Internet Explorer receives the certificate, it displays a lock icon on the status bar, which you can click to view a report, and validates the certificate information, which includes the Web site address, expiration date, and certifying authority. If any of the information in the certificate is invalid, Internet Explorer blocks access to the site. If you need to provide a certificate by request of a Web site, you can obtain a personal security certification from an independent Certification Authority (CA). There are two types of certificates: personal and Web site. A personal certificate verifies your identity to a secure Web site that requires a certificate, whereas a Web site certificate verifies its security to you before you send them information. To transfer information and files on the Internet, you want to learn more about using certificates and import a certificate issued by John Casey, a coworker at Quest Specialty Travel, to see how it works.

STEPS 1. Click Internet Options The Internet Properties dialog box opens, displaying the General tab.

2. Click the Content tab, then under Certificates, click Certificates QUICK TIP To obtain a personal certificate, find a certification authority on the Trusted Root Certification Authorities tab in the Certificates dialog box or search for one on the Internet. The certification authority works with you to create the certificate file and import it to your computer.

The Certificates dialog box opens, displaying the Personal tab. The Personal tab stores your individual (“personal”) certificates, while the other tabs in this dialog box, such as Other People, store certificates based on the purpose described by the tab name. The subsequent tabs are identified as trusted or untrusted, which indicates whether you should use them or not. Because the certificate example is not yours and not issued by a CA, you want to import and store it under the Other People tab.

3. Click the Other People tab, click Import to start the Certificate Import Wizard, then click Next The next Certificate Import Wizard dialog box opens, asking you to select a certificate file.

4. Click Browse to display the Open dialog box, navigate to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files, double-click the file WIN F-1.cer, then click Next The next Certificate Import Wizard dialog box opens, asking you to select a certificate location.

5. Click Next to display a summary of your choices in the wizard, click Finish, then click OK in the dialog box that opens telling you the import was successful The John Casey certificate appears in the Certificates dialog box, as shown in Figure F-11.

TROUBLE If the Remove button is not available, press [Delete] instead. See your network administrator for permission, if necessary.

6. Double-click the John Casey certificate The Certificate dialog box opens, as shown in Figure F-12, displaying information about the specific certificate, including its trustworthiness and the dates between which it’s valid.

7. Click OK to close the Certificate dialog box, click the John Casey certificate to select it, if necessary, click Remove, then click Yes in the message box to confirm the deletion 8. Click Close to close the Certificates dialog box, then click Cancel to close the Internet Properties dialog box The Internet Properties dialog box closes and the Network and Internet window reopens.

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Windows 7

FIGURE F-11: Certificates dialog box with a personal certificate

Certificate issued by John Casey

FIGURE F-12: General tab in the Certificate dialog box

Certificate information

Certification details

Sending secure information using Windows CardSpace With Windows CardSpace, you can securely send information in the form of online cards to Web sites or online services. Windows CardSpace is a system for creating relationships with Web sites and online services that provides a consistent way for you to review the identity of a site, manage your information, review information before sending it to a site, and for sites to request information from you. Windows CardSpace can replace the usernames and passwords that you use to register and log on to Web sites and online services.

You can create a personal card or have a business or organization issue you a managed card. To start Windows CardSpace, click the Start button, click Control Panel, click User Accounts and Family Safety, then click Windows CardSpace. To add a card, click the Add a card button, select a card type, enter the requested information, and then click Save. In the main screen, you can use commands to edit, duplicate, delete, back up, and restore cards. When you’re done, click Close.

Securing Your Computer

Windows 133

UNIT

F Windows 7

Protecting Your Internet Privacy When you browse the Internet, you can access and gather information from Web sites, but Web sites can also gather information about you without your knowledge. You can set Internet privacy options to protect your personal identity from unauthorized access. When you visit a Web site, the site creates a cookie file, known as a first-party cookie, which stores information on your computer, such as your Web site preferences or personal identifiable information, including your name and e-mail address. The next time you visit that site, it can access the cookie to collect this information. Not all cookies are harmful; many first-party cookies save you time reentering information on a return visit to a Web site. However, there are also third-party cookies, which are created by Web sites using advertising banners, for example, you are not currently viewing. Once a cookie is saved on your computer, only the Web site that created it can read it. Windows privacy options allow you to block or permit cookies for Web sites in the Internet zone; however, when you block cookies, you might not be able to access all the features of a Web site. If a Web site that you have blocked tries to place a cookie, a red icon appears on the status bar. To find out if the Web site you are viewing in Internet Explorer contains third-party cookies or if any cookies have been restricted, you can get a privacy report from the site. The privacy report lists all the Web sites with content on the current Web page and shows how each site handles cookies. As you continue to check the current security settings on your computer, you want to check the privacy settings and get a privacy report for a Web page.

STEPS 1. Click Internet Options The Internet Properties dialog box opens, displaying the General tab.

2. Click the Privacy tab The Privacy tab dialog box opens, as shown in Figure F-13, displaying a slider, which you use to select a privacy setting to block cookies for the Internet zone. You move the slider up for a higher level of privacy or down for a lower level of privacy.

3. Drag the slider to adjust the privacy setting

TROUBLE If a blank page appears in Internet Explorer, see “Opening a Web Page and Following Links” in Unit G for information to visit a Web site.

QUICK TIP To view a Web site’s privacy policy summary, select a Web site in the Privacy Report dialog box, then click Summary.

When you change your privacy settings, a detailed description appears next to the level. When you apply the privacy changes, they might not affect cookies that are already on your computer, but they will affect any new ones. Whether you set the privacy level to a high setting, which blocks most or all cookies, or a low setting, which blocks only a few or no cookies, you can click Sites in the section below to override cookie handling for individual Web sites.

4. Click Cancel The Internet Properties dialog box closes without making any changes and the Network and Internet window reopens.

5. Click the Internet Explorer button

on the taskbar

Internet Explorer opens, displaying your home page.

6. Click the Safety button on the toolbar, then click Webpage Privacy Policy The Privacy Report dialog box opens, as shown in Figure F-14, displaying all the Web sites associated with the current Web page and how your computer handled their cookies.

7. Click Close to close the Privacy Report dialog box, then click the Close button Internet Explorer window Internet Explorer closes and the Network and Internet window reopens.

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in the

Privacy level slider

Windows 7

FIGURE F-13: Internet Properties dialog box with the Privacy tab displayed

Current privacy setting information; yours might differ

FIGURE F-14: Privacy Report dialog box

Cookie information for each Web site Web sites with content on the current Web page; your list might differ

Providing security with the Information Bar The Information Bar in Internet Explorer makes it easy for you to make informed decisions about potentially harmful content entering your computer. By default, Internet Explorer blocks pop-ups, certain programs, downloads, security risks, and other harmful threats. If the default settings in Internet Explorer are turned on, the Information Bar appears under the Address bar when a Web site tries to open a pop-up window, install an add-on, such as an ActiveX control, or download a file to your computer. Pop-up windows typically display annoying ads.

ActiveX controls provide added functionality to Internet Explorer, which makes using the Internet more enjoyable. However, it also opens the door for spyware and adware to invade your computer and privacy. When the Information Bar appears, you can click it to display options for dealing with the program or pop-up or to get more information. You can also ignore the Information Bar and continue viewing the Web site, although all the features on the site might not function properly if you choose not to allow the blocked content or program.

Securing Your Computer

Windows 135

UNIT

F Windows 7

Deleting Internet Information As you browse the Web, Internet Explorer stores information about your activities, including the information you have provided to Web sites when you log on (passwords) or fill out a form, the location of Web sites you have visited (history), and preference information used by Web sites (cookies). Internet Explorer also saves Web pages, images, and media (temporary Internet files) for faster viewing in the future. If you frequently browse the Web, Internet Explorer can gather and store a large amount of Internet-related data (including normal and InPrivate browsing), which can fill up your hard drive and slow down your computer. To help prevent computer performance problems, you need to periodically delete the Internet files and information; yet you can still preserve the files and information for your trusted sites in your Favorites. You can delete the Internet files and information individually or all at once. Your computer at Quest Specialty Travel seems to be slowing down, so you decide to clean up the temporary Internet files on the computer and check related settings to reduce the amount stored in the future.

STEPS QUICK TIP To delete browsing history upon exiting Internet Explorer, select the Delete browsing history on exit check box to select it on the General tab in the Internet Explorer Properties dialog box.

1. Click Internet Options The Internet Properties dialog box opens, displaying the General tab.

2. In the Browsing history section, click Delete The Delete Browsing History dialog box opens, as shown in Figure F-15, displaying the different types of files and data stored when you browse the Web.

3. Click the Temporary Internet files check box to select it, if necessary, then click the Preserve Favorites website data check box to select it, if necessary These options delete the temporary Internet files from your computer, except for the ones in your Favorites, freeing disk space on your computer. The files are not placed in the Recycle Bin, so you need to be sure you want to delete them.

4. Click the History check box to select it This option deletes the list of Web sites you have recently visited and no longer need.

5. Click Delete The Delete Browsing History dialog box closes and the Internet Properties dialog box reopens with the General tab displayed.

6. In the Browsing history section, click Settings The Temporary Internet Files and History Settings dialog box opens, as shown in Figure F-16, displaying settings to customize the way temporary Internet files and history items are deleted.

7. In the Temporary Internet Files section, click the arrows in the Disk space to use (8 – 1024MB) box as necessary until you reach 40 MB Changing this amount decreases the space allocated to store temporary Internet files.

8. In the History section, click the arrows in the Days to keep pages in history box as necessary until you reach 25 Changing this amount increases the number of days Internet Explorer builds the History list.

9. Click Cancel, then click OK The Temporary Internet Files and History Settings and Internet Properties dialog boxes close without saving changes, and the Network and Internet window reopens.

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Windows 7

FIGURE F-15: Delete Browsing History dialog box

Preserve Favorites website data check box Temporary Internet files check box Delete Browsing History options

Delete button

FIGURE F-16: Temporary Internet Files and History Settings dialog box

Disk space to use arrows

Days to keep pages in history arrows

Encrypting files using BitLocker If you have an internal or external hard drive, or removable drive, you can use BitLocker to encrypt the entire system drive, including the Windows system files needed to start up and log on to Windows 7. A partition is a section of a disk drive that behaves like a separate drive. Partitioning is particularly useful if you run more than one operating system. BitLocker helps protect your system and blocks hackers from accessing sensitive information. When you add files to your computer, BitLocker automatically encrypts them. When you copy files to another location, the files are decrypted. After you turn on BitLocker, it’s critical

that you create a recovery password, because BitLocker locks up the entire drive if it detects a problem during start-up. To use BitLocker, click the Start button, click Control Panel, click System and Security, click BitLocker Drive Encryption, click Turn On BitLocker for the drive you want to encrypt, follow the BitLocker setup wizard, then click the Close button. If the Turn On BitLocker button is not available, your drive configuration is not suitable for BitLocker. Click the Help button for more information.

Securing Your Computer

Windows 137

UNIT

F Windows 7

Setting Parental Controls The Parental Controls feature helps you manage your child’s access to the Internet, programs, and files on your computer. Parental Controls allows you to set limits on Web access, the amount of time spent logged on the computer, and which games and programs can be used. You can specify different settings for each user account on your computer, so the level of access you want for each individual can be set accordingly. You can also review activity reports on a periodic basis to check what your children are specifically doing during their time on the computer. In addition to the basic parental controls, you can download and install additional online Web site filters and activity reports. With Windows Live Family Safety from Microsoft, you can limit searches, monitor and block or allow Web sites, and limit communication in Windows Live Spaces, Messenger, or Hotmail. During a visit to your Quest Specialty Travel office, your child wants to use your computer so you want to set up Parental Controls.

STEPS Before you complete the steps in this lesson, you need to have access to a standard user account on your computer. See your instructor or technical support person. 1. In the task pane, click the User Accounts and Family Safety link, then click Parental Controls The User Account Control window may open, asking you for permission to make changes to the security or personal settings.

2. If prompted, click Continue, or type the administrator password, then click OK The Parental Controls window opens. See Table F-2 for a description of the different type of controls you can set.

3. Click the standard user account specified by your instructor or administrator The User Controls window opens.

4. Under Parental Controls, click the On, enforce current settings option button Selecting this option enables Parental Controls and collects information about computer usage by the user, as shown in Figure F-17.

5. Under Windows Settings, click Allow and block specific programs The Application Restrictions window opens, displaying options to allow all programs or only the ones you want to allow.

6. Click the can only use the programs I allow option button The Application Restrictions window opens, as shown in Figure F-18, displaying options to block specific programs.

7. Click Cancel, click OK, then click the Close button

in the Parental Controls window

The Parental Controls window closes without saving changes.

TABLE F-2: Parental Control settings

settings

description

Time limits

Click and drag the hours you want to block or allow.

Games

Select options to block or allow games based on ratings or content.

Allow and block specific programs

Select an option to use all programs or only approved programs.

Windows Live Family Safety

Select options to block or allow Web sites or communications with contacts and get reports for online activity; available when Family Safety is downloaded and installed from Windows Live Essentials.

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Windows 7

FIGURE F-17: User Controls window

User account name and type; yours will differ

Parental Controls option button

Current Parental Control settings; yours might differ

Options to set time limits and control game and program usage

Allow and block specific programs link

FIGURE F-18: Application Restrictions window

Current program restrictions; yours might differ

Creating a new user account There are two main types of user accounts: administrator and standard. The administrator account is for the person who needs to make changes to anything on the computer as well as manage user accounts. A standard account is for people who need to manage personal files and run programs. If you have an administrator account, you can create a new user account or delete an existing one. When you add a new user to your computer, Windows creates a separate identity, allowing the user to keep files completely private and customize the operating

system with personal preferences. The name you assign to the user appears on the Welcome screen and on the Start menu when the user is logged on. The steps to add and delete user accounts differ, depending on whether your computer is part of a company or personal network. To create a new user account on a personal network, click the Start button, click Control Panel, click Add or remove user accounts, grant permission to continue, click Create a new account, type a username, select an account type, click Create Account, then click Close.

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Windows 139

Practice Concepts Review

For current SAM information including versions and content details, visit SAM Central (http://samcentral.course.com). If you have a SAM user profile, you may have access to hands-on instruction, practice, and assessment of the skills covered in this unit. Since we support various versions of SAM throughout the life of this text, you will want to check with your instructor for instructions and the correct URL/Web site to access those assignments.

Match the statements below with the elements labeled in the screen shown in Figure F-19. FIGURE F-19

a

b f

e d c

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Which element allows you to view essential protection settings? Which element allows you to limit computer time? Which element protects your privacy? Which element prevents access to your computer? Which element provides malware protection? Which element allows you to install Windows updates?

Match each term with the statement that best describes it. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

Spyware Virus Worm Certificate Firewall

Windows 140

a. A program that tries to collect information about you b. A security system that creates a protective barrier between your computer and others on the Internet c. A program you open that infects your computer d. A program you don’t need to open for it to infect your computer e. A statement that verifies the identity of a person or the security of a Web site

Securing Your Computer

Select the best answer from the list of choices. 12. Which of the following is NOT considered malware? a. Virus c. Worm b. SpyNet d. Trojan horse 13. Which of the following programs protects you from viruses? a. Antivirus c. Windows Defender b. SpyNet d. Windows Update 14. Which of the following creates a protective barrier between your computer and the Internet? a. Definition c. Content Advisor b. Firewall d. Digital ID 15. Which of the following is NOT a security zone? a. Internet c. Trusted sites b. Intranet d. Restricted sites 16. Which of the following are types of certificates? a. Personal and Web site c. Trusted and personal b. Trusted and approved d. Personal and approved 17. Which of the following is also known as a certificate? a. Definition c. Cookie b. Digital ID d. Port 18. Which of the following is NOT an Internet file cleanup operation? a. Cookies c. Favorites b. History d. Passwords 19. Which of the following is NOT a parental control? a. Web restrictions c. Time limits b. Games d. Definitions

Windows 7

Concepts Review (Continued)

Skills Review 1. Explore the Action Center. a. Open the Control Panel. b. Open the System and Security window. c. Open the Action Center window. d. Expand each of the Action Center areas. e. Go back to the System and Security window. 2. Manage Windows Firewall. a. Open the Windows Firewall window. b. Open the Allowed Programs dialog box. c. Change program exceptions to deselect Windows Media Player Network Sharing Service (Internet). d. Go back to the System and Security window. 3. Get Automatic Updates. a. Open the Windows Update window. b. View the update history. c. Open the Change settings window. d. Check for updates. (Stop: Don’t install any updates without permission.) e. Go back to the System and Security window.

Securing Your Computer Copyright 2010 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part.

Windows 141

Skills Review (Continued) 4. Defend against malicious software. a. Open the Windows Defender window. (Hint: Use the Search Control Panel box.) b. Check for new definitions if necessary. c. If prompted, grant permission to make security changes. d. Perform a full scan. e. Display Windows Defender tools. f. View Allowed items and options. g. Close the Windows Defender window. 5. Set up Internet security. a. Open the Network and Internet window. b. Open the Internet Properties dialog box and display security settings. c. Change the security level. d. Display content settings, then open the Content Advisor dialog box. e. If prompted, grant permission to make security changes. f. Change the content rating for Violence. g. Close the Content Advisor dialog box without applying any changes. 6. Protect your Internet identity. a. Display content settings in the Internet Properties dialog box. b. Open the Certificates dialog box. c. Import the file WIN F-2.cer from the drive and folder where you store your Data Files into the Other People tab. d. Remove the certificate. e. Close the Certificates dialog box. 7. Protect your Internet privacy. a. Display privacy settings in the Internet Properties dialog box. b. Change the privacy level to Low. c. Close the Internet Properties dialog box without accepting any changes. d. Start Internet Explorer. e. Visit a Web page other than your home page and get a Web page privacy report. f. Close the report and Internet Explorer. 8. Delete Internet information. a. Open the Internet Properties dialog box and display the Delete Browsing History dialog box. b. Delete temporary Internet files, yet preserve Favorites website data. c. Delete cookies. d. Close the Delete Browsing History dialog box. e. Open the Settings dialog box for Browsing history, review the settings, then close it without making any changes. f. Close the Internet Properties dialog box. 9. Set Parental Controls. a. Open the Parental Controls window. b. If prompted, grant permission to make security changes. c. Select a user account to change parental controls. d. Set time restrictions. e. View the Application Restrictions window, then close it without making any changes. f. Close the Parental Controls window.

Windows 142

Securing Your Computer Copyright 2010 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part.

You work at a small pet shop supply company called PetStop. Because you have some experience with computers and the Internet, your manager asks you to set Internet security and privacy settings for the company computers. a. b. c. d. e.

Open the Internet Properties dialog box from the Control Panel. Display the security settings, then change the security level for the Internet to High. Display privacy settings, then change the privacy level to High. Delete cookies and temporary Internet files, yet preserve Favorites. Close the Internet Properties dialog box and the Control Panel without accepting any changes.

Windows 7

Independent Challenge 1

Independent Challenge 2 You are the network administrator at Robotz, Inc., a toy company that specializes in the production and distribution of robots. You want employees to update their computer systems with the latest Windows 7 system updates. You access Windows Update and determine which components you want the employees to install. a. b. c. d. e. f.

Open the Windows Update window from the Control Panel. Check for updates. View Installed Updates. View the update history. Check Windows Update settings for your computer. Close the Windows Update window and the Control Panel.

Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Enable the option to require users to press [Ctrl][Alt][Delete] at the Welcome screen. ■ Lock the computer. ■ Press [Ctrl][Alt][Delete] and log on to the computer. ■ Disable the option to require users to press [Ctrl][Alt][Delete].

Independent Challenge 3 You manage an international computer security company called Secure-One International. You want to test out your security system with noncertified certificates. Gary O’Neal, an employee, was asked to create his own certificate and try to pass it off as an authorized certificate from a trusted Certification Authority. a. b. c. d. e.

Open the Internet Properties dialog box from the Control Panel. Display the content settings, then open the Certificates dialog box. Import the file WIN F-3.cer from the drive and folder where you store your Data Files into the Other People tab. Remove the Gary O’Neal certificate, then close the Certificates dialog box. Close the Internet Properties dialog box and the Control Panel without accepting any changes.

Real Life Independent Challenge Even if you don’t have children of your own, you might have visitors one day with children who want to play games on your computer. Rather than just letting them have access to your entire system, it would be better to set up a standard user account with Parental Controls. a. b. c. d.

Open the User Accounts and Family Safety window from the Control Panel. Set up Parental Controls for a standard user. Turn on Parental Controls. Open the Application Restrictions window, select the wordpad.exe check box, then close the window.

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Windows 143

Real Life Independent Challenge (Continued) Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Open the Time Restrictions window. ■ Block 6 to 12 Monday through Friday, then close the window. ■ Open the Game Controls window. ■ Allow the user to play games. ■ Set the Hearts game to Always Block, then close the window. e. With permission from your network administrator, switch to the standard user, if necessary, open the WordPad and Hearts programs to view the parental controls in place, then switch back to the administrator. f. Restore the parental controls for the standard user. g. Turn off Parental Controls. h. Close the Parental Controls window.

Visual Workshop Re-create the screen shown in Figure F-20, which shows an Application Restrictions window for a user account; your specific result will differ.

FIGURE F-20

Windows 144

Securing Your Computer

UNIT

G

Exploring the Internet with

Windows 7

Microsoft Internet Explorer Files You Will Need:

The Internet is a global collection of millions of computers linked together to share infor-

No file needed.

ing text, graphics, sounds, videos, and computer programs. The Web (also known as the

mation. Using the Internet, computer users can share many types of information, includWorld Wide Web or WWW) is a part of the Internet that consists of Web sites located on different computers around the world. A Web site contains Web pages linked together to make searching for information on the Internet easier. Web pages are specially formatted documents that contain highlighted words, phrases, and graphics called hyperlinks (or simply links) that open other Web pages when you click them. Some Web pages contain frames, which are windows within a Web page to display other Web pages or content. Web browsers are software programs that you use to “surf the Web,” or display and navigate Web pages. This unit features Microsoft Internet Explorer 8, a popular browser from Microsoft that comes with Windows 7.

Keisha Lane, Vice President of

Operations for Quest Specialty Travel, asked you to use the Web to evaluate the company Web site. You want to find Web sites for other travel companies to see if there are any elements on those sites that Quest Specialty Travel should consider adding to its own site.

OBJECTIVES

Connect to the Internet Open a Web page and follow links Use tabs to browse Web pages Change your home page Search the Web Add a Web page and Slices to Favorites View and subscribe to a feed Get and use Accelerators Block pop-ups and filter phishing

UNIT

G Windows 7

Connecting to the Internet The Internet’s physical structure includes telephone lines, cables, satellites, and other telecommunications media, as depicted in Figure G-1. Universities and large companies are most likely connected to the Internet via high-speed cable wiring that transmits data very quickly. In many areas, DSL (digital subscriber line) provides a completely digital connection using telephone lines, whereas cable modems provide one using cable television lines. DSL and cable modems, also known as broadband connections, are continually connected to the Internet and use a network setup. In remote areas, or if you want a lower-cost alternative to a broadband connection, you can create a connection with a dial-up modem and telephone line, which needs to be established each time you connect to the Internet. You can avoid using physical telephone or cable lines by using a wireless connection, which uses radio waves or microwaves to maintain communications. Data travels more slowly over telephone wires than over digital lines and cable modems. Whether you use a telephone line, DSL line, cable modem, or wireless signal, Windows can help you establish a connection between your computer and the Internet. First, you need to select an ISP (Internet service provider), which is a company that provides Internet access through servers connected directly to the Internet. Your ISP sets you up with an Internet account and connection information that provides you Internet access for a monthly rate. Quest Specialty Travel already has an ISP account. You want to set up an Internet connection so you can browse the Web.

STEPS TROUBLE If you connect to the Internet through a network, follow your instructor’s or technical support person’s directions.

TROUBLE If not all the options are available, click the Show connection options that this computer is not set up to use check box to select it.

1. Click the Network icon (for broadband) or the Open Network and Sharing Center link

(for wireless) on the taskbar, then click

The Network and Sharing Center window opens.

2. Under Change your networking settings, click the Set up a new connection or network link, click Connect to the Internet, if necessary, then click Next The Connect to the Internet Wizard dialog box opens, displaying connection options.

3. Click Set up a new connection, or Set up a new connection anyway if you are already connected to the Internet The next screen in the wizard asks you to choose how to connect to the Internet, as shown in Figure G-2, either wireless, broadband (cable or DSL), or dial-up.

4. Click the option with the way you want to connect: Broadband (PPPoE) or Dial-up The next screen in the Connect to the Internet Wizard asks you to type the information from your Internet service provider (ISP). Your ISP documentation provides you with a username and password.

5. In the User name text box, type your username, press [Tab], then type your password in the Password text box As you type the password, bullets appear to protect others from seeing it instead of characters unless the Show characters check box is selected.

6. If you are creating a dial-up connection, type the area code and telephone number of your ISP in the Dial-up phone number text box Your ISP documentation provides the numbers you should use.

7. Click the Remember this password check box to clear it, if necessary This option remembers your password, so you don’t have to enter it to access the Internet when you connect. A default connection name appears in the Connection name text box. Keep the default name.

8. Click the Allow other people to use this connection check box to clear it, if necessary This option allows other users on your network to connect to the Internet using your Internet connection.

9. Click Connect to complete and establish the Internet connection 10. If the connection is successful, click Close; otherwise click Cancel Windows 146

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FIGURE G-1: Structure of the Internet

Satellite connection

Phone line connection

Fiber-optic cable connection

Wireless Connection

FIGURE G-2: Selecting an Internet connection option

Options to connect to the Internet

Show connection options that this computer is not set up to use check box

Sharing an Internet connection If you have a home or small office network using Windows, you can share an Internet connection with all the computers on the network using one connection. If you are setting up a connection, you can enable Internet connection sharing by selecting the Allow other people to use this connection check box during the Connect to the Internet Wizard process. If your connection to the Internet is already set up, open the

Control Panel, click the Network and Internet link, then click the Network and Sharing Center link. Click the Change adapter settings link in the left pane, right-click your connection icon, click Properties, click Continue, if necessary, to gain access to the properties, click the Sharing tab, click the Allow other network users to connect through this computer’s Internet connection check box to select it, then click OK.

Exploring the Internet with Microsoft Internet Explorer

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UNIT

G Windows 7

Opening a Web Page and Following Links Internet Explorer is a Web browser that you use to view, print, and search for information on the Internet. Table G-1 describes the various elements of the Internet Explorer window. In Internet Explorer, you can open a Web page quickly and easily by entering a Web address in the Address bar. A Web address is a unique place on the Internet where a Web page resides. A Web address is also called a URL, which stands for Uniform Resource Locator. Web pages connect to each other through links that you can follow to obtain more information about a topic, as shown in Figure G-3. A link is specially formatted text or a graphic that you can click to move to another location on the same Web page, or to a different Web page altogether. To follow a link, simply click the highlighted word, phrase, or graphic. The mouse pointer changes to when it is over a link. If you change your mind, or if a Web page takes too long to load, or open on the screen, you can click the Stop button on the Address bar. If you stop a Web page while it is loading, and the page doesn’t completely open, you can click the Refresh button on the Address bar to update the screen. If an older Web page doesn’t display correctly, you can click the Compatibility button to fix it. To evaluate the Quest Specialty Travel Web site, you need to open it in Internet Explorer. You want to explore some of the links to evaluate its content.

STEPS TROUBLE If the Set Up Windows Internet Explorer 8 dialog box opens, click Next, enable Suggested Sites, click Next, enable Express settings, then click Finish.

QUICK TIP To open a Web page in a new tab in the browser window, enter the URL in the Address bar, press and hold [Alt], then press Enter.

1. Click the Internet Explorer button

on the taskbar

Internet Explorer opens, displaying the default home page in a tab in the browser window. The home page, the main Web page around which a Web site is built, appears when you start Internet Explorer.

2. Click anywhere in the Address bar at the top of the window The current address is highlighted, and any text you type will replace the current address.

3. Type www.questspecialtytravel.com, then press [Enter] When you enter a Web address, Internet Explorer automatically inserts “http://” in the Address bar before the URL. The status bar displays the connection process. After downloading for a few seconds, the Web page appears in the document window. To make the site easier to identify, the domain name is highlighted in black while the remainder of the URL appears in gray in the Address bar.

4. Move the pointer over Destinations, as shown in Figure G-3 “Destinations” is a link. When you move the pointer over a link, the pointer changes to address of the link appears in the status bar.

, and the

5. Click Destinations The Internet Explorer logo on the tab changes to the busy icon as you access the Web page and then changes back when the new Web page appears. The Destinations page on the Quest Specialty Travel site opens in the document window.

6. Move the pointer over the Quest Travel logo in the upper-left corner so that the pointer changes to , then click the Quest Travel logo The Quest Specialty Travel home page opens in the document window.

7. Click the Back button

next to the Address bar

The Web page you viewed immediately before the home page—the Destinations page—reopens in the document window.

8. Click the Forward button

next to the Address bar

The Quest Specialty Travel home page reopens in the browser window.

9. Click the Recent Pages list arrow Travel :: Destinations

next to the Address bar, then click Quest Specialty

The Destinations page opens in the browser window again. Windows 148

Exploring the Internet with Microsoft Internet Explorer

Title bar

Search box Command bar

Back and Forward buttons and Recent Pages list arrow

Windows 7

FIGURE G-3: Web page in Internet Explorer browser window

Web page address in the Address bar

Internet Explorer logo

Quest Travel logo Pointer when positioned over a link

Favorites bar Current tab

Status bar

TABLE G-1: Elements of the Internet Explorer window

option

description

Title bar

Displays the name of the Web page and browser you are using at the top of the window

Navigation buttons

Provides buttons to view recently visited Web pages

Address bar

Opens or displays the address of the current Web page or the contents of a local or network computer drive

Search box

Displays link buttons to Web pages on the Internet or to documents on a local or network drive

Favorites bar

Provides buttons and links to view or add favorites, feeds, history, suggested sites, and get add-ons

Tabbed window

Displays Web page in a tabbed window; allows you to display many different Web pages at one time; you might need to scroll down the page to view its entire contents

Command bar

Provides buttons for easy access to the most commonly used commands in Internet Explorer

Status bar

Displays information about both your connection progress with new Web pages that you open and locations of the links in the document window as you move your mouse pointer over them; you can also change the view percentage to zoom in and out within a Web page and set security options

Understanding a URL A Web site consists of a main Web page and a collection of related Web pages located on a computer with a connection to the Internet. Each Web site has a unique URL that is typically composed of four parts: the protocol (a set of rules that allows computers to exchange information), the location of the Web site, the name of the Web site, and a suffix that identifies the type of site. At the end of the Web site name and suffix, another slash may appear, followed by one or more folder

names and a filename. A URL begins with a protocol, followed by a colon, two slashes, the location of the Web site, a dot, the name of the Web site, a dot, and a suffix. For example, in the address http://www. questspecialtytravel.com/destination.html, the protocol is http (Hypertext Transfer Protocol), the location of the Web site is www (World Wide Web), the name of the Web site is questspecialtytravel, the suffix is com (a commercial organization), and the Web page file is destination.html.

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UNIT

G Windows 7

Using Tabs to Browse Web Pages As you open Web sites, you can display each site in a separate tab, so you can view multiple Web sites in a single window. You can open Web pages in new tabs by using the redesigned New Tab page with links— use an Accelerator, browse the Web privately, reopen closed tabs, and reopen your last browsing session— to help you get started quickly. Once you open a tab, you can click to another one to quickly switch between tabs or click the Close button on the tab to exit it. If you prefer a visual way to switch between tabs, you can use Quick Tabs, which displays thumbnails of each page currently open in a tab, to open and close Web pages. When you open a new tab from another tab, the new tab is grouped together and color coded, which you can always change or ungroup later. You can right-click a tab to quickly perform a variety of operations, such as close a tab or tab group, ungroup a tab, refresh tabs, open a new tab, reopen the last tab closed, or see a list of all recently closed tabs and reopen any or all of them. You want to visit the Web site of another travel company so you can compare the functionality and content of the Quest Specialty Travel site with it.

STEPS 1. Point to the New Tab button to the right of the Quest Specialty Travel:: Destinations tab The New Tab icon

appears on the New Tab button.

2. Click A new tab appears, displaying information about using tabs in Internet Explorer. The URL “about:Tabs” is selected in the Address bar. The Destinations page on the Quest Specialty Travel site remains open in the other tab behind the new tab. TROUBLE If this travel Web page is not available or couldn’t be found, type another Web page location and use it throughout this lesson.

3. Type www.travel.com in the Address bar, then press [Enter] The home page for Travel.com, a Web site that provides a service for making travel arrangements, opens in the new tab. When you type a Web address in the Address bar, a feature called AutoComplete displays a list of possible matches from history, Favorites, or addresses you’ve typed previously. If a suggestion in the list matches the Web address you’re typing, a drop-down list appears with the items highlighted in blue. You can click the suggestion in the list you want to enter or continue to type.

4. Click the Quest Specialty Travel:: Destinations tab The Destinations page on the Quest Specialty Travel site reappears as the active tab, as shown in Figure G-4. QUICK TIP To open a Web page in a new tab without making it the active tab, press and hold [Ctrl], then click the link to the page you want to open.

5. Press and hold [Ctrl][Shift], then click About Us The About Us page for Quest Specialty Travel opens in a new colored tab grouped with the tab from which it was opened and becomes the active tab. When you have more than one tab open, the Quick Tabs button and the Tab list arrow become available to the left of the tabs. You can use these to switch between tabs quickly. Clicking the Quick Tabs button displays a thumbnail of each open Web page that you can click to switch among tabs, while the Tab list arrow provides a menu list of open tabs.

6. Click the Quick Tabs button Quick Tabs displays a thumbnail of each open tab, as shown in Figure G-5. QUICK TIP To ungroup a tab, right-click the tab in a group, then click Ungroup This Tab.

7. Click the Travel.com thumbnail to close Quick Tabs and switch to that tab, then click the Close button on the Travel.com tab The Travel.com tab closes, and the About Us page for Quest Specialty Travel appears in the active tab.

8. Click

on the Quest Specialty Travel:: About Us tab

The About Us tab closes, and the Destinations page for Quest Specialty Travel reopens.

9. Click the Quest Specialty Travel link The Quest Specialty Travel home page reopens. Windows 150

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New Tab button Current tab

Windows 7

FIGURE G-4: Web page opened in a tabbed window

New Tab

FIGURE G-5: Switch between tabs with Quick Tabs

Tab Close button

Quick Tabs button

Grouped tabs in blue; your color might differ

Tab List arrow

Quick Tabs window

Using InPrivate browsing If you’re using a computer at a friend’s house, another office, a hotel, or an Internet café and you don’t want to leave any trace or evidence of your Web activity, you can use InPrivate browsing. InPrivate browsing doesn’t retain or keep track of browsing history, searches, temporary Internet files, form data, cookies, or usernames and passwords. You can

start InPrivate browsing from a new tab or use the Safety button on the Command bar. When you start InPrivate browsing, Internet Explorer opens a new browser window. An InPrivate indicator icon appears in the Address bar when the featured is turned on. When you’re done, simply close the browser window to end the InPrivate browsing session.

Exploring the Internet with Microsoft Internet Explorer

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UNIT

G Windows 7

Changing Your Home Page A home page is referred to several different ways on the Web—one way in a browser and another way in a Web site. A home page in a browser is the page that opens when you start the program, whereas a home page in a Web site is the first page that appears when you open it. The home page also loads when you click the Home button on the Command bar. When you start Internet Explorer for the first time, the default home page is the Microsoft Network (MSN) Web site, unless the standard Windows 7 installation was modified by a third party, such as your network administrator or the computer manufacturer. You can change your home page if you want a different page to appear when you start Internet Explorer. You can also display one or more pages in tabs as the home page. You can choose one of the millions of Web pages available through the Internet, or you can select a particular file on your hard drive. As you continue to research the design and features of other travel Web sites, you decide to change your home page to Quest Specialty Travel, and then add another travel Web page to display in a second tab as one of your home pages.

STEPS 1. Click the Home button list arrow Home Page

on the Command bar, then click Add or Change

The Add or Change Home Page dialog box opens, displaying the address of the current Web page and options to use this page as your only home page or add this page to your home page tabs.

2. Click the Use this webpage as your only home page option button, as shown in Figure G-6, then click Yes The Quest Specialty Travel home page is set as the home page.

3. Click the About Us link, then click the Home button

on the Command bar

The Quest Specialty Travel home page opens in the document window. TROUBLE If this travel Web page is not available or couldn’t be found, type another Web page location and use it throughout this lesson.

4. Click anywhere in the Address bar, type www.travel.com, then press [Alt][Enter] The Travel.com home page opens in a new tab.

5. Click the Home button list arrow Home Page

on the Command bar, then click Add or Change

The Add or Change Home Page dialog box opens again.

6. Click the Use the current tab set as your home page option button, then click Yes The Quest Specialty Travel and the Travel.com home pages will both open in two tabs.

7. Click the Close button Command bar

on the Travel.com tab, then click the Home button

on the

The two home pages appear in the two tabs. If you no longer want multiple home pages, you can remove one or all of them.

8. Click the Home button list arrow on the Command bar, point to Remove, click Travel.com, then click Yes in the Delete Home Page dialog box Travel.com is removed from the list of home pages.

9. Click the Tools button on the Command bar, click Internet Options to open the Internet Options dialog box, as shown in Figure G-7, click Use default on the General tab or type the URL of your original home page, then click OK The home page is restored to the default MSN Web page at www.msn.com or your original home page URL.

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FIGURE G-6: Add or Change Home Page dialog box

Current Web page Home page options

FIGURE G-7: Internet Options dialog box

Current home page Web page Use default button

Viewing and maintaining a History list Sometimes you run across a great Web site and simply forget to add it to the Favorites Center. With Internet Explorer, there’s no need to try to remember all the sites you visit. The History feature keeps track of where you’ve been by date, site, most visited, or order visited today. To view the History list, click the Favorites button on the Favorites bar, click the History tab, then click a day or week in the Favorites Center pane to expand the list of Web sites visited. You can click the History list arrow to search the list, or sort the list by date, site, most visited, or order

visited today. Internet Explorer deletes the History list periodically based on the settings you specify on the General tab of the Internet Options dialog box. You can also use commands in the Internet Options dialog box to delete the History list. Click the Tools button, click Internet Options, then click the General tab. Select the Delete browsing history on exit check box to automatically delete the History list, or click Delete, select the History check box, then click Delete to delete the list manually.

Exploring the Internet with Microsoft Internet Explorer

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UNIT

G Windows 7

Searching the Web You can find all kinds of information on the Web. The best way to find information on the Web is to use a search engine. A search engine is a program provided by a search provider you access directly from Internet Explorer or through a Web site and use to search through a collection of Internet information to find what you want. Many search engines are available on the Web, such as Bing (default) by Microsoft, Wikipedia, Google, and Yahoo!, which you can add on to Internet Explorer. When you perform a search, you submit words or phrases, known as keywords that best describe what you want to retrieve to the search engine using the Search box to the right of the Address bar. As you type in the Search box, the search engine displays a menu list of text and visual suggestions for the matched sites. These matched sites are sometimes called hits. The search results of different search engines vary. If you’re looking for information on a page, you can use the Find toolbar to help highlight the text you want to find. You decide to use Bing to search for and examine another travel-related Web site for your competitive review.

STEPS QUICK TIP To specify a default search provider, click the Search box list arrow, click Manage Search Providers, select a provider, click Set as default, then click Close.

QUICK TIP To add more search providers, click the Search box list arrow, click Find More Providers, then click Add to Internet Explorer for the provider you want.

1. Click the Search box list arrow, then click Bing Before you start a search, you should select the search engine you want to use for this session, or specify the default you want to use. Bing is selected as the search engine for this session. With the Search box, you can enter keywords to search for the information you want.

2. Click in the Search box next to the Address bar or press [Ctrl][E] The more specific your search criteria or keyword in the Search box, the better the list of matches you will receive from the search engine. Use specific words, eliminate common words, such as “a” or “the”, and use quotation marks for specific phrases.

3. Type africa A menu appears, as shown in Figure G-8, displaying suggestions based on your search criteria. With the keywords in the Search box, you can use the Search button in the Search box or press [Enter] to display the results in the current tab, or press [Alt][Enter] to display the results in a new tab.

4. Press [Alt][Enter] The search engine, Bing, retrieves and displays a list of links to Web pages that contain your keywords in a new tab. The total number of Web sites found is listed at the top. The search results appear in order of decreasing relevance. If the search results return too many hits, you can narrow the search by adding more keywords. As you add more keywords, the search engine finds fewer, more specific Web pages that contain all of those words.

5. Click the Search box list arrow

, then click Find on this Page

The Find toolbar opens below the tabs, displaying find options, such as Previous, Next, and Highlight All Matches, Match Whole Word Only, and Match Case, and the number of matches. The search keyword is highlighted on the page, as shown in Figure G-9. QUICK TIP To use the Address bar to search, type go, find, or ? followed by a space and a word or phrase in the Address bar, and then press Enter.

Windows 154

6. Click any link in the list of matches The corresponding Web page appears in the tabbed window. You can click links on this Web site to jump to other related Web sites.

7. Click the Close button

on the Find toolbar

The Find toolbar closes and the search text highlighting is turned off.

8. Click the Back button

, then click the Quest Specialty Travel tab

You return to the Quest Specialty Travel home page and the Search results page remains open.

Exploring the Internet with Microsoft Internet Explorer

Windows 7

FIGURE G-8: Search box with keyword and visual suggestions

Search button Search box list arrow Search box with keyword

Visual suggestions; your list might differ

FIGURE G-9: Highlighted search results with the Find toolbar

Search results in a separate tabbed window

Find toolbar

Close button on Find toolbar Text to find and highlight on the page

Search results with highlighted keyword; yours might differ

Previewing and printing a Web page Web pages are designed for viewing on a computer screen, but you can also print all or part of one. Before you print, you should verify that the page looks the way you want. Print Preview shows you exactly how your Web page will look on the printed page. To preview a Web page, click the Print button arrow on the Command bar, then click Print

Preview. To print the current Web page with the current print settings, click the Print button on the Command bar. If you want to set print options using the Print dialog box, click the Print button arrow on the Command bar, then click Print.

Exploring the Internet with Microsoft Internet Explorer

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UNIT

G Windows 7

Adding a Web Page and Slices to Favorites Rather than memorizing URLs or keeping a handwritten list of Web pages you want to visit, you can use the Favorites Center to store and organize Web addresses. When you display a Web page in your browser window that you want to use at a later time, you can add the Web page to your list of Favorites in the Favorites Center. If you have opened a set of tabs, you can save them as a tab group to Favorites. If your list of Favorites grows long, you can delete Favorites you don’t visit anymore or organize Favorites into folders. If you frequently visit a Web page for specific updates, such as sports scores or stock quotes, you can use Web Slices to have Internet Explorer let you know when updates are available. A Web Slice is a portion of a Web page that lets you know when an update is available. If a Web Slice is available on a page, a green Web Slice button appears in the Command bar, similar to an RSS feed. When you click the button, the Web Slice appears on the Favorites bar, where it becomes bold when an update is available. You want to add the Quest Specialty Travel Web page to your Favorites list.

STEPS QUICK TIP To add a Web page as a Favorite to a new or existing folder, click the Favorites button on the Favorites bar, click the Add to Favorites button, select an existing folder or click New Folder to create one, then click Add.

1. Click the Add to Favorites Bar button

on the Favorites bar

The Quest Specialty Travel Web page is added to the Favorites bar and stored in the Favorites Center.

2. Click anywhere in the Address bar, type www.msn.com, then press [Enter] The MSN home page replaces the Quest Specialty Travel home page in the tabbed window. When you display a Web page with a Web Slice, the Add Web Slice button appears on the Command bar. You can click the button arrow to display a list of available Web Slices as well as feeds.

3. Click the Add Web Slices button list arrow available Web Slice on the menu

on the Command bar, then click an

The Internet Explorer dialog box to add a Web Slice opens, as shown in Figure G-10.

4. In the Internet Explorer dialog box, click Add to Favorites Bar The Web Slice is added to the Favorites bar and the name appears bold to indicate an update is available. QUICK TIP To add a group of open tabs to the Favorites Center, click the Favorites button, click the Add to Favorites button arrow, click Add Current Tabs to Favorites, type a name in the Folder Name text box, then click Add.

QUICK TIP You can also organize your Favorites in the Favorites Center by dragging a folder or site to a new location.

5. Click the Web Slice button you just added on the Favorites bar A window opens, displaying a preview of the Web Slice, as shown in Figure G-10.

6. Press [ESC] to close the preview window, then click the Favorites button Favorites bar

on the

The Favorites Center pane opens on the left side of the tabbed window with your Favorites list. If you want to work with several Favorites at a time, you can pin the Favorites Center pane to the tabbed window.

7. Click the Pin the Favorites Center button

in the Favorites Center pane

The tabbed window resizes and the Favorites Center pane is pinned to the left of the tab. The Favorites list contains several folders, including the Favorites Bar folder that accompanies Internet Explorer.

8. Click the Favorites tab in the Favorites Center pane, click the Favorites Bar folder in the Favorites list, then point to the Quest Specialty Travel link When you point to a Favorite or folder, a blue arrow appears to the right. Clicking the blue arrow rather than the link results in the Favorite opening in a new tabbed window.

9. Click the Quest Specialty Travel link The Quest Specialty Travel home page opens in the tabbed window, as shown in Figure G-11.

10. Right-click the Quest Specialty Travel link in the Favorites list, click Delete, click Yes to delete it, right-click the Web Slice on the Favorites bar, click Delete, click Yes to delete it, then click the Close button in the Favorites Center pane You return to the Quest Specialty Travel home page and the Search results page remains open. Windows 156

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Add Web Slices button list arrow on Command bar

Windows 7

FIGURE G-10: Adding a Web Slice to the Favorites bar

Web Slice on Favorites bar Add Web Slices button on Web page

Add to Favorites Bar button

FIGURE G-11: Internet Explorer window with the Favorites Center pane displayed

Favorites Bar button

Web site on Favorites bar

Favorites button Favorites folder Favorite link Web Slice on Favorites bar

Blue arrow

Using Suggested Sites One way to find Web sites based on your browsing history is to use Suggested Sites, a free online service from Microsoft. To turn Suggested Sites on or off, click the Tools button on the Command bar, click Suggested Sites, then click Yes or No. When enabled, Microsoft uses your browsing history to give you suggestions. Simply click the Suggested

Sites Web Slice on the Favorites bar to see a list of suggestions. The more places you visit, the better the suggested sites. You can also delete sites from your history. If you no longer want to use the service, you can choose to turn it off at any time.

Exploring the Internet with Microsoft Internet Explorer

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UNIT

G Windows 7

Viewing and Subscribing to a Feed A feed delivers frequently updated Web content to your browser on a continuous basis. A feed, also known as an RSS (Really Simple Syndication) feed, XML feed, syndicated content, or Web feed, is usually offered on a subscription basis and typically free of charge. A feed can deliver text content in the form of news headlines or blogs, or digital content in the form of pictures, audio, and video. When audio content is delivered (usually in the MP3 format), it’s referred to as a podcast. When you visit a Web site, Internet Explorer checks for available feeds. If it locates a feed, the Feeds button changes color and plays a sound if an option is set in the Feed and Web Slice Settings dialog box. You can view an individual feed or subscribe to one to get content automatically. When you subscribe to a feed, Internet Explorer checks the Web site and downloads new content to keep you updated with the latest site content. You can also add an RSS feed to your Favorites bar, making it easy to view updates. Internet Explorer manages a common Feeds list, which allows other programs, such as e-mail, to access and use them. Because you are working with other travelrelated Web sites, you want to subscribe to a travel feed, so you can always get the latest information.

STEPS QUICK TIP To check for feeds on a Web page, press [Alt][J].

1. Click the tab with the Bing Search results The Web page opens in the current tabbed window. The Feeds button on the Command bar changes to an orange color to indicate that there are feeds available on this page.

2. Click the Feeds button

on the Command bar

A Web page opens, displaying a list of content you can read and subscribe to, similar to the one shown in Figure G-12. If multiple feeds are available, a list of feeds appears.

3. Click the Subscribe to this feed link, then click the Add to Favorites Bar check box to select it in the Subscribe to this Feed dialog box In the Subscribe to this Feed dialog box, as shown in Figure G-13, you can type a new name for the feed, create a folder to organize your feeds, which is similar to the way Favorites work, or add the feed to the Favorites bar.

4. Click Subscribe The Web page displays the message, “You’ve successfully subscribed to this feed!” The Web page feed appears on the Favorites bar and the feed name appears bold to indicate an update is available. QUICK TIP To change Feed options, click the Tools button on the Command bar, click Internet Options, click the Content tab, click Settings under Feeds and Web Slices, then select the options you want.

5. Click the added feed button on the Favorites bar A preview window appears, displaying a list of feeds, as shown in Figure G-13. An individual feed name appears bold to indicate an update is available. If you want to visit a feed, click the link on the menu.

6. Press [ESC] to close the menu, then click the Close button

on the Bing Search results tab

The tabbed window closes and the Quest Specialty Travel home page opens in the current tabbed window.

7. Click the Favorites button on the Favorites bar, click the Pin the Favorites Center button , then click the Feeds tab in the Favorites Center pane The current feeds appear in the Feeds list.

8. Right-click the Bing Search results tab, click Delete, click Yes to confirm the deletion, then click the Close button in the Favorites Center pane The Favorites Center pane closes with the feed deleted from the Favorites Center.

9. Right-click the added feed button on the Favorites bar, click Delete, then click Yes to delete it The feed is deleted from the Favorites bar. The Quest Specialty Travel home page reappears. Windows 158

Exploring the Internet with Microsoft Internet Explorer

Feeds button

Windows 7

FIGURE G-12: Displaying a Web page with a feed

Subscribe to this feed link

Participants in the feed; your list might differ

FIGURE G-13: Subscribing to and viewing a feed

Stores feed in another folder in the Favorites Center

Items in feeds list appear bold; your list might differ

Name of feed; yours might differ

Add to Favorites Bar check box

Subscribe button

Saving a Web page and a Web graphic If there is a Web page that contains content you don’t want to update or cannot legally be changed, such as a published article, you can save the page on your computer. There are several ways to save a Web page ranging from just saving the text to saving all of the graphics and text needed to display that page as it appears on the Web. To save a Web page, click Page on the Command bar, then click Save As. In the Save Webpage dialog box, specify the location where you want to save the file, type the name you want for the file, click the Save as type list arrow, select the file format type you want, then click Save. When you

save a complete Web page, Internet Explorer saves all the graphic and text elements in a folder. If you want to save an individual graphic on a Web page, right-click the graphic, click Save Picture As, specify the location where you want to save the file, type the name you want for the file, click the Save as type list arrow, select the file format type you want, then click Save. If you want to send a Web page by e-mail, select the Send Page by E-mail command on the Page menu, then address and send the message using your e-mail program.

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UNIT

G Windows 7

Getting and Using Accelerators An Accelerator is an add-on program that extends the functionality of Internet Explorer. An Accelerator allows you to perform everyday tasks from your current Web page without having to navigate to other Web sites. For example, you can use default Accelerators in Internet Explorer 8 to get driving directions on a map, translate and define words, e-mail information to others, and search for content. You can also add more Accelerators, such as Bing, eBay, Yahoo!, Wikipedia, Amazon, and Facebook, using the Internet Explorer Gallery. To use an Accelerator, you need to install its add-on. Microsoft provides a Web site gallery where you can quickly install Accelerator add-ons for a variety of different uses, such as map an address using Bing or Yahoo!, find information on eBay, or share information on Facebook. All you need to do is highlight text from any Web page and then click the blue Accelerator icon that appears near your selection to obtain a window with the information you need. If you no longer want to use an Accelerator, you can use the Manage Add-ons dialog box to delete or disable it, or change defaults. After installing a mapping Accelerator, you decide to use it to get a map of the Quest Specialty Travel corporate offices.

STEPS 1. Click the Page button Manage Accelerators

on the Command bar, point to All Accelerators, then click

The Manage Add-ons dialog box opens, displaying a list of the currently installed Accelerators for Internet Explorer. You can also view other installed add-ons. QUICK TIP To remove or disable an Accelerator, click Accelerators under Add-on Types in the Manage Add-ons dialog box, select the Accelerator you want, click Remove, then click Yes.

2. Scroll the Accelerator list, if necessary, for Map with Bing under the Map category to see if it’s installed, then click Close , point to 3. If Bing Maps is installed, skip to Step 4. If Bing Maps is not installed, click All Accelerators, click Find More Accelerators, locate Bing Maps on the Web page, click Add to Internet Explorer, click Add, then click the Back button The Bing Maps Accelerator is installed and the Quest Specialty Travel Web site reappears.

4. Click the About Us link The About Us Web page opens, which includes the address of Quest Specialty Travel.

5. Select the address text for Quest Specialty Travel, then click the blue Accelerator button A menu opens, displaying the available Accelerators.

6. Point to Map with Bing Accelerator on the menu A map with Bing appears from the Accelerator, as shown in Figure G-14.

7. Click the address in the Accelerator window to open it A new tabbed window opens, displaying the larger view of the corporate offices of Quest Specialty Travel in San Diego, California.

8. Click the Close button the Address bar

on the Bing Maps tab, then click the Back button

The Bing Maps tab closes and the Quest Specialty Travel home page reopens.

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Exploring the Internet with Microsoft Internet Explorer

next to

Windows 7

FIGURE G-14: Using a Map with Bing Accelerator

Accelerator button

Available Accelerators menu; your list might differ

Selected text for Accelerator

Map with Bing Accelerator

Managing add-ons and using InPrivate Filtering Add-ons are programs that extend the functionality of Internet Explorer. An Accelerator is one of many types of add-ons you can use in Internet Explorer 8. There are add-on types for toolbars and extensions, search providers, Accelerators, and InPrivate Filtering, to name a few. To manage add-ons, click the Tools button on the Command bar, then click Manage Add-ons. In the Manage Add-ons dialog box, click the add-on type you want to view or work with, then select an add-on. You can disable/enable or remove an add-on. For InPrivate Filtering, you can import and export filters. InPrivate Filtering blocks third-party

Web sites, such as maps and advertisements, from gathering and tracking information about you and your browsing habits without your knowledge. InPrivate Filtering is turned off by default and needs to be turned on each time you start Internet Explorer. To turn it on, click the Safety button on the Command bar, then click InPrivate Filtering. To set InPrivate Filtering settings, click the Safety button on the Command bar, then click InPrivate Filtering Settings. You can automatically block content, choose the content to block or allow, or turn it off.

Zooming in and out Working with Zoom commands gives you another way to control exactly what you see in a Web page. Internet Explorer uses Adaptive Page Zoom tools that allow you to enlarge or reduce everything on the page, including text and images, by relaying out the page. You can adjust the zoom from 10% to 1000%. Zoom commands are located in

the lower-right corner of the window or on the Zoom submenu of the Page button on the Command bar. If you have a mouse with a wheel, you can also press and hold down [Ctrl], then scroll the wheel to zoom in or out.

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Windows 161

UNIT

G Windows 7

Blocking Pop-ups and Filtering Phishing The Pop-up Blocker in Internet Explorer prevents most unwanted pop-up windows from appearing. A pop-up window is a window, typically with an advertisement, that displays in your Web browser without your permission. When Internet Explorer blocks an ad, the Information Bar appears at the top of the current tab telling you that something was blocked. You can click the Information Bar to temporarily or permanently allow pop-ups, change Pop-up Blocker settings, and get Information Bar help. With the Pop-up Blocker Settings dialog box, you can allow or disallow pop-ups from specific sites, choose to play a sound and show the Information Bar when a pop-up is blocked, and set a filter level to block pop-ups. Phishing is a technique criminals use to trick computer users into revealing personal or financial information. Typically, a phishing scam starts with an e-mail message that appears to come from a trusted source, such as a bank or credit card company, but actually directs recipients to provide information to a fraudulent Web site. Windows 7 and Internet Explorer 8 provide SmartScreen filtering to increase security to help protect you from phishing schemes. You can set SmartScreen filtering options on the Safety menu in Internet Explorer. You can check Web sites to see if they have been reported as a phishing site and report them to Microsoft if you think they are fraudulent. After receiving an unwanted pop-up window, you decide to enable Internet Options to block pop-ups and check a Web site for phishing scams.

STEPS 1. Click the Tools button

on the Command bar, then point to Pop-up Blocker

If the Pop-up Blocker is turned on, you’ll see the command Turn Off Pop-up Blocker; if the Pop-up Blocker is turned off, you’ll see the command Turn On Pop-up Blocker.

2. If the Pop-up Blocker is turned off, click Turn On Pop-up Blocker to enable it; otherwise, click a blank area of the browser window to close the menu on the Command bar, point to Pop-up Blocker, then click Pop-up Blocker Settings 3. Click The Pop-up Blocker Settings dialog box opens, as shown in Figure G-15. You can add specific Web sites for which you will allow pop-ups, select notification options, and specify the filter level you want.

4. Click Close The Pop-up Blocker Settings dialog box closes with the current pop-up settings intact. If the SmartScreen Filter is turned on, the command on the submenu will allow you to turn it off; if the SmartScreen Filter is turned off, the command on the submenu will allow you to turn it on. QUICK TIP If available, you can also click the SmartScreen Filter icon in the status bar, then click Check This Website.

5. Click the Safety button on the Command bar, point to SmartScreen Filter, then click Turn On SmartScreen Filter or Turn Off SmartScreen Filter The Microsoft SmartScreen Filter dialog box opens with the option button corresponding to the command you selected.

6. Click OK, click

, point to SmartScreen Filter, then click Check This Website

The SmartScreen Filter dialog box opens, asking if you want to check this site for phishing.

7. Click OK TROUBLE If you need to disconnect from the Internet, click the Network icon in the notification area, click the connection name, then click Disconnect.

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The SmartScreen Filter dialog box opens, telling you that no threats have been reported for this website.

8. Click OK, click

, point to SmartScreen Filter, then click Report Unsafe Website

The Microsoft SmartScreen Filter Web page opens in a new browser window, as shown in Figure G-16, asking you to specify information related to the trustworthiness of the Web site you are reporting.

9. Click the Close button in the browser window, click in the Quest Specialty Travel window, then, if necessary, click Close all Tabs in the dialog box that opens Exploring the Internet with Microsoft Internet Explorer

Windows 7

FIGURE G-15: Pop-up Blocker Settings dialog box

Contains Web site address to allow pop-ups from

Contains a list of sites allowed to send pop-ups Pop-up notification options Filter blocking level

FIGURE G-16: Microsoft SmartScreen Filter Web site

Displaying security information in the Security Status bar While you browse the Web, Internet Explorer 8 automatically checks for valid Web site certificates and any irregularities that might indicate a possible phishing site and for any unwanted or malicious programs that can be installed on your computer from a Web site. If Internet Explorer detects a potential problem, it displays a warning in the Address bar with text in the Security Status bar on the right indicating the problem type, as shown in Figure G-17. The Address bar displays red for certificate errors and known phishing sites, green for sites with high security (connected to the certificate), and yellow for suspected phishing sites. Malicious programs are blocked with the Information bar/Pop-up

Blocker settings that prevent them from working. You can click the security icon in the Security Status bar to find out more information.

FIGURE G-17: Security Status bar

Exploring the Internet with Microsoft Internet Explorer

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Practice Concepts Review

For current SAM information including versions and content details, visit SAM Central. (http://samcentral.course.com). If you have a SAM user profile, you may have access to hands-on instruction, practice, and assessment of the skills covered in this unit. Since we support various versions of SAM throughout the life of this text, you will want to check with your instructor for instructions and the correct URL/Web site to access those assignments.

Match the statements below with the elements labeled in the screen shown in Figure G-18. FIGURE G-18

a b c

h g f e

d

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Which element opens Quick Tabs? Which element opens a new tabbed window? Which element displays the home page? Which element displays a Web page with a feed? Which element opens the Favorites Center? Which element adds a Favorite to the Favorites bar? Which element displays the address of the current Web page? Which element displays search keywords?

Match each term with the statement that best describes it. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13.

hyperlink URL Web Internet ISP

Windows 164

a. b. c. d. e.

Global collection of linked Web pages Web address Global collection of linked computers Provides a connection to the Internet Provides a connection between Web pages

Exploring the Internet with Microsoft Internet Explorer

Select the best answer from the list of choices. 14. Software programs used to access and display Web pages are called: a. Web sites. c. Web utilities. b. Search engines. d. Web browsers. 15. If you want to save the name and URL of a Web page in Internet Explorer and return to it later, you can add it to a list called: a. Favorites. c. Home pages. b. Feeds. d. Preferences. 16. Which of the following is a valid URL? a. http:/www.usf.edu/ c. htp:/ww.usf.edu/ b. http://www.usf.edu/ d. http//www.usf.edu/ 17. Text or graphics that you click to jump to another Web page are called: a. Explorers. c. Web browsers. b. Favorites. d. Hyperlinks. 18. The URL of the current Web page appears in the: a. Title bar. c. Address bar. b. Document window. d. Status bar. 19. What do you call the words or phrases you submit to find information on the Web? a. Hits c. Keywords b. Search engine d. Menu bar 20. Which of the following is not another name for a feed? a. RSS feed c. Syndicated content b. XML feed d. Blog

Windows 7

Concepts Review (Continued)

Skills Review 1. Connect to the Internet. a. Use the Connect to the Internet Wizard to create a dial-up connection. b. Connect to the Internet. 2. Open a Web page and follow links. a. Start Internet Explorer. b. Click in the Address bar, type www.cengage.com, then press [Enter]. c. Explore the Web site by using the scroll bars, toolbar, and hyperlinks. d. Click in the Address bar, type www.sportsline.com, then press [Enter]. e. Follow the links to investigate the content. f. Click the Back button to return to any page on Cengage.com. g. Click the forward button to return to the Sportsline.com home page. 3. Use tabs to browse Web pages. a. Open a new tab. b. Type www.loc.gov in the Address bar, then press [Alt][Enter] to open the page in a new tabbed window. c. Press and hold [Ctrl][Shift], then click a link on the page to open the page in a new grouped tabbed window. d. Click the Quick Tabs button. e. Click any thumbnail to make that tab active. f. Click the tab you opened in Step c, and then close it. 4. Change your home page. a. Click in the Address bar, type www.perspection.com, then press [Enter]. b. Set this Web page as your only home page.

Exploring the Internet with Microsoft Internet Explorer

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Skills Review (Continued) c. d. e. f. g. h.

Click a link on the page. Click the Home button. Type www.course.com, then press [Alt][Enter]. Set the current tab as your home page. Click the Close button for the Course Technology tab, then click the Home button. Click the Tools button, click Internet Options, click Use default on the General tab to use MSN as your home page or type the URL of your original home page, then click OK.

5. Search the Web. a. Select Bing as your search engine. b. Click in the Search box next to the Address bar. c. Type job computer training. d. Press [Alt][Enter]. e. Use the Find on this Page command to highlight the search text. f. Click a link to a Web site from the list of search results. g. Close the Find toolbar, then click the Back button. 6. Add a Web page and Slices to Favorites. a. Display the tab containing the Perspection Web page. b. Add this page as a Favorite to the Favorites bar. c. Click in the Address bar, type www.msn.com, then press [Enter]. d. Add a Web Slice to the Favorites bar, then preview it. e. Open the Favorites list in the Favorites Center. f. Pin the Favorites Center in place. g. Use the Perspection Home Page Favorite in the Favorites list to jump to that page in the current tab. h. Delete the Perspection Favorite and the Web Slice in the Favorites Center. i. Close the Favorites Center. 7. View and subscribe to a feed. a. With the Bing results tab displayed, click the Feeds button on the Command bar. b. Add the feed to the Favorites bar, subscribe to the feed, then preview a feed from the Favorites bar. c. Close the tab containing the feed subscription information. d. Display the Feeds list in the Favorites Center. e. Refresh the feed you saved. f. Display the Bing results feed, then click a feed link in the list. g. Display the Feeds list in the Favorites Center, then delete the Bing results feed. 8. Get and use Accelerators. a. Display the About Us Web page from the Quest Specialty Travel Web site. b. Select the top paragraph, then click the blue Accelerator button. c. Use the Translate with Bing Accelerator to display the text in Spanish. 9. Block pop-ups and filter phishing. a. Open the Pop-up Blocker Settings dialog box. b. View the current Pop-up options, then click Close. c. Type www.cengage.com, then press [Alt][Enter]. d. Click the Safety button, point to SmartScreen Filter, then click Check This Website. e. Click OK. f. Click the Safety button, point to SmartScreen Filter, then click Report Unsafe Website. g. If the Pop-up Blocker was originally turned off, return it to this setting. h. Close all open Internet Explorer windows, close tabs if necessary, then Disconnect if necessary.

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Exploring the Internet with Microsoft Internet Explorer

You will soon graduate from college with a degree in business management. Before entering the workforce, you want to make sure that you are up to date on all advances in the field. You decide that checking the Web would provide the most current information. In addition, you can search for companies with employment opportunities. a. Use Internet Explorer to investigate the business-related sites listed in Table G-2, or search for other business sites if these are not available. Open three sites in separate tabs as a group. b. Click the appropriate links on the page to locate information about employment opportunities that sound interesting to you. c. Add each of the sites to your home page.

Windows 7

Independent Challenge 1

TABLE G-2: Business-related sites

Career Builder Monster Jobs

www.careerbuilder.com www.monster.com www.jobs.com

Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Use the Print button arrow on the toolbar to preview the page. ■ Use a button on the toolbar to display the page with and without headers and footers. ■ Use a list arrow on the toolbar to display the page as two pages at a time. d. When you find a relevant page, use the Print button on the Command bar to print the page. e. Restore the home page to its original Web page.

Independent Challenge 2 You leave tomorrow for a business trip to France. You want to make sure that you take the right clothes for the weather and decide to check the Web for the information. You also want to protect yourself from pop-up windows and check the Web sites you visit for phishing scams. a. Open Internet Explorer, then turn on the Pop-up Blocker and TABLE G-3: Weather sites Automatic Website Checking with the SmartScreen Filter. The Weather Channel b. Use Internet Explorer to access two of the weather sites listed in National Weather Service Table G-3, or search for other weather sites if these are not availCNN Weather able. Open the two sites in separate tabs. c. Check the site you open with the SmartScreen Filter. d. Click the necessary links on the page to locate information about the weather in Paris. e. Print at least two reports on current Paris weather. f. Restore the Pop-up Blocker and SmartScreen Filter back to their original states.

www.weather.com www.nws.noaa.gov www.cnn.com/WEATHER

Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Open the Favorites Center, then click the History tab. ■ Click Today to list the sites you visited today, then view the list. ■ Click the History button list arrow, click View By Order Visited Today, then view the list. ■ Click a blank area of the document window to close the Favorites Center.

Independent Challenge 3 Your boss wants to buy a new desktop computer (as opposed to a laptop). He assigns you the task of investigating the options. You decide that looking on the Web would be more expedient than visiting computer stores in the area. a. Use Internet Explorer to visit at least three of the Web sites listed in Table G-4, or search for other computer company sites if these are not available. Open the three sites in separate tabs. b. Click the necessary links to find a page from each of the three that you think offers the best deal. c. Add the pages to your Favorites on the Favorites bar and in a folder called Computer Deals.

TABLE G-4: Computer companies’ Web sites

Apple Dell HP IBM

www.apple.com www.dell.com www.hp.com www.ibm.com

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Windows 167

Independent Challenge 3 (Continued) d. Use the Print button on the toolbar to print a page from each of the three that you think offers the best deal. e. Delete the two Favorites and the folder you created. Exit Internet Explorer.

Real Life Independent Challenge Summer vacations are a great time to visit new places. For example, you might want to visit several National Parks in the United States. You can search the Web for information about places you want to visit. a. Use the Search box with the Bing engine in Internet Explorer to find Web sites with addresses of the places you’d like to visit. b. Add the Google Search Suggestions add-on to Internet Explorer, if not already there, then repeat your search in a new tab. c. Click a link to a Web page with an address, select an address, then use the Map with Bing Accelerator to display a map. d. Subscribe to the Bing results feed, add it to the Favorites bar, and give it an appropriate name. For example, if you searched for maps of the National Parks, type National Parks as the name of the feed. e. Display the Feeds list, then visit four or five sites listed. f. Use the Print button on the Command bar to print a page from the site that you think offers the best maps and related information. g. Delete the feed you saved and close your browser.

Visual Workshop Start Internet Explorer and re-create the screen shown in Figure G-19, which displays the Internet Explorer window with the Favorites Center pinned and a Web site. Use the Print button on the Command bar to print the Web page. FIGURE G-19

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Exploring the Internet with Microsoft Internet Explorer

UNIT

H Windows 7

Exchanging Mail and News If you are not connected to the Internet and do not have an e-mail account, you cannot work through the steps in this unit; however, you can read the lessons without completing the steps to learn what you can accomplish using Windows Live Mail.

Files You Will Need:

Windows Live Essentials is a collection of Microsoft programs, available free for download

No file needed.

Essentials includes Microsoft Windows Live Mail, a powerful program for managing

on the Web, which allows you to interact and communicate on the Web. Windows Live electronic mail, known as e-mail. Windows Live Mail is the successor to Windows Mail and Outlook Express, e-mail programs that accompanied previous versions of Windows. With an Internet connection and Microsoft Windows Live Mail, you can exchange e-mail messages with anyone on the Internet and join any number of newsgroups. Newsgroups are collections of e-mail messages on related topics posted by individuals to specified Internet locations. From Windows Live Mail, you can also schedule appointments using the Calendar, an electronic version of the familiar paper daily planner.

Quest Specialty

Travel is changing e-mail programs to Windows Live Mail. As the president of Quest Specialty Travel, you need to set up Windows Live Mail to send and receive e-mail messages, join a newsgroup about the travel industry, and set up an appointment.

OBJECTIVES

Start Windows Live Mail Explore the Windows Live Mail window Add a contact to the Contacts Compose and send e-mail Retrieve, read, and respond to e-mail Manage e-mail messages View and subscribe to a newsgroup Read and post a news message Schedule an appointment in the Calendar

UNIT

H Windows 7

Starting Windows Live Mail Whether you want to exchange e-mail with colleagues and friends, or join newsgroups to trade ideas and information, Windows Live Mail provides you with the tools you need. To use Windows Live Mail, you need to set up an Internet connection and e-mail account with an ISP. You don’t have to use a Windows Live ID e-mail account to use Windows Live Mail. However, if you have or create a free account, you can connect to other online Windows Live services that allow you to access and share information from any computer. Windows Live Mail doesn’t come installed with Windows 7; you need to download and install it from Microsoft Windows Live Essentials. When you download and install Windows Live Mail, a menu item for Windows Live appears on the All Programs submenu on the Start menu; from here you can start Windows Live Mail as well as other Windows Live programs, such as Call, Messenger, Photo Gallery, Movie Maker, Toolbar, Writer, Family Safety, and Silverlight. Before you can begin using Windows Live Mail to exchange e-mail with your employees, you start Windows Live Mail and create an e-mail account.

STEPS 1. If the Windows Live Mail program is not installed on your computer, open your browser, type http://download.live.com in the Address bar, press [Enter], click Download, click Run, click Yes if necessary, click the Mail check box to select it if necessary, deselect any other checkboxes, click Install, click Continue if necessary, click Continue, click Close to in your browser window exit the installer, then click the Close button The Windows Essentials Web site opens, where you can download and install Windows Live programs, which include Mail. You can also install Windows Live Messenger, Photo Gallery, Movie Maker, Toolbar, Writer, Family Safety, and Silverlight from this site.

2. Click the Start button on the taskbar, point to All Programs, click Windows Live, then click Windows Live Mail The Windows Live Mail window opens. If you connect to the Internet using a dial-up network connection, you might need to enter your username and password. See your instructor or technical support person for this information. QUICK TIP If you need help connecting to the Internet or learning how to use Windows Live Mail features, click the Help button on the toolbar, then click Get help with Mail.

3. If prompted, click the Connect to list arrow, select the name of your ISP, type your username, press [Tab], type your password, then click Connect Your Internet connection is established. When you first start Windows Live Mail, a wizard opens, asking you for e-mail account setup information. See your instructor or technical support person for this information. Refer to the Clues to Use box “Making Windows Live Mail your default email program” for general information about setting up an e-mail account.

4. If prompted, follow the instructions to set up your e-mail account: for the typical users, type an e-mail address, password, and display name; click the Manually configure server settings for e-mail account check box to select it; click Next; select an incoming mail server type; type the incoming mail server; type the outgoing server; click Next; then click Finish A user mail account is set up. If Windows Live Mail is not your default e-mail program, you might be prompted to set it as the default when you start Windows Live Mail.

QUICK TIP To modify or add an account, click Tools on the menu bar, click Accounts, click an account, click Properties, or click Add, click an account type, then follow the wizard instructions.

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5. If prompted, click the Check this setting when I start Windows Live Mail check box to deselect it, then click Yes or No to set Windows Live Mail as the default The Check this setting when I start Windows Live Mail option allows you to disable the check for the default setting when Windows Live Mail starts.

6. If necessary, click the Menus button

on the toolbar, then click Show menu bar

The menu bar appears in the Windows Live Mail window, as shown in Figure H-1.

7. If necessary, click the Maximize button Exchanging Mail and News

on the Windows Live Mail window

Menu bar

Menus button

E-mail message; yours will differ

Windows 7

FIGURE H-1: Windows Live Mail window

Preview of the selected e-mail message; yours will differ

Making Windows Live Mail your default e-mail program You can set Windows Live Mail as your default e-mail program so that Windows Live Mail opens whenever you click an e-mail link on a Web page or choose the mail command in your Web browser. You can also set Windows Live Mail as your default news reader for when you click a newsgroup link on a Web page or choose the news reader command in your Web browser. To set Windows Live Mail as your default e-mail or

newsgroup program, click Tools on the menu bar in Windows Live Mail, click Options, then click the General tab. In the Default Messaging Programs section of the Options dialog box, click Make Default next to This application is NOT the default Mail handler and This application is NOT the default News handler. If the buttons are grayed out, then Windows Live Mail is currently selected as the default program.

Understanding e-mail account information Before you can set up an e-mail account, you need your account name, password, e-mail server type, and the names of your incoming and outgoing e-mail servers from your ISP or network administrator. The Windows Live Mail Internet Connection Wizard helps you connect to, send, and retrieve e-mail messages from different types of e-mail servers. E-mail servers are the locations where your e-mail is stored before you access it. Windows Live Mail supports three types of incoming e-mail servers: POP3 (Post Office Protocol), IMAP (Internet Message Access Protocol), and HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol). A protocol is a set of rules and

standards that control the transmission of content, format, sequencing, and error management for information over the Internet or a network. POP3 servers allow you to access e-mail messages from a single Inbox folder, whereas IMAP servers allow you to access multiple folders. HTTP servers are used on Web sites, such as Hotmail, and allow you to send and receive e-mail messages in Windows Live Mail or on a Web site. If you use POP3 or IMAP e-mail servers, you also need to provide an outgoing e-mail server. SMTP (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol) is generally used to send messages between e-mail servers.

Exchanging Mail and News Copyright 2010 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part.

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UNIT

H Windows 7

Exploring the Windows Live Mail Window After you start Windows Live Mail, the Windows Live Mail window opens, as shown in Figure H-2. The Windows Live Mail window displays tools that you can use to set up and manage multiple e-mail accounts, create and send e-mail messages, use Contacts to store and retrieve e-mail addresses, create stationery or add a personal signature to your e-mail messages, attach a file to an e-mail message, set junk e-mail options and mark e-mail messages as block or safe, join any number of newsgroups, and use the Calendar to make and manage appointments and tasks. The e-mail program you used previously is different from Windows Live Mail, so you decide to familiarize yourself with the components of the Windows Live Mail window.

DETAILS You note the following features: • The title bar at the top of the window displays the name of the program. • The menu bar provides access to a variety of commands, much like other Windows programs. • The Find a message box provides an easy way to find messages based on any type of text in the message, including the sender, receiver, subject, and message. • The toolbar provides icons, or buttons, for easy access to the most commonly used commands. Many of these commands are also available on menus; to display menus, click the Menus button on the toolbar, then click the Show menu bar. • The Folder pane displays folders where Windows Live Mail stores e-mail messages. You can also use folders to organize your e-mail messages. The Programs area at the bottom of the Folder pane provides shortcuts to related programs, such as Mail, Calendar, Contacts, Feeds, and Newsgroups. • The Message list displays a list of e-mail messages from the selected folder in the Folder pane. • The Reading pane displays the contents of the current message selected in the Message list. • The message header displays the recipient and sender e-mail address and the subject for the message selected in the Message list. • The status bar displays information about your Internet connection with a mail or newsgroup server.

Changing the Windows Live Mail layout You can show or hide parts of the Windows Live Mail window to personalize the way you use Windows Live Mail. For example, the Reading pane appears to the right of the Message list by default, but you can have it display elsewhere, such as below the Message list. You can also change the way messages appear in the Message list from the default automatic view to one- or two-line view. Using Folder pane options, you can display the Folder pane in compact view and shortcuts with

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icons instead of text and show or hide Storage folders and Quick views. The Storage folders provide access to e-mail in the Drafts, Sent Items, and Deleted Items folders, whereas the Quick views provide easy access to unread e-mail and feeds. To change the layout, click the Menus button on the toolbar, click Layout, select a layout option, such as Reading pane (Mail), Message list, Folder pane, or Message header (Mail), select or clear the options you want, then click OK.

Title bar Menu bar

Toolbar Find a message box Message header

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FIGURE H-2: Windows Live Mail window

Reading pane; your contents will differ

Folder pane; your contents might differ

Message list; your messages will differ

Programs Status bar

Searching for a message If you can’t find a message located in one of your folders in the Folder pane, you can use the Find a message box to help you search for it. You can search the currently selected folder or all the folders in the Folder pane. To search for a message, click in the Find a message box, then type any part of the message. Click the Search in button, click the folder

name or All e-mail to narrow or expand the search. If no results are found for a current folder search, you can click the Try searching again in all e-mail link to quickly expand the search. When you’re done, click the Close button in the Find a message box to display all the messages in the current folder.

Signing in to Windows Live Mail You don’t have to use a Windows Live ID e-mail account to use Windows Live Mail. You can add and use accounts with another e-mail address without signing in. However, if you have or create a free account, you can connect to other online Windows Live services, such as sending and viewing photo e-mails online, starting instant messaging conversation from Mail, and sharing contacts and calendars. This online service allows you to access and share information from any computer instead of just the one where you set up the account. To sign in,

click the Sign in button on the toolbar, type your Windows Live ID, then click Sign in. If you don’t have a Windows Live ID, click the Don’t have a Windows Live ID? link, then follow the online instructions. To sign in with a different Windows ID, click your display name, click Sign in with a different ID, type a different Windows Live ID, then click Sign in. To sign out, click the Menus button on the toolbar, click Options, click the Connection tab, click Stop signing in, then click Stop signing in.

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Adding a Contact to the Contacts A contact is a person or company with whom you communicate. One contact can often have several mailing addresses, phone numbers, e-mail addresses, or Web sites. You can store this information in Windows Live Contacts along with other detailed information, such as company name, job title, cell phone number, Windows Live Messenger address for instant messaging (IM), personal information (such as birthday and anniversary dates), or notes. You can also add a Digital ID issued by a service to an e-mail address, which helps to validate your identity and sign documents electronically. You can organize your contacts into folders or into contact categories, which are groups of related people with whom you communicate regularly. You just hired a new employee, Shawn Brooks, so you want to add his contact information to Windows Live Contacts.

STEPS QUICK TIP To find a contact, click in the Find a contact box, then type a name. The search results appear in the Contact list. Click the Close button in the Find a contact box.

1. Click the Contacts button

at the bottom of the Folder pane in the Programs area

The Windows Live Contacts window opens, as shown in Figure H-3, displaying the current contacts. The toolbar for the Windows Live Contacts window appears below the menu bar. Below the toolbar is the Contacts pane along the left side, the Find a contact box, and the Preview pane.

2. Click the New button on the Contacts toolbar The Add a Contact dialog box opens, displaying the Quick add category. In the Quick add category, you enter the name, e-mail, phone, and company information of the person you want to add. You can use other categories—Contact, Personal, Work, IM (instant messaging), Notes, and IDs (digital)—to enter additional information.

3. Type Shawn in the First name text box, press [Tab], then type Brooks in the Last name text box The first and last name of the new contact appear in their respective text boxes.

4. Press [Tab], then type [email protected] in the Personal e-mail text box The e-mail address appears in the Personal e-mail text box, as shown in Figure H-4. E-mail addresses are not case sensitive, so capitalization doesn’t matter, but they cannot contain spaces.

5. Click Add contact QUICK TIP To modify an existing e-mail address, click the Edit button on the toolbar. If an e-mail address is no longer in use, click the Delete button to delete it.

QUICK TIP To create a contact category group, click the New button arrow, click Category, enter a name, select the contacts you want, then click Save.

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The Add a Contact dialog box closes and the Windows Live Contacts window reappears with the Shawn Brooks contact in the Contact list.

6. Click Shawn Brooks in the Contact list The contact information for Shawn Brooks appears in the Preview pane.

7. Double-click Shawn Brooks in the Contact list The Edit Contact: Shawn Brooks dialog box opens, displaying the Summary category, which includes Shawn Brooks’ name and personal e-mail information.

8. Click the Work category, type Quest Specialty Travel in the Company text box, press [Tab] to advance to the Work phone text box, type 619-555-1223, then click Save Shawn’s work name and work phone number appear in the Preview pane in the Windows Live Contacts window.

9. Click the Close button

in the Windows Live Contacts window

The Windows Live Mail window reappears.

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Toolbar

Find a contact box

Contacts pane; your contacts will differ

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FIGURE H-3: Windows Live Contacts window

Preview pane; your contacts will differ

Contact list; yours will differ

FIGURE H-4: Add a Contact dialog box

Contacts categories

Contact first and last name Contact e-mail address

Add contact button

Printing contacts from Windows Live Contacts You can print your contact information in two formats: Memo and Phone List. The Memo style prints all the information you have for a contact with descriptive titles. The Phone List style prints all the phone numbers for however many contacts you specify. To print contact

information, open Windows Live Contacts, select the contacts you want to print, click the File menu; click Print; select a print range, print style, and the number of copies you want to print; then click Print in the Print dialog box.

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Composing and Sending E-mail E-mail is becoming the primary form of written communication for many people. E-mail messages follow a standard memo format, with fields for the sender, recipient, date, and subject of the message. To send an e-mail message, you need to enter the recipient’s e-mail address, type a subject, then type the message itself. The subject text is the first information the recipient sees about the e-mail, so it should provide a short, concise summary of the message contents. You can send the same message to more than one individual or to a contact group. You can also use the Cc (carbon copy) button to send a copy of your e-mail message to another person, or use the Bcc (blind carbon copy) button to send a copy of your e-mail message to another person whose name will not appear in the e-mail message. Bcc is useful when sending e-mails to a large group of unrelated people, and allows for privacy for the recipients. You can personalize your e-mail messages with a stationery template, or you can design your own stationery. If you want to send a file along with your e-mail message, you can attach the file to it. If you have not finished composing a message, you can save it in the Drafts folder and work on it later. Now that you have Shawn Brooks’ contact information in Windows Live Contacts, you want to send him or another specified person an e-mail message.

STEPS QUICK TIP To add stationery to an e-mail message, create a new message, click the Stationery button on the Formatting toolbar, click More stationery, select a stationery, then click OK.

1. Click the New button arrow on the Message toolbar, click E-mail message, then click the in the New Message window, if necessary Maximize button The New Message window opens and is maximized, as shown in Figure H-5.

2. Click the To button next to the To text box The Send an E-mail dialog box opens, displaying the contacts from the Windows Live Contacts.

3. Click the Shawn Brooks name and e-mail address or the e-mail address of your instructor, technical support person, or someone else you know, then click To The contact’s name appears in the To text box, as shown in Figure H-6.

4. Click OK The recipient’s name appears in the To text box. The recipient’s e-mail address is associated with the name selected even though it does not appear. QUICK TIP To save an incomplete message, click File on the menu bar, click Save, then click OK if necessary. The message is saved in the Drafts folder.

QUICK TIP To send a completed message later, click File on the menu bar, click Send later, then click OK if necessary. To send, click the Outbox in the Folder pane, then click the Sync button.

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5. Click in the Subject text box, then type Welcome aboard! The title bar changes from New Message to the subject text “Welcome aboard!”

6. Click the first line in the Message area text box at the bottom of the message window, if necessary to display the Formatting toolbar, click the click the Format button Font Size button arrow on the Formatting toolbar, then click 14 pt Example The Formatting toolbar commands allow you to format the text in the Message area.

7. Type Dear Shawn:, press [Enter] twice, type I would like to welcome you to Quest Specialty Travel. We are excited that you have joined our team. Quest Travel is a growing company, and I believe your contributions will make a big difference. Please come to a luncheon for new employees this Thursday at 12:30 in the company cafe., press [Enter] twice, then type Jessica Long 8. Click the Send button on the Message toolbar The New Message window closes and the Windows Live Mail window reappears. The e-mail message is placed temporarily in the Outbox, a folder for storing outgoing messages, before it is sent automatically to the recipient. A copy of the outgoing message remains in the Sent Items folder reference later.

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Message toolbar To button

To text box Subject text box

Format button

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FIGURE H-5: New Message window

Formatting toolbar Message area

White background with no stationery

FIGURE H-6: Selecting recipients for an e-mail message

Search contacts box; enter a name to find a recipient

Contact list; yours will differ Contains recipient(s) for the active e-mail message To button

Attaching a file to an e-mail message You can easily share a file, such as a picture or a document, using e-mail by attaching it to an e-mail message. Upon receiving the e-mail, the recipient can open the file in the program that created it or save it. For example, suppose that you are working on a report that you created using WordPad and that a colleague working in another part of the country needs to present the report today.

After you finish the report, you can attach the report file to an e-mail message and send the message to your colleague, who can then open, edit, and print the report. To attach a file to an e-mail message, create the message, click the Attach button on the Message toolbar, navigate to the drive and folder location of the file you want to attach, select the file, then click Open.

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Retrieving, Reading, and Responding to E-mail You can receive e-mail anytime—even when your computer is turned off. When you start Windows Live Mail, the program automatically checks for new e-mail messages and continues to check periodically while the program is open. You can retrieve your e-mail manually with the Sync button or set options in Windows Live Mail to do so automatically. New messages appear in boldface in the Inbox along with any messages you haven’t stored elsewhere or deleted. You can also view new messages under Quick views; after you read the e-mail, it’s only available in the Inbox. Message flags are icon symbols that may appear next to a message. You can respond to a message in two ways: You can reply to it, which creates a new message addressed to the sender(s) and other recipients, or you can forward it, which creates a new message you can send to someone else. In either case, the original message appears in the message response. When you reply to a message that has an attachment, the attachment isn’t returned to the original sender. However, when you forward an attachment, it is included along with the message. You can verify that your e-mail message was actually sent by viewing the Sent Items folder. To prepare for the new employee luncheon, you forward an e-mail message you received to your assistant at Quest Specialty Travel.

STEPS 1. Have the e-mail recipient to whom you sent the e-mail message send a reply back to you 2. In the Folder pane, click Inbox The Inbox folder opens with the messages in your Inbox displayed in the Message list. The Reading pane displays the content of the specific e-mail message selected in the Message list. E-mail messages that appear with boldfaced subject or heading text indicate unopened messages.

3. Click the Sync button arrow on the toolbar, then click All e-mail accounts TROUBLE If you didn’t receive a message from Shawn Brooks or another person, click the Sync button on the toolbar again. It might take a few minutes for the message to arrive.

QUICK TIP To print an e-mail message, select the message in the Message list or open the message, click File on the menu bar, click Print, then click Print again.

TROUBLE For some account types, such as IMAP, the Sent items folder is called Sent Mail.

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An information box displays as Windows Live Mail sends and receives your e-mail messages. When you receive new e-mail, the e-mails are placed in the Inbox and Quick views folders in the Folder pane.

4. Click the e-mail message you received from Step 1 See Figure H-7. The Reading pane displays the e-mail message selected in the Message list.

5. Double-click the e-mail message you received in the Preview pane, then click the in the message window, if necessary Maximize button When you receive a short message, you can quickly read it by clicking the message and then reading the text in the Reading pane. Longer messages are easier to read in a full window. You can reply to the author, reply to all recipients, forward the message, or simply close or delete the message.

6. Click the Forward button on the Message toolbar, then click the Maximize button the message window, if necessary

in

The Forward Message window opens, as shown in Figure H-8, displaying the original e-mail subject title in the Subject text box with the prefix “Fw:” (short for Forward) and the original message in the message box.

7. Click in the upper-left corner of the message box, then type Please add Shawn Brooks to Thursday’s luncheon guest list. 8. Click in the To text box, type the e-mail address of your instructor, technical support person, or someone else you know, then click the Send button on the toolbar The e-mail message is sent to the recipient. As you type a recipient name or e-mail address, AutoComplete suggests possible matches from the Contact list.

9. Point to the Folder pane, click the Expand button necessary, then click Sent items

next to the e-mail account if

The Sent items folder opens, displaying all the messages sent from the e-mail account.

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Reply message received; your sender may differ

Reply message header

Inbox in Folder pane

Reply message text in Reading pane

Folder pane; your contents might differ

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FIGURE H-7: Windows Live Mail window with Inbox

Original message text in Reading pane

Message flag

FIGURE H-8: Forward message window

Message ready to forward Enter message here Message reply

Original message

Sending a photo file In Windows Live Mail, you can add photos to an e-mail message as an inline image in the message area or as an attachment. With an inline photo, you can add formatting options to the image, such as frames, color borders, and captions. You can also correct exposure and color, change to black and white, rotate, and change image quality to reduce the size and increase the upload speed. To send a photo file in a

message, click the Add photos button, select the photo file you want, click Add, click Done, then use toolbar buttons (Framing, Autocorrect, Black & White, Rotate, or Quality) as desired to modify the selected photo. To change the size and layout, click the Layout button, then click an arrangement/size button on the toolbar. When you’re done, click the Send button.

Checking the spelling and content in e-mail messages Before you send an e-mail message, you should check the spelling of the text and read through the content to make sure your spelling is accurate and your content conveys the desired message to the recipient(s). To start the spelling checker, type your e-mail message, click Tools on the menu bar, then click Spelling or press F7. To have

Windows Live Mail automatically check the spelling of all of your e-mail messages before sending them, click Tools on the menu bar, click Options, click the Spelling tab in the Options dialog box, click the Always check spelling before sending check box to select it, then click OK.

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Managing E-mail Messages A common challenge with using e-mail is managing an overcrowded Inbox. To keep your Inbox organized, you should create new folders and subfolders as you need them. A subfolder is a folder within a folder. You should also move messages you want to save to other folders and subfolders and delete messages you no longer want. These tasks make it easier to see new messages in your Inbox and to keep track of messages to which you have already responded. The Folder pane in Windows Live Mail works like the Navigation pane in Windows Explorer. When you create a subfolder, the Expand Indicator appears next to the name of the folder that contains the subfolder when you point to the Folder pane. If you can’t find a message, you can use the Find a message box to quickly locate it. To help keep your e-mail organized, you want to create a new folder for project-related e-mail messages, move relevant e-mails into this new folder, and delete any messages you no longer need.

STEPS 1. Click File on the menu bar, point to New, then click Folder The Create Folder dialog box opens, as shown in Figure H-9, displaying the list of folders contained in the Windows Live Mail folder. QUICK TIP To change the account name, rightclick the account name in the Folder pane, click Properties, type a name in the Mail Account text box, then click OK.

QUICK TIP To sort messages in the Message list, click the Sort by button, then select a category, such as From, Date, Subject, Priority, or Flag.

2. Type Projects in the Folder name text box, then click the account name folder at the top of the Folder list The new folder name appears in the Folder name text box and the folder you selected (in this case, the account folder name “Work”) specifies the folder location of the new folder.

3. Click OK The Create Folder dialog box closes and the Sent items – Windows Live Mail window opens. The new folder, Projects, appears under the account name folder (in this case, “Work” in Figure H-9) in the Folder pane.

4. Click Inbox in the Folder pane, then drag the message you received from Shawn Brooks or someone else you know in the Message list of the Inbox to the Projects folder in the Folder pane The message from Shawn Brooks or someone else you know is now located in the Projects folder.

5. In the Folder pane, click the Projects folder, then click the message you received from Shawn Brooks or someone else you know in the Message list, if necessary The e-mail message appears in the Message list and its text in the Reading pane, as shown in Figure H-10.

QUICK TIP To delete a message, select the message in the Message list, then click the Delete button on the toolbar.

6. Right-click the moved message you received from Shawn Brooks or someone else you know in the Message list of the Projects folder A shortcut menu appears with options for managing e-mail messages, such as Move to folder, Copy to folder, Delete, Print, and Add sender to contacts.

7. Click Delete The message is deleted from the Projects folder in the Message list and no longer displays in the Reading pane.

TROUBLE For some account types, such as IMAP, the Deleted items folder is not available. Items are permanently deleted using the Trash folder.

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8. In the Folder pane, right-click the Projects folder, click Delete, then click Yes to confirm the deletion The deleted Projects folder is relocated to the Deleted items folder. The Deleted items folder works just like the Recycle Bin. The folder temporarily stores deleted messages until you automatically or manually delete them.

9. In the Folder pane, right-click the Deleted items folder if available, click Empty ‘Deleted items’ folder, then click Yes to confirm the deletion The Projects folder and all of its contents are permanently deleted.

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FIGURE H-9: Create Folder dialog box

Folder name text box Account name folder; yours might differ Windows Live Mail available folders; your list might differ

FIGURE H-10: New folder in the Folder pane

Moved message from the Inbox

Projects folder

Diverting incoming e-mail to folders Windows Live Mail can direct incoming messages that meet criteria to other folders in the Folder pane rather than to your Inbox. For example, your friend loves sending you funny e-mail, but you often don’t have time to read it right away. You can set message rules to store any messages you receive from your friend in a different folder so they won’t clutter your Inbox. When you are ready to read the messages, you simply open the folder and access the messages just as you would messages in the Inbox. To set criteria for incoming messages, click Tools on the menu bar, point to Message rules, then click Mail. If the Message Rules dialog box opens, click New to create a new message rule. If the

New Mail Rule dialog box opens, no previous message rules exist. In the New Mail Rule dialog box, select the conditions for your rule, select the actions for your rule, click any undefined value (such as the e-mail address you want to divert and the folder where you want to store the diverted messages) and provide information. Type a name to identify the rule, click Save rule, then click OK. If you receive unwanted e-mail from a specific address, you can block all messages from that sender. Simply click the message from the sender, click Actions on the menu bar, point to Junk e-mail, then click Add sender to block senders list or Add sender’s domain to blocked senders list.

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Viewing and Subscribing to a Newsgroup A newsgroup is an electronic forum where people from around the world with a common interest can share ideas, ask and answer questions, and comment on and discuss any subject. Before you can participate in a newsgroup, you must select a news server. A news server is a computer located on the Internet, which stores newsgroup messages, also called articles, on different topics. Microsoft provides its own newsgroups called Microsoft Communities. To select a news server and complete the wizard process, you need to obtain the name of the news server you want to use from your instructor, technical support person, or ISP, and possibly an account name and password. When you add a news server account to Windows Live Mail, it retrieves a list of newsgroups available on that server. Often this list is quite lengthy. Rather than scroll through the entire list looking for a particular topic, you can have Windows Live Mail search the list for that topic. Once you select a newsgroup, you can merely view its contents, or, if you expect to return to the newsgroup often, you can subscribe to it. Subscribing to a newsgroup places a link to the group for easy access in the news server folder in the Folder pane of Newsgroups. Because you need to update the quarterly goals for Quest Specialty Travel, you want to find and subscribe to a newsgroup for travelers so you can monitor the latest feedback about travel companies.

STEPS 1. Click Tools on the menu bar, then click Accounts The Accounts dialog box opens, displaying a list of available mail and news servers. The Accounts dialog box enables you to add, remove, and view properties for news servers, mail servers, and directory services.

2. Click Add, click Newsgroup Account, then click Next The Add a Newsgroup Account dialog box opens.

3. Type your name, click Next, type your e-mail address if necessary, then click Next Individuals participating in a newsgroup need to know your e-mail address so they can reply to your news messages, either by posting another news message or by sending you an e-mail message.

QUICK TIP To remove a news server account, right-click the news server in the Folder pane, click Remove account, then click Yes.

4. Type the name of the news server provided by your instructor, technical support person, or ISP, click the My news server requires me to log on check box to select it if required by your ISP, then click Next 5. If you selected the My news server requires me to log on check box in the previous step, type your E-mail username and your password in the appropriate text boxes, then click Next 6. Click Finish, click Close in the Accounts dialog box if necessary, click the Show available newsgroups, but don’t turn on Communities option, then click OK or click Yes when prompted to download a list of available newsgroups The Newsgroup Subscriptions dialog box opens, displaying news servers on the left (if more than one exist) and related newsgroups on the right.

7. Type travel in the Display newsgroups that contain text box QUICK TIP To download new newsgroup messages, right-click the newsgroup in the Folder pane, point to Synchronization settings, then click New messages only.

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Newsgroups related to travel appear in the Newsgroup list box, as shown in Figure H-11.

8. Click the newsgroup name from the newsgroup list that interests you, then click Go to The newsgroup name – Windows Live Mail opens, as shown in Figure H-12. The newsgroup name you chose appears selected in the Folder pane, while the newsgroup messages appear in the Message list.

9. Right-click the newsgroup name in the Folder pane, then click Subscribe The newsgroup is changed from viewing to subscribing. Subscribing to a newsgroup makes it available along with updates the next time you open Newsgroups, whereas viewing a newsgroup does not.

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FIGURE H-11: Newsgroup Subscriptions dialog box

Newsgroup topic

Available news servers; your list might differ

Subscribe button

List of newsgroups that contain the word “travel”

Go to button

FIGURE H-12: List of newsgroups relating to travel

Messages in selected newsgroup; yours might differ

News server name Newsgroup; yours might differ

Message header Message text

Newsgroups button

Filtering unwanted newsgroup messages After you become familiar with a newsgroup, you might decide that you don’t want to retrieve messages from a particular person, about a specific subject, of a certain length, or older than a certain number of days. This is called filtering newsgroup messages. To filter unwanted messages, click Tools on the menu bar, point to Message rules, then click News. If the New News Rule dialog box opens, no previous message rules exist. Otherwise, the Rules dialog

box opens, and you click Save rule to create a new message rule. In the New News Rule dialog box, select the conditions for your rule, select the actions for your rule, click any undefined value (such as the newsgroup e-mail address you want to divert and the folder where you want to store the unwanted messages) and provide information, type a name to identify the rule, click Save rule, then click OK.

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Reading and Posting a News Message You can read new newsgroup messages after you retrieve them. Newsgroup messages appear in the Message list, just as e-mail messages do. To view a newsgroup message in the Message list, click the title of the message in the Reading pane. If the Expand Indicator appears to the left of a newsgroup message, the message contains a conversation thread. A conversation thread consists of the original message on a particular topic along with any responses that include the original message. Icons appear next to the news messages to indicate whether a conversation thread is expanded or collapsed, and whether or not it has been read. After selecting a travel newsgroup, you want to read some of the messages in the newsgroup to find out what people want from a travel company, and post newsgroup messages to obtain feedback.

STEPS QUICK TIP To view or subscribe to a newsgroup, click the Newsgroups button on the toolbar, select a news server, select a newsgroup, then click Go to or Subscribe.

QUICK TIP To view only unread messages, click View on the menu bar, point to Show or hide, then click Hide read messages.

1. Click

to the left of a newsgroup message in the Message list

The titles of the responses to the original message appear under the original newsgroup message.

2. Click the original newsgroup message, then read the message The newsgroup message appears in the Reading pane, as shown in Figure H-13.

3. Click each reply message under the original message As you read each message, you can choose to compose a new message, send a reply message to everyone viewing the newsgroup (known as posting), send a reply message to the author’s private e-mail address (rather than posting it on the newsgroup), or forward the message to another person.

4. Click the Reply group button on the toolbar, enter user information and click OK if if necessary prompted, then click the Maximize button A reply message window opens, displaying the news server, newsgroup, subject, and original message.

5. Click in the Message area text box above the original message, then type a response to the newsgroup message, as shown in Figure H-14 Your reply to the newsgroup message is complete.

6. Click the Send button on the toolbar, then click Yes Your reply message appears in the Message list along with the other replies to the original message. Everyone viewing the newsgroup can download and read your response. TROUBLE If another warning message appears, click No to subscribe to the Newsgroup, then click No to view a list of newsgroups.

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7. Right-click the newsgroup name in the Folder pane, click Unsubscribe, then click OK The newsgroup is removed; however, the news server is still available as a news account.

8. Right-click the news server in the Folder pane, click Remove account, then click Yes The news server is removed.

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FIGURE H-13: Reading a newsgroup message

Your list of messages will differ

Collapse indicator to hide replies to messages

Message header; yours will differ Message reply from the original message

Message selected in the Message list; yours will differ

FIGURE H-14: Posting a newsgroup message

Send button News server; yours might differ

Newsgroup; yours might differ

Reply message; your reply will differ

Original message; yours will differ

Deleting old newsgroup messages Newsgroup messages are stored on your hard drive, so you should delete unneeded messages to free disk space. Windows Live Mail provides several cleanup options to help you optimize your hard drive space. You can delete entire messages (titles and bodies), compress messages, remove just the message bodies (leaving the title headers), or reset the information stored for selected messages, which allows you to refresh

messages (download again). To clean up files on your local hard drive, select a news server in the Folder pane, click Tools on the menu bar, click Options, click the Advanced tab, then click Maintenance. You can select any of the cleanup options to delete or compress news messages at a specified time, or click Clean Up Now, then click the button for the cleanup option you want to perform.

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Scheduling an Appointment in the Calendar The Calendar in Windows Live Mail is an electronic version of the familiar paper daily planner. You can use the Calendar to schedule time for completing specific tasks, meetings, vacations, holidays, or for any other activity. You can adjust the Calendar to show activities using the Day, Week, or Month format. Appointments are scheduled activities such as a doctor’s visit that don’t include other people or resources, and occupy a block of time in the Appointment area. The Appointment area serves as a daily planner where you can schedule activities by the day, week, or month. Events are activities that last 24 hours or longer, such as a seminar, and do not occupy blocks of time in your calendar. Instead, they appear in a banner at the beginning of a day. If an appointment or event recurs on a regular basis, such as a Monday morning meeting, you can set the Recurrence option. If you need a meeting reminder, you can specify how long before the appointment you want to receive a reminder alert. To set a reminder, you need to sign in to Windows Live Mail with your Windows Live ID. To make sure you don’t forget about the new employee luncheon each month, you want to add the activity appointment to your Calendar.

STEPS 1. Click the Calendar button

at the bottom of the Folder pane

The Calendar – Windows Live Mail window opens, displaying the current date in the Date Navigator and, in the current calendar view, either Day, Week, or Month.

2. Click the Day button on the toolbar, if necessary The calendar view changes to show the currently selected day by hourly increments, where you can view, create, and edit appointments. The current day is selected in the calendar. QUICK TIP To quickly add an appointment, select a time, then type the appointment text you want. To edit the appointment in one of the views, click the appointment, click in the text, then edit the text.

3. In the Date Navigator, click next Thursday, then select 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in Day view The Calendar window opens, displaying the selected date and time for the appointment, as shown in Figure H-15.

4. Click the New button on the toolbar The New Event dialog box opens. The new appointment appears with selected text at the scheduled time in Day view. The start and end times appear along with other information and options you can select. When you enter appointment information in the New Event dialog box, the All day check box remains empty.

5. Type New employee luncheon in the Subject text box, press [Tab], then type Company cafe in the Location text box 6. Click the Recurrence button, then click Monthly The appointment is set to occur every month in the calendar.

7. Click the Save & close button on the toolbar The Calendar window reappears, displaying the new appointment, as shown in Figure H-16. QUICK TIP To delete an appointment, select the appointment, then click the Delete button on the toolbar. If prompted, select a delete occurrence option, then click Delete.

Windows 186

8. Click File on the menu bar, click Exit, then click Yes, if necessary, to disconnect from the Internet Windows Live Mail closes.

Exchanging Mail and News

View buttons Date Navigator with date

Selected date in Day view

Selected appointment date; your date will vary Current calendar name

Windows 7

FIGURE H-15: Calendar window with selected date and time

Selected appointment time

FIGURE H-16: Calendar window with an appointment

Appointment subject

Selected calendar with color

Appointment calendar color

Appointment time Recurrence icon

Appointment in Day view

Creating multiple calendars In the Calendar, you can create individual calendars for multiple people who use Windows Live Mail and share them with each other. When you have multiple calendars, you can view them individually or all at once, side by side, or overlaid to make it easier to compare one calendar with another and check for free time. Appointments for each calendar are displayed in a different color to make them easy to distinguish. If you want to add an appointment from another calendar to yours, you can drag appointments between the two calendars. To create and view a calendar, click the Add calendar link in the Folder pane, type a name in

the Calendar name text box, click the calendar color you want, type a description in the Description text box, click the Make this my primary calendar check box to select it if you want to make this your main calendar, then click Save. To view multiple calendars, select the check boxes next to the calendars you want, then clear the check boxes for the ones you want to hide. To create a new event for a calendar, click the calendar name, then click New event. To change the calendar name or other properties, click the calendar name, then click Properties. To delete a calendar, click the calendar name, then click Delete.

Exchanging Mail and News

Windows 187

Practice Concepts Review

For current SAM information including versions and content details, visit SAM Central (http://samcentral.course.com). If you have a SAM user profile, you may have access to hands-on instruction, practice, and assessment of the skills covered in this unit. Since we support various versions of SAM throughout the life of this text, you will want to check with your instructor for instructions and the correct URL/Web site to access those assignments.

Match the statements below with the elements labeled in the screen shown in Figure H-17. FIGURE H-17

h a b g c

f

d e

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Which element displays new e-mail messages? Which element points to the Message list? Which element displays news messages? Which element points to the Message header? Which element points to a new folder? Which element points to the Reading pane? Which element displays appointments? Which element points to the account name?

Match each term with the statement that best describes it. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

Message flag Newsgroup Windows Live Mail window Windows Live Mail News server Message rules

Windows 188

a. b. c. d. e. f.

A computer on the Internet that stores articles Displays e-mail, contacts, and newsgroups An icon that indicates e-mail priority Diverts selected incoming e-mail folders A program that exchanges e-mail on the Internet A collection of articles on related topics

Exchanging Mail and News

Select the best answer from the list of choices. 15. Which of the following is an outgoing e-mail server? a. POP3 c. SMTP b. IMAP d. HTTP 16. Which of the following is a set of rules and standards that control the transmission of content over the Internet? a. Transfer c. Hypertext b. Protocol d. Flags 17. A contact is a: a. Person with whom you communicate. c. Newsgroup. b. Mailing address. d. Program. 18. When you click the Send button on the toolbar in the New Message window, you first send an e-mail message to the: a. E-mail address. c. Internet. b. Outbox. d. Cc and Bcc addresses. 19. Which of the following means private carbon copy? a. Cc. c. To. b. Bcc. d. None of the above 20. A newsgroup message is also called a(n): a. E-mail. c. Conversation. b. Article. d. Thread. 21. A thread consists of a: a. Message only. c. Responses only. b. Message and any responses. d. All of the above 22. Which of the following is an electronic version of the familiar paper daily planner? a. Windows Live Contacts c. Windows Live Mail b. Calendar d. All of the above

Windows 7

Concepts Review (Continued)

Skills Review 1. Start Windows Live Mail and explore the Windows Live Mail window. a. Start Windows Live Mail, then connect to the Internet, if necessary. b. If prompted, enter your username and password, then click Connect. c. Identify the title bar, menu bar, Find a message box, toolbar, Folder pane, Message list, Reading pane, and status bar. d. On the toolbar, identify icons or elements for opening Windows Live Contacts, sending and receiving e-mail messages, composing a message, and finding a message. 2. Add a contact to the Windows Live Contacts. a. Click the Contacts button. b. Click the New button on the Contacts toolbar. c. Type Grace in the First name text box, press [Tab], then type Wong. d. Click in the Personal e-mail text box, then type [email protected] e. Click Add contact. f. Double-click the contact, add Quest Specialty Travel to the Work category, then click Save. g. Click the Windows Live Contacts Close button. 3. Compose and send e-mail. a. Click the New button, then click the Maximize button, if necessary. b. Click the To button.

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Windows 189

Skills Review (Continued)

4.

5.

6.

7.

c. Click the Grace Wong name and e-mail address or the e-mail address of your instructor, technical support person, or someone else you know. d. Click To, then click OK. e. Type Financial Update Request in the Subject text box. f. Click in the message window, then type Grace: Please send year-end financial report ASAP. Thanks. g. Click the Send button. Retrieve, read, and respond to e-mail. a. Have the e-mail recipient to whom you sent the e-mail message send a reply back to you. b. Click the Sync button. c. In the Folder pane, click Inbox, then click the message you just received. d. Click the Forward button, then click the Maximize button if necessary. e. Click the To text box, type your e-mail address, then compose a response in the message window. f. Click the Send button. Manage e-mail messages. a. Click File on the menu bar, point to New, then click Folder. b. Type Archive, click the account name folder, then click OK. c. Drag the message received from Grace Wong or someone else you know from the Inbox folder to the Archive folder. d. In the Folder pane, click the Archive folder. e. Right-click the message received from Grace Wong or someone else you know, then click Delete. f. Right-click the Archive folder, click Delete, then click Yes. g. Click the Contacts button. h. Click Grace Wong, click the Delete button, click OK, then click the Close button. View and subscribe to a newsgroup. a. Click Tools on the menu bar, then click Accounts. b. Click Add, click Newsgroup Account, then click Next. c. Type your name, click Next, type your e-mail address, then click Next. d. Type the name of a news server (see your instructor, technical support person, or ISP for a name), then click Next. e. Click Finish, click Close if necessary, then click Yes. f. In the News server list, click the news server you just added (if available). g. Type finance in the Display newsgroups that contain text box. (Hint: If no items appear, type budget.) h. Click a newsgroup, then click Go to to open the newsgroup. i. Right-click the newsgroup in the Folder pane, then click Subscribe. Read and post a news message. a. Click a newsgroup message with a . b. Click next to the newsgroup message. c. Click and read each reply. d. Click the Reply group button, then type a response. e. Click the Send button, then click OK. f. Right-click the newsgroup in the Folder pane, click Unsubscribe, then click OK. g. Right-click the news server in the Folder pane, click Remove account, then click Yes.

8. Schedule an appointment in the Calendar. a. Click the Calendar button. b. Click the Day button on the toolbar, if necessary. c. Select a day and time to schedule an appointment. d. Click the New button. e. Type a title for the appointment, press [Tab], then type a location. f. Set the recurrence to Weekly, then click the Save & close button. g. Click File on the menu bar, then click Exit to exit Windows Live Mail. Windows 190

Exchanging Mail and News

You are a new lawyer at Kenny & Associates. You have a home computer with Windows 7 and Windows Live Mail that you often use to do work on while you are at home. Because e-mail is an important method of communication at the law firm, you want to use Windows Live Mail and Windows Live Contacts to enter e-mail addresses of colleagues with whom you need to communicate while working away from the office. a. Start Windows Live Mail, then open the Windows Live Contacts. b. Enter the following names and e-mail addresses: Kristen Kenny, [email protected]_law.com Jennifer Kenny, [email protected]_law.com Karen Quan, [email protected]_law.com c. Print the Windows Live Contacts in both the Phone List and Memo styles. d. Delete the names and e-mail addresses you just entered in the Windows Live Contacts.

Windows 7

Independent Challenge 1

Independent Challenge 2 As president of Auto Metals, you just negotiated a deal to export metal auto parts to an assembly plant in China. Your lawyer, Jack Blea, drew up a preliminary contract. You want to send Jack an e-mail indicating the terms of the deal so he can finish the contract. When Jack responds, move the e-mail into the Legal folder. If you do not have a connection to the Internet, ask your instructor or technical support person for help completing this challenge. a. Open a New Message window using the stationery called Money, or another option. b. Type [email protected] in the To text box in the message window, then type China Deal Contract in the Subject text box. c. Enter the following message: Dear Jack, I have completed the negotiations with the assembly plant. Please modify the following terms in the contract: 1. All parts shall be inspected before shipping. 2. Ship 100,000 units a month for 4 years with an option for 2 more years. Sincerely yours, [your name] Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Set Windows Live Mail as your default e-mail program. ■ Set spelling options to always check spelling before sending a message. ■ Check the spelling in your e-mail message. ■ Attach a file to an e-mail message. ■ Set and run a rule to divert mail messages from a specific sender to a folder. ■ Delete the message rule. d. Send the e-mail, then print the e-mail you sent to Jack Blea. e. Create a new folder called Legal, then move the e-mail message you received from Jack Blea to the new folder. f. Delete the Legal folder.

Independent Challenge 3 You are a legal assistant at a law firm specializing in international law. Your manager asks you to research international contracts with China. You decide to start your research with newsgroups on the Internet. a. Select a news server. (See your instructor, technical support person, or ISP to obtain a news server.) b. Subscribe to a newsgroup about China, then read several newsgroup messages and replies. c. Reply to a message, then post a new message. d. Print the newsgroup messages, including the original message and replies.

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Windows 191

Independent Challenge 2 (Continued) Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Set Windows Live Mail as your default news client. ■ Set and run a rule to divert news messages on a specific topic to a folder. ■ Set options to delete old news messages on your computer. ■ Delete the message rule. e. Unsubscribe to the newsgroup, then remove the newsgroup server.

Real Life Independent Challenge You have a very busy schedule this week, so you want to schedule all your appointments and set reminders so you don’t forget anything. a. Open the Calendar. b. Specify all the appointments you have for the week. Include at least four appointment and one all-day event. c. Specify recurrences for at least two appointments. d. Change the view to Week and Month to see your appointments. Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Create a new calendar, then add some appointments to it. ■ Sign in to Windows Live Mail with your Windows Live ID. ■ Specify reminders for at least two appointments. ■ View the appointments on both calendars, then delete the new calendar.

Visual Workshop Re-create the screen shown in Figure H-18, which displays the Calendar in Windows Live Mail with appointments on a specific day using multiple calendars. FIGURE H-18

Windows 192

Exchanging Mail and News

UNIT

I Windows 7

Communicating over the Internet

Files You Will Need:

With Windows Live Essentials, you can communicate over the Internet more effectively

No files needed.

free for download on the Web, includes Microsoft Windows Live Messenger, a powerful

and easier than ever. Windows Live Essentials, a collection of Microsoft programs available program for exchanging instant messages over the Web. With Windows Live Messenger, you can talk to others over the Internet in real time, use video to see and be seen by others while you converse, share programs and files, collaborate on documents, or request and receive remote online assistance from a contact. With Windows Live Writer, you can use blogging services to create a blog (short for Weblog), a Web site that functions as a publicly accessible journal about whatever interests you.

As the president of Quest

Specialty Travel, you’re preparing for a stockholders’ meeting and you want to take advantage of Windows communication features to talk with stockholders and employees about the company’s financial health.

OBJECTIVES

Start Windows Live Messenger Work with contacts and categories Send and receive instant messages Format instant messages Communicate with video Get remote assistance Personalize Windows Live Messenger Start Windows Live Writer Create a blog post

UNIT

I Windows 7

Starting Windows Live Messenger Windows Live Messenger is an instant messaging program that allows you to send and receive instant messages, hold video chats, and share files. Windows Live Messenger doesn’t accompany Windows 7, so you need to download and install it from the Microsoft Windows Live Essentials Web site. Before you can use Windows Live Messenger, you need to obtain an account ID, which you can get free of charge from Microsoft. You use this account ID to sign in to Windows Live Messenger as well as other Windows Live services, such as Windows Live Mail and Windows Live Family Safety. If you have an MSN Hotmail, MSN Messenger, or Microsoft Passport account, then you already have a Windows Live ID. After you start Windows Live Messenger, you sign in to let users know you are online. When you’re done communicating, you sign out as if you were logging off a program. Before you use Windows Live Messenger, you want to download and install the software, create an account, and then sign in.

For the first seven lessons, ask someone with Windows 7 or Vista, an Internet connection, and the same version of Windows Live Messenger to start Windows Live Messenger and be signed in when you start this lesson. If you don’t have a Windows Live account, see your instructor or network administrator.

STEPS 1. If the Windows Live Messenger program is not installed on your computer, open your browser, type http://download.live.com in the Address bar, press [Enter], click Download, click Run, click Yes if necessary, click the Messenger and Writer check boxes to select if necessary, click Install, click Continue if necessary, click Continue, click Close in your browser window to exit the installer, then click the Close button The Windows Essentials Web site opens, where you can download and install Windows Live programs, which include Messenger and Writer. You can also install Windows Live Mail, Photo Gallery, Movie Maker, Toolbar, Family Safety, and Silverlight from this site.

2. Click the Start button on the taskbar, point to All Programs, click Windows Live, then click Windows Live Messenger, if necessary The Windows Live Messenger Sign in window opens, as shown in Figure I-1. If you already have an account, skip to Step 5. QUICK TIP You can double-click the Windows Live Messenger Signed In or Winicon dows Live Messenger Not Signed In on the icon taskbar to start the program.

3. If you don’t have an account, click the Sign up link on the Windows Live Messenger window Your Web browser opens, displaying the Sign up—Windows Live Web site.

4. If you’re signing up for a new account, follow the online instructions to create a Windows Live ID, then close any open browser windows The Windows Live Messenger Sign in window reappears.

5. Click in the E-mail address box, type your e-mail address, press [Tab], type your password, then click Sign in The Windows Live Messenger window opens along with a window containing related Web content. On first use, the Welcome to Windows Live Messenger window opens providing options to download free content.

6. Click the Close button on the Welcome to Windows Live Messenger window, if on the related Web content window, necessary, then click the Close button if necessary The Windows Live Messenger window appears, as shown in Figure I-2. Windows 194

Communicating over the Internet

FIGURE I-2: Windows Live Messenger window

Status list arrow; Jessica is available online Share a quick message box

Sign up link for a Windows Live ID

Windows 7

FIGURE I-1: Windows Live Messenger Sign in window

Toolbar

Welcome to Messenger information indicating no contacts; yours might differ

E-mail address box

Password box Sign in options

Sign in button Buttons to other non-Windows Live Messenger services

Use the E-mail address list arrow to select an address

Exploring the Windows Live Messenger window At the top of the Windows Live Messenger window is the Status list arrow, which displays the current username and online status. Below the Status list arrow is the Share a quick message box, which you can use to enter and share a quick message for contacts to see. Below the quick

message is the toolbar for Windows Live Messenger. The buttons along the bottom of the window display icons you can use to access related Web sites in the related Web content window.

Signing in to Windows Live Messenger in different ways The Sign in window for Windows Live Messenger provides options you can use to make it easier to sign in or to sign in with a different account. To have Windows Live Messenger remember your e-mail address, password, or sign you in automatically, select the Remember me, Remember

my password, or Sign me in automatically check boxes. To sign in with a different account, click the Status list arrow, click Sign out from here, click the E-mail address list arrow, click Sign in with a different Windows Live ID, enter your e-mail address and password, then click Sign in.

Resetting a lost password If you forget your password, you can reset it from within Windows Live Messenger. Simply click the Start button, point to All Programs, click Windows Live, then click Windows Live Messenger to start the program. Next you click the Forgot your password? link at the bottom

of the Windows Live Messenger Sign in window. Your Web browser opens, displaying the Reset your password Web site. Finally, type your Windows Live ID, type the security characters in the picture, click Continue, then follow the online instructions to reset your password.

Communicating over the Internet

Windows 195

UNIT

I Windows 7

Working with Contacts and Categories You can use Windows Live Messenger to exchange instant messages with a designated list of contacts over the Internet. To send instant messages to other people, you need to ensure that they have Windows Live Messenger and an ID or are Yahoo! members. You can then add them to your Contacts list using the Add a contact or group button. If any of the people who you want to contact don’t have Windows Live Messenger or an ID, they need to obtain these for you to communicate with them. To make it easier, you can send a person an e-mail with information about getting and installing Windows Live Messenger and obtaining an ID. As your Contacts list grows, you might want to organize your contacts into categories (formally called groups) or remove the ones you no longer use. Windows Live Messenger makes it easy to organize contacts into predefined categories as well as categories that you create yourself. You want to create a new contact and add it to a new category.

STEPS QUICK TIP To find a contact, click in the Search contacts box, then enter a contact name. As you type, a results list appears. Click the Close button in the Search contacts box to exit the search.

1. In the Windows Live Messenger window, click Add a contact or group button toolbar, then click Add a contact

on the

The Windows Live Messenger wizard dialog box opens, as shown in Figure I-3, asking you for a contact’s instant messaging e-mail address, mobile device number, and category.

2. Type your contact’s complete e-mail address in the Instant messaging address box The instant messaging address for the contact appears in the dialog box. You can also specify a mobile device number and select a category in this dialog box.

3. Click Next The next Windows Live Messenger wizard dialog box opens, asking you to send an invitation to the contact. When you send an invitation to a contact, the contact also receives a dialog box, asking him/her to allow or block you when the contact is online.

4. Click in the Include your own message box, type Hi. Do you have time to talk?, if necessary, click the Also send this in e-mail invitation in case this person doesn’t have Messenger yet check box to select it, then click Send invitation The next Windows Live Messenger wizard dialog box opens, asking you to add contact information to your profile or close the dialog box. QUICK TIP To add a contact to your Favorites list, drag the contact to the Favorites list or right-click the contact, then click Add to favorites.

5. Click Close The Windows Live Messenger window reappears, displaying the contact name in a category. The Windows Live Messenger window also displays the categories Favorites and Groups. The Favorites category provides an easy access list to frequently used contacts, while the Groups category provides a group of contacts to communicate with.

6. Click the Add a contact or group button click OK, if necessary

on the toolbar, click Create a category, then

The Create a new category dialog box opens, asking you to enter a category name and select the contacts you want to add to the category.

7. Type Work in the Enter a category name box, then click a contact from the list The Create a new category dialog box displays the new category name and selected contact in the Contacts list at the bottom, as shown in Figure I-4.

8. Click Save The Windows Live Messenger window reappears, displaying the new Work category with the contact. Windows 196

Communicating over the Internet

Windows 7

FIGURE I-3: Windows Live Messenger wizard dialog box

Instant messaging address box

FIGURE I-4: Create a new category dialog box

Enter a category name box Selected contact; your contact will differ

Contacts list

Contacts selected for the new category; your contact will differ

Managing contacts and categories As your Contacts list changes and grows, you can use options to edit, delete, or block your contacts. To edit a contact, right-click the contact, click Edit contact, click an information category (General, Contact, Personal, Work, or Notes), enter the information you want, then click Save. To delete a contact, right-click the contact, click Delete contact, select the Also block this contact check box if desired, select the Also remove from my Windows Live Hotmail contacts check box if desired, then click Delete contact. To block or unblock a contact, right-click the contact you want to change, then click Block contact or Unblock contact. You

can also click the Block button during a conversation. After you create a category, you can rename, edit, or delete it. To rename a category, right-click the category, click Rename category, type a new name, then press [Enter]. To edit a category, right-click the category, click Delete category, then click OK. To edit a category, right-click the category, click Edit category, make the changes you want, then click Save. To remove a contact from a category, right-click the contact, then click Remove contact from category.

Communicating over the Internet

Windows 197

UNIT

I Windows 7

Sending and Receiving Instant Messages An instant message (IM) is an online typewritten conversation in real time between two or more contacts. Whereas e-mail messages collect in an e-mail program and can be viewed at a later time, instant messages can only be exchanged if both parties are online, and the communication is instantaneous. You can use Windows Live Messenger to perform the following tasks over the Internet: send instant messages to any of your contacts who are online; have conversations with a group of friends; see the latest information about your contacts; see and hear your contacts; send and receive text messages with a mobile device; send a voice clip to express yourself personally; and save your conversations. In addition, you can complete PC-to-telephone or PC-to-PC calls, share and update files using the Sharing folder, as well as connect with contacts who use Yahoo! Messenger. You send and receive instant messages with Holly to discuss the next stockholders’ meeting.

STEPS QUICK TIP If you don’t want to receive messages, you can change your status to one of many choices, such as Busy. In the Windows Live Messenger window, click the Status list arrow, then click a status option.

1. In the Windows Live Messenger window, click the Status list arrow at the top of the window, then click Available, if necessary The list arrow displays your current online status and other common commands, such as Sign out from here, available in Windows Live Messenger. The color to the left of the contact name indicates the online status of the contact, as shown in Figure I-5. Green indicates available, red indicates busy, orange indicates away, and white indicates appear offline.

2. Wait for a green status for your contact (Holly), double-click your contact’s name (Holly) in the list of contacts, then wait for an acceptance response from your online contact The Conversation window opens and sends an invitation to your online contact to have a conversation.

3. Click the Text tab

at the bottom of the Message box, if necessary

The Text tab supports instant messaging using typewritten text. If you have Microsoft Windows Journal Viewer installed as well as a writing input device, the Handwrite tab supports conversations using handwritten text.

4. Click in the Message box, if necessary, then type the message shown in the top part of the Conversation window in Figure I-6 labeled “Jessica says” The message appears in the Message box. To start a new line while typing, press [Shift][Enter]. As you type an instant message, Windows Live Messenger displays status information about your conversation in the Conversation window.

5. Press [Enter] The message is sent and appears in the Conversation window. QUICK TIP If you want to add another person to the conversation, click the Invite button on the toolbar, then double-click the person you want to add.

Windows 198

6. Have your contact (Holly) type the message shown in the Conversation window in Figure I-6 labeled “Holly Johnson says” and send it to you, type the message shown in the Message box in Figure I-6, then send it The conversation appears in the Conversation window.

7. Click the Close button on the Conversation window, if necessary, click the No, do not save my message on this computer (recommended for shared computers) option button, then click OK

Communicating over the Internet

FIGURE I-6: Conversation window

Name and address of the contact in conversation

Online status of contact

Contact name and online status

Windows 7

FIGURE I-5: Windows Live Messenger window

Holly’s picture Jessica says; Jessica’s sent message

Green status indicator; your status might differ

Holly Johnson says; Holly’s sent message

Contact in the Work category; your contact will differ

Status information; yours might differ

Jessica’s picture

Jessica’s current message not sent yet in the Message box

Sending a file or e-mail during an instant message While you are conversing in Windows Live Messenger, you can also send a file or e-mail message. You can send many different types of files, including documents, pictures, and music. To send a file, click the contact to whom you want to send the file, click the Show menu button, point to File, click Send a single file, navigate to and select the file you want to send, then click Open. A request to transfer the file is sent to your contact. You are notified when it is accepted or declined. If your computer is located on a network behind a firewall, you might not be able to send files to those outside the firewall. If you want to send files to those outside the firewall, you need to open the connection

manually; check with your network administrator for details. Before you receive files over the Internet, make sure you have virus protection software on your computer. When you receive a file, a message dialog box related to viruses might open. To open a received file, click the Open link in the Conversation window or click the Show menu button, point to File, then click Open received files. If you want to send a contact an e-mail message to follow up on a conversation in Windows Live Messenger, right-click the contact, then click Send e-mail (e-mail address). Your browser opens with a Windows Live Hotmail message window. Type your message, then click Send.

Communicating over the Internet

Windows 199

UNIT

I Windows 7

Formatting Instant Messages You can format an instant message as if it were a regular e-mail message by changing fonts and text color and by inserting backgrounds. Selecting a background changes the appearance of the Conversation window to reflect the tone or mood you want to set. In addition, you can also insert graphical symbols called emoticons, such as a happy face, which help convey your emotions, or graphical animations, called winks. The list of emoticons and winks is available in the Conversation window. If your conversation needs some prodding to get people conversing, you can use the Nudge button to insert a graphical symbol called a nudge to encourage the person you are having a conversation with to continue the chat. As you communicate with Holly about the next stockholders’ meeting, you decide to personalize the tone of the communication by formatting the instant message text and adding emoticons and winks.

STEPS

QUICK TIP To record and play a voice clip, press and hold the Voice Clip in the button Conversation window, record your clip, release the mouse, then click Play/Stop in the Conversation window.

QUICK TIP To preview or remove a wink, click Show all on the Wink menu. To see additional winks, including audio ones, click Featured winks or use the See more offerings menu on the Wink menu.

1. In the Windows Live Messenger window, double-click your contact’s name (Holly) in the list of contacts currently online, then wait for an acceptance response from your online contact The Conversation window opens and sends an invitation to your online contact to initiate a conversation.

2. Click the Background button

, then click the Show all link

The Backgrounds dialog box opens, as shown in Figure I-7.

3. Select a background from the list, then click Set The background you selected appears in the Conversation window.

4. Type and send the messages for Jessica and Holly in a conversation, as shown in Figure I-8 The messages appear in the Message box. As you type an instant message, you can insert an emoticon or wink.

5. Click the Wink button Send

, click the Show all link, select an icon from the list, then click

The wink icon appears in the Conversation window, as shown in Figure I-8.

6. In the Message box, type Great!, a space, click the Emoticon button Smile :) icon on the menu

The emoticon appears in the message text in the Conversation window, as shown in Figure I-8.

7. Press [Enter] The message text with the emoticon is sent.

8. Click the Background button

, click the Show all link, click

, then click Set

The color scheme is set to the default color and the background is set to (None).

9. Click the Close button

Windows 200

, then select the

Communicating over the Internet

on the Conversation window

Windows 7

FIGURE I-7: Backgrounds dialog box

Available backgrounds; yours might differ (None) background Default background; yours might differ Set button

FIGURE I-8: Conversation window with emoticons and winks

Background; yours might differ

Link to play the wink

Emoticon symbol Background button Emoticon button

Wink button

Creating and using groups In addition to having conversations with individuals, you can also have a conversation with a group. A Windows Live Messenger group can have up to 20 members; you can only belong to 20 groups at any one time. To create a group, click the Add a contact or group button on the toolbar, click Create a group, click OK if necessary, type a group name, click Next, type your contacts or click the Select from

your contact list link to add contacts, click Next, then click Done. If you receive an invitation for a group, you can click Join, Decide later, or No thanks. To send and receive instant messages to a group, doubleclick a contact group, type your message, then press [Enter]. When you’re done communicating, click the Close button on the Conversation window.

Communicating over the Internet

Windows 201

UNIT

I Windows 7

Communicating with Video Windows Live Messenger provides state-of-the-art computer communications features. You can talk to others over the Internet as you do on a phone, use video to see while others are speaking, share programs and files with others, and collaborate on documents. Once you set up your computer hardware and software, such as a Webcam or microphone and speakers, you’re ready to communicate over the Internet. You have two communication choices: audio only and audio and video. With audio only, you speak into a microphone and hear the other person’s response over your computer’s speakers. With audio and video, you send video to others so they receive live images as well as sound. If the person you are calling doesn’t have a video camera, they will see you on their computer screen, but you won’t see them. If your computer is located on a network behind a firewall, you can communicate with people who are behind the same firewall, but you might not be able to communicate with those outside the firewall; check with your network administrator for details. You and Holly have discussed whether to use video in Live Messenger to introduce other members of the management team. As part of a test run, you decide to show her how easy it is to use video with instant messaging.

To use the audio and video features of Windows Live Messenger, you need to have speakers, a microphone, and a video camera (Webcam) attached and installed on your computer and your contact’s computer. If you don’t have any of the hardware, read the lesson without completing the steps to learn what is possible in Windows Live Messenger.

STEPS TROUBLE If you and your contact don’t have video cameras, skip to Step 6.

QUICK TIP To make a phone call using the Internet, click the Show menu button, point to Actions, point to Call, then select one of the call commands. You need a voice server provider to complete the call.

1. In the Windows Live Messenger window, double-click your contact’s name (Holly) The Conversation window opens and sends an invitation to your online contact to have a conversation.

2. Wait for an acceptance response from your online contact 3. Click the Video Call button on the toolbar A video screen graphic appears in the left pane of the Conversation window without the live video until the contact accepts the invitation to the video conversation, as shown in Figure I-9.

4. When you receive an acceptance, start talking back and forth Live video appears in the left pane of the Conversation window, as shown in Figure I-10. As you converse, you can adjust the speaker balance and the volume.

5. Use the controls to adjust the volume of the speakers or microphone The volume of the speakers or microphone change as adjusted.

6. When you’re done with the conversation, click the Close button on the Conversation window, then click Yes to confirm the ending of the call, if necessary The Conversation window closes and the Windows Live Messenger window appears.

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Communicating over the Internet

Windows 7

FIGURE I-9: Starting a video conversation

Video Call button Start or stop my contact’s Webcam button

No Webcam connection

Switch to full-screen view button

Options for this person button Start or stop my Webcam button

Jessica on video

FIGURE I-10: Conversation window with video

My contact’s volume slider

Holly on video

Mute speakers button

My volume slider Jessica on video Mute microphone button

Sending a message to a mobile device If you have a wireless device, such as a Web-enabled cellular phone, pager, Smartphone, iPhone, Pocket PC Phone, or Pocket PC, you can set it up to receive instant messages using Windows Live Messenger. When you send a message to a contact’s mobile device, the message includes your e-mail address and phone number unless the mobile device doesn’t support the feature. If your contact’s mobile device is not turned on, the message might be delayed or not arrive at all. To set up an account, click the Status list arrow, then click Options.

In the Options dialog box, click Phone in the left pane, click Mobile Settings, then follow the online instructions on the Web site. When you’re done, close your browser, click the Allow people on my contacts list to send messages to my mobile device check box to select it, then click OK. To send a message to a mobile device, rightclick the contact with a mobile number to whom you want to send a message, click Send mobile text (SMS), type your message, then press [Enter].

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Windows 203

UNIT

I Windows 7

Getting Remote Assistance Sometimes the best way to fix a computer problem is to get help from a friend or colleague who knows how to solve it. If your friend or colleague lives too far away to help you in person, you can use Remote Assistance and an Internet connection to help you get the support and answers you need. With Remote Assistance in Windows Live Messenger, you can ask a trusted contact in another location to connect to your computer over the Internet and provide support in real time. After connecting to your computer, you can invite a contact to view your desktop, chat online using instant messages, talk online using a microphone and speakers, and send files. Instead of simply talking about a solution, sometimes you need someone to show you how to perform the steps before you fully understand a procedure. Remote Assistance allows you to give a contact control of your computer. He can demonstrate how to perform the procedure using his mouse and keyboard while you watch in real time. If your computer is located on a network behind a firewall, you might not be able to use Remote Assistance; check with your network administrator for details. Holly, a company stockholder, is having trouble making changes using the Control Panel. Because she works in another city, you offer to use Remote Assistance to show her how to make the changes she wants.

STEPS 1. In the Windows Live Messenger window, have your contact (Holly) click the Show menu on the toolbar, point to Actions, click Request remote assistance, select you button as a contact, then click OK The Conversation window opens, and you receive an invitation from your online contact for remote assistance. QUICK TIP The exchange of passwords between you and your contact needs to take place securely over instant messaging, e-mail, or phone.

QUICK TIP To chat during a Remote Assistance session, click the Chat button on the Windows Remote Assistance toolbar, type a message, then click Send.

QUICK TIP To change the size of the Windows Remote Assistance window, click the Actual size or Fit to screen button on the Windows Remote Assistance toolbar.

2. When you receive an invitation, click the Accept link, then wait for the Remote Assistance window to open When you receive an acceptance, the Windows Remote Assistance window opens. Your contact receives a Remote Assistance message dialog box with a password, which he/she needs to convey to you.

3. Enter the password from your contact (Holly), then click OK Your contact (Holly) receives a Remote Assistance message dialog box.

4. Have your contact (Holly) click Yes to let you view her screen The Windows Remote Assistance window opens on your computer, indicating that you can request control of your contact’s computer. Compare your contact’s (Holly’s) screen to Figure I-11.

5. Click the Request control button

on the Windows Remote Assistance window toolbar

Your contact (Holly) receives a Remote Assistance message dialog box, asking for computer control.

6. Have your contact (Holly) click Yes to let you take control of her screen The Windows Remote Assistance window opens, indicating that you are now sharing control.

7. Click the Show desktop button on the taskbar, click the Start button then click Control Panel

The open windows minimize to the taskbar, and the Control Panel window opens in your Remote Assistance window and on your contact’s (Holly’s) computer, as shown in Figure I-12. As you demonstrate how to make changes in the Control Panel, each step of the procedure appears in your Remote Assistance window and on your contact’s (Holly’s) desktop.

8. Click the Close button on the Control Panel window, click the Show desktop button on the Windows Remote on the taskbar, then click the Stop sharing button Assistance window toolbar to stop the session on the Windows Remote 9. Have you and your contact (Holly) click the Close button on the Conversation window Assistance window, then click the Close button The Windows Live Messenger window reappears.

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on the taskbar,

Communicating over the Internet

Contact’s Windows Remote Assistance toolbar

Contact’s Windows Live Messenger window

Status information

Windows 7

FIGURE I-11: Connecting to a remote computer using Remote Assistance

Contact’s (Holly) conversation window Contact’s (Holly) desktop

FIGURE I-12: Controlling a remote computer using Remote Assistance

Stop sharing button

Windows Remote Assistance toolbar

Results appear here and on contact’s computer

Status information

Sharing games and activities Windows Live Messenger allows you to share your documents and programs with another user or users. Your contact cannot work with the document until you give them access. You must allow a user access to your computer and program window so that he can “take control” of the program and then run any menu commands or make changes to a

document. If you and other users have the same multiplayer game, such as Age of Empires II, installed on individual computers, you can play the game using Windows Live Messenger. To start an activity or game, start a conversation, click the Activities button on the toolbar, click an activity, then follow the instructions.

Communicating over the Internet

Windows 205

UNIT

I Windows 7

Personalizing Windows Live Messenger When you sign in to Windows Live Messenger, the program notifies any current online users in your Contacts list that you are available to chat. While you’re signed in, you might need to leave your computer for a meeting or lunch. Instead of changing your status manually, you can set preferences to have Windows Live Messenger change your status for you. In addition, you can customize Windows Live Messenger to show the menu bar if you prefer, or automatically sign you in. You can also change your display name, provide a personal message, and select a picture to represent you during your online communications. Instead of selecting a regular static picture, you can even choose a dynamic display picture or animated character. As you become more familiar with Windows Live Messenger, you decide to personalize the message that appears when you’re away from your desk.

STEPS 1. Click the Status list arrow in the Windows Live Messenger window, then click Options The Options dialog box opens, displaying the Personal category, as shown in Figure I-13.

2. Click the Show me as “Away” when I’m inactive for x minutes check box to select it, if necessary, then set the number of inactive minutes to 5 This option automatically changes your online status to Away when your computer is inactive for 5 minutes.

3. Click Sign In in the left pane The Sign In category options appear, as shown in Figure I-14.

4. Click the Automatically run Windows Live Messenger when I log on to Windows check box to deselect it, if necessary With this option deselected, Windows Live Messenger only runs when you start it from the Start menu or notification area. When this option is selected, Windows Live Messenger starts in the background when you log on to Windows.

5. Click Messages in the left pane, click Change Font, select Verdana or another available font as the default, click OK, then click OK again The Change Font dialog box and the Options dialog box close.

6. Right-click the contact that you added to Windows Live Messenger, click Delete contact, click Delete contact to confirm, right-click the category that you added, click Delete category, then click OK The contact and category that you added are deleted from Windows Live Messenger.

7. Click the Status list arrow, then click Sign out from here You are signed out of Windows Live Messenger.

8. Click the Close button on the Windows Live Messenger window, then click OK in the Windows Live Messenger is still running dialog box, if necessary Windows Live Messenger closes; however, the program is still running in the background. The Windows Live Messenger icon remains active on the taskbar.

9. Right-click the Windows Live Messenger icon on the taskbar, then click Close window Windows Live Messenger exits.

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Windows 7

FIGURE I-13: Options dialog box with Personal category

Number of inactive minutes

FIGURE I-14: Options dialog box with Sign In category

Sign In category

Changing the layout You can customize the layout of the Windows Live Messenger window using the Layout category in the Options dialog box. To open the Options dialog box, click the Change contact list layout button on the toolbar. You can select check boxes to show or hide favorites, groups,

the tab bar, and the what’s new list. In the Contacts list, you can select an option to display a picture or color indicator. In addition, you can set options to change the label display and organization of contacts along with the sort order.

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Windows 207

UNIT

I Windows 7

Starting Windows Live Writer Windows Live Writer is a program that allows you to create a blog Web site. A blog Web site is a publicly accessible journal that contains regular entries with text, photos, and videos about whatever interests you. Live Writer enables you to use blogging services such as Windows Live Spaces, SharePoint, WordPress, Blogger, LiveJournal, or TypePad. Windows Live Writer doesn’t come installed with Windows 7, so you need to download and install it from the Microsoft Windows Live Essentials Web site. The first time you start Windows Live Writer, the Windows Live Writer wizard dialog box opens, asking you to configure Windows Live Writer to create or use an existing blog. In preparation for the stockholders’ meeting, you want to configure Windows Live Writer in order to create a blog.

For the next two lessons, you need an Internet connection and a Windows Live account. If you don’t have a Windows Live account, see your instructor or network administrator.

STEPS TROUBLE If the Windows Live Writer Wizard dialog box doesn’t open, click the Blogs menu, then click Add blog account to create a new blog.

1. Click the Start button on the taskbar, point to All Programs, click Windows Live, then click Windows Live Writer The first time you start Windows Live Writer, a wizard dialog box opens, asking you to configure Windows Live Writer. If an Untitled—Windows Live Writer window opens, skip to Step 7; a blog has already been created. Ask your instructor or technical support person whether you should create a new blog.

2. In the Windows Live Writer wizard dialog box, click Next The next Windows Live Writer wizard dialog box opens, asking you to select a blog service, as shown in Figure I-15.

3. Click the I don’t have a blog; create one on Windows Live for me option button, if necessary, then click Next The next Windows Live Writer wizard dialog box opens, asking you to enter Windows Live ID sign in information.

4. Type your Windows Live ID (e-mail address) and password, then click Next Windows Live Writer sets up a blog account. The next Windows Live Writer wizard dialog box opens, asking you to enter a blog nickname. QUICK TIP To change blog settings, click the Blogs menu, then click Edit blog settings, or click the Tools menu, then click Options.

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5. In the blog nickname text box, type a blog nickname or use the default text provided The Windows Live Writer wizard dialog box displays the blog nickname, as shown in Figure I-16.

6. Click Finish An Untitled—Windows Live Writer window opens, as shown in Figure I-17, displaying a new blog.

7. Click the Maximize button

Communicating over the Internet

on the Untitled—Windows Live Writer window

Windows 7

FIGURE I-15: Windows Live Writer Wizard blog selection

Blog service options

FIGURE I-16: Windows Live Writer Wizard blog nickname

Blog nickname; yours might differ

FIGURE I-17: Untitled Windows Live Writer window

Current blog post title

Blog name; yours might differ

Communicating over the Internet

Windows 209

UNIT

I Windows 7

Creating a Blog Post A blog entry is a dated entry journaling an item of interest made on a blog Web site typically on a daily, weekly, or random basis. With Windows Live Writer, you can insert, organize, and customize photos and publish videos to Internet sites, such as Soapbox on MSN video or YouTube, and embed them in your blog entries. In addition, you can also insert hyperlinks, maps from Bing Maps, tables, tags, and other rich content. When you’re finished creating a blog entry, you can preview your content before you publish it. To publish the blog post, you need to create or use an existing account at a blogging service, such as a Windows Live ID account for Windows Live Spaces. With Windows Live Writer configured, you want to create a blog post for the members of the board and stockholders to read before the meeting.

STEPS 1. In the Untitled—Windows Live Writer window, click in the Enter a post title box, type Stockholders’ meeting date and time, then press [Enter] The Windows Live Writer window displays the title of the blog entry as a link. The blog title also appears in the Windows Live Writer window title bar. QUICK TIP To select a category for the blog post, click the Category list arrow, select a category option, or type a new category name, then click Add.

2. Click in the blog post text area, type the text shown in Figure I-18, then press [Enter] Once you click in the message area, the Formatting toolbar becomes active.

3. Under the Insert category in the task pane, click the Hyperlink link The Insert Hyperlink dialog box opens.

4. Click in the URL box, type www.questspecialtytravel.com, press [Tab] twice, type Quest Specialty Travel in the Text to be displayed box, then click Insert The hyperlink appears at the bottom of the current blog post entry.

QUICK TIP If you’re not ready to publish your blog post, you can save it as a draft. Click the Save draft button on the toolbar. To post the draft, click the Save draft button arrow, then click Post draft to blog.

QUICK TIP To create a new blog post, click the New button on the toolbar, type a post title, type post text, then click the Publish button on the toolbar.

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5. Click the Preview tab at the bottom of the Windows Live Writer window A preview of the blog post appears as it would display on the Windows Live Spaces blog Web site.

6. Click the Edit tab at the bottom of the Windows Live Writer window The Windows Live Writer window reappears.

7. Click the Publish button on the toolbar, then enter your password and click OK if prompted Windows Live Writer publishes the blog post to the Windows Live Spaces blog Web site and opens your browser to display the Web page, as shown in Figure I-19.

8. Click the Close button tabs

on your browser window, then, if necessary, click Close all

Your browser window closes.

9. Click the Close button necessary

on the Windows Live Writer window, then click Yes, if

Windows Live Writer saves any changes and closes.

Communicating over the Internet

Toolbar

Publish button

Formatting toolbar Blog post title

Windows 7

FIGURE I-18: Windows Live Writer window blog post

Task pane

Blog post text

Preview tab Edit tab

FIGURE I-19: Blog post displayed in your browser window

Published blog post on the Web Profile name; yours will differ

Hyperlink to Quest Specialty Travel Web site

Inserting photos and videos in a blog In addition to text, you can insert photos and videos into a blog post. To insert and customize a picture or photo, click the Picture link in the task pane, select the picture file you want, then click Open. To customize the picture, select the picture in the blog post, click the Picture, Advanced, or Effects tab in the Picture task pane, then select the options you want. The Picture tab allows you to change text wrapping, margins, borders, and link options. The Advanced tab allows you to change the picture size and take other actions, such as rotate, contrast, crop, tilt, and watermark. The Effects tab allows you to add effects, such as black and white, sepia tone, color pop, sharpen,

Gaussian blur, emboss, and adjust temperature. To create and insert a photo album into a blog post, click the Photo album link in the task pane, click the From Files tab to use photos on your computer or click the From Existing Album tab to use an album from a Windows Live account. To insert a video into a blog post, click the Video link in the task pane, click the From File tab to select a video on your computer, click the From Video Service tab to use a video from a video hosting service, such as Soapbox or YouTube, or click the From Web tab to link or embed a video from a third-party Web site, then click the Publish button on the toolbar.

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Practice Concepts Review

For current SAM information including versions and content details, visit SAM Central (http://samcentral.course.com). If you have a SAM user profile, you may have access to hands-on instruction, practice, and assessment of the skills covered in this unit. Since we support various versions of SAM throughout the life of this text, you will want to check with your instructor for instructions and the correct URL/Web site to access those assignments.

Match the statements below with the elements labeled in the screen shown in Figure I-20. FIGURE I-20

f e

a

b d

c

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Which element indicates you are online in Windows Live Messenger? Which element indicates a contact is online in Windows Live Messenger? Which element displays the Windows Remote Assistance toolbar from your computer? Which element displays the Windows Remote Assistance toolbar from your contact’s computer? Which element displays sent online chat messages? Which element displays the next online chat message?

Match each term with the statement that best describes it. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

Instant message Emoticons Winks Background Nudge

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a. b. c. d. e.

A graphical symbol to encourage conversation A typewritten conversation A graphical symbol to convey emotions A graphical appearance to Windows Live Messenger A graphical symbol to convey animation

Communicating over the Internet

Select the best answer from the list of choices. 12. Which of the following is not allowed in an instant message? a. Text c. Formatted text b. Emoticons d. Attachments 13. Which of the following programs allows you to share the desktop? a. Windows Live Spaces c. Windows Mail b. Windows Live Messenger d. None of the above 14. Which of the following programs can provide Remote Assistance? a. Windows Meeting Spaces c. Windows Mail b. Windows Live Messenger d. All of the above 15. Which of the following programs can display video? a. Windows Live Spaces c. Windows Mail b. Windows Live Messenger d. All of the above 16. Which of the following might cause communication problems with Windows Live Messenger? a. Winks c. Firewalls b. Network d. Emoticons 17. Which of the following are graphical animations? a. Winks c. Firewalls b. Nudges d. Emoticons 18. Which of the following is created with Windows Live Writer? a. Blog c. Picture b. Document d. Video 19. Which of the following is not an item to insert with Windows Live Writer? a. Hyperlink c. Table b. E-mail d. Map

Windows 7

Concepts Review (Continued)

Skills Review 1. Start Windows Live Messenger. a. Start Windows Live Messenger. b. Sign in, if necessary. 2. Work with contacts and categories. a. If your contact is not available, add a new available contact to your list. b. Create a category named Friends. c. Add your contact to the Friends category. 3. Send and receive instant messages. a. Double-click a contact currently online. b. Type and send a message, then wait for a response. c. Continue to converse in this manner. d. Close the Conversation window. 4. Format instant messages. a. Double-click a contact currently online to start a conversation. b. Change the background. c. Type a message. d. Insert an emoticon and a wink. e. Send the message and wait for a response. f. Set the background back to none. g. Close the Conversation window.

Communicating over the Internet Copyright 2010 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part.

Windows 213

Skills Review (Continued) 5. Communicate with video. a. Double-click a contact currently online to start a conversation. b. Start a video call. c. If necessary, adjust the volume of the speakers or microphone. d. Stop communicating, then close the Conversation window. 6. Get remote assistance. a. Ask for remote assistance from an online contact. b. Instruct your contact to accept the invitation, then click Yes to let the contact view your screen and chat. c. Instruct your contact to scale the window to display the entire desktop, if necessary. d. Instruct your contact to take control of your desktop and perform a task for you to see. e. Instruct your contact to release control of your desktop, then close the Remote Assistance window. f. If you are working on a lab computer, delete any contacts that you added to Windows Live Messenger. 7. Personalize Windows Live Messenger. a. Open the Options dialog box. b. In the Personal category, change the number of inactive minutes to 10. c. In the Sign In category, select the Automatically run Windows Live Messenger when I log on to Windows check box, if it was initially set on your computer. d. Change the default font for instant messages. e. Close the Options dialog box. f. Delete any contacts that you added to Windows Live Messenger. g. Sign out in Windows Live Messenger, then close the program window. 8. Start Windows Live Writer. a. Start Windows Live Writer. b. Maximize the window. c. Create a new blog post if one is already present. 9. Create a blog post. a. Type a post title, then type a post message. b. Preview the blog post in Windows Live Writer. c. Display the blog post to edit it. d. Insert a hyperlink to a Web site. e. Publish the blog post to your Windows Live ID account. f. View the blog post in your browser, then close the browser window. g. Close Windows Live Writer and save any changes.

Independent Challenge 1 You are working in a regional office as a financial service advisor for Point Financial Services. You’ve recently invested in a new money market fund. As the financial markets move up and down during the day, you want to send instant messages to clients and other advisors at the main office. a. Select a partner who has access to a Windows 7 or Vista computer with an Internet connection and the same version of Windows Live Messenger, then add your partner to your Contacts list, if necessary. b. Choose a time for instant messaging, then start Windows Live Messenger. Select your contact, then send an instant message. c. Wait for a response (this might take a few moments), then continue to converse in this manner. d. During the conversation, insert an emoticon, a wink, and a nudge.

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Windows 7

Independent Challenge 1 (Continued) Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Create a group. ■ Add contacts to the group. ■ Change the name of the group. ■ Delete a contact in the group, then delete the group. e. If you are working on a lab computer, delete any contacts that you added to Windows Live Messenger. f. Sign out, then close the Windows Live Messenger window.

Independent Challenge 2 You are a student at Midwest University, and you will collaborate with another student on a project this semester. Because you commute to the university from a distance, you want to be able to work on shared projects on your home computer while communicating efficiently with your partner. a. Select a partner who has access to a Windows 7 or Vista computer with an Internet connection and the same version of Windows Live Messenger, then add your partner to your Contacts list if necessary. b. Choose a time for a video conference, then start Windows Live Messenger. c. Select your contact, start a conversation, then use a video call (if the video hardware is available) to communicate about your project. Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Send an e-mail during an instant message. ■ Send a document during an instant message. ■ Send a message to a mobile device. d. Stop the video conversation. e. If you are working on a lab computer, delete any contacts that you added to Windows Live Messenger. f. Sign out, then close the Windows Live Messenger window.

Independent Challenge 3 You are a tech support representative at Global Greentronics, a global environmental engineering firm. The company has offices around the world, and your job is to provide online tech support to employees at all locations. You use Remote Assistance in Windows Live Messenger to troubleshoot problems or show employees how to perform tasks. a. Select a partner who has access to a Windows 7 or Vista computer with an Internet connection and the same version of Windows Live Messenger, then add your partner to your Contacts list, if necessary. b. Choose a time for instant messaging, then start Windows Live Messenger. Have your contact ask you for remote assistance. c. Have your contact let you view his screen and chat. d. Enter a password, then request control. e. Wait for control, then perform an action on the other computer. f. Stop sharing, then disconnect from Remote Assistance. g. If you are working on a lab computer, delete any contacts that you added to Windows Live Messenger. h. Sign out, then close the Windows Live Messenger window.

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Real Life Independent Challenge You are planning an event, such as a reunion of friends or family who live all across the country. Rather than try to have several phone meetings or exchange a flurry of e-mail messages, you use your Windows Live Writer skills to set up a blog with the information you want to share with the group. a. b. c. d. e. f.

Start Windows Live Writer. Create a new blog post. Add blog text. Insert a hyperlink to a related Web site. Preview the blog post. Edit the blog post.

Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Insert a photo, modify the border, crop the edge, then add an effect. ■ Insert a new or existing photo album. ■ Insert an existing video from YouTube. g. Preview the blog post, then publish the blog post. h. Close the Windows Live Writer window.

Visual Workshop Re-create the screen shown in Figure I-21, which displays the Windows Live Writer window. If the photo is not available in the Sample Pictures folder, use another photo then modify the text to relate to the image. FIGURE I-21

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Communicating over the Internet

UNIT

J Windows 7

Files You Will Need:

Creating Movies and DVD Videos

MM J-1.wlmp MM J-2.wmv MM J-3.jpg MM J-4.wmv MM J-5.wma MM J-6. jpg

Windows Live Essentials, a collection of Microsoft programs available free for download on the Web, includes Windows Live Movie Maker, a powerful program for creating movies with photo images, video, and audio. You can view these movies on your computer, send

MM J-7. jpg

them to others via e-mail, or make them available on the Web. You can use photo images

MM J-8.jpg

taken with a still camera, video recorded by a video or Web camera, or any audio sounds,

MM J-9.jpg

music, or narration recorded by a microphone to create professional-looking home movies

MM J-10.wma

or business productions. Windows Live Movie Maker provides you with the tools you need

MM J-11.avi MM J-12.avi

to produce polished movies that you can view and share using Windows Media Player. With

MM J-13.wav

Windows DVD Maker, you can insert video, audio, and photos and combine them with ti-

MM J-14.wav

tles and predefined menus to create a DVD that you can play on a TV or computer using a

Wildlife.wmv

DVD player.

Derek Opazo, one of the tour developers at Quest Specialty Travel, wants

to create a promotional movie and DVD to create interest in a tour destination.

OBJECTIVES

Plan a Movie Maker video Start Movie Maker and view a project Create a Movie Maker project file Organize and trim clips Add transitions and effects between clips Add titles and credits Add a soundtrack Publish and view your movie Create a DVD video

UNIT

J Windows 7

Planning a Movie Maker Video Windows Live Movie Maker (Movie Maker for short) lets you combine video, audio, and photo image files to create movies you can show on your computer, e-mail to others, send to a portable device or mobile phone, or burn to a DVD. You save the movie as a working project (WLMP) or as a Windows Media Video (WMV) file, just as you would save a word-processing or spreadsheet document. In addition, you can publish the movie to the Web. However, movies and their accompanying files are much larger than most other documents you create—usually exceeding 5 MB. Creating a movie can be a time-consuming endeavor, so it’s a good idea to plan your content before you begin. Before you start creating a movie, you want to review the steps involved in planning a Windows Live Movie Maker video.

DETAILS Before you create a video, you need to do the following: • Decide the purpose of the movie Your movie might be a promotional piece for business use or a vacation movie to share with family and friends. Your purpose determines the subject, type, and quality of the source material, which is the video and audio material you will use.

• Determine how to share the movie with others You might want to show your movie on a computer projection screen at a meeting, send it as an attachment in an e-mail message, transfer it to a portable device or mobile phone, burn it directly to a DVD, or place it on a Web site, such as YouTube. Placing a movie on a Web site enables viewers to download, or transfer, files to their computers to store for future viewing. Keep in mind that if your movie is very long or has many high-quality images, the file will be large and take a long time for others to download.

• Choose source material If you have a digital video or digital Web camera, you can copy or transfer the digital video or images to your computer and then import them into Windows Live Movie Maker. If you have a scanner, you can scan photos onto your computer and import them as well. These video or audio segments are known as clips.

• Sketch the movie Before putting your movie together in Windows Live Movie Maker, it’s important to make a sketch of your movie that shows the order of the audio and video components. Determine which audio clips you want to accompany specific video clips. Figure J-1 shows an example of a movie sketch. It starts with a title screen; followed by a video clip of birds flying over a stream, a video clip of a bear searching for food, and a still image of the bear; and then ends with a list of credits. Your sketch also shows transitions, visual effects, a caption, and a soundtrack.

• Review the process used to create a movie Figure J-2 shows the process you use to create a movie. First, you insert clips of source material into a Windows Live Movie Maker project file. A project file, which is the working copy of your movie, is a Windows Live Movie Maker document with the file name extension WLMP. You then use the project file to add video clips and photos to Windows Live Movie Maker, set the order of your movie segments through Windows Live Photo Gallery, trim (delete) portions of clips you don’t want to use, specify how clips display from one to the next (called transitions), specify any video effects, and, lastly, preview your work. Finally, you save your project file as a movie with the file name extension WMV and display the completed movie using the Windows Media Player program, or publish your movie to a video publishing Web site, such as YouTube.

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Creating Movies and DVD Videos

5 secs

Windows 7

FIGURE J-1: Sketch of the movie plan 10 secs

Title screen

Video file

Transition

Video file

9 secs

5 secs

13 secs

Image file

Credits screen Sound file

Visual effect FIGURE J-2: Movie creation process with Windows Live Movie Maker

Step 2: Create a project file with the WLMP file extension; trim the clips; and add transitions and effects

Step 1: Import the source material into the storyboard; and set the media order

Step 3: Preview the results and save the project

Step 4: Save the movie with the WMV file extension and play it in Windows Media Player

Sources of video and sound clips If you want to use existing video and audio clips in your movie instead of recording them yourself, you can obtain them from various companies that specialize in stock audio and video clips on CD or DVD or download them from the Web. If you use clips from a commercial

source, however, be sure you are aware of licensing restrictions that regulate how you may or may not use the content. If you’re not sure, check with the publisher.

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J Windows 7

Starting Movie Maker and Viewing a Project Windows Live Movie Maker doesn’t come installed with Windows 7, so you need to download and install it from the Microsoft Windows Live Essentials Web site. Movie Maker is a Windows Live accessory program, which you can start from the Windows Live menu on the All Programs menu on the Start menu. Before you can start Windows Live Movie Maker, the video card on your computer must support Microsoft DirectX 9c or later and Pixel Shader 2.0 or later with video drivers for Windows 7. To work on an existing Movie Maker project after you start Windows Live Movie Maker, you need to open the appropriate project file. You can view a project in the Windows Live Movie Maker window using the storyboard. The storyboard is the main editing area in your current project and shows the order of your clips, photos, music, and text. After reviewing the steps involved in planning a Windows Live Movie Maker video, you want to view an existing project to get acquainted with the main screen elements of Windows Live Movie Maker.

STEPS 1. If the Windows Live Movie Maker program is not installed on your computer, open your browser, type http://download.live.com in the Address bar, press [Enter], click Download, click Run, click Yes if necessary, click the Movie Maker check box to select it if necessary, deselect the others, click Install, click Continue if necessary, click Continue, click Close to in your browser window exit the installer, then click the Close button The Windows Live Essentials Web site opens, where you can download and install Windows Live programs, which include Movie Maker. You can also install Windows Live Mail, Messenger, Photo Gallery, Toolbar, Writer, Family Safety, and Silverlight from this site.

2. Click the Start button on the taskbar, point to All Programs, click Windows Live, then click Windows Live Movie Maker TROUBLE If an x appears in place of the video clips, double-click the clip in the storyboard, click Find, navigate to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files, select the file, then click Open.

TROUBLE If you can’t view the exact frame, click the Previous frame or button Next frame button on the Monitor bar.

The Windows Live Movie Maker program opens, displaying a new project with the default title, My Movie.

3. Click the Movie Maker button

, then click Open project

The Open Project dialog box opens, displaying the contents of the most recently used folder.

4. Navigate to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files, click MM J-1.wlmp, , if necessary click Open, then click the Maximize button The project opens, showing a frame of the first clip on the left side of the window in the preview monitor while a thumbnail of a video clip displays on the right side of the window in the storyboard. Below the preview monitor is the Seek bar, which allows you to drag the slider to adjust the play position, and the Monitor bar, which contains buttons to control the playback and navigation of the movie. See Figure J-3 to identify the names and functions of the major screen elements.

5. Click the Play button on the Monitor bar, wait about 7 seconds, then click the Pause on the Monitor bar button The movie plays with its accompanying soundtrack until you click the Pause button, as shown in Figure J-4. As the movie plays, a black line, known as the playback indicator, appears in each clip to indicate the current movie location. The Seek slider moves along the Seek bar to indicate the clip time progression.

6. Drag the playback indicator in the video clip or the Seek slider on the Seek bar to the 18 seconds elapsed time in the movie 7. Press [Spacebar] The movie resumes playing until the end. The Spacebar provides a quick way to play and pause your movie.

8. Point to the beginning of the Seek bar, then click the Seek bar The pointer changes to Windows 220

, displays the current elapsed time, and the Seek slider moves to the beginning.

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FIGURE J-3: Windows Live Movie Maker window with an open project

Project name Movie Maker button

Ribbon for the Home tab Imported video clip in the storyboard

Preview monitor

Playback controls on Monitor bar

Seek bar

FIGURE J-4: Playing a movie project

Playback indicator Video clip

Current elapsed time of the movie

Seek slider on Seek bar Play/Pause button on Monitor bar

Complete time of the movie

Zoom in and Zoom out buttons

Importing media directly from a device Windows Live Movie Maker provides you with the tools you need to import photos and videos from a digital camera, memory card, CD, or DVD. To import media from a device into Windows Live Movie Maker, you need to have Windows Live Photo Gallery installed on your computer along with Windows Live Movie Maker. In Windows Live Movie Maker, click the Movie Maker button, then click Import from device. If prompted to use Windows Live Photo Gallery, click OK. Select the device you want to use, then click Import. To set other options, such as where to save the files, what format to use, whether to rotate

photos during import, or whether to delete files from the device after importing, click the More options link. Select the import option you want, then complete the Import Photos and Videos Wizard. In Windows Live Photo Gallery, select the imported photos and videos you want to use in a movie. Click the Make button on the toolbar, then click Make a movie. Windows Live Movie Maker reopens, displaying the currently opened movie with the photos and videos from Windows Live Photo Gallery added into the storyboard.

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Creating a Movie Maker Project File When you start Windows Live Movie Maker, a new, untitled project with the name My Movie automatically opens. To create a movie, you add or drag video and audio clips and photos to the project file’s storyboard. You can then arrange the clips in any order you want by dragging them on the storyboard. Once you start creating a project in the storyboard, you can save it as a project file in the Movie Maker Projects file format (WLMP). You can open and play WLMP and MSWMM (the file format for Windows Movie Maker; the previous version of the program) files in Windows Live Movie Maker. If you open an MSWMM movie project file, and then save it in Windows Live Movie Maker, the file format changes to WLMP. Before you can use video or audio source material in your movies, you must first insert them into Windows Live Movie Maker from a file on your computer or directly from a digital source connected to your computer, such as a digital video camera or microphone. To bring in video or audio clips or still pictures that are formatted in a digital file, you use the Add videos and photos button on the Home tab or the Import from device command on the Movie Maker menu. Table J-1 lists the file formats (identified by file name extensions) you can import to Windows Live Movie Maker. After familiarizing yourself with the main screen elements of Windows Live Movie Maker, you want to import a few videos and a photo into the storyboard and create a project file for a tour destination concept video.

STEPS 1. Click the Movie Maker button , click New project, then click No if you are asked to save changes to the opened movie The previous project closes, and a new project opens in the Windows Live Movie Maker window. The storyboard and preview monitor are empty, verifying that you are viewing a new project.

2. Click the Add videos and photos button

on the toolbar

The Add Videos and Photos dialog box opens. QUICK TIP To select files in nonconsecutive order, press and hold [Ctrl], then click the files you want to use.

TROUBLE If you inserted the wrong clip to the storyboard, select it, then press [Delete]. The clip remains on your hard drive.

QUICK TIP To zoom the storyboard, click the or Zoom out (–) Zoom in (+) button .

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3. Navigate to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files A selection of video and audio clips appears in the Add Videos and Photos dialog box.

4. Press and hold [Shift], click the file MM J-2.wmv, click the file MM J-4.wmv to select the media files, then release [Shift] and the mouse button The media files MM J-2.wmv, MM J-3.jpg, and MM J-4.wmv are selected. Pressing [Shift] allows you to select multiple files in consecutive order in any dialog box when you are selecting files to open.

5. Click Open Windows Live Movie Maker imports all of the selected media files into the storyboard, as shown in Figure J-5.

6. Click the Movie Maker button

, then click Save project

The Save Project dialog box opens.

7. Navigate to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files, click in the File name text box, type Bear Country, then click Save The movie project is saved and the Bear Country file name appears in the Windows Live Movie Maker title bar.

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FIGURE J-5: Windows Live Movie Maker window with imported media

Playback indicator

Imported video clips and a photo

Preview monitor

TABLE J-1: File types Windows Live Movie Maker can import

file type

file extensions

Video

.wmv, .asf, .wm, .m2ts, .m2t, .mov, .qt, .avi, .dvr-ms, .wtv, .mp4, .m4v, .mpeg, .mpg, .mpe, .m1v, .mpv2, .mod, .vob

Audio

.asf, .wm, .wma, .aif, .aiff, .wav, .m4a, .mp3

Photo images

.jpg, .jpeg, .tif, .tiff, .gif, .bmp, .png, .wdp

Importing photos and videos from Windows Live Photo Gallery If you installed Windows Live Photo Gallery on your computer along with Windows Live Movie Maker, you can use the program to quickly import media directly into Windows Live Movie Maker. You can import photos and videos from a digital camera, memory card, CD, or DVD into Windows Live Photo Gallery and use them to make a movie in

Windows Live Movie Maker. Windows Live Photo Gallery comes with a Make a movie command on the Make menu, which connects the program with Windows Live Movie Maker. The command transfers selected media to a new or open movie in Windows Live Movie Maker.

Creating a movie using AutoMovie AutoMovie is a command on the Home tab that allows you to create a movie by automatically adding a title at the beginning, credits at the end, and transitions between media elements. In addition, AutoMovie adds pan and zoom effects to photos and fits the duration of your project to the music so everything ends simultaneously. To make a movie

using AutoMovie, add videos and photos to the storyboard, add music, click the AutoMovie button on the Home tab, click OK if an alert message to use AutoMovie appears, click Yes or No to add music, then click Close in the AutoMovie is done alert message. After AutoMovie creates a movie, you can edit, save, and share it with others.

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Organizing and Trimming Clips As you continue to add video, sound clips, and photos to your movie, the number of clips can become hard to manage. In the storyboard, you can arrange the media elements into the order that you want them in the movie. If an element is not in the right orientation, you can rotate it, or if you no longer want to use an element, you can remove it. When you remove clips and photos, they are only removed from Windows Live Movie Maker; the original imported files are not deleted and remain unchanged on your hard drive. Frequently, the clips you import into Windows Live Movie Maker run longer than you want them to in your final movie. You can easily trim clips by playing the clip and setting a new start and end point, known as the start trim point and end trim point. The portion between the trim points remains in your movie. The frames before and after the trim points are deleted from your movie, but the original clip is not affected and retains its original length. You can trim a clip as it plays, or you can pause the clip to set the trim points. You can use the Set start point and Set end point buttons on the Edit or Trim tabs, although it’s often faster to use the timeline trim handles (large rectangular sliders on the ends of the Seek bar) on the Trim tab. You want to adjust the order of the clips you imported for your movie and trim the lengthy intro clip by moving the start and end points to a new location.

STEPS QUICK TIP To rotate a clip, select it, then click the Rotate left 90° button or the Rotate right 90° button on the Home tab.

QUICK TIP To remove a clip, select it, then click the Remove button on the Home tab.

1. In the storyboard, point to the last clip MM J-4.wmv A ScreenTip appears, displaying the name, duration, transition, and effects applied to the clip. In this case, the name of the file is MM J-4.wmv, the duration is 12 seconds, and the remaining items, Transition and Effects, are set to None.

2. Click the last clip MM J-4.wmv to select it, then drag it before the first clip in the storyboard As you drag the clip, a move label appears with the icon and a black line appears indicating the current destination point. The clips are arranged in the order in which you want them in the movie, as shown in Figure J-6. The MM J-4.wmv clip remains selected.

3. Click the Edit tab, if necessary, under Video Tools The Edit tab opens, displaying options to adjust the audio, timing, background color, and trim of the selected clip.

4. Click the Trim tool button

on the Edit tab

The Trim tab opens, displaying options to set the start and end points of the selected clip.

5. Click the Play button on the Monitor bar, click the Pause button on the Trim tab then click the Set start point button

after 1 second,

The start point for the clip changes to the current point on the Seek bar. Your stopping point frame and time might be less or more than 1.00s, where “s” stands for seconds.

QUICK TIP To restore a clip on the storyboard to its original length, select the clip, click the Trim tool button on the Edit tab, then drag the trim sliders to the original start and end points.

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6. Click the Start point up or down arrow until it reaches 1.02s, then click the End point up or down arrow until it reaches 10.98s The start point for the clip is set to 1.02 seconds and the end point for the clip is set to 10.98 seconds, as shown in Figure J-7.

7. Click the Save trim button

on the Trim tab

The Edit tab opens, displaying the trimmed clip in the storyboard.

8. Click the Play button

on the Monitor bar

The shortened clip plays for approximately 10 seconds instead of the previous 12 seconds.

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FIGURE J-6: Arranging clips in the storyboard

Clip moved to the beginning of the movie

FIGURE J-7: Trimming a clip

Start point time Save trim button End point time

Trimmed clip

End trim point Start trim point

Splitting a video clip Sometimes you want to trim the middle of a video clip or add a transition or visual effect. If so, you can split a clip in two, then trim off the start or end points you don’t want, or add a transition or visual effect to enhance the movie. To split a clip in two, select the clip, position the playback indicator where you want to break it, then click the Split button on the Edit tab or press [M]. After you split a clip, you can move the individual clips around or use buttons on the Animations, Visual

Effects, Edit, and Trim tabs to modify them. If you split a clip with a caption, the caption is split as well. If you incorrectly split a clip, you can use the Undo button on the Quick Access toolbar (on the left side of the title bar) to repair the clip. If the Undo button is not available, remove the split clips, insert the original video clip again, then start over. When you split a video, the original video files remain unchanged on your hard drive.

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Adding Transitions and Effects Between Clips A transition is a visual effect that provides a smoother, more gradual change between clips in a movie. A transition plays as one clip ends and the next clip starts. You can add a transition between two video clips, pictures, or titles on the storyboard or timeline. Windows Live Movie Maker provides a variety of video transitions that you can easily add to a movie project, such as Bow Tie, Eye, Diamond, Fan Up, and Shatter In. In addition to transitions, you can add a variety of visual effects to a movie project, such as 3D ripple, Fade in from white, Pixelate, Spin 360, Ease In, Blur, Film Sepia tone, and Mirror vertical. A visual effect is applied for the entire duration of a clip, photo, or title in a movie project. You can add multiple visual effects to the same clip, as well as customize the order of effects. For still photos, you can add pan and zoom effects to create the illusion of motion. If you no longer want to use a transition or special effect, you can remove it. The clips and photo display a sharp change between them, so you decide to add transitions and effects to smooth the movie out and add a more professional look.

STEPS QUICK TIP To select all the clips in the storyboard, click the Select all button on the Home tab.

QUICK TIP To remove a transition, select a clip, click the Animations tab, then click the No transition box.

1. Click the MM J-4.wmv clip in the storyboard The MM J-4.wmv clip is selected in the storyboard.

2. Click the Animations tab on the menu bar The Animations tab opens, displaying transition options. Because the clip is a video and not a photo, the pan and zoom options are not available.

3. Point to the Crossfade box on the Animations tab in the Transitions group A brief preview of the transition effect plays in the monitor when you point to it.

4. Click the Crossfade box A gold selection rectangle appears around the Crossfade box, indicating the effect is applied to the selected clip. Concurrently, the selected clip displays a gray fold in the lower-left corner, indicating that a transition is applied.

5. Click the Transition duration list arrow on the Animations tab, then click 1.50 The duration of the transition effect changes to 1.50 seconds.

6. Click the MM J-3.jpg clip in the storyboard, then click the Zoom out center box in the Pan and zoom group (scroll down as needed) The Zoom out center pan and zoom effect is applied to the photo image, as shown in Figure J-8.

7. Click the Visual Effects tab The Visual Effects tab opens, displaying numerous visual effects and a brightness option. The brightness option allows you to adjust the lightness or darkness of a video or photo. QUICK TIP To remove a visual effect, select a clip, click the Visual Effects tab, then click the No effect box.

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8. Click the Spin 360º box in the Effects group (scroll down as needed) The Spin 360 effect is applied to the photo image, as shown in Figure J-9.

9. Click before the first clip in the storyboard, then click the Play button Monitor bar The movie plays with the transition at the beginning and the visual effects at the end.

Creating Movies and DVD Videos

on the

Animations tab

Zoom out center effect box Pan and zoom group

Windows 7

FIGURE J-8: Adding a transition and zoom effect

Zoom effect applied to the photo

Grey fold indicates a transition

FIGURE J-9: Adding a visual effect

Visual Effects tab

Spin 360º box Effects group

Visual effect applied to the photo

Play button

Adding multiple visual effects Instead of adding one visual effect to a clip, you can add multiple ones to create your own unique look. To add multiple visual effects to a clip, select the clip you want to use, click the Visual Effects tab, then click the More arrow (located below the down scroll arrow above Effects). In the drop-down menu, locate Multiple effects at the bottom of the list, then click it. The Add or Remove Effects dialog box opens. A list of available effects appears on the left and a list of currently displayed

effects appears on the right. To add an effect, select an effect from the Available effects list, then click Add. To remove an effect, select an effect from the Displayed effects list, then click Remove. To change the order in which the effects are displayed, select an effect from the Displayed effects list, then click the Move up or Move down button. When you’re done, click Apply.

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Adding Titles and Credits You can add titles and credits to your movies just like the professionals. You can add any text you want, such as the title of your movie, your name, captions, and credits at the end. You can add a title at the beginning of a clip, overlapping a clip, known as a caption, or credits at the end of a movie. You can also change the appearance of the title or credits, and you can add special animation effects, such as a Fade, Stretch, and Spin in, which play for the amount of time you specify. When you add text to a movie, a Format tab opens under Text Tools, displaying typical options for editing and formatting text, which includes changing the text font, size, style, alignment, color, and transparency. Any formatting you make to a text box is applied to all the text in the box, not just the selected text. The short video clips need some definition, so you decide to add a title, caption, and credits for a more complete and professional look.

STEPS TROUBLE If a text box doesn’t display, double-click the text label below the thumbnail in the storyboard to display it.

1. Click the Home tab, click before the first clip in the storyboard, then click the Title on the Home tab button The Format tab opens under Text Tools and a title screen with a black background appears before the first clip with a text box, which includes the selected sample text “[Enter text here]” in white. A text label appears beneath the screen in the storyboard with the same text. The Format tab provides the typical options to edit and format text and includes additional ones to apply text effects and change text transparency and the background screen.

2. Type Bear Country in the text box The selected sample text is replaced by the text you typed in the text box. In the storyboard, the text label beneath the screen also changed, as shown in Figure J-10. QUICK TIP To change the background color, select the background screen, click the Format tab, click the Background color button, then select a color.

3. Click the Zoom in—big box above Effects (scroll down as needed) The Zoom in—big effect is applied to the text on the title screen.

4. Click the Home tab, then click the Credits button A credits screen with a black background appears after the last clip with a text box, which includes the text CREDITS and selected sample text in white. A text label appears beneath the screen in the storyboard with the same text. The Format tab opens under Text Tools and the Scroll effect is automatically applied to the text by default.

5. Type Derek Opazo in the text box The selected sample text is replaced by the text you typed in the text box.

6. Click the Edit tab under Video Tools, click the Duration list arrow, then click 9.00 The duration for the credits screen is set to 9 seconds. QUICK TIP To delete a text box, click the text box to select it, then press [Delete]. To delete a background screen for titles or credits, select it, then press [Delete].

7. Click the Home tab, click the left side of the MM J-2.wmv clip, click the Caption button , then type Lunchtime? The Format tab opens under Text Tools and a text box appears with selected sample text, which is replaced by the text you typed. The text duration for the caption is set by default on the Format tab to 5 seconds starting from the beginning of the clip.

8. Point to an edge of the text box, drag it to the upper-left corner of the video (over the grass), then click the Stretch box above Effects The caption text box is moved to the top of the video screen, as shown in Figure J-11.

9. Click before the first clip in the storyboard, then click the Play button Monitor bar

on the

The movie plays with the title at the beginning, the caption in the middle, and the credits at the end.

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Creating Movies and DVD Videos

Format tab under Text Tools

Default text effect Title screen with a black background

Windows 7

FIGURE J-10: Adding a title to a movie

Title text label Text box

Title text

FIGURE J-11: Adding a caption to a movie

Format tab under Text Tools

Caption text box

Stretch box Caption position in the video Caption text label

Credits screen with a black background Credits text label

Creating a slide show You can use Windows Live Movie Maker to create slide shows by using still images from a digital camera, Web camera, or scanner instead of video clips. The images must be saved in one of the formats listed for still images in Table J-1. You can import them into Windows Live Movie Maker and create transitions between them, just as you would in a

movie. To specify how long you want to display an image and transition, select the photos, click the Edit tab under Video Tools, click the Duration list arrow, then select a duration time. You can also add sound clips to create a soundtrack that plays as your pictures appear on the screen.

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Adding a Soundtrack With Windows Live Movie Maker, you can put two types of sounds in your movies: sounds that are part of a video clip and separate sounds, such as music or narration. When you add a separate sound, you can add it for the entire movie or at a specific point in the movie. You work with the two types of sound in different places in Windows Live Movie Maker. When you add sound to a movie as part of a video, you can adjust the volume and apply fade in or out on the Edit tab under Video Tools. When you add separate sound to a movie, you can adjust the volume, apply fade in or out, change the duration, and split the sound on the Options tab under Music Tools. You want to add additional interest to the Credits screen, so you import a previously recorded music clip to play during the credits and adjust the duration to end at the same time as the credits.

STEPS 1. Click the Home tab, then, if necessary, click the Credits screen in the storyboard The Home tab opens, displaying options that include adding and working with audio and music tracks. The credits screen is selected in the storyboard and the contents of the screen appear in the preview monitor. QUICK TIP To delete a separate audio clip, click the audio clip label in the storyboard, then press [Delete].

2. Click the Add music button arrow current point

on the Home tab, then click Add music at the

The Add Music dialog box opens.

3. Navigate to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files if necessary, click the MM J-5.wma sound file, then click Open The audio clip appears above the credits screen in the storyboard.

QUICK TIP To fit photos to the duration of an audio clip, select the photo with the audio clip, click the Home tab, then click the Fit to music button.

4. Click the Options tab under Music Tools The Options tab opens, displaying options to set the music volume, fade in or out, and start and end points.

5. Click in the End point box, then type 9.00s The end point for the credits screen is set to finish at the same time as the audio clip.

6. Click the Fade out list arrow, then click Slow The audio clip is set to fade out slowly at the end, as shown in Figure J-12.

QUICK TIP To set the music volume, select the clip with the audio, click the Video volume button on the Edit tab under Video Tools or on the Options tab under Music Tools, then drag the slider.

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7. Click before the first clip in the storyboard, then click the Play button Monitor bar

on the

The movie plays with the title at the beginning, the caption in the middle, and the credits at the end.

Creating Movies and DVD Videos

Options tab under Music Tools Fade out list arrow

Start and end point times for the sound on the Credits screen

Windows 7

FIGURE J-12: Adding separate sound to a movie

Audio clip

Adjusting audio levels With Windows Live Movie Maker, you can play a video clip sound and soundtrack simultaneously and have one play louder than the other. For example, a video clip of an airplane might have airplane engine noises as part of the video clip. You can add a soundtrack from a CD or DVD, or a narration that plays louder than the engine noises. To adjust the

balance between the video clip sound and the soundtrack you created, click the video clip in the storyboard, click the Home tab, click the Audio mix button on the Home tab, then drag the slider toward the Video track (left) or the Audio track (right) to increase the volume.

Recording sound clips You can use the Sound Recorder program that comes with Windows 7 to record sound as a digital media file for use in Windows Live Movie Maker. To use Sound Recorder, you need to have a sound card and speakers installed on your computer. To record sound, you need to have a microphone plugged into your sound card. When you record a sound, the audio is saved by default as a Windows Media Audio (WMA)

file, unless you have Windows 7 Home Basic or Professional, which saves the audio as a Windows Audio Visual (WAV) file. To record a sound, click the Start button on the taskbar, point to All Programs, click Accessories, click Sound Recorder, click Start Recording, then click Stop Recording when you’re done. In the Save As dialog box, type a name for the file, then click Save.

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Publishing and Viewing Your Movie Once your movie looks and sounds the way you want, you can publish the project file as a movie on the Web or save it as a movie file. When you publish a movie on the Web, Windows Live Movie Maker uses plug-ins, such as Publish on YouTube, to help you complete the process. Each plug-in is designed by a third-party developer for a specific use, so the process to complete each one differs. The YouTube plug-in comes with the standard Windows Live Movie Maker installation. If you want to use another plug-in, such as LiveUpload to Facebook, you need to download and install it from the Web, which you can access directly from Windows Live Movie Maker. When you save a movie to a file, you save it in the WMV (Windows Media Video) format for certain screen sizes and uses, such as high-definition (1080p), a recordable DVD, an attachment in an e-mail or instant message, or a portable device or mobile phone. After you save the movie in the WMV format, you can play it in a media player, such as Windows Media Player, or in a Web browser. After finishing the initial version of the movie, you want to publish it so that you can e-mail it to a coworker for review.

STEPS 1. Click the Movie Maker button

, then point to Save movie

A submenu appears, displaying the available options to save a movie, as shown in Figure J-13. Each option saves the movie file with the WMV format, yet uses different internal processes for each, such as compressing a file for use as an e-mail attachment.

2. Click For e-mail or instant messaging on the submenu The Save Movie dialog box opens, displaying the My Videos folder, the Bear Country file name selected, and Windows Media Video (WMV) File as the Save as type.

3. Type Bear Country Mail in the File name box The file name changes to Bear Country Mail.

4. Navigate to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files, then click Save Windows Live Movie Maker displays a progress meter while the movie is created. Upon completion, an alert message opens, asking you to play the movie, open the folder where it’s stored, or close the dialog box, as shown in Figure J-14.

5. Click Play Your movie plays, including video and sound, in Windows Media Player, as shown in Figure J-15. Windows Live Movie Maker is visible in the background.

6. When the movie is done, click the Close button

in Windows Media Player

Windows Media Player closes.

7. Click the Close button save the project

in Windows Live Movie Maker, then click Yes, if necessary, to

Windows Live Movie Maker closes and the desktop window opens.

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FIGURE J-13: Save movie options

Movie Maker button

Publish movie menu option

Save movie submenu options

Save movie menu option

FIGURE J-14: Completed save movie options

Play, Open folder, and Close buttons

FIGURE J-15: Bear movie in Windows Media Player

Movie title

Movie Maker movie in Windows Media Player Play/Pause button

Adding and using publishing plug-ins Windows Live Movie Maker uses plug-ins to publish a movie directly to sharing sites on the Web, such as YouTube. Third-party developers have created additional plug-ins you can use to upload your movies to Facebook and SmugMug to name a few. You can open a Web site from Windows Live Movie Maker that lists and provides access to a variety of plug-ins. The plug-ins on the Web site can be used in Windows Live Movie Maker and/or Windows Live Photo Gallery, such as LiveUpload to Facebook. Check the Microsoft Web site for details. To add a plug-in, click the Movie Maker button, point to Publish movie, then click Add a

plug-in. Your browser opens, displaying a Web site with a list of available plug-ins. Click a link, then click the download link for the plug-in. Click Run or Save to run or save the setup program, then follow the on-screen instructions. In Windows Live Movie Maker, click the Movie Maker menu, click Exit, then restart Windows Live Movie Maker. After the plug-in is installed, you can access it from the Sharing section on the Home tab or on the Publish movie menu from the Movie Maker menu. Each plug-in is designed by a third-party developer for a specific use, so the process to publish a movie for each one differs.

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UNIT

J Windows 7

Creating a DVD Video With Windows DVD Maker, you can insert video, audio, and pictures and combine them with titles and predefined menus to create a DVD that you can play on a TV or computer using a DVD player. If you have still photos, you can also create a slide show set to music. You start Windows DVD Maker from the Start menu on the All Programs submenu. To create a DVD in Windows DVD Maker, you add and arrange your media, add menu text, select a menu style, choose DVD playback options, and then burn it. After you finish working with a DVD project, you save it in the MSDVD format. After using Windows Live Movie Maker to create a movie, you want to use Windows DVD Maker to create a similar DVD movie to compare and contrast the results.

STEPS TROUBLE To not show the introduction screen, click the Don’t show this page again check box to select it on the screen.

1. Click the Start button on the taskbar, point to All Programs, click Windows DVD Maker, then click the Choose Photos and Videos button in the introduction screen if necessary The Windows DVD Maker window opens. An introduction screen might appear that provides information about creating a DVD.

2. Click the Add items button on the toolbar The Add Items to DVD dialog box opens. QUICK TIP To remove DVD project items, select the items, then click the Remove items button.

3. Navigate to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files, press and hold [Ctrl], click the file MM J-2.wmv, click the file MM J-4.wmv, release [Ctrl] and the mouse button, then click Add The two video clips are inserted into the Windows DVD Maker window.

4. Click the MM J-4 clip, then click the Move up button

on the toolbar

The order of the video clips reverses. QUICK TIP To change DVD options, click the Options link, specify DVD and video format options, then click OK.

5. In the DVD title box, select the current text, then type Bear Country The DVD title appears in the Windows DVD Maker window, as shown in Figure J-16.

6. Click Next, scroll down the menu styles list, then click Travel The Travel menu style is applied to the DVD, as shown in Figure J-17.

7. Click the Preview button on the toolbar, click the Play or Scenes on-screen elements to play the video clips, then click OK Your movie plays, including video and sound, in the Windows DVD Maker preview window.

QUICK TIP To open a DVD project, click the File button, click Open project file, select the file, then click Open.

8. Click the File button on the toolbar, click Save, type Bear Country DVD in the File name box, navigate to the drive and folder where you store your Data Files, then click Save The DVD file is saved in the Windows DVD Maker Project (MSDVD) format. If you want to create a DVD, you insert a blank DVD in your DVD recorder, then click the Burn button.

9. Click the Close button

in Windows DVD Maker

The Windows DVD Maker window closes.

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Creating Movies and DVD Videos

Windows 7

FIGURE J-16: Adding videos and photos to the DVD

Move up button Add items button

DVD burner drive letter; yours might differ Added items to the DVD

DVD title Options link

FIGURE J-17: Applying a menu style to the DVD

Preview button File button

Travel menu style applied to DVD

Menu styles

Creating a DVD slide show In Windows DVD Maker, you can create a slide show. After you add the photos to Windows DVD Maker, specify a DVD title, then click Next. You can use the Slide show button to add music, specify a picture

length or change the show length to match the music length, select a transition, and use pan and zoom effects. When you’re done, click Change Slide Show.

Customizing a DVD In Windows DVD Maker, you can customize menu text and buttons. After you add the clips and photos to Windows DVD Maker, specify a DVD title, then click Next. You can use the Menu text and Customize menu buttons to create a unique DVD. The Menu text button allows

you to change and format menu text items—such as DVD title, Play button, Scenes button, and Notes button—whereas the Customize button allows you to insert a foreground or background video, insert a menu audio, and select a Scenes button style.

Creating Movies and DVD Videos

Windows 235

Practice Concepts Review

For current SAM information including versions and content details, visit SAM Central (http://samcentral.course.com). If you have a SAM user profile, you may have access to hands-on instruction, practice, and assessment of the skills covered in this unit. Since we support various versions of SAM throughout the life of this text, you will want to check with your instructor for instructions and the correct URL/Web site to access those assignments.

Match the statements below with the elements labeled in the screen shown in Figure J-18. FIGURE J-18

i h a g f e b d c

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Which element points to the preview monitor? Which element points to the Monitor bar? Which element points to the Seek bar? Which element points to the storyboard? Which element points to the title screen? Which element points to the credits screen? Which element points to the playback indicator? Which element points to a clip transition? Which element points to a clip caption?

Match each term with the statement that best describes it. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

Clip Trim Storyboard Transition Seek bar Monitor bar

Windows 236

a. b. c. d. e. f.

Remove portions of clips you don’t want Specify how clips display from one to the next Audio or video segment Use to organize clips Use to play back clip Use to display a current frame

Creating Movies and DVD Videos Copyright 2010 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part.

Select the best answer from the list of choices. 16. Before you can use a preexisting video clip in Windows Live Movie Maker, you must first a. Record c. Collect b. Import d. Transition 17. A “working copy” of a movie is called a . a. Storyboard c. Project b. Movie d. Clip 18. Which one of the following shows the order of your clips in Windows Live Movie Maker? a. Preview monitor c. Playback indicator b. Monitor bar d. Storyboard 19. Which one of the following is a video format that Windows Live Movie Maker can import? a. .avi c. .wav b. .wlmp d. .jpg 20. Which one of the following is a publishing plug-in option? a. For e-mail or instant messaging c. Publish on YouTube b. Burn a DVD d. For portable device or mobile phone

it.

Windows 7

Concepts Review (Continued)

Skills Review 1. Plan a Movie Maker video. a. Write the basic steps in planning a Windows Live Movie Maker video without referring to the unit material. b. Compare your results with topic entitled “Planning a Movie Maker Video.” 2. Start Movie Maker and view a project. a. Start the Windows Live Movie Maker program. b. Open the file MM J-1.wlmp from the drive and folder where you store your Data Files, then play it. c. Play the movie, then pause it before it’s done. d. Zoom in, zoom out, then drag the Seek slider back to the beginning of the movie. 3. Create a Movie Maker project file. a. Create a new Movie Maker project but don’t save the file MM J-1.wlmp. (Hint: Because you are using still photographs, your project is a slide show.) b. Import and view the following photos from the drive and folder where you store your Data Files: MM J-6.jpg, MM J-7.jpg, MM J-8.jpg, and MM J-9.jpg. c. Play the slide show, then save the project as Wyoming. 4. Organize and trim clips. a. Change the order of the photos to MM J-7.jpg (horse), MM J-6.jpg (wagon), MM J-9.jpg (bales), MM J-8.jpg (shed) in the storyboard. b. Select all the photos in the storyboard. c. Change the duration of the photos to 8 seconds. (Hint: Because these are still images, you can extend the length of time they display on screen using the Edit tab under Video Tools.) d. Play the slide show. 5. Add transitions and effects between clips. a. Set the transition for the first photo to Flip. b. Set pan and zoom effects for the remaining photos. c. Play the slide show. 6. Add titles and credits. a. Add a title screen to the beginning of the movie. b. Add the text On the Range in Wyoming to the title screen. c. Set the text effect to Swing down. d. Add a credits screen to the end of the movie. e. Add your name to the credits screen. Windows 237 Creating Movies and DVD Videos Copyright 2010 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part.

Skills Review (Continued) 7. Add a soundtrack. a. Add the sound file MM J-10.wma into the entire movie. b. Use the Fit to music button on the Home tab to adjust the audio to end with the last slide. c. Play the slide show with its soundtrack. 8. Publish and view your movie. a. Save your movie as Wyoming Slides on the computer where you store your Data Files with the Standard-definition settings. b. Play the movie in Windows Media Player. c. Close Windows Media Player and Windows Live Movie Maker, then save the project, if necessary. 9. Create a DVD video. a. Start the Windows DVD Maker program. b. Add the items from the drive and folder where you store your Data Files: MM J-6.jpg, MM J-7.jpg, MM J-8.jpg, and MM J-9.jpg. c. Set the DVD title to Wyoming. d. Set the menu style to Video Wall. e. Save the DVD as Wyoming Slides DVD on the computer where you store your Data Files. f. Close Windows DVD Maker.

Independent Challenge 1 The owner of the Wildlife Preserve wants to produce an advertising movie for its Web site. She asks you to bid on the job. As part of your bid, you prepare a sample movie using Windows Live Movie Maker and sample video and audio media files. a. b. c. d. e. f.

g. h. i.

Open your browser, then search for and download wildlife animal videos from the Web into a folder called Wildlife. Start Windows Live Movie Maker, then if necessary, create a new project. Import wildlife animal videos into the storyboard. If your videos don’t include sound, download appropriate sound files from the Web, then import them into the storyboard for your videos as necessary. Create a movie at least 20 seconds long, using the downloaded or sample video and sound files. Adjust clip lengths and add transitions and effects for effectiveness. Adjust the audio levels using the Audio mix command on the Home tab to change the audio balance between the sound in the video and the imported sound as needed. View the entire movie in the preview monitor. Save the project as Wildlife. Save the project as a movie named Wildlife Sample with the Widescreen (480p) setting. View the movie in Windows Media Player. Close Windows Media Player and Windows Live Movie Maker.

Independent Challenge 2 You work for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as the educational outreach liaison for the state of Florida. Your job is to organize field trips to Cape Canaveral and to visit schools across the state to stimulate student interest in NASA programs. You plan to create a movie to show in classrooms and to place on the NASA Educational Outreach Web site. Your manager asks you to create a sample movie using Windows Live Movie Maker. a. Open your browser, go to http://hubblesite.org or another NASA-related site, then search for and download at least three vidoes into a folder called NASA. b. Start Windows Live Movie Maker, then, if necessary, create a new project. c. Import the video clips you downloaded from the Web into the storyboard. d. Create a movie project in the storyboard by dragging the space video clips into the order you want. e. Trim the video clips as needed, then play the clip to verify its length, making necessary adjustments. Windows 238

Creating Movies and DVD Videos

f. Add a transition and effect to each clip, then play each transition and effect frame by frame.Verify the length of each in the timer below the Seek bar. g. Add a title screen with Space Journey, a caption on a video clip with a text effect, and a credits screen with your name. h. View the entire movie in the prevew monitor. i. Save the project as NASA. Save the project as a movie named Space Journey with the High-definition (1080p) setting. View the movie in Windows Media Player, then close Windows Media Player.

Windows 7

Independent Challenge 2 (Continued)

Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Install a publishing plug-in with permission from your instructor or technical support person. ■ Publish the movie to the Web using a plug-in, such as YouTube. ■ View the movie in your browser window. j. Close Windows Live Movie Maker.

Independent Challenge 3 You are being considered for a job as a junior product manager at the International Advertising Agency, which prepares custom marketing videos for clients worldwide. As part of the selection process, the marketing director asks you to submit a short movie created in Windows Live Movie Maker and a DVD created in Windows DVD Maker that shows your skills. You can choose the subject. a. Open your browser, search for and download two or three video and sound files from the Web, then put them in a folder called IAA. b. Plan and create a movie, importing the media files and using trimming, transitions, and effects. c. Add a title screen, a caption on a video clip with a text effect, and a credits screen with your name. d. Save the project file as IAA. e. View the entire movie in the preview monitor. f. When you are satisfied with its contents, save the project as a movie named IAA Sample with the Burn on DVD setting. g. Select a menu style, then preview the DVD. h. Save it as a DVD named IAA Sample DVD. Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Change the menu text. ■ Customize the menu text. ■ Burn a DVD. i. Close Windows DVD Maker. j. View it in Windows Media Player. k. Close Windows Media Player and Windows Live Movie Maker.

Real Life Independent Challenge You are planning to set up a Web site for an upcoming event for friends, family, and coworkers on the free server space from your Internet service provider (ISP). You want to use Windows Live Movie Maker to create a slide show of interesting pictures and place it on the site. Keep in mind, however, that your ISP limits your site to 5 MB, so you have to monitor the sizes of your graphics and the movie. a. Choose four appropriate pictures in JPG format to include in your show, then put them into a folder called Event. If necessary, scan them from hard copy. Make sure each image is about 1 MB (you might need to reduce the resolution to achieve this). b. Set up the individual images in a slide show format as a Movie Maker project, adjusting clip locations, display times, transitions, and effects in any way you feel is effective, then save the project as Event. c. Import one or more sound clips downloaded from the Web. Include the sounds clips in your slide show, then adjust the sound clips to work with the slide show.

Creating Movies and DVD Videos

Windows 239

Real Life Independent Challenge (Continued) d. Save the project as a movie, using appropriate title and descriptive information, then save the movie as Event Sample with the High–definition (1080p) setting. e. Play the Event movie in Windows Media Player, then close Windows Media Player and Windows Live Movie Maker. f. Start Windows DVD Maker, add the same items you used for Windows Movie Maker. g. Create a slide show with an appropriate duration, music, transitions, and effects. h. Select a menu style, then preview the DVD. i. Save it as a DVD named Event Sample DVD, then close Windows DVD Maker.

Visual Workshop Using the skills you learned in this unit, create the project shown in Figure J-19. Save the project as Blue Sun. All necessary files are in the folder containing your Data Files. The video clip you need is called MM J-12.avi (Sun) and the sound clip you need is called MM J-13.wav. Include the Flip transition and the Cyan tone Visual Effect in the movie. Save the project as a movie named Blue Sun Phone with the For portable device or mobile phone setting.

FIGURE J-19

Windows 240

Creating Movies and DVD Videos

UNIT

K Windows 7

Files You Will Need:

Working with Windows Media With Windows 7, you can use programs, such as Windows Explorer, Windows Live Photo Gallery, and Windows Media Center, to work with pictures, videos, and music. In this unit,

Bridge.jpg

you learn how to view, manage, fix, and print photos, and to get pictures from a digital

Cruise.jpg

camera or scanner or music from a CD. In addition, you also learn how to work with the

Farm.jpg Golden Gate.jpg Harbor.jpg

different media types using Windows Media Center.

As part of a new marketing pro-

motion at Quest Specialty Travel, Ron Dawson, the VP of Marketing, wants you to view,

Hotel.jpg

manage, and work with current travel photos to create a slide show to promote travel des-

House.jpg

tinations. This slide show will be featured on DVDs, CDs, and the company Web site. You

Red Barn.jpg

decide to spend some time exploring programs, such as Windows Explorer, Windows Live

Trees.jpg

Photo Gallery, and Windows Media Center that allow you to view and manage photos, videos, and music.

OBJECTIVES

View pictures Manage pictures Fix pictures Print pictures Change AutoPlay settings Get pictures from a digital camera or scanner Copy and play music from a CD Stream media Associate a sound with an event

UNIT

K Windows 7

Viewing Pictures A picture is any type of image, such as a photograph, graphic, drawing, or painting. Some common file formats for pictures include JPEG (Joint Photographic Experts Group), GIF (Graphics Interchange Format), BMP (Bitmap), TIFF (Tagged Image File Format), and PNG (Portable Network Graphics). Windows 7 provides you with several ways to view pictures. In a folder with pictures, you can use the Extra Large Icons view or the Preview pane button on the toolbar to see a larger view of the pictures. In the Pictures folder, you can use the Slide show button on the toolbar to display pictures in a full screen slide show. If you want to preview a picture or open a picture to edit it, you can use the Preview button to open the picture with the default program associated with the picture file type, or select the specific program—such as Windows Photo Viewer, Windows Live Photo Gallery, or Paint—you want to use to make changes. Windows Photo Viewer is the default program Windows 7 uses to preview photos. Windows Photo Viewer allows you to view, rotate, print, e-mail, burn a CD/DVD, and open pictures and photos in other programs. You decide to use the sample pictures provided by Windows 7 to learn how to view and work with photos.

STEPS 1. Click the Start button

on the taskbar, then click Pictures

The Pictures library folder opens, displaying the Sample Pictures folder. QUICK TIP Click the folder icon in the Address bar to display the complete path.

QUICK TIP To e-mail a photo, select the photo you want, click the E-mail button on the toolbar, select a picture size, click Attach, then address and send the e-mail message.

2. Double-click the Sample Pictures folder The Sample Pictures folder opens, displaying the sample pictures provided by Windows 7. The Sample Pictures folder appears in the Pictures library folder; however, it’s actually located in Public\Pictures\Sample Pictures.

3. Click a picture in the Sample Pictures folder Information about the picture appears in the Details pane, as shown in Figure K-1, which includes file name, file format, State (shared or not), Date taken, Tags, Rating, and Dimensions (height x width). Tags are keywords used to make it easier to search for files. Ratings are user-defined ratings, ranging from one to five stars, also used to search for files.

4. Click the Views button arrow, then click Extra Large Icons The pictures in the folder appear larger to make them easier to view.

5. Click the Views button arrow, then click Large Icons The pictures in the folder are restored to the Large Icons view.

6. Click the Slide show button on the toolbar The pictures in the folder appear in full screen one after the other for five seconds each.

QUICK TIP To select a different program to open the selected file, click the Preview button arrow, select the program you want from the menu, or click Choose default program to change the default program to open the new file type for the selected file.

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7. Right-click the slide show screen, then click Exit on the shortcut menu, or press [Esc] The slide show stops, and the Sample Pictures folder window reappears. With the slide show shortcut menu, you can play, pause, or stop a slide show or display the previous or next slide. You can also specify the slide show speed or set the slide show to shuffle the pictures around or continually loop.

8. Click the Koala picture in the Sample Pictures folder, then click the Preview button on the toolbar The Windows Photo Viewer window opens displaying the Koala picture, as shown in Figure K-2.

9. Click the Close button in the Windows Photo Viewer window, then click the Sample Pictures window The Windows Photo Viewer window and the Sample Pictures folder close.

Working with Windows Media Copyright 2010 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part.

in

Toolbar for a Pictures folder

Slide show button

Views button arrow

Windows 7

FIGURE K-1: Sample Pictures folder

Sample Pictures folder

Selected photo

Details pane

FIGURE K-2: Picture preview in Windows Photo Viewer

Windows Photo Viewer toolbar

Controls to change photo size, play slide show, rotate, or delete

Selecting the appropriate file format Picture files can be stored as a variety of file types. Each file type has a different format and recommended use. JPEG ( Joint Photographic Experts Group; also known as JPG) and PNG (Portable Network Graphics) are graphic file formats commonly used on Web pages, whereas BMP (Bitmap) and TIFF (Tagged Image File Format, also known as TIF) are file formats used in documents. The format specifies how the information in the file is organized internally. JPG and PNG formats are compressed formats, which means that the file size is smaller and transfers over the Internet faster. Each compressed file format uses a different compression

method, which produces different results when you display the graphic files. JPG is designed for photographs and supports millions of colors, but loses some image quality by discarding image data to reduce the file size. PNG is designed for Web graphics and supports millions of colors without losing image quality. However, not all Web browsers fully support PNG’s capabilities without the installation of additional software. The TIF format is designed for all graphics and colors and is one of the most widely used graphic formats, but the file size is large. BMP is the standard Windows graphic format and is similar to TIF.

Working with Windows Media

Windows 243

UNIT

K Windows 7

Managing Pictures You can use Windows Live Photo Gallery to view, locate, and edit pictures. Windows Live Photo Gallery doesn’t come installed with Windows 7, so you need to download and install it from the Microsoft Windows Live Essentials Web site. By default, Windows Live Photo Gallery shows all the pictures and videos located in the Pictures and Videos library folders. However, you can add and view pictures in other folders on your computer. The toolbar below the Windows Live Photo Gallery title bar provides common commands you can use with pictures, such as File, Info, and Slide show. The left pane displays a tree structure similar to the Folders list that allows you to display pictures filtered by criteria you select, including All photos and video folders, Date taken, People tags, and Descriptive tags. To help you locate and view your pictures, you can also use options below the toolbar in the right pane to arrange files by name, date, rating, type, tag, or person and sort files in ascending or descending order. The Search box is also available to help you find pictures. Ron gave you the travel pictures for the promotion, so you decide to add them to Windows Live Photo Gallery and modify the file attributes to make them easier to find and display.

STEPS 1. If the Windows Live Photo Gallery program is not installed on your computer, open your browser, type http://download.live.com in the Address bar, press [Enter], click Download, click Run, click Yes if necessary, click the Photo Gallery check box to select it if necessary, deselect any other check boxes, click Install, click Continue if necessary, click Continue, in your browser window click Close to exit the installer, then click the Close button The Windows Essentials Web site opens, where you can download and install Windows Live programs, which include Photo Gallery. TROUBLE If the Sign in Windows Live dialog box appears, enter your ID and password, then click Sign In.

2. Click the Start button on the taskbar, point to All Programs, click Windows Live, click Windows Live Photo Gallery, then click No, if necessary, in the file type alert dialog box The Windows Live Photo Gallery window opens, displaying a tree structure of options in the left pane you can use to display pictures. The All photos and videos option is selected in the tree structure by default and the elements in the gallery on the right are displayed in Thumbnail view and arranged by the Auto option, which displays elements in folder groups by date.

3. Click the File button on the toolbar, click Include a folder in the gallery, navigate to the location where you store your Data Files, select the UnitK folder, click OK, then click OK again, if necessary The UnitK folder appears in the tree structure and the contents of the folder appear in the gallery.

4. Point to the picture of the Golden Gate bridge An enlarged preview of the picture appears with information about the file, as shown in Figure K-3. After several moments, the ScreenTip disappears.

5. Click the View Details button QUICK TIP To add a caption to a picture, select the picture, click Add caption in the Info pane, type the caption text, then press [Enter].

on the status bar

Information about each picture, including the file name, date taken, file size, resolution size, rating, and caption, appears next to its thumbnail. The View details button also toggles to the View thumbnails button.

6. Click the Info button on the toolbar The Info pane appears, displaying information about the currently selected picture.

7. Click the Golden Gate.jpg picture, click Add descriptive tags in the Info pane under the Descriptive tags heading, type California, then press [Enter] The new tag appears under Descriptive tags in the Info pane as well as the tree structure in the left pane.

QUICK TIP To search by specific text, type the text in the Find a photo box.

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8. In the tree structure, click California under Descriptive tags The gallery is filtered to display pictures with the California tag, as shown in Figure K-4.

9. In the tree structure, click UnitK, then click the Close button Working with Windows Media

in the Info pane

Windows Live Photo Gallery toolbar

Windows 7

FIGURE K-3: Preview a picture in Windows Live Photo Gallery

Point to a picture to enlarge it

Windows Live Photo Gallery tree structure

Enlarged picture

UnitK folder

View details button; toggles to View thumbnails button

FIGURE K-4: Display pictures with the California tag

Info button

Info pane

Filtered results in Details view

Add descriptive tags Added tag Add caption

Filter by California tag Information about the selected picture

Publishing pictures on the web If you use Windows Live Photos with Windows Live account on the Web, you can use Windows Live Photo Gallery to publish your photos online. You can publish your photos as an online, group, or event album. As an alternative, you can also publish your photos to an online photo-sharing Web site, such as Flickr, Facebook, or YouTube, using a plug-in, which you can download and install. To publish photos, sign in to Windows Live, then in Windows Live Photo Gallery, open the folder containing the photo or folder you want to publish. Select the photos you want to publish in an album, click the Publish button on

the toolbar, then select a publishing option: Online album, Group album, or Event album, or point to More Services, then select an online photo-sharing service, such as Publish on Flickr. To download and install a plug-in, click Add a plug-in on the More Services menu, then follow the online instructions. For a group or event album, select an event or group, then click Next. Type an album name or select one, select the permission setting you want, then click Publish. A message window appears as your photos are uploaded to the Web. To view your photos after they are published online, click View album.

Working with Windows Media

Windows 245

UNIT

K Windows 7

Fixing Pictures Often there are aspects of a picture that you want to change to make it look more appealing. If you have a picture that lacks sharpness and color detail or a photo that features a person with red eye, you can use the editing tools in Windows Live Photo Gallery to adjust brightness, contrast, and color and to remove red eye. If the colors in a picture don’t look accurate, you can use the Auto adjust feature. Auto adjust enhances a picture by automatically changing the brightness (light), contrast (dark), color temperature, tint, or saturation. Color temperature allows you to make the colors warmer (red) or cooler (blue), tint modifies the color cast (adds or removes green), and saturation changes color vividness or intensity. If you don’t like the changes made by Auto adjust, you can change the individual color attributes by using the Adjust exposure and Adjust color options. You can also use tools in Windows Live Photo Gallery to remove red eye and crop a picture. You want to adjust the color setting in one of the photos you plan to use in the travel slide show.

STEPS 1. In Windows Live Photo Gallery, click the Cruise.jpg picture The Cruise picture appears selected.

2. Click the Fix button on the toolbar The Windows Live Photo Gallery window opens, displaying the Edit pane, as shown in Figure K-5. QUICK TIP To crop a picture, click Crop photo in the Edit pane, drag the resize handles to create the area you want to crop, then click Apply.

3. In the Edit pane, click Adjust exposure The Adjust exposure options appear with accompanying sliders. The exposure options include Brightness, Contrast, Shadows, Highlights, and Histogram.

4. Drag the Contrast slider to the right The Cruise photo in the editing window becomes crisper and sharper. A check mark appears next to the Adjust exposure control to indicate one or more of the options have changed. A revised statistical representation of the distribution of colors in the photo appears in the Histogram. An arrow appears at the top and bottom of the Edit pane that allows you to scroll up and down the pane.

5. In the Edit pane, click the scroll down arrow, if necessary, then click Adjust color The Adjust color options appear with accompanying sliders. The color options include Color temperature, Tint, and Saturation. QUICK TIP To fix pictures with red eye, click Fix red eye in the Edit pane, then drag a rectangle around the eye you want to fix.

6. Drag the Color temperature slider to the left The Cruise photo colors become cooler, causing the blue tones to stand out more. If you don’t like a change, you can undo it or revert back to the original version of the photo.

7. Click the Undo button arrow at the bottom of the Edit pane, then click Undo all The Cruise photo reverts to its original exposures and colors.

8. Scroll to the top of the Edit pane, then click Auto adjust The Auto adjust feature analyzes the picture and automatically applies the best set of adjustments to make. See Figure K-6. A check mark appears next to the options to indicate the ones affected by Auto adjust.

9. Click the Back to gallery button on the toolbar, then click OK, if necessary, in the automatically save changes alert dialog box The changes are applied to the cruise photo and the picture window within Windows Live Photo Gallery closes.

Windows 246

Working with Windows Media

Edit pane

Fix button

Adjust exposure

Windows 7

FIGURE K-5: Windows Live Photo Galley with the Edit pane displayed

Adjust color

Undo button

FIGURE K-6: Photo with Edit pane adjustments

Auto adjust button

Back to gallery button

Check mark indicates options have changed

Adjust exposure options

Undo button arrow

E-mailing pictures If you have one or more pictures that you want to share with others, you can send them as e-mail attachments. Before you send photos or pictures in an e-mail as an attachment, you typically need to resize them in a separate graphics program so your recipient can view them with minimal scrolling. You can then start your e-mail program, create a new e-mail message, then attach the files. With Windows 7, you can also send a photo or picture in an e-mail message without having to

resize it in a separate graphics program, or even open your e-mail program. To do this, click the E-mail button on the toolbar in Windows Live Photo Gallery or any Explorer window. Windows 7 asks how you want to size the photos and pictures, and then opens a new e-mail message window with the picture files attached. You simply address the message, add any message text, then send it.

Working with Windows Media

Windows 247

UNIT

K Windows 7

Printing Pictures If you have a photo printer, it can be more convenient to print your photographs directly from your computer, digital camera, or scanner. In Windows Live Photo Gallery, you can use the Print Pictures dialog box to help you arrange photographs on the page and print them on paper. You can select the photo(s) to print, paper size, quality, paper type, and page layout, including full page prints, contact sheet prints (thumbnails), 8 3 10-inch prints, 5 3 7-inch prints, 4 3 6-inch prints, 3.5 3 5-inch prints, and wallet size prints. To get the best results when you print photographs, set your printer resolution to the highest setting for the best quality output, and use high-quality glossy paper designed specifically for printing photographs. When you print photographs with a high-resolution setting, the printing process takes longer. Many printer manufacturers also make paper designed to work best with their specific printers; check your printer manufacturer’s Web site for more information. Before you create the slide show, you decide to print some of the travel photos to see how they look.

STEPS 1. In Windows Live Photo Gallery, click the Red Barn.jpg picture, press and hold down [Ctrl], then click the Trees.jpg picture The Red Barn and Trees pictures appear selected.

2. Click the Print button on the toolbar, then click Print The Print Pictures dialog box opens, as shown in Figure K-7. A preview of the first page—the Red Barn.jpg picture—appears in the dialog box.

3. If necessary, click the Printer list arrow, then click an available printer The other print options change depending on the printer you select. The picture appears as it would print on the selected printer. A color printer displays a color preview, whereas a black-and-white printer displays a grayscale preview.

4. Click the Paper size list arrow, then click Letter or another available paper size The paper size you selected appears. The page layout options change depending on the paper size you select. QUICK TIP If you don’t have a color printer or special glossy photo paper, you can still complete this lesson, but your printout will not be of high quality.

5. Click the Quality list arrow, click an available quality, click the Paper type list arrow if available, then click an available paper type The quality and paper type you selected appear. The quality and paper type options change depending on the printer you select. The higher the print quality, the higher the dpi (dots per inch) resolution. However, the paper you use also makes a difference. Photo paper provides a better look than plain paper.

6. Click the 5 3 7 in. (2) photo size in the list of photo sizes on the right A preview of the two photos you selected appears, as shown in Figure K-8. Two 5 3 7-inch photos fit on one piece of 8½ 3 11-inch paper.

7. Click Print The pictures print and the Windows Live Photo Gallery window opens.

8. In the tree structure, right-click the UnitK folder, click Remove from the gallery, then click Yes in the Remove folder from the gallery dialog box The UnitK folder is removed from the Windows Live Photo Gallery window, but it’s not removed from your computer.

9. Click the Close button

in Windows Live Photo Gallery

The Windows Live Photo Gallery window closes.

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Working with Windows Media

Windows 7

FIGURE K-7: Printing options in Print Pictures dialog box

Print options; your settings might differ Preview of first page; your image color might differ

Print sizes

Next and Previous buttons to preview pictures

FIGURE K-8: Photo layouts in Print Pictures dialog box

Print options vary depending on the printer; your settings might differ

Selected print size; 5 ⫻ 7 inches, two photos per page

Print preview display of photos

Ordering photo prints from the Web If you have digital photographs that you don’t want to print yourself, you can use Windows Live Photo Gallery to send them to an online printing company. To order prints of your digital photographs, make sure you are connected to the Internet, start Windows Live Photo Gallery, select the photos you want to order, click the Print button on the toolbar, click Order prints to open the Order Prints dialog box, select a

company to print your photos, click Send Pictures, then follow the remaining steps to place an order with the printing company you chose. You’ll need to provide print sizes, quantities, and billing and shipping information to complete the order. The printing company sends the prints directly to your shipping address.

Working with Windows Media

Windows 249

UNIT

K Windows 7

Changing AutoPlay Settings When you insert a CD or DVD with music files, pictures, video files, or mixed content into your computer disc drive or attach certain devices, such as a digital camera, to your computer, you can specify how you want Windows 7 to respond by changing AutoPlay settings. You can have Windows detect the type of content on the disc and automatically start a program to display the content, display the content in a folder window, or prompt you each time to choose an action. For example, you can have Windows play or rip a CD or DVD using Windows Media Player, open the first folder to view files using Windows Explorer, or take no action. Windows 7 allows you to set AutoPlay options for a wide variety of media, including an audio or enhanced audio CD, a DVD or enhanced DVD movie, software and games, pictures, video and audio files, a blank CD or DVD, mixed content, an HD DVD or Blu-ray Disc movie, and a Video or Super Video CD. In addition, you can set AutoPlay options for USB media devices, such as digital cameras and removable drives, which plug in to your computer. Before you start using media devices and discs, you want to make sure the AutoPlay options are correctly set.

STEPS 1. Click the Start button Sound link

on the taskbar, click Control Panel, then click the Hardware and

The Hardware and Sound window opens, displaying options for different types of hardware.

2. Click the AutoPlay link The AutoPlay window opens, as shown in Figure K-9, displaying different types of media with corresponding default action list arrows. The Use AutoPlay for all media and devices check box at the top of the dialog box allows you to enable or disable this option. When selected, the AutoPlay dialog box opens when you insert a medium or device to let users select the option they want. QUICK TIP When AutoPlay is enabled, you can stop Windows from performing an action on a CD or DVD by holding down [Shift] at the same time you insert a CD or DVD.

QUICK TIP To reset Windows defaults for AutoPlay, click Reset all defaults, located at the bottom of the media and device list in the AutoPlay window.

3. Click the Use AutoPlay for all media and devices check box to select it, if necessary With this option selected, a CD or DVD inserted into a disc drive or a media device plugged in to your computer will start automatically.

4. Click the Blank CD list arrow A drop-down menu appears, as shown in Figure K-10, displaying the available default options you can choose from. The available options vary depending on the media type. For the Blank CD media type, you can select Burn an audio CD using Windows Media Player, Burn files to disc using Windows Explorer, Take no action, or Ask me every time.

5. Press [Esc] The menu closes without taking any action. The default, Choose a default, appears for the Blank CD list arrow.

6. Click Save The AutoPlay window closes and saves the current settings.

7. Click the Close button

in the Hardware and Sound window

The Hardware and Sound window closes.

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Working with Windows Media

Windows 7

FIGURE K-9: AutoPlay window

Use AutoPlay for all media and devices check box

Default AutoPlay option for specific types of media Blank CD list arrow

FIGURE K-10: AutoPlay options for a blank CD

AutoPlay options for a Blank CD Scroll down to display additional media types and devices, or reset all defaults

Managing pictures on a digital camera If you’re not sure what pictures are stored on your digital camera, you can view and manage them directly on the device instead of having to copy them to your computer. When you connect a digital camera to your computer, one of the options listed in the AutoPlay dialog box is Open

this device to view files using Windows Explorer. When you click this command, you can double-click the media device icon to view the files on it in an Explorer window. In the Explorer window for the media device, you can right-click pictures to preview, open, copy, or delete them.

Working with Windows Media

Windows 251

UNIT

K Windows 7

Getting Pictures from a Digital Camera or Scanner Windows 7 makes it easy to transfer pictures from a scanner or digital camera to your computer. A scanner is like a photocopy machine on which you can lay photographs, books, and other documents that you want to save in digital form on your computer. In addition to scanning photographs, many high-resolution scanners also allow you to scan a negative from a filmstrip and enlarge it. Check your scanner documentation for specifics. A digital still camera, or digital camera as it is commonly called, stores pictures digitally rather than on film. The major advantage of digital still cameras is that taking and processing photos is fast and inexpensive. To use the scanner or digital camera features, you need to have a scanner or digital camera attached and installed on your computer using Windows Plug and Play. Another option is to use the Add a device Wizard, which is available in the Devices and Printers window; simply click the Start button, then click Devices and Printers. When you connect a digital camera to your computer, Windows displays the AutoPlay dialog box, where you can choose to import files using Windows Explorer or Windows Live Photo Gallery or view files from the device using Windows Explorer. Ron gave you a digital camera with additional photos on it for use in the marketing and promotional materials. You want to load the photos from the camera to your computer to see if there are any appropriate for use in the slide show.

If you don’t have a digital camera attached and installed on your computer, read this lesson without completing the steps to learn how to import photos from a digital camera.

STEPS TROUBLE If the AutoPlay dialog box doesn’t appear, click the Start button, click Computer, right-click the digital camera icon, then click Import pictures and videos.

1. Connect a digital camera to your computer and follow the instructions to install and recognize the camera The AutoPlay dialog box opens, displaying the available options for a digital camera, as shown in Figure K-11. The options shown in the AutoPlay dialog box change depending on the specific media device attached or disc inserted.

2. Click Import pictures and videos using Windows The Import Pictures and Videos dialog box opens, displaying a thumbnail of the first picture, the optional ability to add a descriptive tag to the imported pictures, and a link to change import options, as shown in Figure K-12.

3. Click the Import settings link The Import Settings dialog box opens, displaying settings for the current device, as shown in Figure K-13. The dialog box allows you to specify the import folder location, folder name, and file name. You can also set other options to prompt for a tag on import (default), always erase from camera after importing, rotate pictures on import (default), or open Windows Explorer after import (default). If you’ve changed importing options, yet want to get back to the default settings, you can use the Restore defaults button.

4. Click OK The Import Pictures and Videos dialog box opens. QUICK TIP To delete the pictures from the camera after importing, click the Erase after importing check box to select it in the Import Pictures and Videos dialog box during the importing process.

Windows 252

5. Click Import in the Import Pictures and Videos dialog box The Import Pictures and Videos dialog box displays a progress meter and a preview of each picture as it’s imported to your computer. Once the importing process is complete, the pictures are downloaded from the digital camera to your computer and appear in Windows Explorer in the Imported Pictures and Videos folder, which is located in a folder named with the date in the My Pictures folder. The My Pictures folder is located in the Pictures library folder.

6. Click the Close button

in the Windows Explorer window

The Windows Explorer window closes.

7. Disconnect the digital camera from your computer Working with Windows Media

Windows 7

FIGURE K-11: AutoPlay dialog box

Name of digital camera device; yours might differ Import pictures and videos option

FIGURE K-12: Import Pictures and Videos dialog box

Picture thumbnail; yours will differ

Import settings link

Import button

FIGURE K-13: Import Settings dialog box

Selected device type

Current camera import options

Restore defaults button

Scanning a picture Windows 7 makes it easy to scan pictures for use on your computer with the Windows Fax and Scan program or the Import from a camera or scanner command on the File menu in Windows Live Photo Gallery. First, you need to plug the scanner into your computer and install the related software according to the manufacturer’s instructions. To start a new scan, either click the Start button, point to All Programs, click Windows Fax and Scan, click the Scan button in the lower-left corner, then click the New Scan button on the toolbar, or click the Start button, point to All Programs, click Windows Live, click Windows Live Photo

Gallery, click the File button, click Import from a camera or scanner, select the scanner device icon, then click Import. In the New Scan dialog box, specify the options you want for the new scan. Some important options include Profile, File type, Resolution (dpi or dots per inch), brightness, and contrast. To preview the scan, click Preview. Make any adjustments to the settings you want before the final scan. To create the final scan, click Scan. When you’re done, click Import to store the scanned image on your computer and display it in Windows Explorer or Windows Live Photo Gallery.

Working with Windows Media

Windows 253

UNIT

K Windows 7

Copying and Playing Music from a CD Windows Media Player can copy one music track or an entire album from a music CD to your computer. When you copy music from a CD or download music from the Web to your computer, Windows automatically copies music by the same artist into one folder in the Music folder, and creates subfolders for each album. Windows 7 provides several ways to play the music on your computer. In the Music folder, you can click either Play or Play all on the toolbar or double-click an individual music file to open and play the music in Windows Media Player. You want to copy a few music files from a music CD to your computer for potential use in the marketing slide show promotion.

You need a personal music CD to complete the steps in this lesson. If you don’t have access to a personal music CD, read through the steps but do not perform any actions.

STEPS 1. Insert a music CD into the CD drive, then click Play audio CD using Windows Media Player in the AutoPlay dialog box, if necessary The Windows Media Player window opens and starts to play the first track on the CD in the Library or Now Playing window. The Now Playing window is a smaller, more compact window for playing music in Windows Media Player. QUICK TIP Before you copy music to your computer, you should make sure you have enough free space; music tracks typically use between 1.5 MB and 4 MB of disk space.

QUICK TIP If you click Play all in the Music folder, Windows Media Player plays all the music in random order. If you click Play all in a subfolder within the Music folder, all the music in the subfolder plays in consecutive order.

TROUBLE If Windows Media Player doesn’t recognize the artist name on a CD, it automatically names the folder Unknown Artist.

Windows 254

2. Move the mouse to display controls, if necessary, click the Stop button of the window, then click the Switch to Library button , if necessary

at the bottom

The CD stops playing. The Windows Media Player window displays a list of music tracks on the CD in the library, as shown in Figure K-14. A selected check box appears next to each music track to indicate which will be copied from the CD. You can deselect check boxes for tracks you don’t want to copy.

3. Click the check boxes to deselect all but three music tracks, then click the Rip CD button on the toolbar The copying process starts with the first selected music track. The Rip status column for the first selected music track, changes from “Pending” to “Ripping,” followed by a progress percentage. When the copy is complete, the Rip status changes to “Ripped to library,” and all of the music track check boxes are unselected. The default copy location for the ripped music is in your Music folder.

4. Click Music in the Navigation pane The music you copied appears in the library. You can start Windows Media Player and select the tracks you want to play, or you can select the tracks you want to play in the Music folder and play them in Windows Media Player.

5. Click the Close button

in the Windows Media Player window

The Windows Media Player window closes.

6. Click the Start button

on the taskbar, then click Music

The Music folder opens, displaying the folder to which you copied the music tracks, which is named the artist’s name or for the type of music you copied.

7. Double-click the folder named for the album that contains the music you copied, then double-click the music album subfolder The subfolder contains the copied music tracks, similar to the ones shown in Figure K-15.

8. Click the Play all button on the toolbar to open Windows Media Player and play the when you’re done, close the Music folder, then remove the CD from the music, click drive Working with Windows Media

Current CD in CD drive; yours will differ

Rip CD button CD information

Windows 7

FIGURE K-14: Copying music from a CD using Windows Media Player

Library on your computer

Music tracks on CD CD with music Selected music tracks Controls to play, pause, and stop the player

FIGURE K-15: Music tracks copied to the Music folder

Music folder Album name folder Artist name folder

Music tracks copied from a CD; your music will differ

Copying music to your portable device or CD A portable device is a small handheld piece of equipment that combines computing, telephone, fax, Internet, e-mail, and networking capabilities. Portable handheld devices, such as Pocket PCs and personal digital assistants (PDAs), provide a convenient way to stay connected to others and get work done while you are away from home or work. Many of these portable devices also allow you to download or copy music files to them, so you can listen to music. Windows Media Player makes it easy to copy the music you want to a portable device, such as an MP3 player. To copy files to your portable device, connect your portable device to your computer, then start Windows Media Player. If the device needs to be set up to be synchronized with your computer, a wizard will provide you with step-by-step instructions. Synchronization is the process of updating two devices (in this case, an MP3 player and

Windows Media Player) to have the same files. When you set up Auto Sync, the device will be synchronized automatically. If Auto Sync starts, you can click Stop sync to stop it. To copy specific files, click the Switch to Library button, if necessary, to display the media files in your library, click the Sync tab, drag the media files you want to the Sync list, then click Start sync. To change the sync priority order, sync method, and other settings, click Sync options. After Windows Media Player verifies that there is enough space for the selected files on the portable device, the synchronization process starts. To copy files to a CD, insert the blank CD, click Burn an audio CD in the AutoPlay dialog box, click the Burn tab if necessary, drag the files you want to burn from the Details pane to the Burn list, then click Start burn. To select a disc type, click Burn options.

Working with Windows Media

Windows 255

UNIT

K Windows 7

Streaming Media If you have all of your music on one computer, but you want to play it on another computer, you can use Windows Media Player to stream the music from one computer to another. If you have a network, you can use Windows Media Player to stream music and video to and from another computer or media devices— such as a networked digital stereo receiver or TV, Linksys, or Xbox 360—in your home. You can also stream your music library from a home computer over the Internet to another computer using remote media streaming. Before you can start streaming media, you need to set up your network and media devices, turn on home media streaming, and enable options to allow devices to access, play, or control your media. After you set up media streaming, you can specify which devices, music, videos, and pictures you want to stream on your network. In Windows Media Player, you can use the Navigation pane to access and play streamed media from another computer or media device, or use the Play To button to push media to another computer or media device. After copying a few music files from a music CD to your main computer, you want to stream the music to another computer on your network.

If you don’t have Windows Media Player on another networked computer, read this lesson without completing the steps to learn what is possible with media streaming.

STEPS

STEPS TROUBLE If the Turn on home media streaming command is not available, it’s turned on; skip Step 1.

1. In the Windows Media Player window, click the Switch to Library button , if necessary, click the Stream button, click Turn on home media streaming, click Turn on media streaming, then click OK This turns on media streaming, which detects available playback devices on your network.

2. Click the Stream button, click Automatically allow devices to play my media, then click Automatically allow all computers and media devices This lets networked computers and media devices stream media to Windows Media Player on your computer.

3. Click the Stream button, click Allow remote control of my Player, then click Allow remote control on this network This lets networked computers and media devices push media to Windows Media Player on your computer.

4. Have a person on another computer connected to your network start Windows Media Player and perform the first three steps in this lesson This turns on media streaming and lets other computers share media in Windows Media Player.

5. In the Navigation pane, click the Expand indicator computer under Other Libraries, then click Music

next to an available networked

The music available on the connected networked computer appears in the Windows Media Player window.

6. Double-click a music track to play for a few minutes, then click the Stop button The music track from a connected networked computer plays in Windows Media Player. See Figure K-16. TROUBLE If the Play To button is not available, right-click a track in the library, point to Play to, then click the name of the connected networked computer.

Windows 256

7. In the Navigation pane, click Music under Library, click the Play To button Play tab, then click the name of the connected networked computer

under the

The Play To window opens, as shown in Figure K-17, listing the music from your computer playing in the Windows Media Player window on the connected networked computer.

8. Click the Close button

in the Play To window

The Play To window closes and the music on the connected networked computer stops playing.

9. Use the Stream button to separately select Allow remote control of my Player and Automatically allow devices to play my media to turn them off, then have the person on the networked computer complete this step as well in Windows Media Player 10. Click the Close button Working with Windows Media

Media on the networked computer Library on local computer

Play to button

Windows 7

FIGURE K-16: Streaming media from another computer

Selected library on networked computer

Media player controls

FIGURE K-17: Play To window streaming media to a computer

Networked computer

Music list streaming to the networked computer

Media player controls

Setting streaming options If you don’t want to make all of your media available to other devices and computers on your network, you can select which media to make available. You can also specify which devices and computers are allowed or blocked. To set these options, click the Stream button in Windows Media Player, then click More streaming options. Click Allow All to allow

all computers to stream, click Block All to block all computers, or select Allowed or Blocked for each individual computer. To select streamed media types, click the Choose default settings link, select the options you want, then click OK. To change the name of your media library, type a name in the Name your media library box, then click OK.

Working with Windows Media

Windows 257

UNIT

K Windows 7

Associating a Sound with an Event Besides customizing the desktop appearance of Windows, you can also add sound effects to common Windows commands and functions, such as starting and exiting Windows, completing a print job, opening and closing folders, or emptying the Recycle Bin. A sound theme is a set of sounds applied to events in Windows 7 and programs. You can select from a current sound scheme (a collection of sounds associated with events), or you can mix and match sound files to create your own sound scheme for your computer. You can use the sounds that accompany Windows 7, create your own, or download sound files from the Web. No matter which sounds you choose, you need to utilize WAV files with the .wav file extension in the Sound dialog box when prompted. Rather than use the sounds provided by Windows 7, you decide to create your own original sound scheme for use with the slide show.

STEPS TROUBLE If the sound scheme is not Windows Default, click the Sound Scheme list arrow, then click Windows Default.

1. Click the Start button Sound link

on the taskbar, click Control Panel, then click the Hardware and

The Hardware and Sound window opens, displaying options for different types of hardware.

2. Click the Change system sounds link under the Sound link The Sound dialog box opens, displaying the Sounds tab. The Windows Default sound scheme is selected by default.

3. Click Default Beep in the Program Events list The associated sound, Windows Ding, appears in the Sounds list along with Test and Browse buttons, as shown in Figure K-18. QUICK TIP If you put WAV files in the Media folder, located in the Windows folder, the sound files appear in the Sounds list, and you can add sounds to the list.

4. Click the Sounds list arrow, then click tada or another available choice The tada sound is now associated with the Default Beep event. The Windows Default sound scheme changes to Windows Default (modified).

5. Click the Test button The tada sound plays.

6. Click Save As under Sound Scheme, type Ron’s Scheme, then click OK The Sound Scheme changes to Ron’s Scheme.

QUICK TIP To remove a sound associated with an event, click an event on the Sounds tab, click the Sounds list arrow, then click (None).

Windows 258

7. Select Ron’s Scheme under Sound Scheme, click Delete, then click Yes in the Scheme dialog box The Ron’s Scheme sound scheme is deleted and the sound scheme changes back to Windows Default. You can only delete saved sound schemes; the default sound schemes can’t be deleted.

8. Click Cancel, then click the Close button The Hardware and Sound window closes.

Working with Windows Media

in the Hardware and Sound window

Windows 7

FIGURE K-18: Sound dialog box with the Sounds tab displayed

Sounds tab

Save As button Current sound scheme; yours might differ

Delete button

Program Events list

Test button Sounds list arrow

Creating a sound file Using Sound Recorder and a microphone, you can record your own sound files. Sound Recorder creates Windows Media Audio files with the .wma file extension. If you are using Windows Vista Home Basic or Business, Sound Recorder saves files in the .wav format instead of .wma. Sound Recorder doesn’t play sounds; you can play your recording in a digital media player, such as Windows Media Player. Before you can use

Sound Recorder, you need to have a sound card, speakers, and a microphone installed on your computer. To create a sound, click the Start button, point to All Programs, click Accessories, and then click Sound Recorder. Click the Start Recording button, record the sounds you want, then click the Stop Recording button when you’re done. Select a folder, type a name for the file, click Save, then click the Close button.

Controlling the volume Windows comes with master volume controls that allow you to change the volume of all devices and applications on the computer at once. You can increase or decrease the volume, or you can mute (turn off) the sound on your computer. The master volume control is available by default in the notification area on the taskbar. In addition to changing the master volume on your computer, you can also adjust the volume of

specific devices, such as a CD or DVD player, without affecting the volume of other devices. To set volume levels for specific devices, click the Volume icon in the notification area of the taskbar, click the Mixer link, drag the Speakers slider to adjust the settings for the sound level you want, drag the other sliders to adjust the settings for the applications you want, then click the Close button.

Using the Pictures folder as a screen saver Instead of using screen savers provided by Windows 7, you can use your own pictures to create a slide show screen saver. To use pictures as a screen saver, create a folder on your computer or use the Pictures folder, place the pictures you want to use in the slide show in the folder, right-click the desktop, click Personalize, click the Screen Saver link, click the Screen saver list arrow, click Photos, then click Settings. In the

Photos Screen Saver Settings dialog box, click Browse to open the Browse For Folder dialog box, choose the folder with your pictures or use the selected Pictures folder, then click OK. Specify the slide show speed you want and whether to shuffle the order of the pictures, then click Save. You can click Preview to view the screen saver slide show.

Working with Windows Media

Windows 259

Practice Concepts Review

For current SAM information including versions and content details, visit SAM Central (http://samcentral.course.com). If you have a SAM user profile, you may have access to hands-on instruction, practice, and assessment of the skills covered in this unit. Since we support various versions of SAM throughout the life of this text, you will want to check with your instructor for instructions and the correct URL/Web site to access those assignments.

Match the statements below with the elements labeled in the screen shown in Figure K-19. FIGURE K-19

a

h g

b f

e c

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

d

Which element allows you to change the view? Which element allows you to start a slide show? Which element displays the Edit pane? Which element displays pictures in an Explorer window? Which element displays, edits, and manages pictures? Which element imports pictures? Which element plays audio music on CD? Which element allows you to sort pictures?

Match each term with the statement that best describes it. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13.

Scanner Digital still camera Auto adjust Color temperature Adjust color

Windows 260

a. b. c. d. e.

Use to change brightness, contrast, temperature, tint, or saturation Use to make colors warmer or cooler Use to change individual color attributes Use to convert photos or data to digital form stored on a computer Use to take digital pictures

Working with Windows Media

Select the best answer from the list of choices. 14. Which of the following is not a Pictures folder toolbar button? a. Preview c. Open b. Slide show d. Print 15. Which of the following opens by default when you click the Preview button on a Pictures folder toolbar? a. Windows Photo Viewer c. Windows Media Player b. Windows Live Photo Gallery d. Windows Media Center 16. Which of the following is not a Windows Live Photo Gallery tree structure option? a. Tags c. Date Modified b. Ratings d. Date Taken 17. Which of the following features changes brightness, contrast, temperature, tint, and saturation? a. Auto adjust c. Adjust color b. Color temperature d. Adjust exposure 18. Which of the following features changes only brightness and contrast? a. Auto adjust c. Adjust color b. Color temperature d. Adjust exposure 19. Which of the following features changes only temperature, tint, and saturation? a. Auto adjust c. Adjust color b. Color temperature d. Adjust exposure 20. Which of the following is not an AutoPlay option? a. Software and games c. Blank CD b. Mixed media d. DVD movie 21. Which of the following programs rips music from a CD? a. Paint c. Windows Media Player b. Windows Live Photo Gallery d. Windows Media Center

Windows 7

Concepts Review (Continued)

Skills Review 1. View pictures. a. Open the Pictures folder, then open the Sample Pictures folder. b. View the pictures as Extra Large Icons. c. Restore the view to Large Icons. d. Display a slide show of the sample pictures, then preview a picture. e. Close the Windows Photo Viewer, then the Sample Pictures window. 2. Manage pictures. a. Open Windows Live Photo Gallery, then add the UnitK folder to the gallery. b. Select the Bridge.jpg picture. c. View the pictures as details, then display the Info pane. d. Add the tag Country to the selected picture. e. Change the rating of the selected picture to 4 stars. f. Select the UnitK folder, then close the Info pane. 3. Fix pictures. a. Select the Hotel.jpg picture in the Windows Live Photo Gallery, then display the Edit pane. b. Use Adjust color, then drag the Tint and Saturation sliders all the way to the right. c. Use the Undo command to revert the picture back to its original settings. d. Use the Auto adjust feature, then return to the gallery.

Working with Windows Media Copyright 2010 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part.

Windows 261

Skills Review (Continued) 4. Print pictures. a. Select the Golden Gate.jpg and Harbor.jpg pictures. b. Open the Print Pictures dialog box. c. Select a printer, paper size, and quality. d. Select a photo layout size, then print the photos. e. Remove the UnitK folder from Windows Live Photo Gallery, then close Windows Live Photo Gallery. 5. Change AutoPlay settings. a. Open the AutoPlay window in the Control Panel. b. Select the Use AutoPlay for all media and devices check box, if necessary. c. Scroll down to the bottom of the window, then reset all defaults. d. Save the results, then close any open windows. 6. Get pictures from a digital camera or scanner. a. Connect a digital camera to your computer, then follow the instructions to install and recognize the camera, if necessary. b. Import pictures using the AutoPlay dialog box. c. Open the Import Settings dialog box, view the settings, then close the dialog box. d. Import pictures using the Import Pictures and Videos dialog box. e. Close any open windows, then disconnect the digital camera from your computer. 7. Copy and play music from a CD. a. Insert a music CD into the CD drive, click Play audio CD using Windows Media Player in the AutoPlay dialog box, then stop the music from playing. b. Rip one song from the CD, then view the track you added in the library. c. Open the artist or type of music folder in the Music folder, open the subfolder that contains the track you ripped, play the song, then close all open Explorer windows. 8. Stream media. a. In Windows Media Player, on your computer and a networked computer, use the Stream button to automatically allow devices to play my media and allow remote control on this network. b. Click the Music category on an available, networked computer under Other Libraries. c. Play a music track, then stop it. d. Click the Music category on your local computer under Library. e. Click the Play to button, then select a connected, networked computer to play the music. f. Close the Play To window. g. On your computer and a networked computer, use the Stream button for the following tasks: Do not automatically allow devices to play my media and Do not allow remote control on this network. h. Close Windows Media Player. 9. Associate a sound with an event. a. Open the Hardware and Sound window in the Control Panel. b. Open the Sounds tab in the Sound dialog box. c. Select an event in the Program Events list. d. Change the sound for the event, then test the sound. e. Save the sound scheme as My Scheme, then delete your saved sound scheme. f. Cancel the Sound dialog box, then close the Hardware and Sound window.

Independent Challenge 1 As the marketing director at Meadow Farms Nursery, you want your customers to know what flowers and plants are part of the daily sale. You install a computer screen near the entrance of the nursery to display this information in a slide show format. You don’t have the time each day to create a slide show from scratch, so you want to use the Slide Show feature in the Sample Pictures folder.

Windows 262

Working with Windows Media

a. b. c. d.

Open the Sample Pictures folder. Preview the pictures using Extra Large Icons and Large Icons. Select the flowers and garden pictures in the Sample Pictures folder. Preview the pictures in Windows Photo Viewer. (Hint: Use the Previous and Next buttons to switch between the selected pictures.) e. Close the Windows Photo Viewer. f. Display a slide show of the pictures.

Windows 7

Independent Challenge 1 (Continued)

Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Change the slide show speed to slow. (Hint: Right-click the screen during the slide show.) ■ Set the slide show to shuffle. ■ Restore the settings to medium speed and no shuffle. g. Exit the slide show.

Independent Challenge 2 You are an independent consultant for Home Memories, a scrapbooking company. As part of your in-home demonstration, you want to show customers how to transfer picture files from a digital camera to their computer, fix and organize their digital photos, and print their photos using a multipicture layout for use in their scrapbooks. a. Take at least four photos of a related subject using your digital camera, if necessary, then import the photos to a folder named Memories in the location where you store your solution files. b. Add the Memories folder to Windows Live Photo Gallery. c. Use the Auto adjust feature to fix the color on all of the pictures. d. Create a tag for the pictures, then assign the tag to the pictures. e. Assign each of the pictures a rating, then display the picture by tag and by rating. f. Print all of the pictures in the Memories folder using two different page layouts. Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Plug in and install a scanner on your computer. ■ Scan photographs into Windows Live Photo Gallery. ■ Order a photo print from the Web. g. When you finish printing, remove the folder from Windows Live Photo Gallery.

Independent Challenge 3 You are a college student majoring in music. As part of your studies, you need to listen to different types of music files and identify the unique parts of each one. You want to copy music tracks from different CDs onto your computer and then play different ones to complete your assignments. a. b. c. d.

Open the AutoPlay window in the Control Panel. Set the AutoPlay option for Audio CD to Take no action. Start Windows Media Player, then insert a music CD into the CD-ROM drive. Rip at least two selected tracks to a folder named Music Major in the location where you store your solution files.

Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Change the master volume to an optimum level for your music. ■ Attach a PDA or MP3 player to your computer, and then copy the two tracks to the device. ■ Synchronize the music on the portable device with Windows Media Player. e. Play at least two tracks you ripped from the Music Major folder. f. Reset all defaults for AutoPlay, then close Windows Media Player.

Working with Windows Media

Windows 263

Real Life Independent Challenge You have stored all your music in Windows Media Player and want to share it with family and friends. An easy way to share your media is to make it available for streaming over a home network. You want to set up media streaming to stream music to and from your home network and share with others. a. Start Windows Media Player. b. Set streaming options to automatically allow devices to automatically play my media and allow remote control on this network. Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Change the name of your media library. ■ Set media streaming options to block devices. ■ Change default settings for media streaming. c. Play at least two tracks from a networked computer, then play at least two tracks to a networked computer. d. Set streaming options for the following tasks: Do not automatically allow devices to play my media and Do not allow remote control on this network, then close Windows Media Player.

Visual Workshop Re-create the screen shown in Figure K-20 using your own music files; yours will differ.

FIGURE K-20

Windows 264

Working with Windows Media

UNIT

L Windows 7

Managing Shared Files Using a Network If you are not connected to a network, you cannot work through the steps in this unit; however, you can read the lessons without completing the steps to learn what is possible in a network environment.

Files You Will Need Memos (folder) Thielen Raise.rtf Quest Travel (folder) Business (folder) QST Focus.rtf

Windows 7 comes with a powerful tool for managing files and folders across a network. A network is a system of two or more computers connected together to share resources. The Network window, which you can access from the Start menu, allows you to view the entire network and access shared files and folders with people from other parts of the network. Recently, you were hired as a travel consultant at Quest Specialty Travel. As a new employee, you want to learn how to use network tools to manage files and folders on the company network.

QST Press Release.rtf To Do List.rtf Suppliers List.rtf

OBJECTIVES

Understand network services Explore the Network and Sharing Center Examine network computer properties Open and view a network Create a shared folder Map a network drive Work with shared files Disconnect a network drive Use a homegroup

UNIT

L Windows 7

Understanding Network Services

DETAILS Windows 7 allows you to do the following: • Share central resources through client/server networking Windows offers a network configuration called client/server networking. Under this arrangement, a single computer is designated as a server, allowing access to resources for any qualified user. Client/server networking provides all users on a network a central location for accessing shared files. Figure L-1 shows an example of a client/server network configuration.

• Share resources through peer-to-peer networking Windows also offers a network configuration called peer-to-peer networking. Peer-to-peer networking enables two or more computers to link together without designating a central server. In this configuration, any computer user can access resources stored on any other computer, as long as those resources are available for sharing. Peer-to-peer networking also allows individual computer users to share files and other resources, such as a printer, with other users on the network without having to access a server. Figure L-2 shows an example of a peer-to-peer networking configuration.

• Share resources through network connections Windows provides connectivity between your computer and a network, another computer, or the Internet using Network Connections. Whether you are physically connected using a direct cable or connected remotely using a dial-up or cable modem, you can connect securely to a network over the Internet using a virtual private network (VPN) connection or set up your computer to let other computers connect to yours using an incoming network connection. VPN and incoming network connection are examples of WANs.

• Share designated files and folders on your computer securely with other network users Windows provides security options when your computer is connected to a network. You select which resources on your computer you want to share with others. Before network users can use any resources on your computer, they must be granted the required permission.

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Managing Shared Files Using a Network

FIGURE L-1: An example of a client/server network

Windows 7

WAN or Internet

Wireless signal

LAN Workstation

Network router

DSL line

Network hub Network printer

Workstation

Network server

Typical client/ server network

FIGURE L-2: An example of a peer-to-peer network

Wireless signal WAN or Internet Typical peerto-peer network LAN Network router

DSL line

Shared printer

Workstation Network hub

Managing Shared Files Using a Network

Windows 267

UNIT

L Windows 7

Exploring the Network and Sharing Center The Network and Sharing Center in Windows 7 provides a central location where you can view and modify network and sharing options for a computer connected to a network. From a network perspective, you can view a map of the network, view network connection status information, change the network location type (either Public or Private: Work or Home), and specify whether you want others on the network to see you, known as network discovery. When you connect to a network for the first time, Windows automatically detects it and asks you to choose a network location. When you change the network location, Windows automatically adjusts firewall settings depending on the network type. In addition to viewing and setting network options, you can also turn sharing options on and off. The Network and Sharing Center visually displays network maps and sharing on and off icons to make it easier to view status information. Before you get started using a network, you want to examine the current network settings and view a visual map of the network.

STEPS QUICK TIP Click the Network icon in the notification area on the taskbar, then click the Open Network and Sharing Center link.

1. Click the Start button on the taskbar, click Control Panel, then click the View network status and tasks link under Network and Internet The Network and Sharing Center window opens, displaying information, status, and options related to your network connection, as shown in Figure L-3.

2. Click the Change advanced sharing settings link in the Task pane, then click the Expand button under Home or Work (current profile), if necessary The Advanced sharing settings dialog box opens.

3. Click the Turn on network discovery option, if necessary This option enables your computer to view the computers and devices available on your network.

4. Click the Turn on file and printer sharing option, if necessary This option enables you to share files and printers on your computer with users who have access to and permission to your network.

5. Click the Turn on sharing so anyone with network access can read and write files in the Public folders option, if necessary, then click Save changes This option enables you to share your files in the Public folder with users who have access to your network. This provides full access to open, change, and create files on your computer.

6. Click the network type link (either Home network, Work network, or Public network) The Set Network Location dialog box opens, displaying options to select a network type, either Home, Work, or Public. Home or Work allows complete network discovery to see computers and devices, whereas Public provides limits on network discovery and cannot display a visual network map.

7. Click Home network, if necessary, click Yes if prompted with a security alert, then click Close The Set Network Location dialog box closes and the Network and Sharing Center window opens. The Home network option allows you to view computers and devices on a local network. QUICK TIP Click an icon in the visual map to open the networked device.

8. Click the See full map link at the top of the window, click the Network map of list arrow, then select the network connection you want to view The Network Map window opens, displaying a visual map of your network, as shown in Figure L-4.

9. Click the Back button

in the Network Map window

The Network Map window closes and the Network and Sharing Center window reopens.

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Managing Shared Files Using a Network

Your network settings might differ

Task pane contains common network commands

See full map link

Windows 7

FIGURE L-3: Network and Sharing Center window

Connections links; yours might differ

Change advanced sharing settings link

Network type link; yours might differ

FIGURE L-4: Network Map window

Network map of list arrow; for multiple networks, specify the network you want to map Visual network map; your map might differ

Setting network sharing options In the Network and Sharing Center, you can set options to share files, printers, Public folders, and media on the network, which provides a convenient way to share information and resources. You can also share the media files in your Windows Media Player. If you have a private network, you can play shared media files on another computer using Windows Media Player, or other networked digital media player (also called a digital media receiver), such as Xbox 360. When you open a shared media folder in the Network folder, the networked media player, such as Windows Media Player, opens, where you can play the shared media

files as if the files were on your computer. To set file or Public folder sharing options, open the Network and Sharing Center window; click the Change advanced sharing settings link in the Task pane; click the Expand button under the network type (Home, Work, or Public); turn on the Network discovery, File and printer sharing, and Public folder sharing option; then click Save changes. To set media sharing, click the Expand button under the network type (Home, Work, or Public), click the Choose media streaming options link, set options to allow or block media streaming for a device, click OK, then click Save changes.

Managing Shared Files Using a Network

Windows 269

UNIT

L Windows 7

Examining Network Computer Properties Names and locations are used to identify computers on a network. The computer’s name refers to the individual machine, and the computer’s location refers to how the machine is grouped together with other computers. In a peer-to-peer network, individual computers are often organized into workgroups. A workgroup is a group of networked computers that belong to users who need to share information or perform common tasks. A home or small office network is typically a peer-to-peer network where individual computers are organized into workgroups with a host and several clients. The host is a computer on the network that shares an Internet connection with the other client computers on the network. In a client/server network, individual computers are often grouped into domains. A domain is a collection of computers that the person managing the network creates to group together computers used for the same tasks and to simplify the setup and maintenance of the network. The difference between a domain and a workgroup is that the network administrator defines the domains that exist on the network and controls access to computers within those domains. In a workgroup, each user determines who has access to his or her computer. Computers anywhere on the network can be located easily through the naming hierarchy and can be addressed individually by name. You can also view network connection properties and diagnose any problems using the Connection Status dialog box. You want to learn more about the Quest Specialty Travel network, so you decide to check the properties of your network computer.

STEPS QUICK TIP You can use the option buttons in the Network Connection Status dialog box to change properties, disable the connection, and diagnose problems.

1. In the Network and Sharing Center window, click a connections link in the Connect or disconnect area of the View your active networks section The Network Connection Status dialog box opens, as shown in Figure L-5, displaying connection information, such as the connectivity type (Internet Protocol version 4 and 6, IPv4 and IPv6), media state (enabled or disabled), current network connection duration and speed, signal quality, and connection activity (sent and received bytes of data). Wireless networks also include an identification name (SSID).

2. Click Close, then click the Close button

in the Network and Sharing Center window

The Network and Sharing Center window closes.

3. Click the Start button

on the taskbar, then click Computer

The Windows Explorer window opens, displaying local and network drives and devices.

4. Click the System properties button on the toolbar The System window opens, displaying information about your computer. TROUBLE If you are not connected to a network workgroup or domain, you can use the Network Identification Wizard to join one. After you connect the network hardware, click the Network ID button to start the wizard.

Windows 270

5. Click the Change settings link in the Computer name, domain and workgroup settings section, then click Yes if prompted with a security alert The Computer Name tab of the System Properties dialog box opens, as shown in Figure L-6. Your computer name and current network, either domain or workgroup, type appears. In the example shown in Figure L-6, the network computer name is “SteveJ-PC” and the domain name is “MSHOME.”

6. Click Change The Computer Name/Domain Changes dialog box opens, displaying options to change the computer name and network type, either domain or workgroup.

7. Click Cancel, click OK, then click the Close button

Managing Shared Files Using a Network

in the System window

Windows 7

FIGURE L-5: Network Connection Status dialog box

Network connection status information for a wireless connection

Properties, Disable, and Diagnose buttons

FIGURE L-6: Computer Name tab displayed in the System Properties dialog box

Computer name; yours might differ

Workgroup name indicates that computer is not on a domain Change button

Viewing network connection properties A computer that uses a Windows network must be configured so that other machines on the network recognize it. On a small network, you might be responsible for configuring your computer, or that responsibility might fall to the network administrator. You can view and modify some of the network settings for your computer using the Network Connections window. In the Network and Sharing Center window, click Manage network connections in the left pane to display the network connections for the computer. Double-click a network connection icon to display current network status for the specific connection and diagnose any problems. Right-click a network connection icon, then click Properties to display network settings. The network dialog box opens

displaying the General tab with the name of your network interface card and a list of available network components. The network connection consists of three types of components: client, service, and protocol. The client type allows you to access computers and files on the network. The service type allows you to share your computer resources, such as files and printers, with other networked computers. Protocol is the language that the computer uses to communicate with other computers on the network. Understanding which components are installed on your computer helps you understand the capabilities and limitations of your computer on the network.

Managing Shared Files Using a Network

Windows 271

UNIT

L Windows 7

Opening and Viewing a Network The key to managing files and folders in a network environment is to understand the structure of your particular network. Most networks consist of multiple types of computers and operating systems. You can use the Network command on the Start menu to view the contents of your network in the Network window. The Network window lets you view the entire network or just your part of the network, to give you access to the server, domain, and workgroup computers on the network. The Network window also displays shared folders and media drives available on your immediate network. A shared media drive is a special network drive designed to stream audio and video media from one network computer to another. If you’re working on a domain network, you can use Active Search Directory to help you find network resources, such as computers and printers. You’re not sure what is available on the Quest Specialty Travel network, so you decide to open and view the company network to become more familiar with it.

STEPS 1. Click the Start button Navigation pane

on the taskbar, click Computer, then click Network in the

The Network window opens, as shown in Figure L-7, displaying the network computers available on your immediate network. In the example shown in Figure L-7, a shared media drive also appears in the network view.

2. Double-click a network computer icon under Computer in the Network window The Network window displays the contents of the network computer drive or folder, as shown in Figure L-8. In the example shown in Figure L-8, the computer contains a shared printer and folders.

3. Double-click a shared folder icon in the Network window, if available The window displays the contents of the shared folder, as shown in Figure L-9. In the example shown in Figure L-9, the folder contains photographs.

4. Click the Close button

in the Network window

The Network window closes.

Creating a network connection Network Connections provides connectivity between your computer and a network, another computer, or the Internet. Using the New Connections Wizard, you can set up a home or small office network, connect to the Internet, connect to a remote network using a wireless, dial-up, or virtual private network (VPN) connection, or connect directly to another computer using a cable. You can also accept incoming connection access to your computer, which means your computer running Windows 7 can operate as a remote access server or as a dial-up network server. To establish any one of these connection types, click the

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Managing Shared Files Using a Network

Network icon in the notification area on the taskbar, click the Open Network and Sharing Center link, click Set up a new connection or network, click the connection type you want (Connect to the Internet, Set up a new network, Manually connect to a wireless network, Set up a wireless ad hoc (computer-to-computer) network, Set up a dial-up connection, or Connect to a workplace), then follow the wizard instructions. To connect to the network, click the Network icon in the notification area on the taskbar, click an established connection, then click Connect.

Network computer icon

Windows 7

FIGURE L-7: Network computers

Network computers; your contents will differ

Shared media icon

FIGURE L-8: Contents of a network computer

Shared printer and folders; your contents will differ

FIGURE L-9: Contents of a folder on a network computer

Your contents will differ

Managing Shared Files Using a Network

Windows 273

UNIT

L Windows 7

Creating a Shared Folder To create a shared folder on a network, you use many of the same file management tasks that apply to Windows Explorer. You can create a new folder to share or use an existing one anywhere on your computer. For example, you can create a shared folder in a subfolder within your Documents folder. After you select the folder you want to share, you use the Share command to share the folder and its contents on a network and to specify whether you want to give network users permission to change the contents of the shared folder. When you create a shared folder, you have the option to use the current name of the folder or a different name known as the share name. A share name is the assigned name network users see in the Network window. If you use a different share name, the original folder’s name remains the same. Unless you have a very good reason for using different names, it’s best to keep the shared name and the folder name the same for consistency. After viewing the contents of the Quest Specialty Travel network, you decide to create a shared folder on your computer called Travel Ideas and allow employees from anywhere on the network to add information to the files in this folder.

If you are not working in a network environment, you might not be able to complete these steps. In this case, simply read the steps without completing them.

STEPS 1. Click the Start button

on the taskbar, then click Documents

The Documents window opens, displaying the contents of the Documents folder on your hard drive.

2. Right-click a blank part of the Documents window (not on a file or folder), point to New, then click Folder A new folder, named New folder, appears in the Documents window. QUICK TIP You can also share files using the Public folders accessible in any Windows Explorer window. In the Favorites pane, click Public to display all the Public folders, then drag the files you want into the Public folder for others to access and use.

3. Type Travel Ideas, then press [Enter] The folder is renamed Travel Ideas.

4. Click the Share with button on the toolbar, then click Specific people The File Sharing dialog box opens. You can use the File Sharing dialog box to adjust the settings to allow other users access to the files in your shared folder. By default, Windows assigns the computer owner’s name to the name of the folder, and sets the permission level to Owner. Owner allows you as the creator of the folder to have complete access to change file contents, and copy, delete, and modify any file in the folder. The other permissions include Read (read only) and Read/Write (make changes).

5. Click the list arrow to the right of the top (empty) list box, then click Everyone The list arrow choices enable you to select a specific user or everyone, or to create a new user who can then access your shared folder. Selecting the Everyone user option allows any networked computer user to access the shared folder based on the selected permission level.

6. Click Add Everyone appears in the accessible list for the shared folder. By default, Windows automatically sets the file permission to Read, the lowest permission level. QUICK TIP To remove file sharing, select the shared folder, click the Share with button on the toolbar, then click Nobody.

Windows 274

7. Click the Permission Level list arrow for the Everyone user, then click Read/Write The permissions are set for the Travel Ideas folder, as shown in Figure L-10.

8. Click Share, click Yes if prompted with a security alert, then click Done The Documents window reappears. Anyone on the network can now access the Travel Ideas folder, shown in Figure L-11, from anywhere on the network.

Managing Shared Files Using a Network

Windows 7

FIGURE L-10: File Sharing dialog box with permissions

Add button

User names in the accessible list; your name might differ

Permission Level for each user

Share button

FIGURE L-11: Shared folder within the Documents folder

Shared folder

Shared folder details

File permission properties Every file in the Windows file system includes permissions for each user, or settings that designate what each user can and cannot do to each file. Three basic types of file permissions are available for users: Read, Read/Write, or Owner. The Read permission allows the user to open and view the file but not to make changes that can be saved in the file. When you open a read-only file, the words “Read Only” appear in the title bar. You can, however, save the file with a new name in a different

location to have full access to it. The Read/Write permission allows the user to edit and save changes to the file (or “write”) and execute programs on server or client computers. The Owner permission allows the user to modify file contents and delete, copy, and edit the file. Qualified users or system administrators use file permissions and passwords to control who can access any specific area of the network. In this way, the network remains secure against unauthorized use.

Managing Shared Files Using a Network

Windows 275

UNIT

L Windows 7

Mapping a Network Drive Windows networking enables you to connect your computer to other computers on the network quite easily. If you connect to a network location frequently, you might want to designate a drive letter on your computer as a direct connection to a shared drive or folder on another computer. Instead of spending unnecessary time opening the Network window and the shared drive or folder each time you want to access it, you can create a direct connection to the network location for quick-and-easy access. This process is referred to as mapping a network. The QST network administrator has created a shared folder called Quest Specialty Travel on the computer named Admin. You want to use the Network window to map a drive letter from your computer to this folder. That way, you can easily move files to this central location for others to share.

STEPS TROUBLE Before beginning, ask your instructor which networked computer you can map onto your computer. If you do not have a networked computer available, read the steps without completing them.

QUICK TIP To map a drive for a specific drive or folder, right-click the drive or folder, click Map Network Drive, then click OK.

1. In the Windows Explorer window, click Network in the Navigation pane The Network window opens, displaying the network computers available on your immediate network.

2. Press [Alt] to display the menu bar, click Tools on the menu bar, then click Map network drive The Map Network Drive dialog box opens, as shown in Figure L-12. By default, the Map Network Drive dialog box assigns network drive letters from Z to A. Local drives, such as your hard drive or removable drives, are assigned letters from A to Z. If you want to use a different drive letter, click the Drive list arrow, then click the drive letter you want to use. If you need to reassign a drive letter after it has been assigned, disconnect from the drive, then remap the drive.

3. Click Browse The Browse For Folder dialog box opens, displaying available network drives.

4. Use the Expand indicators to navigate to the networked computer icon supplied by your instructor or technical support person The window for the networked computer displays the folders available for file sharing. In this case, the networked computer called Admin expands to show the Quest Specialty Travel folder.

5. Click the shared Quest Specialty Travel folder (or the folder specified by your instructor or technical support person) to select it, as shown in Figure L-13, then click OK The Map Network Drive dialog box reappears, displaying the network path to the server. TROUBLE If your mapped drives do not automatically reconnect when you log on, make sure your username and password are the same for all the networks to which you connect.

6. Click the Reconnect at logon check box to select it, if necessary, then click Finish The Reconnect at logon option allows you to automatically reconnect to the drive every time you log on. The Map Network Drive dialog box closes, and Windows networking maps a drive connecting your computer to the shared Quest Specialty Travel folder (or to the shared folder specified by your instructor or technical support person). When the connection is complete, a window opens for the newly mapped drive, within which you can view the files within the mapped drive, as shown in Figure L-14. You can also easily copy folders and files from any disk into the shared folder.

7. Click the Close button in the Network window

in the mapped drive window, then click the Close button

The mapped drive and Network windows close.

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Managing Shared Files Using a Network

Windows 7

FIGURE L-12: Map Network Drive dialog box

Drive letter Browse button Sample network path Reconnect at logon check box

FIGURE L-13: Browse For Folder dialog box

Quest Specialty Travel folder located on Admin

FIGURE L-14: Quest Specialty Travel folder window on Admin

Network path to the Quest Specialty Travel folder Your content might differ

Creating a shortcut to a network location Instead of clicking numerous icons in the Network folder to access a network location, you can create a shortcut to the network location for quick access. A shortcut is a link that you can place in any location to gain instant access to a particular file, folder, or program on your hard drive or on a network. The actual file, folder, or program remains stored in its original location. You place an icon representing the shortcut in a

convenient location, such as in a folder or on the desktop. To create a shortcut to a network location, click the Start button, click Computer, click Network, right-click a network computer icon or a folder on a network computer, click Create Shortcut, then drag the shortcut icon to the location you desire.

Managing Shared Files Using a Network

Windows 277

UNIT

L Windows 7

Working with Shared Files Once you create shared folders and map your network drives, copying and moving shared files and folders in Windows is as easy as managing files on your own computer. The only difference is that data transfer can take longer over a network than it does on your local computer. You can copy and move files using Windows Explorer. You can also work with network files in any program from your computer. For example, you can use WordPad to edit text files or Paint to create a graphic. You have some files on a removable drive that you want to copy to the shared Travel Ideas folder on your hard drive to make them accessible to the other users on the network. You also want to move a To Do List file from the shared Travel Ideas folder to the Quest Specialty Travel folder on the network drive (Z:) so others can make changes to it.

STEPS 1. Click the Start button on the taskbar, click Computer, navigate to the location where you store your Data Files, double-click the UnitL folder, then double-click the Quest Travel folder Windows Explorer opens, displaying the contents of the Quest Travel folder in your Data Files folder.

2. Click the Organize button on the toolbar, click Folder and search options, click the Automatically expand to current folder check box to select it if necessary, then click OK This option automatically expands the folders list in the Navigation pane to the current folder. TROUBLE If you click the shared Travel Ideas folder by mistake, click the Travel Ideas folder from your Data Files location, then continue to Step 4.

3. Point to the Documents folder in the Folders list if necessary, click the Expand indicator next to it, then click next to the My Documents folder The shared Travel Ideas folder displays in the Navigation pane.

4. Click the Organize button on the toolbar, click Select all, right-drag the files from the right pane to the shared Travel Ideas folder in the Folders list, then click Copy here All of the files in the Quest Travel folder stored with your Data Files copy to the shared Travel Ideas folder on your hard drive. Anyone who has access to your computer can now share the files.

5. In the Folders list, click the shared Travel Ideas folder, point to the Computer, then click the Expand indicator next to it Windows Explorer displays the contents of the Travel Ideas folder along with the icon representing the mapped network drive in the Navigation pane, as shown in Figure L-15.

6. Right-click the To Do List file, drag the file to the mapped networked drive in the Folders list, click Move here, then click the mapped network drive in the Folders list The To Do List file in the mapped networked drive displays in the Windows Explorer window.

7. Click the Start button , point to All Programs, click Accessories, click WordPad, click the WordPad button, click Open, click the mapped network drive, click the To Do List file, as shown in Figure L-16, then click Open The To Do List file opens from the mapped network folder in WordPad.

8. Click the bottom of the list, type Hire a VP of Travel, click the Save button in the WordPad window toolbar, then click the Close button

on the

WordPad saves the changes to the To Do List file and closes. The contents of the mapped network drive open in the Windows Explorer window

9. Click the Organize button on the toolbar, click Folder and search options, click the Automatically expand to current folder check box to deselect it, then click OK The Navigation pane restores to the default setting for the Automatically expand to current folder option.

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Managing Shared Files Using a Network

Windows 7

FIGURE L-15: Shared Travel Ideas folder

Contents of shared Travel Ideas folder

Shared Travel Ideas folder

Quest Travel folder where you store your data files; your location might differ

Mapped drive; your list might differ

FIGURE L-16: Open dialog box with files on mapped drive

Quest Specialty Travel mapped drive Files on mapped drive; your list might differ

Mapped drive; your list might differ

Connecting to a network over the Internet You can create a VPN (virtual private network) connection to connect to a network over the Internet. A VPN provides a secure connection between your computer and the network. The computer to which you want to connect must support a VPN and Internet connection. Before you create a connection, you need to have the name or IP (Internet Protocol) address of the VPN computer. You use a connection wizard to set up a VPN connection. You only need to set up a VPN connection to a network once. Click the Network icon in the notification area on the

taskbar, click the Open Network and Sharing Center link, click Set up a new connection or network, click Connect to a workplace, click Next, then click Use my Internet connection (VPN). Type the host name or IP address; click Next; type the username, password, and domain name; then click Connect. When you are connected, Windows displays a connection icon in the notification area on the taskbar. You can point to the icon to display information about the connection or right-click the icon to perform tasks.

Managing Shared Files Using a Network

Windows 279

UNIT

L Windows 7

Disconnecting a Network Drive Usually, you map a network drive to reconnect automatically every time you log on. However, sometimes you might find it necessary to disconnect a mapped drive manually. Your system administrator might add a new hard drive to the server, or she might reorganize the directory structure of the network, making the current network path obsolete. If this occurs, the process of disconnecting a mapped drive is easy to do using the Disconnect network drive command. The system administrator informs you that network maintenance will take place over the weekend. To prepare for this process, you want to manually disconnect all mapped drives.

STEPS 1. In the Windows Explorer window with the mapped network drive, select all the files, right-click the selection, click Delete, then click Yes to confirm the deletion The files on the mapped network drive are deleted.

2. In the Navigation pane, click Documents, right-click the shared Travel Ideas folder, then click Delete The Confirm Folder Delete dialog box opens.

3. Click Yes to confirm the folder deletion, then click Continue in the Sharing message box, if necessary The shared Travel Ideas folder is deleted.

4. In the Navigation pane, click Computer Windows Explorer displays the available drives on your computer, including the mapped network drive to Quest Specialty Travel. QUICK TIP To disconnect a network drive in Windows Explorer, right-click the mapped network drive in the left pane, then click Disconnect.

5. Press [Alt] to display the menu bar, then click Tools on the menu bar The Tools menu appears, as shown in Figure L-17.

6. Click Disconnect network drive on the menu The Disconnect Network Drives dialog box reappears, as shown in Figure L-18. The dialog box lists all the network drives that you have mapped from your computer.

7. Check with your system administrator or instructor for permission to disconnect a drive. If you have approval, click the mapped drive with the Quest Specialty Travel folder, click OK, then click Yes in the warning message, if necessary. If you don’t have approval, click Cancel Windows disconnects the drive you selected and closes the Disconnect Network Drives dialog box.

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Windows 7

FIGURE L-17: Tools menu with the Disconnect network drive command

Tools menu Disconnect network drive command

FIGURE L-18: Disconnect Network Drives dialog box

Drive available to disconnect; your list might differ

Network paths The path to a shared network directory is like the path to a file on a hard drive or removable disk. For example, the path to the Suppliers file on your Data Files drive is R:\Quest Specialty Travel\Travel Ideas\Suppliers.

Network paths replace the drive designation with the host computer name, as in \\Server\Quest Specialty Travel. In either case, the path tells the computer where to search for the files you need.

Managing Shared Files Using a Network

Windows 281

UNIT

L Windows 7

Using a Homegroup A homegroup is a shared home network with two or more computers running Windows 7. You can create or join a homegroup to share printers and libraries, which includes documents, pictures, music, and videos. You can play music streamed from another person’s computer on a homegroup using Windows Media Player or other networked digital media player (also called a digital media receiver), such as Xbox 360; you can access the media from a shared media folder that appears in the Network folder. Before you can view and use files from other people on your network, you need to join the homegroup on a home network, not a private or public one. You can join a homegroup in any edition, but you can only create one in Windows 7 Home Premium, Professional, or Ultimate Editions connected to a workgroup using the Home network type. To join the homegroup, you need the password generated during the setup process. After you join, you can use the Share with button on the toolbar in Windows Explorer to share your files with others on the homegroup or other network. It’s important to note that any computers turned off or sleeping do not appear in the homegroup. You have some documents, pictures, videos, and music that you want to share exclusively within a home network in your department. You want to create a homegroup (or use an existing one), so that your colleagues can use these resources as well.

STEPS QUICK TIP To display the password on the homegroup creator’s computer, click the Start button, click Control Panel, click the Choose homegroup and sharing options link under Network and Internet, then click the View or print the homegroup password link.

QUICK TIP If a homegroup error occurs when trying to join the homegroup, click the Start the HomeGroup troubleshooter link in the HomeGroup window.

1. In the Navigation pane, click Homegroup The Homegroup window opens, displaying an introduction screen and an option to create or join a homegroup, as shown in Figure L-19.

2. If necessary, click Create a homegroup, select the Pictures, Music, Videos, and Documents check boxes, click Next, write down the join password exactly as shown, then click Finish The Create a Homegroup wizard opens, asking you to select the library folders you want to share, write down the join a homegroup password for others to use, and create a homegroup.

3. If you didn’t create a homegroup, click Join now, type the password from the person who created the homegroup exactly as given, click Next, then click Finish The Join a Homegroup Wizard opens, asking you for a homegroup password provided by the homegroup creator.

4. In the Navigation pane, click Homegroup, if necessary A list of available libraries shared by other members of your homegroup appears in the Windows Explorer window, as shown in Figure L-20.

5. Double-click the available library The library folders shared by other members of your homegroup appear in the Windows Explorer window.

6. Click the Start button on the taskbar, click Control Panel, then click the Choose homegroup and sharing options link under Network and Internet The HomeGroup window opens, displaying homegroup settings.

7. Click the Leave the homegroup link under Other homegroup actions The Leave the Homegroup dialog box opens.

8. Click the Leave the homegroup link, then click Finish in the Leave the Homegroup Wizard The HomeGroup window reappears.

9. Click the Close button

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in the HomeGroup window

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Windows 7

FIGURE L-19: Join a homegroup

Join now button

Homegroup in Navigation pane

FIGURE L-20: Shared libraries on a homegroup

Networked computer on a homegroup Shared libraries from a networked computer on a homegroup

Setting homegroup sharing options If you have two or more computers running Windows 7 on the Home network type, you can set up and join in a homegroup to share files, printers, and media. You can even play music streamed from another person’s computer on a homegroup using Windows Media Player. Before you can use a homegroup, you need to create one first (only workgroups). During the setup process, Windows 7 creates a password, which you can change later, for everyone to use on individual computers to join the homegroup. If you no longer want to be a part of the homegroup, you have the option to leave it. To set homegroup options, click the Network icon in the notification area on the taskbar, click the Open Network and Sharing Center link, then click Choose

homegroup and sharing options. If prompted, click Create a homegroup, select the items you want to share, click Next, write down the join password, then click Finish. You select the check boxes for the libraries and printers that you want to share. To share media, select the Stream my pictures, music, and videos to all devices on my home network check box; click Choose media streaming options; click Allow All, Block All, or select individual settings; then click OK. Perform any homegroup actions: View or print the homegroup password, change the password, leave the homegroup, or start the HomeGroup troubleshooter. When finished, click Save changes, then click the Close button.

Managing Shared Files Using a Network

Windows 283

Practice Concepts Review

For current SAM information including versions and content details, visit SAM Central (http://samcentral.course.com). If you have a SAM user profile, you may have access to hands-on instruction, practice, and assessment of the skills covered in this unit. Since we support various versions of SAM throughout the life of this text, you will want to check with your instructor for instructions and the correct URL/Web site to access those assignments.

Match the statements below with the elements labeled in the screen shown in Figure L-21. FIGURE L-21

f

a e

d

b c

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Which element points to a shared homegroup? Which element points to a shared library? Which element points to a shared file? Which element points to a folder on a network server? Which element points to a network server? Which element points to a mapped drive?

Match each term with the statement that best describes it. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Shared folder File permissions Client Network path Server Network discovery

Windows 284

a. b. c. d. e. f.

Determines who has access resources on a network A computer on a network that uses shared resources A location where multiple users can access the same files The address for an individual computer on a network Determines who can read, write, or execute files A computer on a network designated to share resources

Managing Shared Files Using a Network

Select the best answer from the list of choices. 13. A network in which the computers are connected close together is called a(n) _________________. a. LAN c. VPN b. WAN d. HPN 14. A virtual private network is an example of a(n) _________________. a. LAN c. HPN b. WAN d. USB 15. What hardware device connects multiple LANs together? a. Network interface card c. Hub b. Router d. Client 16. In a client/server network, what are computers organized into? a. Workgroups c. Clients b. Domains d. Servers 17. What network component allows you to share your computer resources? a. Client c. Protocol b. Service d. NIC 18. What happens when you map a network drive? a. Windows networking displays a graphic showing the entire structure of the network. b. You can use the shared files and folders of another computer on the network. c. The computer you are using is attached to the network. d. Windows networking adds your computer to the network path. 19. Which of the following is NOT available in a homegroup? a. Share networks c. Share libraries b. Share printers d. Stream music

Windows 7

Concepts Review (Continued)

Skills Review 1. Explore the Network and Sharing Center. a. Open the Control Panel, then view network status and tasks. b. Verify that the network discovery option is turned on. c. Verify that the file sharing option is turned on. d. Verify that the sharing so anyone with network access can open, change, and create files option is turned on. e. Verify that the Private option is set for the network location. f. View a full map of your network. g. Close the Network Map window. 2. Examine network computer properties. a. Use Change settings under Network discovery. b. Display the network computer name and domain. c. Click OK. d. Click View the Network Connection Status. e. Close the Network and Sharing Center window. 3. Open and view a network. a. Open the Network window. b. Double-click the network computer supplied by your instructor or technical support person. c. Double-click the shared folder supplied by your instructor or technical support person. d. Close the Network window and the Network and Sharing Center window.

Managing Shared Files Using a Network Copyright 2010 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part.

Windows 285

Skills Review (Continued) 4. Create a shared folder. a. Display the Documents folder, right-click in the Documents window, point to New, then click Folder. b. Name the new folder Company. c. Right-click the Company folder, click Share with, then click Specific people. d. Add Everyone to the permissions, then set the level to Read/Write. e. Click Share, then click Done. 5. Map a network drive. a. Display the Network window. b. Navigate to the network computer to which you want to map. c. Click the shared folder to which you want to map. d. Click Tools on the menu bar, then click Map Network Drive. e. Click the Reconnect at logon check box to select it, click OK, then click the Close button. 6. Work with shared files. a. Make sure a copy of the location where your Data Files are located is available. b. Display the Computer window, navigate to the drive where you store your Data Files, then double-click the folder. c. Click the Quest Travel folder, then display the Folder list. d. Click the Business folder in the Explorer Bar. e. Click the Expand icon next to the Documents folder. f. Select all the files, then drag them to the shared Company folder you created in the Documents folder. g. Click the shared Company folder in the Folders list. h. Move the QST Focus file to the mapped networked folder in the Folders list. i. Click the mapped networked folder in the Folders list to view the file, then close both windows. j. Open the QST Focus file from the shared Company folder on your hard drive in WordPad. k. Delete the last paragraph in the document. l. Save the file, type your name, print it, then close the file and WordPad. 7. Disconnect a network drive. a. Open the Computer window, double-click the mapped drive, then delete the QST Focus file. b. Display the Documents folder, delete the shared Company folder, then close the Documents folder. c. Select the Disconnect Network Drive command on the Tools menu. d. Select the drive you mapped in Steps 5a–e, click OK, then click Yes, if necessary. 8. Use a homegroup. a. Display the HomeGroup window. b. If necessary, create a homegroup. c. If you didn’t create a homegroup, join a homegroup. d. Open the homegroup, then display the shared libraries. e. Leave the homegroup, then close the HomeGroup window.

If you are not connected to a network, ask your instructor or technical support person for help in completing the following Independent Challenges. If you are working in a lab environment, you might not be able to create a shared folder. If so, do not create a shared folder; use the folder supplied by your instructor instead.

Independent Challenge 1 As the new clerk at a craft store called Holly’s, you are asked to create a list of suppliers’ names. Your task is to enter the supplier information in a new file and place that file in two places for others to use. You must create a shared folder on your computer to store the file, then map a drive to a network folder that will also contain the file. a. Open the Documents folder and display the Folders list. b. Create a shared folder called Suppliers with read-only permissions. Windows 286

Managing Shared Files Using a Network

c. d. e. f.

Open the WordPad document named Suppliers List from the location where you store your Data Files. Map a drive to a shared folder on another computer to which you have permission. Create a World Wide Suppliers folder on that drive. Copy the Suppliers List file from the Suppliers folder on the local computer to the World Wide Suppliers folder on the mapped drive. g. Delete the Suppliers folder on your hard drive and the World Wide Suppliers folder on the mapped drive. h. Disconnect the network drive you mapped, then delete the shared folder you created.

Windows 7

Independent Challenge 1 (Continued)

Independent Challenge 2 As president of Legal Helps, Inc., an online legal documents company, you decide to increase the pay rates of two of your employees, Jessica Thielen and Debbie Cabral. You use WordPad to write a memo that you can edit and use for both employees. After completing the memos, you print the document. You also want to copy the documents to the company server so they can be stored in the employees’ folders. a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h.

Create a Memos folder in the location where you store your Data Files. Open a WordPad document named Thielen Raise from where you store your Data Files. Change Dear Jessica to Dear Debbie in the Thielen Raise memo. Save the file as Cabral Raise in the Memos folder, print the document, close the file, then close WordPad. Map a drive to a shared folder on another computer to which you have permission. Create a folder called Thielen on the mapped drive, then copy the Thielen Raise file into the Thielen folder. Create a shared folder called Cabral on the mapped drive, then copy the Cabral Raise file into the Cabral folder. Open WordPad, open the Cabral Raise file into the Cabral folder on the mapped drive, change 10% to 12%, save the file, then close WordPad.

Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Turn on and set media sharing. ■ Open the Network window, then open the shared media drive. ■ Turn off media sharing. i. Delete the Thielen and Cabral shared folders on the mapped drive, then disconnect the network drive you mapped.

Independent Challenge 3 You are the system administrator for your company’s computer network. During peak usage of the network, you want to monitor who is on the network. You use the System Properties dialog box in the Network window to learn who is connected to the network. a. Open the Network window. Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Use the New Connections Wizard to create a connection to an available network. ■ Establish a connection to the network. ■ Display the Network Connections window, then close it. b. Display the network identification for two connected computers to learn their names and domain. c. Print the screen for the network identification for the connected computers. d. Map two drives to a shared folder on another computer to which you have permission. e. Display the network identification for the mapped drives. Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Create a shortcut to a network location. ■ Use the shortcut to open the network location. ■ Delete the network location shortcut. f. Disconnect the network drives you mapped.

Managing Shared Files Using a Network

Windows 287

Real Life Independent Challenge You want to share some of your music with your family on your home network. You create a homegroup on your home network, so everyone in your family can get access to your music. You give each family member the password to the homegroup, so they can join the homegroup and play music directly from your computer. a. If necessary, create a homegroup on a home networked computer, share the Music library, then write down the password. b. On another home networked computer, join the homegroup using the password provided by the person who created the homegroup. c. Open the homegroup, then open the shared Music library. d. Navigate to a music folder, then open a music track to play it. e. Leave the homegroup.

Visual Workshop Re-create the screen shown in Figure L-22, which displays the files on a local hard drive, files on a network drive, and files on a homegroup. FIGURE L-22

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Managing Shared Files Using a Network

UNIT

M Windows 7

Going Mobile If you are not using a laptop, you cannot work through the steps in this unit; however, you can read the lessons without completing the steps to learn what is possible in a mobile environment.

Files You Will Need Quest Travel To Do List.rtf Business QST Focus.rtf Air West

If you use a laptop computer, the Windows Mobility Center makes it easy to change or access mobile PC-related options all in one place. In the Windows Mobility Center, you can adjust volume level and power options, check your network connectivity, connect to an external display, enable presentation settings, and access the Sync Center, which helps you keep files up to date when you’re working on separate computers, such as a desktop computer and a laptop. If you have a Tablet PC or ink device, you can use the Personalize Handwriting Recognition utility to customize and personalize the way you work. Windows 7 also comes standard with Tablet PC Input Panel and Windows Journal that you can effectively use on a Tablet PC with a pen.

Jessica Long, president of Quest Specialty

Travel, relies on her laptop computer to stay connected to the day-to-day operations at the office during her extensive business travels. She wants to take advantage of the latest mobile features in Windows 7 and asks you to examine her settings.

OBJECTIVES

Explore the Windows Mobility Center Manage power options Connect to a wireless network Set up a remote computer Mark offline files for synchronization Synchronize offline files Set pen and touch options Use the Tablet PC Input Panel Handwrite with Windows Journal

UNIT

M Windows 7

Exploring the Windows Mobility Center With the Windows Mobility Center, you can change or access mobile PC-related options all in one place. The Windows Mobility Center comes with a variety of different options depending on your computer manufacturer and Windows installation. The standard option allows you to adjust volume level and power options, check your network connectivity, detect and connect to an external display, enable presentation settings, and access the Sync Center. The Sync Center helps you keep files up to date when you’re working on different computers, such as a desktop computer and a laptop. You can make an option change in the Windows Mobility Center, or click an icon to open the utility in the Control Panel, where you can make additional changes. You decide to start checking Jessica’s settings by opening the Windows Mobility Center to see what it has to offer the remote user.

STEPS 1. Click the Start button

on the taskbar, then click Control Panel

The Control Panel window opens, displaying Windows-related utility accessories.

2. Click the Hardware and Sound link The Hardware and Sound window opens, as shown in Figure M-1, displaying links to hardware-specific areas and options, which includes your mobile device. QUICK TIP To open the Windows Mobility Center quickly, [X]. press

3. Click the Windows Mobility Center link The Windows Mobility Center window opens, as shown in Figure M-2, displaying the mobile PC options available for your mobile device. You can use the Windows Mobility Center to turn features, such as your wireless connection or presentation settings, on or off. When you click the icon related to a Mobility Center option, Windows opens a corresponding settings dialog box, where you can change feature options.

4. Click the Change audio settings icon

in the Volume box

The Sound dialog box opens, displaying options related to the sound hardware you have installed on your computer. The default device is indicated by next to a hardware icon.

5. Click OK The Sound dialog box closes and the Windows Mobility Center window reappears. QUICK TIP To change connection options to a projector or external monitor, press [P], or click the Start button, point to All Programs, click Accessories, then click Connect to a Projector.

6. Click the Change display settings icon in the External Display box The Screen Resolution dialog box opens, displaying options related to the monitor configuration and settings you have installed on your computer. You can also connect to and set options for an external projector or monitor within this dialog box. This is useful when you want to add a secondary monitor to your laptop to give a full-screen presentation or demo.

7. Click OK The Screen Resolution dialog box closes and the Windows Mobility Center window reappears.

8. Click the Change presentation settings icon

in the Presentation Settings box

The Presentation Settings dialog box opens, displaying options to turn presentation settings on or off, turn your screen saver on or off, set the computer volume, and select a background.

9. Click OK The Presentation Settings dialog box closes and the Windows Mobility Center window reappears.

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Going Mobile

Windows 7

FIGURE M-1: Hardware and Sound window

Windows Mobility Center link

Links to other mobility options

FIGURE M-2: Windows Mobility Center window

Change audio settings icon

Change presentation settings icon

Change display settings icon

Your mobility options might differ

Connecting to a network projector A network projector is a video projector that is connected to a wireless or local area network. If you have, and can connect to, a network projector at a remote location, you can give a presentation as if you were physically in the same room as the audience. The audience for the presentation needs to be in the same room as the network projector and the presentation can’t be viewed over a network. To connect to a network projector, you can search for one on your network or obtain a network or Web address from your network administrator or the person in charge of the network projector. To connect to a network projector,

click the Start button, point to All Programs, click Accessories, then click Connect to a Network Projector. If you don’t know the projector location, click Search for a projector (recommended), select a projector from the list, then click Next to continue. If you know the projector address, click Enter the projector address, then type a network address. The address can be a Web address (http://server.com/...) or a network path (\\server\...). If the projector icon you select contains a lock, it’s security enabled and requires a password from your network administrator. Simply type a projector password, then click Connect.

Going Mobile

Windows 291

UNIT

M Windows 7

Managing Power Options You can change power options properties for a laptop computer to reduce power consumption and maximize battery life. For example, if you often leave your computer for a short time while working, you can set your computer to go into standby, a state in which your monitor and hard drive turn off after being idle for a specific amount of time. If you are often away from your computer for an extended time, you can set it to go into hibernation, a state in which your computer first saves everything in memory on your hard drive and then shuts down. To help you set power options, you can choose one of the power plans included with Windows or modify one to suit your needs. A power plan is a predefined collection of power usage settings. The typical power plan settings allow you to dim or turn off the display, put the computer to sleep, and adjust the brightness. However, the power options you see vary depending on your computer’s hardware configuration. Windows detects the power options available on your computer and displays only the options you can access. Because plug-in power is not always available when you travel, you rely on your laptop battery to conserve as much power as possible to maximize your computer use. You decide to examine the power plan on Jessica’s laptop to see how she can efficiently utilize her laptop’s battery time.

STEPS 1. In the Windows Mobility Center window, click the Change power settings icon Battery Status box

in the

The Power Options window opens, as shown in Figure M-3, displaying two standard power plans, Balanced and Power saver, and one additional plan, High performance, under Show additional plans. You can select a standard power plan, or you can customize one.

2. Click the Power saver option button, if necessary, then click the Change plan settings link for the Power saver option The Edit Plan Settings window opens, as shown in Figure M-4, displaying dim, sleep, display, and brightness settings for this power plan.

3. Click the On battery or Plugged in list arrow (depending on how your computer is using power) next to Put the computer to sleep, click 1 minute, then click Save changes Your computer is set to go to sleep if it isn’t used for 1 minute.

4. Wait 1 minute until the computer goes into sleep mode, then move your mouse to exit sleep mode The Power Options window reappears.

5. Click the Change plan settings link for the Power saver option, click the Restore default settings for this plan link, then click Yes to confirm the change in the Power Options box The Edit Plan Settings window reopens and the default settings are restored.

6. Click Cancel The Edit Plan Settings box closes and the Power Options window reappears.

7. Click the Close button

in the Power Options window

The Power Options window closes and the Windows Mobility Center window reappears.

Windows 292

Going Mobile

Power saver option

Windows 7

FIGURE M-3: Power Options window

Power plans

Change plan settings link for the Power saver option

FIGURE M-4: Edit Plan Settings window

Settings for the Power saver power plan; your options might differ Change advanced power settings link

Restore default settings for this plan link

Changing advanced power options In addition to setting and modifying a power plan in Windows 7, you can also change advanced options to further customize the way you manage power options on your computer. For example, you can set options such as what you want your computer to do when you click the power or sleep button, close the laptop lid, or set password protection. If you want to specify what the power button does when you press it, open the Control Panel, click the Hardware and Sound link, click the Power Options link, click the Choose what the power buttons does link in the task pane, specify the options you want when you press

the power or sleep button, or when you close the lid, select the Require a password (recommended) or Don’t require a password option, then click Save changes. If you need more customization, you can use the Advanced settings tab. In the Power Options window, click the Change plan settings link next to the power plan you have selected, then click the Change advanced power settings link. In the Power Options dialog box, click the plus sign (+) and minus sign (–) to display the option you want to change, click the option, click the option list arrow and select a setting, click OK, then click Save changes.

Going Mobile

Windows 293

UNIT

M Windows 7

Connecting to a Wireless Network Windows 7 provides updated wireless networking capabilities, enabling you to discover, set up, connect to, and manage connections to wireless networks (known as Wi-Fi, or wireless fidelity). You can quickly connect to an available unsecure or secure (protected with a network security password, known as a security key or passphrase) wireless network or manually connect to one not recognized. If you need to connect manually to a wireless network, you can use a connection wizard. As you walk through the manual connection process, you need to specify a network name, called the SSID (service set identifier), a security encryption type, and a passphrase to provide secure access. The SSID is broadcasted from your access point (AP)—typically a wireless router connected to a wired network—to your other wireless devices to connect to a wired network. Windows 7 also provides updated support for Bluetooth-enabled hardware devices, allowing you to take advantage of the latest wireless devices, including wireless keyboards and mice, wireless printers, and connections with cell phones and PDAs. Jessica needs to establish a connection to the Internet in public places such as airports and restaurants that provide wireless access points. To familiarize yourself with the process, you decide to connect to a wireless access point.

If you don’t have a PC with wireless network capability or an available wireless access point, read through this lesson, then proceed to the next lesson.

STEPS TROUBLE If your wireless network is not available, click the Refresh button . If it’s still not available, click the Open Network and Sharing Center link, click the Set up a new connection or network link, click Manually connect to a wireless network, then follow the onscreen instructions.

TROUBLE If a wireless network next to displays it, the network is nonsecure and a security key isn’t necessary. If a wireless network displays next to it, the network is secure and you need to supply a security key to access it. Contact your wireless network administrator.

Windows 294

1. In the Windows Mobility Center window, click the Change wireless network settings icon in the Wireless Network box or click the Network icon in the notification area The Connect to a Network window opens, displaying the available wireless networks in your area.

2. If you’re already connected to a wireless network, select the wireless network, then click Disconnect The Connect to a Network window, as shown in Figure M-5 (on the left), allows you to disconnect from the selected wireless network.

3. Select the wireless network to which you want to connect The Connect to a Network window, as shown in Figure M-5 (on the right), allows you to connect to the selected wireless network.

4. Click Connect The Connect to a Network dialog box opens. If the network is a secured network and the security key has not been saved on your computer, you need to type the security key as shown in Figure M-6. If the network is an unsecured network, or if the security key for a secured network is saved on your computer, you can skip Steps 5 and 6 as you automatically connect to the network.

5. Enter the security key supplied by your network administrator The security key is an encrypted password that allows you to access the wireless network.

6. Click OK The Connect to a Network dialog box closes and connects you to the wireless network.

7. Click the Minimize button Back button

in the Windows Mobility Center window, then click the

The Windows Mobility Center window minimizes to the taskbar and the Control Panel window opens.

Going Mobile

Refresh button Disconnect button

Your window might differ Connect button

Selected wireless network

Windows 7

FIGURE M-5: Connect to a Network window

Currently available wireless networks

Secure wireless network Unsecure wireless network

FIGURE M-6: Connect to a Network dialog box

Security key box

Setting up a wireless router or access point If you have a wireless router or access point, you can set up your own wireless network. A router directs communication traffic between two networks, such as a home or office network and the Internet. An access point provides wireless access to a wired Ethernet network. An access point plugs into a wired router and sends out a wireless signal, which other wireless computers and devices use to connect to a wired network. During the setup process, you need to specify a network name, then choose file and printer sharing options, a security type, and a security key to provide secure access. The security type is encryption, either WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy), which is older and

less secure (uses 64- or 128-bit nonchanging encryption), or WPA (Wi-Fi Protected Access), which is much more secure (uses 256-bit constantly changing encryption). To set up a wireless router or access point, click the Network icon on the taskbar in the notification area, click the Open Network and Sharing Center link, click Set up a new connection or network link, click Set up a new network, click Next, wait for devices to show, select the wireless router or access point, click Next, type the network name (SSID), click Next, type a security key or use the one generated, click Next, read the screen, enable the sharing options you want, then click Close.

Going Mobile

Windows 295

UNIT

M Windows 7

Setting Up a Remote Computer You can use Remote Desktop Connection (RDC) to connect to a remote computer on your network or the Internet and use the remote computer as if you were physically in front of it. Before you can connect to a remote computer, it needs to be turned on (available for a network connection). It also has to be set up to allow users to connect to it remotely. You can allow anyone to connect to the remote computer, or you can specify users with a password. After the remote computer is set up, you can use RDC to connect to it (see the yellow Clues to Use box for details). When the RDC dialog box opens, you need to have the name or IP (Internet Protocol) address of the remote computer and, if required, the username and password specified on the remote computer for security purposes. In the RDC dialog box, you can also customize settings for the remote connection, which include the display size and color depth, when to use local or remote resources, and what programs to use and options to allow. Once you connect to the remote computer, the remote desktop appears on your screen and is ready to use. If Jessica is on the road and encounters a computer problem that she can’t figure out, it’s important to have access to technical support. To prepare for this possibility, Jessica wants to set up your computer so a technical support person can gain remote access to your computer and fix any problems.

If you don’t have a username on your network to obtain remote access, read through this lesson, then proceed to the next lesson.

STEPS 1. In the Control Panel window, click the System and Security link The System and Security window opens. TROUBLE If this connection type doesn’t work, click the Allow connections from computers running any version of Remote Desktop (less secure) option to let others establish a remote connection.

2. Click the Allow remote access link under System, then click Yes, if necessary, to grant permission to access the dialog box The System Properties dialog box opens, as shown in Figure M-7, displaying the Remote tab.

3. Click the Allow connections only from computers running Remote Desktop with Network Level Authentication (more secure) option button, then click OK if necessary in the Remote Desktop dialog box regarding sleep mode This option allows others to connect to this computer using a more secure connection.

4. Click Select Users The Remote Desktop Users dialog box opens, displaying the current users who have access to your computer.

5. Click Add The Select Users dialog box opens, which allows you to indicate who can remotely access your computer. TROUBLE If the Name Not Found dialog box opens, the username you typed is not acceptable. Click Cancel three times, then skip to Step 8.

6. Enter a username in the Enter the object names to select box as indicated by your network administrator, click Check Names, then click OK The Remote Desktop Users dialog box opens, as shown in Figure M-8.

7. Click the username, click Remove, then click OK to close the Remote Desktop Users dialog box The Remote Desktop Users dialog box closes and the System Properties dialog box reappears.

8. Click the option that was previously selected before following the steps to set up a remote computer or click the Don’t allow connections to this computer option button, then click OK The System Properties dialog box closes and the System and Security window reappears.

9. Click the Close button

in the Control Panel window

The Control Panel window closes. Windows 296

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FIGURE M-7: System Properties dialog box with the Remote tab displayed

Remote Desktop connection options Select Users button

FIGURE M-8: Remote Desktop Users dialog box

User name added for remote connection

Add and Remove buttons

Connecting to and controlling a remote computer After you set up your computer for a remote connection, others can establish a remote connection to your computer and control it as if they were sitting in front of it. To establish a remote connection, click the Start button, point to All Programs, click Accessories, click Remote Desktop Connection, type the name or IP address of the remote computer, click Options as shown in Figure M-9, then enter the remote computer name and username if available. Click any of the other tabs in the dialog box to customize the way the remote computer will appear and respond to your control. When you’re done, click Connect. If prompted, enter the needed connection credentials. To resize the remote desktop to display the local desktop, click the Minimize or Restore Down button in the remote desktop window. When you’re done, click the Close button, then click Yes to disconnect.

FIGURE M-9: Remote Desktop Connection dialog box

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UNIT

M Windows 7

Marking Offline Files for Synchronization When a network connection is not available, the files on a network server are not available either, unless you mark them as offline files. An offline file is a copy of a network file that is stored on your computer for use when the network connection is not available. This allows you to make changes to the offline file on your local computer and then synchronize your changes to the network server when a connection is available. Before you can make a network file available offline, you need to enable offline files in the Offline Files utility. It’s also a good idea to check your disk usage to make sure you have enough space on your hard disk to store copies of the offline files. Optimally, you should have less than 90% of the disk space in use for all offline files. When you make a network file available offline, Windows automatically creates a copy of the file on your computer’s hard drive. Once this copy is stored on your computer, you can use the Sync Center to work with offline files to keep them synchronized on your computer and the network. When Jessica is on the road, she wants to work on files normally located on QST network servers, so you decide to mark the network files for offline use.

To complete this lesson, you need access to Data Files on a network drive specified by your instructor or technical support person.

STEPS TROUBLE If Enable Offline Files is available in the dialog box, click it, click Yes, click OK, restart your computer, then repeat Step 1.

TROUBLE If the percentage of disk usage for all offline files is greater than 90%, either click Change Limits to increase the usage percentage, or click Delete temporary files.

QUICK TIP If you’re not sure where your offline files are located, click the View your offline files button on the General tab in the Offline Files dialog box.

1. Click the Windows Mobility Center button on the taskbar, click the Change synchronization settings icon in the Sync Center box, then click the Manage offline files link in the Sync Center window The Offline Files dialog box opens, as shown in Figure M-10. The feature to use offline files is enabled by default in Windows 7 as evidenced by the Disable offline files button. However, if the feature is disabled, the button appears as Enable offline files instead of Disable offline files.

2. Click the Disk Usage tab, then review the percentage of use information The Disk Usage tab, as shown in Figure M-11, displays the disk space in use by current and temporary offline files, and allows you to change the disk space usage limits if you need more or less.

3. Click OK 4. Click the Start button on the taskbar, click Computer, click Network in the Navigation pane, then navigate to the drive and folder specified by your instructor or technical support person where you store your Data Files 5. Double-click the Quest Travel folder in the UnitM folder, right-click To Do List.rtf, then click Always available offline The To Do List.rtf file is marked for offline use, as shown in Figure M-12. The Sync Center icon in the notification area of the taskbar, which you can click to open the Sync Center window.

appears

6. Click the Work offline button on the toolbar to work offline on network files 7. Double-click the To Do List.rtf file, move the insertion point to the end of the document, press [Enter], type Finalize year-end reports, save your changes, then close the wordprocessing program The offline copy of the file is changed. In the Details pane, the offline status changes from “Offline” to “Offline (need to sync).” Now, you can synchronize the offline file with the file on your network.

8. Click the Work online button on the toolbar, then click the Minimize button Network window This option enables you to work online with your network files and sync to them. Windows 298

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in the

Windows 7

FIGURE M-10: Offline Files dialog box with the General tab displayed

Disable offline files button; offline files is currently enabled

View your offline files button

FIGURE M-11: Offline Files dialog box with the Disk Usage tab displayed

Disk space usage for all current and temporary offline files; your information might differ Delete temporary files button

Change limits button

FIGURE M-12: Making a file available for offline use

Network location; yours might differ File marked for offline usage Work offline button

Offline availability

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M Windows 7

Synchronizing Offline Files If you work with both regular and offline files, keeping track of the latest versions of all your files can be challenging. With the Sync Center, you can keep files (including documents, music, photos, and, in some cases, contacts) and other information up to date between your computer and mobile devices, network folders, and compatible programs. You can keep files in sync (short for synchronization) in one direction (changes in the file on one computer are made in the file on the other computer) or in both directions (changes in the files on both computers get changed on both computers). The Sync Center compares files between the two computers and then copies the latest version in the appropriate place. If the same file is accidently changed on both computers, the Sync Center prompts you to resolve the error. Jessica has been working on some offline files while on the road and needs your assistance. She asks you to connect to your network servers and synchronize the offline files.

STEPS 1. Click View sync partnerships in the task pane, if necessary, then click Offline Files in the Sync Center The Offline Files folder icon is selected, as shown in Figure M-13. TROUBLE If a problem occurs, the progress meter turns red and the status indicator displays an error link. Click the error link to determine the problem and a possible solution.

2. Click the Sync button on the toolbar The Sync button changes to the Stop button, the progress meter next to the folder name provides an indication of the length of the process, and the status indicator provides the results of the sync. Figure M-14 shows the completed sync results.

3. Click the Close button in the Sync Center window, then click the Windows Mobility Center window

in the

The Sync window and Windows Mobility Center window close.

4. Click the Network window taskbar button on the taskbar to display the network drive and folder specified by your instructor or technical support person where you store your Data Files The files in the Quest Travel folder within the UnitM folder open in the network window.

5. Right-click the To Do List.rtf file, then click Always available offline The offline file mark is removed from the file.

6. Double-click the To Do List.rtf file to open the file and view the offline changes, then close the word-processing program in the network window 7. Click the The network window closes.

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Sync Center window

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FIGURE M-13: Sync Center window with the Offline Files folder

Offline Files folder

FIGURE M-14: Sync Center window with the sync results

Sync button Sync progress meter; process complete

Sync status; offline files synchronized

Managing a wireless connection After you set up and connect to a wireless network, you can use the Manage Wireless Networks window to view established wireless connections, add or remove wireless networks, or change the connection order. In the Manage Wireless Networks window, each established wireless network appears, displaying security and connectivity information. You can use buttons on the toolbar to manage your wireless network connections. If you want to view or change connection and security properties for individual wireless connections, you can use the Wireless Network Properties dialog box. You can view the wireless network name, SSID, type, and availability, and enable automatic or preferred

connect options or change the security type and key. To manage a connection, click the Network icon on the taskbar in the notification area, click the Open Network and Sharing Center link, click Manage wireless networks in the left pane, then select a wireless network. To remove a wireless connection, select it, click Remove, then click OK. To change the connection order, click the Move up or Move down buttons. To add a wireless network, click Add, then follow the instructions. To change connection properties, right-click the connection icon, click Properties, use the Connection and Security tabs to set the options you want, then click OK.

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UNIT

M Windows 7

Setting Pen and Touch Options A Tablet PC or ink device allows you to use a stylus pen instead of a keyboard to input information into your computer. If you have a Tablet PC or ink device, you can use the Personalize Handwriting Recognition utility to set the pen and touch options and use writing samples and personal dictionaries to help Windows recognize your handwriting more accurately. You can adjust how quickly you tap the screen when you double-tap or the distance the pointer can move between tapping when you double-tap, and then test your settings to make sure they are what you want. If you want more visual feedback when you perform a specific pointer action, you can display the ones you want. A flick is a quick stroke of the pen to navigate and perform shortcuts using your tablet pen. You can select options to use flicks to perform common commands and adjust the sensitivity slider to set the right recognition level for your flicks. Jessica’s Tablet PC laptop provides the ability to use a pen as an input device, which makes it easier for her to take notes. You want to change the pen and input device options to customize the way the pen works.

If you don’t have a Tablet PC or ink device connected to your computer, you can still perform the following lesson using your mouse.

STEPS 1. Click the Start button on the taskbar, point to All Programs, click Accessories, click Tablet PC, then click Personalize Handwriting Recognition The Handwriting Personalization window opens, as shown in Figure M-15.

2. Click the Change automatic learning settings link under Related Tasks The Pen and Touch dialog box opens, displaying the Handwriting tab. The Handwriting tab displays options for the automatic collection of handwriting personalization learning data.

3. Click the Pen Options tab, then select the Double-tap item in the Pen actions area The Double-tap item appears selected and the Settings button appears enabled.

4. Click Settings The Double-Tap Settings dialog box opens, displaying sliders for options that allow you to adjust double-tap speed and spatial tolerance. Spatial tolerance is the distance the pointer can move between taps when you double-tap your handwriting device.

5. Double-tap or double-click the door in the lower-right corner of the dialog box to test your settings, then click OK The test door opens and closes as you tap or click it. The Pen and Touch dialog box reopens.

6. Click the Flicks tab The Flicks tab displays options to use flicks to perform common actions quickly and easily. You can specify whether you want to use navigational flicks or navigational and editing flicks, as well as set the sensitivity level to recognize flicks.

7. Click OK The Pen and Touch dialog box closes and the Handwriting Personalization window reappears. TROUBLE If you don’t have a pen input device, you can use your mouse to write the sentence.

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8. Click the Teach the recognizer your handwriting style link, click Sentences, click Next, then write the sentence Keep on listening; I hear jazz music nearby The Handwriting Personalization Wizard displays your writing sample, as shown in Figure M-16.

9. Click Save for later, click the Don’t send writing samples option button, click Next, then click Close to exit the wizard Going Mobile

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FIGURE M-15: Handwriting Personalization window

Teach the recognizer your handwriting style link

Change automatic learning settings link

FIGURE M-16: Handwriting Personalization Wizard

Writing sample

Pen, Erase, and Clear all buttons

Save for later button

Using Windows Touch If you have a touch screen PC with multitouch capability, you can use Windows Touch to use your screen rather than a traditional mouse or touch pad to navigate and input commands in Windows 7. The Start menu and taskbar icons become bigger for touch screen use, and all

Windows 7 programs are touch screen ready. The common gestures are press and hold to right-click, slide two fingers apart to zoom out and back together to zoom in, flick to scroll through a page, and touch two points and rotate to turn an image.

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UNIT

M Windows 7

Using the Tablet PC Input Panel Windows 7 comes standard with Tablet PC tools that you can effectively use on a Tablet PC with a pen. Although the tools are also available on a standard PC and you can use them with a mouse, they aren’t as effective as using them with a Tablet PC. Windows 7 comes with three Tablet PC tools: Tablet PC Input Panel, Windows Journal, and Sticky Notes. The Tablet PC Input Panel allows you to enter text without using a standard keyboard. With the Tablet PC Input Panel, you use the writing pad to convert your handwriting into typed text. The writing pad allows you to write using continuous characters as well as individual characters. You can use editing gestures (pen strokes), such as Correcting, Deleting, Splitting, and Joining, to modify the text in the writing pad. To find out how the editing gestures work, you can view an online video. The on-screen keyboard in the Input Panel provides a mini keyboard to enter individual characters. In addition to handwritten text, you can also use the Tablet PC Input Panel to insert common characters, such as Bksp, Del, Tab, Enter, or Space, numbers, symbols, and Web addresses. Jessica is unsure how to use the Tablet PC Input Panel, so you explore its features so that you can easily explain them to her.

If you don’t have a Tablet PC or ink device connected to your computer, you can still perform the following lesson using your mouse.

STEPS 1. Click the Start button click WordPad

on the taskbar, point to All Programs, click Accessories, then

The WordPad program opens, displaying a blank document. QUICK TIP To use the on-screen keyboard, click the Touch Keyboard button at the top of the Tablet PC Input Panel.

2. Click , point to All Programs, click Accessories, click Tablet PC, click Tablet PC Input Panel, then click the Writing Pad button, if necessary The Tablet PC Input Panel opens with the Writing Pad button selected, displaying the input pad for continuous writing along with related options.

3. Write the name Jessica long in the Input Panel using your mouse or pen As you write each letter, the input panel recognizes and displays it as text, as shown in Figure M-17.

QUICK TIP To view an editing how-to video, click the Correcting, Deleting, Splitting, or Joining buttons.

4. Click the text long in the Input Panel The input panel displays the recognized letters, as shown in Figure M-18. You can change the recognized letters by clicking the text you want to adjust. You can also select a text recognition suggestion or use an editing gesture to correct, delete, split, or join text.

5. Click the Long link or select a text recognition suggestion to change the appearance of the word long to Long The word Long appears capitalized.

QUICK TIP To move the Tablet PC Input Panel out of the way to the left, click the Close button, then click the edge of the window to move the Input Panel back in view.

6. Click in the WordPad document, if necessary, to place the insertion point, then click Insert in the Input Panel The text is inserted in the document.

7. Click Tools on the Input Panel title bar, then click Exit The Tablet PC Input Panel closes.

8. Save the file as JessicaLong.rtf to the location where you store your Data Files, then click in the WordPad window the Close button The WordPad window closes without saving changes.

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FIGURE M-17: WordPad with Tablet PC Input Panel character recognition

Touch Keyboard button Writing Pad button Tablet PC Input Panel Recognized handwritten text WordPad document

FIGURE M-18: Writing pad with character recognition editing

Close button Editing gestures; click a button to watch a “how-to” video Insert button; inserts text in the WordPad document

Text recognition suggestions

Using the Math Input Panel If you use your Tablet PC to take notes in math or you work in an engineering or scientific profession, then you need the Math Input Panel in Windows 7. The Math Input Panel recognizes handwritten math expressions and inserts them into other programs. The program needs to support Mathematical Markup Language (MathML). To use the Math Input Panel, open the document in which you want to insert your math expressions, handwrite your math expression, then click Insert. If you take notes in Windows Journal, you can convert your handwritten math expression to normal text that you can use in a word-processing program. First, drag the selected expression directly

into the Math Input Panel. Then, click the Start button, point to All Programs, click Accessories, click Math Input Panel, then handwrite the math expression. As you write, the expression appears in the recognition box. If you need to make a text correction, click the Select and Correct button, select a part of the expression, then select a correction from the menu. To erase the expression, click the Erase button, then drag to erase it. To clear the expression and start over, click the Clear button. To undo or redo a change, click the Undo or Redo button. To insert the expression in the open document, click the Insert button.

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UNIT

M Windows 7

Handwriting with Windows Journal Windows Journal is one of the standard Tablet PC tools that come with Windows 7. Windows Journal allows you to handwrite notes and draw pictures as if you were using a regular notebook pad. Windows Journal provides a toolbar with common tools you can use to handwrite notes and draw pictures. The standard note tools include New, Save, Import, Find, Cut, Copy, Paste, Undo, and Redo. In addition to the standard note tools, Windows Journal includes drawing tools, such as Pen, Highlighter, Eraser, Selection, Insert/Remove Spacer, and Flag. The pen tools in Windows Journal work in a similar way to the Pen Tool in Paint. However, there are some differences; for example, Windows Journal includes the Stroke Eraser, which lets you erase an entire line with a single click, and the Selection Tool, which lets you click an object to select it. Jessica wants to take handwritten notes during meetings instead of typing them, so she wants to try Windows Journal to see how it works.

If you don’t have a Tablet PC or ink device connected to your computer, you can still perform the following lesson using your mouse.

STEPS TROUBLE If Windows Journal asks you to install a print driver, click Install, click Yes to allow, then click Close; if you are in a lab, check with your instructor or technical support person first.

1. Click the Start button on the taskbar, point to All Programs, click Accessories, click Tablet PC, then click Windows Journal The Windows Journal window opens, as shown in Figure M-19.

2. Click the Pen button list arrow Point

on the Windows Journal toolbar, then click Medium

The pointer changes to the medium point tip, as indicated by a red dot.

3. Draw a map on the page similar to the one shown in Figure M-20, including the lines and location information but excluding the green flag on the toolbar to change 4. If you need to make a correction, click the Eraser button , then click the line(s) you want to erase the pointer to the Stroke Eraser The Stroke Eraser allows you to erase entire lines by clicking any portion of the line. The lines you click become erased.

QUICK TIP To select more than one element, click the Selection Tool button, then drag a selection ring around the elements you want.

5. Click the Flag button list arrow , click the green flag, click the page to place the flag as indicated in Figure M-20, then click a blank area on the page The flag element appears on the page.

6. If you need to move an element, click the Selection Tool button the element, then drag it to a new location as needed

on the toolbar, click

The element you dragged is repositioned on the page.

7. Click the Save button

on the Windows Journal toolbar

The Save As dialog box opens. QUICK TIP To insert a text box, click the Insert menu, click Text Box, drag a box, then type text.

8. Navigate to the location where you store your Data Files, click in the File name text box, if necessary, type QST_Map, then click Save The document saves to its new location, the Save As dialog box closes, and the Window Journal window reappears.

9. Click the Close button

in the Windows Journal window

The Windows Journal program closes. Windows 306

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Pen button list arrow

Windows Journal toolbar

Windows 7

FIGURE M-19: Windows Journal window

Blank note or drawing area

FIGURE M-20: Windows Journal window with a map

Pen tool

Flag tool Selection tool Eraser tool

Inserted flag

Drawing

Creating Sticky Notes Sticky Notes allows you to create notes on your computer that mimic the paper version of sticky notes. You can also create a 30-second recorded note with a microphone and add written notes to it. To start Sticky Notes, click the Start button, point to All Programs, click Accessories, click Sticky Notes, then write in the notepad area. To create a new note, click the New Note button. To switch between notes, click in the sticky note box. To move a note around the screen,

point to the top of the note box (pointer changes to an arrow), then drag the note. To resize a note, point to the edge of the note box (pointer changes to a double arrow), then drag the edge to the size you want. If you no longer want a note, display the note, then click the Delete Note button, then click Yes. To close Sticky Notes, right-click the Sticky Notes button on the taskbar, then click Close window.

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Practice Concepts Review

For current SAM information including versions and content details, visit SAM Central (http://samcentral.course.com). If you have a SAM user profile, you may have access to hands-on instruction, practice, and assessment of the skills covered in this unit. Since we support various versions of SAM throughout the life of this text, you will want to check with your instructor for instructions and the correct URL/Web site to access those assignments.

Match the statements below with the elements labeled in the screen shown in Figure M-21. FIGURE M-21

a i h b

c

d g f

e

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Which element opens the Power Options window? Which element opens the Sync Center window? Which element opens the Connect to a network window? Which element indicates a secure network? Which element indicates a nonsecure network? Which element indicates an offline file? Which element indicates the status of offline files? Which element displays the writing pad? Which element displays the on-screen keyboard?

Match each term with the statement that best describes it. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

Wi-Fi SSID Hibernation Standby Power plan

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a. b. c. d. e.

A predefined collection of power usage settings A state in which your monitor and hard disks turn off after being idle for a set time A state in which your computer first saves everything in memory on your hard disk and then shuts down A wireless network name Another name for a wireless network

Going Mobile

Select the best answer from the list of choices. 15. Which of the following helps you keep files up to date in the Windows Mobility Center? a. wireless network c. Sync Center b. external display d. presentation settings 16. Which of the following is a state in which your monitor and hard drive turn off after being idle for a set time? a. Power saver c. Hibernation b. Standby d. Balanced 17. Which of the following is a state in which your computer first saves everything in memory on your hard drive and then shuts down? a. Power saver c. Hibernation b. Standby d. Balanced 18. Which of the following identifies the name of a wireless network? a. Wi-Fi c. UFD b. SSID d. AP 19. Which of the following broadcasts a signal to other wireless devices? a. Wi-Fi c. UFD b. SSID d. AP 20. Which of the following is broadcasted to other wireless computers? a. Wi-Fi c. UFD b. SSID d. AP 21. Which of the following allows you to control another computer? a. Wi-Fi c. Sync Center b. RDC d. IP 22. Which of the following is not a Tablet PC tool? a. Voice Record c. Windows Journal b. Tablet PC Input Panel d. Sticky Notes

Windows 7

Concepts Review (Continued)

Skills Review 1. Explore the Windows Mobility Center. a. Open the Hardware and Sound window in the Control Panel. b. Open the Windows Mobility Center window. c. View and close the audio, display, and presentation settings. 2. Manage power options. a. In the Windows Mobility Center window, view the power settings. b. Open the Edit Plan Settings window for one of the power plans. c. Change the Put the computer to sleep option for the power plan you chose to one minute, then save the changes. d. Wait one minute to put your computer to sleep, then wake it up. e. Restore the default settings for the plan, cancel the dialog box, then close the Power Options window. 3. Connect to a wireless network. a. In the Windows Mobility Center, view the available wireless networks. b. If you’re already connected to a wireless network, disconnect from it. c. Select a wireless network, then connect to the network you selected. d. Enter a security key, if necessary, then connect to the network. e. Minimize the Windows Mobility Center window, then go back to the Control Panel window. f. Display the current connection in the notification area.

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Skills Review (Continued) 4. Set up a remote computer. a. In the Control Panel window, open the System and Security window. b. Click the Allow remote access link, then click Yes, if necessary. c. Change the settings to allow connections from computers running any version of Remote Desktop. d. Add users that you want to allow to connect to your computer remotely, then verify the names. e. Remove the remote users you added, then close the Remote Desktop Users dialog box. f. Change the computer to not allow connections or change the setting to what it was previously set at before following the steps, close the System Properties dialog box, then close the Control Panel window. 5. Mark offline files for synchronization. a. Display the Windows Mobility Center window, then open the Sync Center window. b. Open the Offline Files dialog box, enable offline files, if necessary, then check disk usage. c. Close both the Offline Files dialog box and the Network and Internet window. d. Open the Network window and navigate to the drive and folder specified by your instructor or technical support person where you store your Data Files. e. Open the Quest Travel folder in the UnitM folder, then make the Business folder always available offline. f. Enable the Work offline setting. g. Open the Business folder, then open the QST Focus.rtf file in a word-processing program, such as WordPad. h. Delete the last paragraph in the document, save the file as QST Focus.rtf in the Business folder, then exit the program. i. Enable the Work online setting, then minimize the Network window. 6. Synchronize offline files. a. In the Sync Center window, view the sync partnerships, if not already displayed. b. Synchronize the Offline Files folder. c. Close the Sync Center and Windows Mobility Center windows. d. Restore the Network window to display the drive and folder specified by your instructor or technical support person where you store your Data Files. e. Make the Business folder unavailable offline. f. Open the Business folder, open the QST Focus.rtf file in a word-processing program, such as WordPad, to see the offline change, close the program, then close the Network window. 7. Set pen and touch options. a. Open the Handwriting Personalization window. b. Click the Change automatic learning settings link. c. Open the Settings dialog box for the Press and hold item option. d. Press and hold the graphic to test your settings, then close the dialog box. e. Display the Pen Options tab, then display the Flicks tab. f. Click Teach the recognizer your handwriting style, click Sentences, then click Next. g. Write the sentence “Keep on listening; I hear jazz music nearby.” h. Click Save for later, click the Don’t send writing samples option, click Next, then click Close. 8. Use the Tablet PC Input Panel. a. Start WordPad, then start the Tablet PC Input Panel. b. Write your first name in the Input Panel. c. Use the button below the written text to make sure the text is correct. d. Use the Input Panel to insert a space, then use the Character Pad to insert your last name. e. Exit the Tablet PC Input Panel, save the file as MyName.rtf to the location where you save your Data Files, then exit WordPad. 9. Handwrite with Windows Journal. a. Start Windows Journal, then use the Pen button to select the Fine Chisel pen. b. Draw a simple map of your current location; use the Erase button as needed to delete lines. c. Insert a green flag to mark your location on the map; use the Selection Tool button to move elements as needed. d. Save the drawing as YourMap.jnt to the location where you store your Data Files, then exit Windows Journal. Windows 310

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You are a quality assurance tester for a laptop PC manufacturer called On the Road PC. You’re coming out with a new laptop with an improved battery and you want to test it using Windows 7. a. b. c. d. e.

Open the Windows Mobility Center window, then view the Power Settings. Change the settings for each of the power plans. Change the Turn off the display option to one minute, then save your changes. Wait one minute for your computer display to turn off, then turn it back on. Restore the default settings for the plan.

Windows 7

Independent Challenge 1

Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Open the Advanced Settings dialog box. ■ Change the Lid close action to Hibernate for On battery. ■ Change the Power button action to Hibernate for On battery. ■ Save your changes, close the lid of your laptop, then restore the default settings. f. Cancel the dialog box, then close the Power Options window.

Independent Challenge 2 Your school requires all students to own a laptop and bring them to class. As part of your school’s effort to reduce the use of paper and increase efficiency, all assignments, notes, and tests are available and taken online. To comply with school policy, you need to learn how to use the mobile features on your laptop to connect to the school’s network using a wireless connection. a. Open the Windows Mobility Center window. b. View each of the available options and describe the functionality and use of each one. c. View the available wireless connections. Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ If a wireless network is not available and you have an access point, set up a wireless connection. ■ In the Connect to a network window, click Set up a connection or network. ■ Enter a network name and security key (or use the one generated). ■ Write down the security key, then follow the rest of the wizard instructions. d. Connect to an available wireless connection; if necessary, use the security key provided by your instructor to access a security-enabled network. e. Display your school Web site using your default browser and the wireless connection. f. Close your browser, then disconnect from your wireless connection.

Independent Challenge 3 You are the president of Air West, a regional airline that provides commuter service to remote places in the western part of the United States. As part of your commitment to ensure quality and timely service, you frequently take flights and talk with customers. Once you’ve gathered feedback, you enter it in offline files on your laptop computer, which you like to sync back to company network servers when you get back on the ground near a wireless hot spot. a. Enable Offline Files, if necessary, then check disk usage. b. Open the Network window and navigate to the drive and folder specified by your instructor or technical support person where you store your Data Files. c. Start WordPad, type Customer Feedback, then save the file as Feedback.rtf to the location where you store your Data Files. d. Close the Feedback.rtf file, then make the Air West folder always available offline. e. Open the Feedback.rtf file, insert a new paragraph, type Air West, then save and close the file, and exit WordPad. f. Synchronize the offline files, view the sync results, then close the Sync Center window.

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Real Life Independent Challenge You recently purchased a Tablet PC to take handwritten notes during project meetings. Windows Journal is a useful tool for taking notes and making lists. Use Windows Journal to take notes for a project you are working on and to create at least one list of action items (items that need to be completed). a. Start Windows Journal, then write a list of action items in a text box, then add the initials of the person responsible for each item. (Hint: Click the Insert menu, click Text Box to create a text box.) b. Insert different color flags to indicate the priority of the items. c. Draw a diagram similar to a flowchart to show the steps of the project. d. Use the Eraser and Selection tools to make adjustments to the drawing. e. Save the file as ProjectNotes.jnt to the location where you store your Data Files, then exit Windows Journal.

Visual Workshop Re-create the screen shown in Figure M-22, which displays a letter being written using the Tablet PC Input Panel. FIGURE M-22

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UNIT

N Windows 7

Maintaining Your Computer

Files You Will Need

Windows 7 offers a number of useful tools for managing and maintaining routine tasks on

No files needed.

repairing disks. Windows also provides tools to find and fix disk problems, speed up disk

your computer, such as installing and removing programs and formatting, copying, and access, and clean up disk space. By periodically finding and repairing disk errors, you can keep your files in good working condition and prevent disk problems that might cause you to lose your work. You can also schedule these tasks to run on a regular basis. If you find Windows performing sluggishly even after completing routine maintenance, you can adjust system processing and memory settings to improve performance. In addition, you can add and remove programs that come with Windows 7 and set program defaults.

As

the backup IT professional at Quest Specialty Travel, you review several routine disk management tasks you can perform to keep QST’s computers running smoothly.

OBJECTIVES

Improve computer performance Format a disk Find and repair disk errors Defragment a disk Clean up a disk Restore computer settings Remove or repair a program Add a program Set default programs

UNIT

N Windows 7

Improving Computer Performance The Performance Information and Tools utility in the Control Panel provides a central location for you to evaluate the performance of your computer, print out a system health report, and access tools to increase performance. The utility analyzes your computer and provides performance rating information known as the Windows Experience Index (WEI). The WEI consists of a performance rating, known as a subscore, for the critical components on your computer. These components include the central processor (CPU, known as the central processing unit), memory (RAM, known as random access memory), graphics, gaming graphics, and primary hard disk. A subscore of 3.0 or higher is a good target score for most components. The base score is the lowest score of any of the components. A base score of 1.0 or 2.0 is adequate for most tasks; however, a base score of 3.0 or higher is optimal for running Windows 7. A good way to find out about the health of your system is to run a system diagnostics report, which identifies potential problems and provides a description of the symptom, cause, details, and resolution. To help you improve performance, you can access performance-related tools in the task pane. As part of routine maintenance, you want to check computer performance levels and generate a system health report to determine if any of the QST computers require your attention.

STEPS 1. Click the Start button Security link

on the taskbar, click Control Panel, then click the System and

The System and Security window opens, displaying links to Windows 7 system and security options and settings. QUICK TIP If Windows 7 detects hardware or software that affects the WEI, click Refresh now, then click Continue to recheck the system. You can also click the Update my score link, then click Continue. This might take a few minutes.

2. Click the Check the Windows Experience Index link under System The Performance Information and Tools window opens, as shown in Figure N-1, displaying subscore and base score performance ratings for your Windows 7 system.

3. In the task pane, click the Advanced tools link The Advanced Tools window opens, as shown in Figure N-2, displaying links to additional performance tools and information. If Windows 7 detects any performance issues, a link appears under Performance issues. You can click the link to view more details and correct the problem.

4. Click the Generate a system health report link, click Yes to grant access to the window, if necessary, then wait for the results; this might take a few minutes The results appear, as shown in Figure N-3, in the Resource and Performance Monitor window (your results will differ). The system help report provides a description of the symptom, cause, details, and resolution of each problem.

5. Click the Close button in the Resource and Performance Monitor window 6. Click the Minimize button in the Advanced Tools window Improving performance and searches Windows keeps track of files in indexed locations and stores information about them in the background using an index, like the one found in the back of this book, to make locating files faster and easier. In the Performance Information and Tools window, you can click the Adjust indexing options link in the task pane to view, add, remove, and modify indexed locations, indexed file types, and other advanced index

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settings. For example, if a file type is not recognized by the index, you can add it, or if you’re having problems with the search index, you can rebuild or restore it. In the Indexing Options dialog box, click Modify to view, add, or remove indexed locations, or click Advanced to change indexing settings, such as encrypting files and rebuilding the index, then specify the file types you want to index.

Links to performance tools in the task pane

Windows 7

FIGURE N-1: Performance Information and Tools window

Base score; your results might differ

Subscores for system components; your results might differ

FIGURE N-2: Advanced Tools window

Details on performance issues, if available, are listed here; your results might differ

Links to advanced tools

FIGURE N-3: Resource and Performance Monitor window

System diagnostics report; your results will differ

Maintaining Your Computer

Windows 315

UNIT

N Windows 7

Formatting a Disk Formatting a disk—including hard or removable disks, USB Flash drives, and memory cards—prepares it so that you can store information on it. Formatting removes all information from the disk, so you should never format a disk that has files you want to keep. When you format a disk, you need to specify certain settings: capacity, file system, and allocation unit size. Capacity is how much data the disk or partition can hold, such as the physical size, storage size, and sector size. A file system is the overall structure in which files are named, stored, and organized. NTFS and FAT or FAT32 are types of disk file systems (see the yellow Clues box for details). Most hard disks use NTFS, whereas all removable disks use FAT. If your hard disk uses the FAT or FAT32 file system, you can convert it to the NTFS format. Disk allocation unit size, or cluster size, is a group of sectors on a disk. The operating system assigns a unique number to each cluster, and then keeps track of files according to which clusters they use. As part of routine computer maintenance at QST, you want to back up some important work files for safekeeping on a removable disk, but first you need to format the disk to which you will back up.

STEPS TROUBLE A CD or DVD disc is not a valid disk type to format.

1. Insert a removable disk in the appropriate drive on your computer, then click the Close in the AutoPlay dialog box, if necessary button Formatting removes all files on the disk; make sure the disk you are using does not contain any files you want to keep.

2. Click the Start button

on the taskbar, then click Computer

The Computer window opens, displaying the local and network drives attached to your computer.

3. In the left pane, click the drive icon containing your removable disk Disks and drives appear under the Computer icon in the left pane of the Windows Explorer window. In this example, the Address bar adds Removable Disk (F:) to the list after Computer. The icon representing the Removable Disk (F:) is highlighted, and the files on the disk appear in the right pane of the Windows Explorer window. Double-check the files on your removable disk to make sure they are not ones you want to keep.

4. Right-click the drive icon containing your removable disk in the left pane, then click Format on the shortcut menu

QUICK TIP If you format a disk with the FAT file system, the label can contain up to 11 characters; if you format a disk with NTFS, the limit is 32 characters.

The Format dialog box opens, as shown in Figure N-4. The fastest way to format a removable disk is with the Quick Format option, which formats a previously formatted disk by removing all files from it. The Full Format option removes all files from any removable disk and scans the disk for bad sectors. To select the Full Format option, deselect the Quick Format check box. You should choose Quick Format only if you are certain that your removable disk is not damaged. The Enable Compression option, supported only on NTFS disks, specifies whether to format the disk so that folders and files on it are compressed. The Create an MS-DOS startup disk option formats a disk so that you can start up your computer in MS-DOS, a diskbased operating system, to fix a problem, display information, or run an MS-DOS program using MS-DOS commands (experience with MS-DOS is required).

5. In the Format options area, click the Quick Format check box to select it, if necessary 6. Select the current text in the Volume label text box, then type BACKUP The volume label represents the name of the disk. The volume label appears in the Windows Explorer and Computer windows to make the removable disk easier to identify.

7. Click Start, then click OK in the alert dialog box QUICK TIP To copy files to or from a removable disk, open the disk window, then drag files to and from the window.

Windows 316

A progress meter appears at the bottom of the Format dialog box. After a few moments, the Format Complete alert dialog box opens.

8. Click OK in the Format Complete alert dialog box The Format Complete alert dialog box closes.

9. Click Close in the Format dialog box The removable disk is now formatted.

Maintaining Your Computer

Windows 7

FIGURE N-4: Format dialog box

Your drive might differ

Current format type and file system for selected disk

Quick Format option

Progress meter

Understanding disk file systems A disk must be formatted with a file system that allows it to work with the operating system to store, manage, and access data. Two of the most common file systems are FAT (or FAT32, which is an improvement on FAT technology) and NTFS. Disks on DOS, Windows 3.1, or Windows 98/Me computers use the FAT file system, whereas disks on computers running Windows NT 4.0, Windows 2000, Windows XP, and later can use either the NTFS or FAT system. NTFS is a newer file system that is the standard file system for Windows 7. However, NTFS does not support removable disks, so they are always formatted with FAT. When you format a disk with the FAT file system, a formatting program divides the disk into storage compartments. First, it creates a series of rings, called tracks, around the circumference of the disk. Then it divides the tracks into equal parts, like pieces of a pie, to form sectors. The number of sectors and tracks depends on the size of the disk. Although the physical surface of a disk is made of tracks and sectors, a file is stored in clusters. A cluster, also called an allocation unit, is one or more sectors of storage space. It represents the minimum amount of space that an operating system reserves when saving the contents of a file to a disk. Thus, a file might be stored in more than one cluster. Each cluster is identified by a unique number. The first two clusters are reserved by the operating system. The operating system maintains a file

allocation table (or FAT) on each disk that lists the clusters on the disk and records the status of each cluster, whether it is occupied (and by which file), available, or defective. Each cluster in a file “remembers” its order in the chain of clusters—and each cluster points to the next one until the last cluster, which marks the end of the file. NTFS features a built-in security system that does not allow users to access the disk unless they have a user account and password with the necessary rights and permissions. NTFS protects disks from damage by automatically redirecting data from a bad sector to a good sector without requiring you to run a disk-checking utility. Given the reliability and the built-in repair mechanisms of NTFS disks, only rarely do they require maintenance. This is an example of fault tolerance, the ability of a disk to resist damage, which is a critical issue with disks on a network computer. Because NTFS is more suited to network demands, such as a high level of security and resistance to system failure, network administrators format network disks with NTFS whenever possible. Sometimes, however, users on a network want or need to use a non-Windows operating system, or a user might need a computer that is capable of running an older version of Windows that requires FAT and Windows 7 in dual-boot setup. The disks on that computer would then be formatted with FAT.

Maintaining Your Computer

Windows 317

UNIT

N Windows 7

Finding and Repairing Disk Errors Sometimes an unexpected power loss or program error can create inaccessible file segments that take up space on a hard or removable disk. The Check Disk program that comes with Windows helps you find and repair damaged sections of a disk. Check Disk can also be used to find physical disk errors or bad sectors. The program doesn’t physically repair your media, but it moves data away from any bad sectors it finds. To keep your disks working properly, you should run Check Disk from time to time. When you run Check Disk, all program files must be closed for the process to run. While the Check Disk process is running, your disk will not be available to perform any other task. Before you perform routine computer maintenance at QST, you want to make sure the removable disk for the backup files has no problems, so you run Check Disk.

STEPS TROUBLE If you have any open files or programs, Windows prompts you to close them.

1. In the Computer window, right-click the drive icon containing your removable disk in the left pane, then click Properties on the shortcut menu The Properties dialog box opens with the General tab displayed.

2. Click the Tools tab The Properties dialog box opens with the Tools tab displayed, as shown in Figure N-5. In addition to the Error-checking section, from which you run the Check Disk program, the Tools tab also provides you with access to other utilities, defragmentation and backup, that can make Windows 7 work more efficiently. Defragmentation starts the Disk Defragmenter program and optimizes a disk for better performance, whereas backup starts the Backup program and copies files and folders to a disk for safekeeping.

3. In the Error-checking section, click Check now The Check Disk dialog box opens, as shown in Figure N-6.

4. Click the Automatically fix file system errors check box to select it, if necessary This option repairs most errors automatically using predetermined settings.

5. Click the Scan for and attempt recovery of bad sectors check box to select it, if necessary This option makes corrections for any unreadable or bad sectors on the removable disk. TROUBLE If the disk is in use, an alert dialog box opens. Close all files on the selected disk.

6. Click Start The progress meter displays the scanning status. When the process is complete, the Checking Disk message box opens.

7. Click Close in the message box, then click OK to close the Properties dialog box 8. Click the Close button in the Computer window 9. Remove the removable disk from the appropriate drive on your computer

Changing the size of virtual memory If your computer doesn’t have enough RAM, Windows uses virtual memory to provide what you need from your hard disk. Virtual memory temporarily uses space on your hard disk to provide your computer with more RAM. If you are running out of virtual memory (using hard disk space as RAM), you can increase the minimum size of the paging file (a virtual memory). The Initial size is set to installed RAM plus 300 MB and the Maximum size is set to three times the amount of

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Maintaining Your Computer

installed RAM. To increase the size, click the Start button, click Control Panel, click the System and Security link, click the System link, click Advanced system settings in the task pane, click Yes, if necessary, click Settings (under Performance), click the Advanced tab, click Change, clear the Automatically manage paging file size for all drives check box, click the disk you want, click Custom size, type a new size in the Initial or Maximum size, click Set, then click OK as needed to close the dialog boxes.

Windows 7

FIGURE N-5: Properties dialog box with the Tools tab displayed

Check now button

Buttons to defragment or back up files on current disk

FIGURE N-6: Check Disk dialog box

Option to fix file system errors Option to recover bad sectors

Progress meter

Boosting speed with removable media You can use Windows ReadyBoost to speed up your computer by using disk space on certain removable media devices, such as USB Flash drives. When you insert a compatible removable media device (one that uses fast flash memory), the AutoPlay dialog box opens and provides the option to use Windows ReadyBoost. Before you can use it, you need to turn it on and specify the amount of space you want to allocate. Windows provides a recommended space amount. In general, ReadyBoost recommends one to three times the amount of random

access memory (RAM) installed on your computer for the best performance results. With the removable media in the drive, click the Start button, click Computer, right-click the drive, click Properties, click the ReadyBoost tab, click the Use this device option, drag the slider to specify the space to reserve for system speed, then click OK. To use Windows ReadyBoost, remove the media device, reinsert it, then use the AutoPlay dialog box to start it.

Maintaining Your Computer

Windows 319

UNIT

N Windows 7

Defragmenting a Disk When you delete files from a disk, you create empty spaces that can then be spread over different areas of the disk. When you subsequently create a new file on this disk, parts of the file are stored in these empty spaces, resulting in a single file that is broken into many parts. A file broken up in this way is called a fragmented file. When you open or store a fragmented file, the computer must search many areas on the disk, which lengthens retrieval time. Keep in mind, however, that the file is otherwise usable, and it is undetectable to the user that the file is fragmented. You can use the Disk Defragmenter program to place all of the parts of a file in one contiguous, or adjacent, location. This procedure, which efficiently arranges all of the files and unused space, is called optimization. Optimization makes your programs run faster and your files open more quickly. For best results, run Check Disk to check for errors on your disk before you start the disk defragmentation process. It’s also a good idea to analyze the disk to determine the extent of the fragmentation. While Disk Defragmenter works, you can use your computer to carry out other tasks; however, your computer will operate more slowly, so it’s best to wait. You can also set a schedule to run Disk Defragmenter on a regular basis. You can defragment a hard disk on your computer; however, you cannot defragment a removable disk with Windows 7. As part of routine computer maintenance at QST, you want to use Disk Defragmenter to optimize computer hard disks for the best performance.

STEPS QUICK TIP You can also click the Start button on the taskbar, point to All Programs, click Accessories, click System Tools, then click Disk Defragmenter.

1. Click the Advanced Tools button on the taskbar, click the Open Disk Defragmenter link, then click Yes to grant access to the dialog box, if necessary The Disk Defragmenter dialog box opens, as shown in Figure N-7, displaying defragment schedule information as well as buttons to change the schedule, analyze the disk, or start defragmentation.

2. Click the Configure schedule button The Disk Defragmenter: Modify Schedule dialog box opens, as shown in Figure N-8.

3. Click the Run on a schedule (recommended) check box to select it, if necessary This option enables Disk Defragmenter to run based on a schedule.

4. Click the Frequency list arrow, then click Monthly The Frequency category changes from Weekly, the default, to Monthly.

5. Click Select disks, click the (Select all disks) check box to deselect it, select the check box for your local disk to select it, then click OK The Disk Defragmenter: Select Disks For Schedule dialog box closes. The disk to be defragmented changes to the local disk.

6. Click OK again in the Disk Defragmenter: Modify Schedule dialog box The Disk Defragmenter: Modify Schedule dialog box closes. The new defragmentation schedule is set and the Disk Defragmenter dialog box reopens. TROUBLE If you are working in a lab, check with your instructor or technical support person for authorization to defragment your hard disk. If you do not receive authorization, skip Steps 7 and 8.

7. Click Defragment disk Progress information appears under the Progress category, indicating defragmentation is occurring, along with a percentage of completion. The defragmentation process can take several minutes to several hours, depending on the extent of the fragmentation on your disk. The button changes to Stop operation.

8. Click Stop operation The defragmentation process stops.

9. Click Close in the Defragmentation window, then click the Back button Advanced Tools window The System and Security window reappears.

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twice in the

Current defragmentation schedule; yours will differ

Windows 7

FIGURE N-7: Disk Defragmenter dialog box

Configure schedule button

Current disk fragmentation status; yours will differ

Analyze disk button Defragment disk button

FIGURE N-8: Disk Defragmenter: Modify Schedule dialog box

Options to specify a defragmentation schedule

Setting start-up and recover options If you installed more than one operating system on your computer (known as a dual boot), such as Windows XP, Windows Vista, and Windows 7, you can select the default operating system you want to use when you start up your computer. You can also specify how much time to display the list of operating systems for a dual boot before the default starts. If you have problems starting Windows, you can set options to instruct Windows what to do. You can then set options to automatically restart and create a system log of events to track where any problem

occurs. To set start-up and recover options, click the Start button, click Control Panel, click the System and Security link, click the System link, click the Advanced system settings link in the task pane, click Yes, if necessary, then click Settings (under Startup and Recovery). In the Startup and Recovery dialog box, select the operating system you want to start as the default, select the system startup and system failure check boxes you want, click OK, then click OK again.

Maintaining Your Computer

Windows 321

UNIT

N Windows 7

Cleaning Up a Disk Cleaning up a disk involves removing unneeded files to make room for other files on your computer. You can use a Windows program called Disk Cleanup to clean up your hard disk safely and effectively. Disk Cleanup searches your selected hard disk, then lists temporary files, Internet cache files, the Recycle Bin, and unnecessary program files that you can safely delete without affecting your Windows 7 system files. Disk Cleanup also gives you the option to remove Windows components and installed programs that you no longer use. You can select the types of files you want Disk Cleanup to delete. Before you select and delete files, make sure you will not need them in the future. If you have multiple users on your computer, you can specify whether to clean up only your files or all the files on the computer. A lack of free disk space can slow your computer down, so as part of routine maintenance, you want to clean up computer hard disks.

STEPS QUICK TIP You can also click the Start button on the taskbar, point to All Programs, click Accessories, click System Tools, then click Disk Cleanup.

QUICK TIP To clean up Windows components, installed programs, and restore points, click the Clean up system files button, click the More Options tab, then click the appropriate button.

TROUBLE If you are working in a lab, check with your instructor or technical support person for authorization to delete the Recycle Bin or any other files. If you do not receive authorization, click Cancel to close the dialog box, then skip Step 7.

Windows 322

1. In the System and Security window, click the Free up disk space link under Administrative Tools If you have more than one hard disk, the Disk Cleanup: Drive Selection dialog box opens.

2. If prompted, select your local hard disk (typically (C:)), then click OK The Disk Cleanup: Drive Selection dialog box closes and the Disk Cleanup dialog box opens and calculates how much disk space is available to free up on the selected disk. Upon completion, the Disk Cleanup for (C:) dialog box opens (the hard disk is C: in this example), displaying the Disk Cleanup tab with types of files to remove and the amount of disk space taken up by each type of file, as shown in Figure N-9. Your list of files to delete might differ.

3. In the Files to delete list, click Recycle Bin (but not the check box), then click View Files The Recycle Bin window opens, listing the files currently stored in the Recycle Bin.

4. Click the Close button

in the Recycle Bin window

The Recycle Bin window closes.

5. In the Files to delete box, click the check boxes next to any item with a check mark to deselect them (be sure to scroll through the entire list) This deselects all the default items for deletion and brings the total amount of disk space you gain to 0 bytes.

6. In the Files to delete box, click the Recycle Bin check box to select it The check mark indicates that you want to delete all the files in the Recycle Bin, as shown in Figure N-10.

7. Click OK in the Disk Cleanup dialog box, then click Delete Files in the Disk Cleanup message box to confirm the deletion The Disk Cleanup for (C:) message box opens, and a progress meter appears, displaying deletion status. After a few moments, the message box closes and the System and Security window reappears. If you open the Disk Cleanup dialog box after deleting the Recycle Bin files, the amount of disk space taken up by the Recycle Bin will be 0 bytes.

Maintaining Your Computer

Windows 7

FIGURE N-9: Disk Cleanup for Local Disk (C:) dialog box

Types of files and space taken up; your list might differ

Clean up system files button View Files button

FIGURE N-10: Recycle Bin selected for Disk Cleanup

Recycle Bin check box; selected item to be deleted

Total amount of disk space gained statistic Description of selected item from Files to delete list

Scheduling tasks Task Scheduler is a program that enables you to schedule tasks to run regularly, such as Disk Cleanup, at a time convenient for you. Task Scheduler starts each time you start Windows. With Task Scheduler, you can schedule a task to run daily, weekly, monthly, or at certain times (such as when the computer starts or idles), change the schedule for or turn off an existing task, or customize how a task runs at its scheduled time. You can create a basic task using the Create Basic Task Wizard or a more complex task using the Create Task dialog box. Before you schedule a task, be sure that the system date and time on your computer are accurate, as Task Scheduler relies on this information to run. Click the

Start button, point to All Programs, click Accessories, click System Tools, click Task Scheduler, then click Yes, if necessary. In the Actions pane, click Create Basic Task, type a name and description, click Next, click a scheduled task time interval, click Next, specify a start time and recurring interval, click Next, select an action option, click Next, specify the information or options you want, click Next, then click Finish. To run, end, disable, or delete a task, click the Task Scheduler Library, select the task, then click the command you want at the bottom of the Actions pane.

Maintaining Your Computer

Windows 323

UNIT

N Windows 7

Restoring Computer Settings Windows 7 is a reliable operating system, but any time you make changes to your computer, such as adding or removing software and hardware, you run the risk of problems developing with your operating system. To alleviate problems, you can use System Restore to undo harmful changes to your computer and restore its settings back to before the problems arose. System Restore returns your computer system, but not your personal files, to an earlier time, before the changes were made to your computer, called a restore point. As you work with your computer, System Restore monitors your changes and automatically creates restore points on a daily basis or at important system events, but you can also create your own restore point. If you recently performed a system restoration and encountered problems with it, you can use System Restore to undo your most recent restoration. System Restore is turned on by default when you install the Windows 7 operating system, but you can turn it off or make other System Restore changes on the System Restore tab in the System Properties dialog box. In preparation for some significant software and hardware upgrades at QST, you want to create a restore point in case problems arise after the upgrades.

STEPS QUICK TIP You can also click the Start button on the taskbar, point to All Programs, click Accessories, click System Tools, then click System Restore.

TROUBLE If you are working in a lab, check with your instructor or technical support person for authorization to create a restore point. If you do not receive authorization, skip to Step 8.

1. In the System and Security window, click the System link, click the System protection link in the task pane, then click Yes to grant access to the dialog box, if necessary The System Properties dialog box opens, displaying the System Protection tab, as shown in Figure N-11. The System Protection tab allows you to turn on and off System Restore for specific disk drives attached to your computer. System Restore requires a minimum of 300 MB of available space on your hard disk and doesn’t run on hard disks smaller than 1 GB. System Restore uses up to 15% of the space on each hard disk. If System Restore runs out of usable disk space, it becomes inactive until sufficient disk space is made available.

2. Click Create The System Protection dialog box opens, requesting a name for the restore point.

3. Type RP Files The current date and time are automatically added to the title of the restore point to make it easier to find in a list of restore points.

4. Click Create A progress meter appears, displaying the status of the restore point. After a few moments, the message box closes, and a system protection alert dialog box opens to confirm the Windows 7 restore point creation.

5. Click Close to confirm the process The System Properties dialog box reappears. QUICK TIP To restore your computer, click System Restore, click Next, select a restore point, click next, then click Finish, wait for the restore, then click OK.

6. Click System Restore, then click Next The System Restore dialog box opens, as shown in Figure N-12, providing options to restore the most recent restore point or select a different restore point.

7. Click Cancel The System Restore dialog box closes and the System Properties dialog box reappears.

8. Click OK, then click the Control Panel Home link in the task pane The Control Panel window reappears.

Deleting restore points To delete all but the most recent restore point, click the Start button, point to All Programs, click Accessories, click System Tools, click Disk Cleanup, select a disk if necessary, click the Clean up system files

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button, click the More Options tab, click Clean up under System Restore, then click Delete to confirm the deletion.

Windows 7

FIGURE N-11: System Properties dialog box with the System Protection tab displayed

System Restore button

Protection settings for the available drives

Create button

FIGURE N-12: System Restore dialog box

Select to choose a restore point; your restore points will differ; no options and restore information appear on first use

Starting Windows when problems occur If you have a problem starting Windows, you can use one of several start-up options to help you start Windows in a safe environment where you can restore settings and fix the problem. Safe mode is a good place to start. If a problem does not occur when you start in safe mode, you can eliminate basic Windows files and drivers as possible causes of the problem. If you added a device or changed a software device driver, you can use safe mode to remove the device or restore the changed driver. You can also use Last Known Good Configuration to restore settings saved when your computer was last shut down properly. To begin, restart your computer and, as your computer boots, press and hold F8, use the arrow keys to select a start-up option, then press [Enter].

If you have a dual-boot system, select the operating system you want, then press [Enter]. Restore any recent system changes, or remove any newly installed software that might be causing the problem. Shut down your computer, then start your computer to see if it works properly. If problems persist, try a different start-up option, or seek assistance from a support technician. You can also use Startup Repair to fix Windows problems. Restart your computer with the Windows installation disc in the appropriate drive, click Repair your computer, select your operating system, click Next, click Startup Repair, then follow the on-screen instructions.

Maintaining Your Computer

Windows 325

UNIT

N Windows 7

Removing or Repairing a Program If you do not use a program very often and want to free some space on your hard disk, you can remove the program. You can always reinstall it at a later time. If you’re having problems with a program, you can repair it. Windows 7 comes with many programs called Windows components, such as Internet Explorer, Windows Media Player, and games, already installed on your computer. If you want to free space on your hard disk, you can use Programs and Features to remove a component. If you have installed a program that is not included on the Windows 7 installation disc, such as Microsoft Office, you should avoid using Windows Explorer to delete the program because program files and other information might be located in other places, and you might not find everything. Also, some programs share files with other programs, so deleting them can cause damage to other programs. To uninstall a program, use the Uninstall button or the Change button on the toolbar in the Programs and Features window, and follow the software-specific uninstall program. You need to free up more space on your hard disk, so you decide to remove some of the games that came with Windows 7 you no longer use.

If you do not have the Windows 7 installation disc, you might not be able to complete the steps in the next lesson to reinstall a removed Windows 7 program. Simply read through this lesson and the next without completing the steps.

STEPS QUICK TIP To view installed updates, open the Programs and Features window, then click the View installed updates link in the task pane.

1. In the Control Panel window, click the Programs link, then click the Uninstall a program link under Programs and Features The Programs and Features window opens, displaying all the programs currently installed on your computer not related to Windows 7.

2. Click a program from the list The toolbar changes to display buttons to uninstall, change, and repair (if available) the selected program, as shown in Figure N-13.

3. Click the Turn Windows features on or off link in the task pane, then click Yes to grant access to the dialog box, if necessary The Windows Features dialog box opens, with all of the components of your Windows 7 program displayed in the Components list. Each component contains one or more parts that you can install or remove. A blank box means that none of the parts of that component are installed; a shaded box means that only some of the parts of the component are installed; and a checked box means that all of the parts of that component are installed. To display what is included in a component, click the plus sign next to the component name.

4. Click the Plus sign next to Games, click the Minesweeper check box or another available one (do not change any other settings) The Minesweeper check box is deselected in the Components list, as shown in Figure N-14.

5. Click OK A status bar appears, indicating progress as the wizard installs files from your hard disk or the installation disc to your hard drive. Upon completion, the Programs and Features window reappears. TROUBLE If the Set up Games dialog box opens, use the recommended settings.

Windows 326

6. Click the Start button

on the taskbar, then click Games

The Minesweeper game no longer appears in the Games window.

7. Click the Close button in the Games window, then click the Back button Programs and Features window to open the Programs window Maintaining Your Computer

in the

Buttons to uninstall, change, or repair an installed program; yours might differ

Windows 7

FIGURE N-13: Programs and Features window

Installed programs; your list might differ

Selected installed program; your program might differ

FIGURE N-14: Windows Features dialog box

Shaded box indicates some components are currently installed

Minesweeper check box; deselected to uninstall Blank box indicates uninstalled component

Check box indicates installed component

Terminating an inactive program If a program stops responding to mouse or keyboard commands, you can use the Windows Task Manager to terminate and exit the program, after which you can restart it. To terminate an inactive program, rightclick an empty area on the taskbar, then click Start Task Manager or press [Ctrl][Alt][Delete], then click Start Task Manager to open the Windows Task Manager window. Click the Applications tab, if necessary. Click the program you want to terminate in the task list, then click

End Task. Sometimes it takes a few moments to terminate the program. If the program still doesn’t terminate, click End Task again. When the program termination process completes, click the Close button in the Windows Task Manager window. You can also click the Close button in a program window, then click End Task. When an alert appears, click Cancel.

Maintaining Your Computer

Windows 327

UNIT

N Windows 7

Adding a Program Windows 7 comes with many programs; a typical installation provides you with the most common programs, but you can install additional Windows components as needed. You can use links in the Programs window to add Windows components not included in the original installation or that you removed to free space on a hard disk. When you install a Windows component, you might need the Windows 7 installation disc to complete the process; in most cases, the files are already available on your hard disk. If you want to install a program that is not included on the Windows 7 installation disc (known as a third-party program), such as Microsoft Office, you need to use the installation program provided by the software manufacturer on disc or downloaded from the Web. When you install a new third-party program on your computer, the Start menu highlights the menus you need to click to start the program. During breaks and lunch at QST, you like to play some of the games that came with Windows 7. You want to check which games are not available and install them to play.

If you do not have the Windows 7 installation disc to install a Windows 7 program, you might not be able to complete the lesson steps. Simply read through this lesson without completing the steps.

STEPS TROUBLE If you do not have the Windows 7 installation disc, see your instructor or technical support person.

1. Click the Turn Windows features on or off link under Programs and Features, then click Yes to grant access to the dialog box, if necessary The Windows Features dialog box opens, and the wizard searches for components installed on your computer. The Components list shows all the components of Windows 7, as shown in Figure N-15.

2. Click the Plus sign next to Games The Components list of current Windows 7 games appears in a list.

3. Click the Minesweeper check box or the one you selected in the previous lesson to select it (do not change any other settings) The Minesweeper check box is selected, as shown in Figure N-16.

4. Click OK, then if requested, insert the Windows 7 installation disc in the appropriate drive A status bar appears, indicating progress as the wizard installs files from your hard disk or the installation disc to your hard disk. Upon completion, the Programs window reopens.

5. Click the Close button 6. Click the Start button

in the Programs window to close it on the taskbar, then click Games

The Minesweeper game now appears in the Games window.

7. Click the Close button in the Games window, then if necessary, remove the Windows 7 installation disc from the appropriate drive

Windows 328

Maintaining Your Computer

Windows 7

FIGURE N-15: Windows Features dialog box

Shaded box indicates some components in the list are installed Blank box indicates uninstalled component

Windows components

Check box indicates installed component

FIGURE N-16: Windows Features dialog box with a game selected

Minesweeper check box; selected to install

Getting older programs to run on Windows 7 Some older programs are designed to run on earlier versions of Windows and don’t work properly on Windows 7. You can set the compatibility of Windows 7 to act like an earlier version of Windows to run an older program. In addition, you can also set display resolution and color settings, and user privilege levels, to provide the best level of compatibility for the program and the Windows 7 operating system. You use the Program Compatibility Wizard to step you through the process or set options manually on the Compatibility tab in the program’s Properties dialog box. To use the Program Compatibility Wizard,

open the Control Panel, click the Programs link, click the Run programs made for previous versions of Windows link, then follow the on-screen instructions. To set options manually, click the Start button, locate the older program, right-click the program you want to change, click Properties, click the Compatibility tab, click the Run this program in compatibility mode for check box to select it, click the list arrow below the check box, click the version of Windows you want to use, select the check boxes with the other compatibility settings you want, then click OK.

Maintaining Your Computer

Windows 329

UNIT

N Windows 7

Setting Default Programs When you double-click an audio or video file, or click a Web link, a default program associated with that file type automatically starts and opens the file. The Set program access and computer defaults link in the Default Programs window of the Control Panel provides an easy way to change the default program used for specific file types. These include file types such as .bmp or .jpg, and common activities, such as Web browsing, sending e-mail, playing audio and video files, and using instant messaging. You can also specify which programs are available from the Start menu, the desktop, and other locations. To change default options, you need to have administrator privileges for your computer. The options you set apply to all users on your computer. QST uses Paint as its default graphics program. As part of your computer checks, you want to make sure all the computers are set up with Paint as the default program.

STEPS QUICK TIP You can also click the Start button on the taskbar, click Control Panel, click the Programs link, then click the Default Programs link.

1. Click the Start button

on the taskbar, point to All Programs, then click Default Programs

The Default Programs window opens, displaying links to program-related options.

2. Click the Set your default programs link, then in the Programs list click Paint The Set Default Programs window opens, as shown in Figure N-17, displaying default program options for Windows Paint. You can set this program as your default or choose defaults, such as file types and protocols, for the selected program. Instead of choosing defaults by program, you can also choose defaults by the file type or protocol.

3. Click the Back button , click the Associate a file type or protocol with a program link, then click an available file type The Set Associations window opens, as shown in Figure N-18, displaying information about the selected file type. You can use the Change program button to change the program associated with the file type.

4. Click the Back button , click the Set program access and computer defaults link, then click Yes to grant access to the dialog box, if necessary The Set Program Access and Computer Defaults dialog box opens, which allows you to control access to certain programs and set defaults for this computer.

5. Click the down arrow

to the right of the Custom option

Default options appear for your Web browser, e-mail program, media player, instant messaging program, and virtual machine for Java if it’s installed. You can use the current program or a Windows program as the default.

6. Click Cancel The Default Programs window reappears.

7. Click the Close button

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Maintaining Your Computer

in the Default Programs window

Windows 7

FIGURE N-17: Set Default Programs window

Programs list; your list might differ

Set this program as default link Choose defaults for this program link

FIGURE N-18: Set Associations window

Program associated with selected file type

Change program button

Selected file type; your list might differ

Running MS-DOS programs and commands Besides running Windows 7 programs, you can also enter commands and run programs written in MS-DOS. MS-DOS stands for Microsoft Disk Operating System. MS-DOS, or DOS, employs a command-line interface through which you must type commands at a command prompt to run different tasks. A character such as a > or $ appears at the beginning of a command prompt. Each DOS command has a strict set of rules, called a command syntax, that you must follow when expressing a command. Many commands allow you to include switches and parameters that give you additional control of the command. For example, dir /p lists the contents of the current folder, one screen at a time if

you use the /p switch. To open the command prompt, click the Start button, point to All Programs, click Accessories, and then click Command Prompt. At the prompt, type a command including any parameters, and then press [Enter]. You can ping a connection to make sure it works and find out an IP address. Ping is a diagnostic network tool that verifies whether an IP address is accessible. To test a connection, type ping IP address at the command prompt, and then press [Enter]. To find an IP address and configuration information, type ipconfig or type ipconfig /all, and then press [Enter]. To get a new IP address, type ipconfig /release, press [Enter], type ipconfig /renew, and then press [Enter].

Maintaining Your Computer

Windows 331

Practice

For current SAM information including versions and content details, visit SAM Central (http://samcentral.course.com). If you have a SAM user profile, you may have access to hands-on instruction, practice, and assessment of the skills covered in this unit. Since we support various versions of SAM throughout the life of this text, you will want to check with your instructor for instructions and the correct URL/Web site to access those assignments.

Concepts Review

Match the statements below with the elements labeled in the screen shown in Figure N-19. FIGURE N-19

f e d

c

b a

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Which element optimizes a disk? Which element displays the subscore and base score? Which element sets program standards for use? Which element cleans up a disk? Which element removes components? Which element removes programs?

Match each term with the statement that best describes it. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

Disk Cleanup Check Disk Disk Defragmenter System Restore Quick Format

Windows 332

a. b. c. d. e.

Finds and repairs disk errors Deletes files Optimizes disk access Reinstalls computer files Erases disk files

Maintaining Your Computer

Select the best answer from the list of choices. 12. Which of the following is the lowest score for the components ratings? a. Base score c. Score b. Subscore d. Index 13. Which option performs a disk format that removes all files from a disk and scans the disk for bad sectors? a. Quick Format selected c. Full Format selected b. Quick Format deselected d. Full Format deselected 14. Which of the following locations is not a tool in the disk properties dialog box? a. Error checking c. Maintenance b. Defragmentation d. Backup 15. Which of the following is not a Check Disk function? a. Finds damaged sections of a disk c. Repairs damaged sections of a disk b. Moves data away from damaged sections of a disk d. Physically repairs a damaged disk 16. Disk defragmentation arranges _________________. a. Data Files c. System files b. Unused space d. All of the above 17. Which of the following is not a Disk Cleanup file type? a. Program Files c. Temporary files b. Recycle Bin d. Temporary Internet files 18. A restore point allows you to _________________. a. Recover personal files c. Recover personal and system files b. Recover system files d. Recover software programs 19. Which of the following is not a feature in the Programs window? a. Install a Windows component c. Remove a Windows component b. Install a program d. Remove a program 20. Which of the following is not a feature in the Default Programs window? a. Set your default programs c. Associate a file type with a program b. Set your default Windows components d. Set program access and computer defaults

Windows 7

Concepts Review (Continued)

Skills Review If you are working in a lab, check with your instructor or technical support person for authorization to perform Steps 4–8; if you do not receive authorization, skip Steps 4–8. 1. Improve computer performance. a. Open the Control Panel, then open the System and Security window. b. Open the Performance Information and Tools window. c. View the WEI ratings. d. Open the Advanced Tools window, then generate a system health report. e. Close the Resource and Performance Monitor window, then minimize the Advanced Tools window. 2. Format a disk. a. Insert a removable disk in the appropriate drive. b. Open the Computer window. c. Right-click the drive icon containing your removable disk, then click Format. d. Click the Quick Format check box to deselect it, if necessary. e. Click Start, then click OK in the alert dialog box. f. Click OK in the message box, then click Close in the Format dialog box.

Maintaining Your Computer

Windows 333

Skills Review (Continued) 3. Find and repair disk errors. a. In the Computer window, right-click the drive icon containing your Data Files, then click Properties. b. Click the Tools tab, then click Check now. c. Click the Automatically fix file system errors check box to select it, if necessary. d. Click the Scan for and attempt recovery of bad sectors check box to select it, then click Start. e. Click Close in the message box, click OK in the Properties dialog box, then click the Close button in the Computer window. f. Remove the removable disk. 4. Defragment a disk. a. Click the Advanced Tools taskbar button, then open Disk Defragmenter. b. Modify the schedule. c. Enable the Run on a schedule (recommended) option, if necessary. d. Modify the schedule to be weekly. e. Deselect all disks, then select the local disk. f. Start the disk defragmentation, then cancel it. g. Close the Disk Defragmenter window, then click the Back button twice to return to the System and Security window. 5. Clean up a disk. a. In the System and Security window, start Disk Cleanup. (Hint: Click Free up disk space under Administrative Tools.) b. Perform a Disk Cleanup on your files only. c. If necessary, click the drive list arrow, click the local hard disk, then click OK. d. In the Files to delete list, click Temporary Internet Files (but not the check box), then click View Files. e. Click the Content window Close button. f. Click the check boxes next to any items with check marks to deselect the items. (Be sure to scroll through the entire list.) Click the Temporary Internet Files check box to select it. g. Click OK in the Disk Cleanup dialog box, then click Delete Files in the message box. 6. Restore computer settings. a. In the System and Security window, open the System window, then open the System Properties dialog box with the System Protection tab. b. Create a restore point with your name, date, and time, close System Restore, then close System Properties. c. Click the Control Panel Home link to go back to the Control Panel. 7. Remove a program. a. In the Control Panel, open the Programs window. b. Open the Programs and Features window to uninstall a program. c. Select a program to display the Uninstall, Change, and Repair buttons. d. Click Turn Windows features on or off to open the Windows Features dialog box. e. Open the list of games. f. Deselect the Chess Titans check box or another available game. g. Click OK to uninstall the game, then close the Programs and Features window. h. Use the Start button to open the Games window without the game, then close the Games window. i. Use the Back button to display the Programs window. 8. Add a program. a. In the Programs window, click Turn Windows features on or off to open the Windows Features dialog box. b. Open the list of games. c. Select the Chess Titans check box or the game you chose in Step 7f. d. Click OK to install the game, then if requested, insert the Windows 7 installation disc. Upon completion, remove the installation disc. e. Close the Programs window. f. Use the Start button to display the game in the Games window, then close the Games window. Windows 334

Maintaining Your Computer

9. Set default programs. a. Start Default Programs from the Start menu. b. Click Set your default programs to open the Set Default Programs window, then select a program. c. Go back to the Default Programs window. d. Click Associate a file type or protocol with a program to open the Set Associations window, then select a file type or protocol. e. Go back to the Default Programs window. f. Open the Set Program Access and Computer Defaults dialog box, then display the Microsoft Windows, Non-Microsoft, and Custom settings. g. Click Cancel, then close the Default Programs window.

Windows 7

Skills Review (Continued)

Independent Challenge 1 You are an IT professional at Blythe Securities, an investment banking and securities firm. Part of your job is to make sure all the computers are maintained properly and run at the best possible performance levels. After installing Windows 7 on all the computers in the office, you want to check performance levels to determine the average subscores and base score and identify any computers that need performance improvement. a. b. c. d. e. f.

On at least three different computers, determine the Windows Experience Index score. Write down the subscores for all the components. Write down the base score. Generate a system health report. Determine which computers need performance improvement. Open WordPad, then create a document called Performance Results.rtf in the location where you store your Data Files that contains the results of your performance tests.

Independent Challenge 2 You own Kenney & Associates, an international public relations firm that specializes in overseas travel. You want to protect important company data from software viruses, so you decide to keep a clean copy of your files on a removable disk. a. Format a blank removable disk using the Full Format type, then label the disk My Files. You can use the copied disk you made in this unit if you want, but not the disk that contains your Data Files. b. Copy two or three files of your choice to the blank, formatted disk. c. Scan the removable disk for errors, then label the disk for easy identification. Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Insert a removable media device, such as a USB Flash drive. ■ Enable Windows ReadyBoost. ■ Specify the amount of space you want to allocate. ■ Remove and reinsert the drive to use Windows ReadyBoost.

Independent Challenge 3 You are a course developer at EZSoft Inc., a computer training company that specializes in training beginner- to expert-level software users. You are developing a new course on maintaining a computer. You are currently working on a lesson to teach students how to optimize and improve disk performance by using the Windows system tools Check Disk and Disk Defragmenter. a. Open WordPad, then create a document called Win7 Tools Training.rtf in the location where you store your Data Files that instructs students on how to use the Check Disk and Disk Defragmenter system tools.

Maintaining Your Computer

Windows 335

Independent Challenge 3 (Continued) b. Follow the steps in the WordPad document to check and defragment the hard drive (see your instructor or technical support person for authorization to defragment your hard disk), and take at least one print screen of the Check Disk and Disk Defragmenter window as you go through the material, and insert the picture in the WordPad document. To take a print screen of the current window and then insert it into the WordPad document, press [Alt][Print Screen] to copy the picture to the Clipboard, switch to the WordPad document, place the insertion point where you want the picture to go, then click the Paste button on the WordPad toolbar. c. Save the document, print it, then close WordPad.

Real Life Independent Challenge Windows 7 comes with many interesting games. You want to install them all on your computer so you can review the current list and hopefully play a game you’ve never tried before. a. b. c. d. e. f.

Open the Control Panel, then open the Programs window. Use the Windows Features dialog box to install all the available Windows games. Check the Games submenu on the Start menu to make sure they are installed. Open and play a game. Uninstall the Windows games you installed in Step b. Check the Games submenu on the Start menu to make sure they are uninstalled.

Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Install a third-party game. (Hint: Check on the Web for free shareware games, such as www.downloads.com; get authorization to install the game from your instructor or network administrator.) ■ Use the Program Compatibility Wizard to check the third-party game software program. ■ Uninstall the third-party game software.

Visual Workshop Re-create the choices in the screen shown in Figure N-20, which shows the results of using the Disk Cleanup for Local Disk (C:) dialog box. (Hint: Your categories might differ slightly.) If you are working in a lab, check with your instructor or technical support person for authorization to delete all the files in the Disk Cleanup for Local Disk (C:) dialog box. FIGURE N-20

Windows 336

Maintaining Your Computer

UNIT

O Windows 7

Backing Up and Restoring Your Files

Files You Will Need:

It is vital that you make backup copies of the files on your computer on a regular basis so

Quest Travel (folder)

backup, when referring to the noun or adjective) refers to the process of using a special

Company (folder)

software program designed to read your data quickly, compress it into a small, efficient

QST Company

you don’t lose valuable data if your computer encounters problems. The term back up (or

Info.rtf

space, and then store it on an external medium, such as an external or network drive, a

QST Fact

removable USB disk, or writable CDs or DVDs. Windows 7 includes Backup and Restore, a

Sheet.rtf

file backup and restore utility, located in the Control Panel. Using Backup and Restore has

QST People.rtf QST Press Release.rtf To Do List.rtf

several advantages over simply copying files to a removable disk. First, your files are compressed as they are copied so that you can fit more onto a removable disk. Backup and Restore can also split a large file across two or more disks (saving disk space), something you cannot do with the Copy command. Finally, in an emergency, Backup and Restore offers several data-recovery aids to help you locate and restore important files quickly.

As

an IT professional at Quest Specialty Travel (QST), you often need to establish backup routines and schedules to keep from losing important company information and data.

OBJECTIVES

Explore Backup and Restore Back up files Manage and change backups Schedule a backup Restore backed-up files Restore previous file versions Copy files from a backup Delete a backup set Create a system repair disc

UNIT

O Windows 7

Exploring Backup and Restore Using the Backup process in Backup and Restore, you can pick the day, time, and how often you want to back up your files, folders, and settings. You can also specify the type of data to back up, such as documents, photos, or music. Windows 7 takes care of the rest. And you won’t be interrupted while you work because automatic data backup occurs in the background, regardless of when you’ve scheduled your backup. You can continue to use your computer, even when it’s backing up. Easily backing up your data is only part of the story—you also need a way to get your files back where they belong if something happens to them. Using the Restore process, you can choose only what you want to restore—whether it’s an individual file or even your entire system and its related settings. Windows 7 takes care of reinstating the files to their previous location before they were lost. Before you start setting up backup routines and schedules, you want to check out Backup and Restore in Windows 7 to help you determine the best strategy for backing up QST company files.

Before you start this unit, copy the Data Files folder for UnitO to the Documents folder on your computer. When you are done with the unit, delete the folder.

STEPS QUICK TIP You can also click the Start button, point to All Programs, click Maintenance, then click Backup and Restore.

1. Click the Start button

on the taskbar, then click Control Panel

The Control Panel window opens.

2. Click the System and Security link The System and Security window opens.

3. Click the Backup and Restore link The Backup and Restore window opens, as shown in Figure O-1, displaying options to set up, back up, or restore files.

QUICK TIP From the Backup and Restore window, you can use the links in the task pane to create a system image or system repair disc.

4. Read the status information in the Backup and Restore window In Figure O-1, the Backup status indicates that a Windows Backup has not been set up. If you have not backed up your computer, you should use the Set up backup link to create a Windows Backup. This is critical if your computer ever stops working. If you have already backed up your computer, you should use the Back up now button to create a backup of recently changed personal files.

5. Click the Get help button

in the Backup and Restore window

The Windows Help and Support window opens, displaying links to Help topics for backup and restore.

6. Click the What backup tools does Windows provide? link, then read the information in the Help topic in the Windows Help and Support window 7. Click the Close button The Backup and Restore window reappears.

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Backing Up and Restoring Your Files

Get help button

Windows 7

FIGURE O-1: Backup and Restore window

Set up backup link

Creating a backup strategy Before you back up files, it is a good idea to develop a backup strategy. A backup strategy is a method for regularly backing up your work that balances trade-offs between safety, time, and media space. For example, if safety were your only concern, you could back up your entire hard drive every hour or if spending minimal time and money didn’t matter, you might back up only a few crucial files once a month. The best choice is a balance between the two extremes. The backup medium that you use to store backed-up files from a hard drive is usually an external or network drive, a removable disk, such as a USB flash drive, or writable CDs or DVDs designed to store computer data you are unable to back up to the Internet. For time purposes, you should back up only the files that change on a regular basis; back up the rest of your files at less-frequent intervals. Software program files that can

easily be reinstalled from their original program CDs or DVDs do not need to be backed up as often as your personal document files. If you cannot afford to lose the work accomplished in one day, such as mission-critical data files, you should back up once a day. If your work does not change much during the week, back up once a week. Depending on the number and size of your files and the backup device you are using, the backup can take a few minutes to a few hours to complete. If you are planning to back up large amounts of information, such as your entire hard drive, it is best to start the backup at the end of the day and use a large-capacity external drive or removable disk, if possible, so you do not have to swap multiple disks. When a file does not fit on a disk, Backup splits the file, fitting what it can on the current disk and then prompting you to insert the next disk.

Backing Up and Restoring Your Files

Windows 339

UNIT

O Windows 7

Backing Up Files You can back up files from a local or network drive to an external or network drive, a removable disk, or a writable CD or DVD. The Backup process walks you through the steps of backing up files on your computer. You can back up every file on your computer or selected files and folders. Backing up your entire computer is a good idea in case you have a problem with Windows and it doesn’t start properly. Typically, you back up your entire computer after you make major changes to your system and you back up changes to individual files, folders, and settings on a regular basis. During the process, you select the backup location, files and folders to back up, then choose the day, time, and how often you want to back up. You can select a backup location on another drive, USB drive, writable CDs or DVDs, or a network. System files, program files, temporary files, Recycle Bin files, and files on a FAT drive are never backed up. When you perform a backup, Windows 7 creates a backup set, also known as a backup job, which contains the compressed copies of the files you backed up and an index of the backed-up files to make it easier to locate and manage them during the restore process. You have not backed up any files on your computer, so you want to back up the document files on your computer to a removable disk.

If you do not have an external, removable, CD-R/RW, or DVD-R/RW drive attached to your computer or access to a network drive, simply read through the rest of the unit without completing the steps.

STEPS 1. Insert the removable disk (USB flash drive) you formatted with the name BACKUP in UnitN or use another available external, CD, or DVD writable drive with a blank writable CD or DVD disc Now you can back up files to the removable disk. The drive or disc space you need for backups depends on what you need to back up on a regular basis. A general rule of thumb requires 30%–50% free disk space on the backup drive or disc. TROUBLE If your removable disk doesn’t appear, click the Refresh button. If it still doesn’t appear, you might need a larger size drive.

2. Click the Set up backup link or the Change settings link The Set up backup Wizard opens. The Change settings link is not available until after the first backup, which is shown later in Figure O-4.

3. In the Save backup on list, click the removable disk, as shown in Figure O-2, then click Next The next wizard dialog box appears, asking you what you want to back up. You can choose the Let Windows choose (recommended) or Let me choose option. The Let Windows choose (recommended) option backs up files saved in libraries, on the desktop, and in default Windows folders, while the Let me choose option backs up only the files you select.

4. Click the Let me choose option button, then click Next The next wizard dialog box appears, asking you what type of files you want to back up. TROUBLE If the UnitO Data Files are not on your local hard disk, copy them to the Documents library folder on your computer.

5. Scroll down if necessary, click the Expand Indicator to navigate to the Documents folder where you copied your Data Files, click the UnitO check box to select it, click any other selected check boxes to deselect them, then click Next The next wizard dialog box appears, displaying your backup settings, as shown in Figure O-3.

6. Click the Save settings and run backup button The Backup and Restore window opens, displaying a progress meter during the backup process. Upon completion, an alert might open.

7. Click Close, if necessary, to close the alert dialog box The backup results appear, as shown in Figure O-4, along with other current and future backup information, such as location, next backup, last backup, contents, and schedule.

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Backing Up and Restoring Your Files

Windows 7

FIGURE O-2: Backup save location

Backup location; yours might differ

Refresh button

FIGURE O-3: Backup settings

Backup location; yours might differ

Backup summary; yours might differ

Save settings and run backup button

FIGURE O-4: Backup results

Back up now button Backup results; yours might differ Manage space link Backup settings; yours might differ Change settings link

Backing Up and Restoring Your Files

Windows 341

UNIT

O Windows 7

Managing and Changing Backups After you complete a backup, you can manage backups and make changes to backup settings. In the Backup and Restore window, you can use the Manage space link to view backups, delete backups, and browse backup locations. If you need to free up space on your backup drive, you can delete an old backup. In addition, you can change settings for creating a system image. A disk image is an exact copy of a drive, which is useful for restoring a computer with hard drive problems. If you want to change settings for the next backup, you can use the Change settings link in the Backup and Restore window to change the backup location, backup files, or schedule. The backup location can reside on your local computer or a network server. You can back up your personal files on your local computer. However, system files, program files, temporary files, Recycle Bin files, and files on a FAT drive are never backed up. So far, you have only backed up files in the Documents category. As part of routine computer maintenance, you want to add the Pictures category to the regular backup.

STEPS QUICK TIP To perform a backup with the current settings, click Back up now in the Backup and Restore window.

1. In the Backup and Restore window, click the Manage space link The Manage Windows Backup disk space window opens, as shown in Figure O-5, where you can view backup space usage summary information, view previous backups, delete backups, or browse the backup location.

2. Click the View backups button The Manage Windows Backup disk space window opens, displaying previous backups. You can delete previous backups if you need to free up space on your backup location.

3. Click Close, then click Close The Backup and Restore window reappears, as shown in Figure O-6.

4. Click the Change settings link The Set up backup window briefly opens before the Set up backup Wizard opens.

5. In the Save backup on list, click the removable disk, then click Next The next wizard dialog box appears, asking you what you want to back up.

6. Click the Let me choose option button, if necessary, then click Next The next wizard dialog box appears, asking you what type of files you want to back up. QUICK TIP If you add a new user account on your computer, Windows Backup can include the data files in the backup.

7. Scroll down if necessary, click the Expand Indicator to navigate to the Documents folder where you copied your Data Files, click the UnitO check box to select it, if necessary, select the check box for another folder, if available, to select it, then click Next The next wizard dialog box appears, displaying a review of your backup settings.

8. Click Save settings and exit The Backup and Restore window reappears, displaying updated information about the backup, which includes the date and time of the last backup and the next scheduled backup, and the location of the saved files.

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Backing Up and Restoring Your Files

Windows 7

FIGURE O-5: Manage Windows Backup disk space window

Space usage summary; yours might differ

Browse link

View backups button

FIGURE O-6: Backup and Restore window

Manage space link

Change settings link

Understanding permissions to back up files and folders You must have certain permissions to back up files and folders. If you are an administrator or a backup operator in a local group using Windows 7, you can back up any file and folder on the computer to which the local group applies. Else, you must be the owner of the files and folders you want to back up, or you must have one or more of the following permissions: Read, Read and Execute, Modify, or Full Control. You can restrict access to a backup file by selecting the Allow only the owner and the Administrator access to the backup data check box in the Backup Job Information dialog box. Thereafter, only an administrator or the person who created the backup file will be able to restore the files and folders. To add a user to the Backup Operators group, click the

System and Security link in the Control Panel, click the Administrative Tools link, double-click the Computer Management icon in the Administrative Tools window to open the Computer Management window, click the Expand indicator next to Local Users and Groups in the console tree, click Groups, double-click Backup Operators in the Details pane, click Add in the Backup Operators Properties dialog box, type the domain and username of the person you want to make a backup operator in the form \\Domain\user name, then click OK. For more information about using Computer Management, see Appendix B, “Administering Your Computer.”

Backing Up and Restoring Your Files Copyright 2010 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part.

Windows 343

UNIT

O Windows 7

Scheduling a Backup A smart backup strategy is to schedule backups on a regular basis to protect your data. Typically, late at night or on the weekends, when nobody is around, is a good time to perform backups. Backup makes it easy to schedule backups any time you want to perform them. You can schedule a backup to run once every day, every week, or every month. If you have a backup scheduled for a certain time and you need to cancel it, you can turn off automatic backups and then turn it back on later. If your computer is turned off at the time the backup is scheduled to occur, the backup process begins the next time you turn on your computer. When setting a backup schedule, Windows operates according to your system’s clock to commence backups. Keeping your computer’s clock set to an accurate time is crucial to the success of your backups and other file maintenance tasks. You decide to set a backup schedule for routine backups during QST’s off-hours.

STEPS 1. In the Backup and Restore window, click the Change settings link The Set up backup Wizard opens.

2. In the Save backup on list, click the removable disk, click Next, click the Let me choose option button if necessary, click Next, navigate to the Documents folder where you copied your Data Files, click the UnitO check box, if necessary, click any other selected check boxes to deselect them, then click Next The next wizard dialog box appears, displaying your backup settings.

3. Click the Change schedule link The next wizard dialog box appears, displaying the current backup schedule.

4. Click the Run backup on a schedule (recommended) check box, if necessary Automatic backups based on the selected schedule are activated.

5. Click the What day list arrow, then click Saturday The scheduled backup day and time is set to Saturday night at 7:00 p.m.

6. Click the What time list arrow, then click 3:00 PM The scheduled backup day remains Saturday, but the time is set to 3:00 p.m., as shown in Figure O-7.

7. Click OK, then click the Save settings and exit button The Backup and Restore window reappears. QUICK TIP To turn on automatic backups, click the Turn on schedule link in the Backup and Restore window.

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8. Click the Turn off schedule link in the task pane, then click Yes to grant access to the dialog box, if necessary Automatic backups based on the current schedule are deactivated. The Turn off schedule link is removed from the task pane and the Turn on schedule link is added to the Backup and Restore window, as shown in Figure O-8.

Backing Up and Restoring Your Files

Run backup on a schedule (recommended) check box

Windows 7

FIGURE O-7: Backup schedule updated

Backup schedule settings updated

FIGURE O-8: Backup schedule turned off

“None” indicates that automatic backup is turned off

Turn on schedule link

Restore my files button

Rotating your backups For extra security, it is a good idea to rotate your backup media or locations. For example, if you do a complete backup once a week and incremental backups on the intervening days, you might want to keep one week’s worth of backup on one media and then use a different media for the following week. If your original storage medium and your backup media are both damaged, you will still be able to restore files

from the previous time period’s backup. The files you restore probably will not be the most current versions, but you will be better off than if you had to re-create everything from scratch. In case of fire or theft, you might want to store your backup media in a separate location away from your computer.

Backing Up and Restoring Your Files

Windows 345

UNIT

O Windows 7

Restoring Backed-Up Files The real value in backing up your files becomes apparent if you lose or damage some files, or need information from a document that has changed a great deal over time. Using the Restore Files Wizard, you can restore a single file, several files, or an entire hard drive. Simply specify which files you want to restore and where you want them to be placed—either in their original place or in a new location. When you create a backup, a catalog, or index of the backed-up files, is built and stored on the backup medium. The catalog is called GlobalCatalog in Backup and Restore and uses the .wbcat file extension. The catalog speeds up the process when you want to restore the files by creating an index of files for easy retrieval. One of the Quest Specialty Travel employees accidentally deleted some important files from his hard drive, so you need to restore them from the latest backup.

STEPS 1. In the Backup and Restore window, click Restore my files The Restore Files Wizard opens, asking you what you want to restore. You can select the backup files you want to restore by browsing for files or folders, or by searching for them. QUICK TIP To search for a file or folder, click Search, type the characters you want to find, press [Enter], select the check boxes with the files or folders you want, then click Add.

2. Click the Browse for folders button, navigate to the location where your Data Files are stored on the removable disk, select the UnitO folder, then click Add folder The UnitO folder appears in the wizard dialog box, as shown in Figure O-9.

3. Click Next The next wizard dialog box appears, asking where you want to save the restored files. The restore location needs to be a disk with the NTFS system file format. Because a removable disk uses the FAT system file format, you need to select an NTFS disk, which is typically your hard disk.

4. Click the In the following location option button, click Browse, select the Documents folder on your hard disk, then click OK The restore location is selected, as shown in Figure O-10.

5. Click the Restore the files to their original subfolders check box to select it, if necessary This option allows you to restore the files with the same file structure as the original one.

6. Click Restore The Restore Files Wizard dialog box opens. The backed-up files are restored to the selected restore location with their original subfolder structure from the root of your hard disk, typically (C:).

7. Click the View restored files link The Windows Explorer window opens, displaying the folder that contains the restored files.

8. Click the C folder to select it, press [Delete], click Yes to confirm the deletion, click in the Continue to delete a shared folder, if necessary, then click the Close button Windows Explorer window The restored folder is deleted. The Windows Explorer window closes and the Restore Files Wizard dialog box reappears.

9. Click Finish, then click the

in the Backup and Restore window

The Backup and Restore window closes and the desktop appears.

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Backing Up and Restoring Your Files

Windows 7

FIGURE O-9: Restore files or folders

Browse for files button Folder added to list to restore

Browse for folders button

Buttons that remove files and folders from the restore list

FIGURE O-10: Restore location and options

In the original location option button In the following location option button Restore the files to their original subfolders check box

Browse button

Restore location; yours might differ

Backing Up and Restoring Your Files

Windows 347

UNIT

O Windows 7

Restoring Previous File Versions When you perform a backup using the Backup Wizard or create a restore point using the System Restore Wizard, Windows creates shadow copies of files and folders. Shadow copies are internal copies of files. When System Protection is turned on in the System Properties dialog box, Windows automatically creates shadow copies of files—except Windows system files—that have been modified since the last restore point was created. If one or more backed-up or restored files become damaged or you accidentally modify or delete them, you can use the Previous Versions feature to restore them with the shadow copies. You can restore either individual files or complete folders. It’s important to realize that you cannot undo the changes made to a file after restoring it using the Previous Versions feature. Once you restore a file or folder, the current file or folder is deleted and replaced by the restored one. As an IT professional at Quest Specialty Travel, you want to make sure you are able to restore files if you need to, so you decide to restore a file using the Previous Versions feature.

STEPS 1. Click the Start button

on the taskbar, then click Computer

The Computer window opens.

2. Navigate to the Documents folder where your Data Files are stored, then open the Quest Travel folder The folder window opens, displaying the Data Files for this unit—in this case, the Quest Travel folder in the UnitO folder in the Documents window.

3. Right-click the To Do List.rtf file, as shown in Figure O-11, then click Restore previous versions The To Do List Properties dialog box opens, as shown in Figure O-12, displaying the shadow copies of the previous version of the file or folder in the File versions list. TROUBLE If no files display, turn on System Protection and perform a restore, click the Start button, click Computer, click the System properties button, click the Advanced system settings link, click the System Protection tab, select the local disk, click Configure, click the Restore system settings and previous versions of files option button, then click OK twice.

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4. Click the To Do List.rtf file item in the list, if necessary, to select it The selected file includes the date modified and location where the shadow copy is stored.

5. Click Restore, click Copy and Replace, if necessary, then click Finish The file is restored.

6. Click OK The Properties dialog box closes.

7. Click the Close button

in the Explorer window

The desktop appears.

Backing Up and Restoring Your Files

Windows 7

FIGURE O-11: Restoring a previous version

Selected file

Restore previous versions command

FIGURE O-12: Properties dialog box with the Previous Versions tab displayed

Previous version from a shadow copy

Restore button

Restoring your computer To restore your computer, you need to exit the Backup and Restore window and run Windows Complete PC Restore from the System Recovery Options menu. You can access the Recovery Options menu from a recovery partition using the F8 key at Windows 7 start-up or from the start-up of your Windows 7 installation disc. Windows Complete PC Restore reformats your hard disk and erases all your data and programs, and then restores it. Before you start the restore process,

be sure to have the removable media (your backup material) available. Click the Start button, click Control Panel, click the Back up your computer link, click Restore computer, click Close to the alert, click the Close button, insert your Windows installation disc, then restart your computer. At start-up, press F8, select Repair your computer on the Advanced Boot Options menu, then press [Enter]. Follow the on-screen instructions to complete the process.

Backing Up and Restoring Your Files Copyright 2010 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part.

Windows 349

UNIT

O Windows 7

Copying Files from a Backup If you have backed up files or folders and know exactly where they are located on the backup media, you can open the backed-up media drive and navigate directly to the files and folders like any other external drive. You can then use the Copy and Paste commands to copy the files and folders you need to another place on your computer. If you prefer, you can also use the Copy To Folder command on the Edit menu. This method is useful when you are copying files and folders to disks, networks, and other drives. If you’re not sure where a backup file is located, you can find it in Backup and Restore. In Backup and Restore, click the Manage space link, then click the Browse link for the current backup or click the View backups button. An IT colleague needs some of your files to finish backing up all the files used in a particular project, so you copy them from your backup to give to him.

STEPS 1. Click the Start button

on the taskbar, then click Computer

The Computer window opens.

2. Double-click the icon for the removable disk, right-click the backup file icon with the name of your computer, then click Open, as shown in Figure O-13 The backup file with your computer name (in this case, STEVEJ-PC) opens, displaying the Backup Set folder. The numbers after the folder name, in this case, 2010-02-05 232019, indicate the date (year-month-day) and time (in a 24-hour clock, not a.m. or p.m.) that the file was backed-up. Accordingly, the date and time listed for your Backup Set folder will differ from this example.

3. Double-click the Backup Set folder The contents of the Backup Set folder open, displaying backup folders corresponding to different backups.

4. Double-click the Backup Files folder The Backup Files folder opens, as shown in Figure O-13, displaying a Catalogs folder and compressed .zip folders with the backup files. The Backup Files folder name listed in the Address bar also includes the date and time information.

5. Double-click a compressed .zip folder, then navigate folders to display the Quest Travel folder In this example, the backed-up files are located in the following path: F:\BACKUP\STEVEJ-PC\Backup Set\ Backup Files\Backup files1.zip\C\Users\SteveJ\Documents\UnitO.

6. Right-click the Quest Travel folder, as shown in Figure O-14, then click Copy The Quest Travel folder is copied to the Clipboard.

7. Click Documents in the Navigation pane, right-click a blank area in the right pane, then click Paste The Documents window opens, which is the location in which the backed-up Quest Travel folder and its contents are pasted.

8. Select the Quest Travel folder, press [Delete], click Yes to confirm the deletion, then click in the Documents window the Close button

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Backing Up and Restoring Your Files

Backup file location on removable disk; your location might differ Backup Set folder; your date and time will differ

Windows 7

FIGURE O-13: Navigating to the backed-up files

Catalogs folder containing backups

Compressed backup files Open command

FIGURE O-14: Copying backed-up files

Backed-up Data Files; your path might differ Backed-up Quest Travel folder and its contents Copy command on shortcut menu

Using advanced techniques to manage files and folders When working with files and folders, you can right-click the mouse button to access a shortcut menu with additional management commands. For example, to arrange desktop icons so they do not appear cluttered, right-click a blank area of the desktop, point to View, then click Auto arrange icons or Align icons to grid. Instead of opening a program before you create a new file, you can use a shortcut menu to do both at the same time. To create a new file, right-click a blank area of the desktop, point to New, then click the type of file you want. If you always start a specific program after Windows, you can have Windows automatically start the program for you: Right-click the Startup folder

on the All Programs submenu, click Open, then drag the shortcut to the program into the Startup folder. You can also use the Folder and Search Options dialog box to set advanced management options. In a Windows Explorer window, click the Organize button, then click Folder and search options. To show or hide files and folders, click the Don’t show hidden files, folders, or drives or Show hidden files, folders, and drives option button on the View tab. To show or hide operating system files, click the Hide protected operating system files check box on the View tab.

Backing Up and Restoring Your Files

Windows 351

UNIT

O Windows 7

Deleting a Backup Set Once you begin backing up files, you might find a number of unnecessary backup sets accumulating in your backup file. If you want to delete the entire backup file, you can delete it from the Backup and Restore window. However, if you want to delete only part of it, you can delete the backup set or any of the files from the backup file from the Windows Explorer window. When you delete a backup set, the backup file remains in the backup location. If you want to subsequently delete this backup file, drag the file icon into the Recycle Bin as you would any other Windows file. After creating several backup sets on a QST computer, you decide as part of general maintenance to delete the ones you no longer need to free up some disk space.

STEPS 1. Click the Start button

on the taskbar, then click Computer

The Computer window opens.

2. Double-click the icon for the removable disk with the backup files The Computer window opens, displaying the contents of your removable drive, in this case, BACKUP (F:).

3. Right-click the folder icon with the name of your computer, then click Open The folder with your computer name (in this case, STEVEJ-PC) appears, as shown in Figure O-15, displaying the Backup Set folder.

4. Select the Backup Set folder The folder is selected, ready to be deleted.

5. Right-click the selected Backup Set folder, as shown in Figure O-16, click Delete, then click Yes to confirm the deletion The folder is deleted.

6. Click the Close button

in the Documents window

The desktop reappears.

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Backing Up and Restoring Your Files

Windows 7

FIGURE O-15: Backup Set folder

Backup set folder; your date and time will differ

FIGURE O-16: Deleting the backup set

Backup set folder; your date and time will differ

Delete command

Deleting backups in the Backup and Restore window If you want to free up space on your drive, one complete backup at a time, you can delete an entire backup file in the Backup and Restore window. Click the Start button, click Control Panel, click the Backup your computer link under System and Security, click the Manage space link, click View backups, select the backup you want to delete, as shown in Figure O-17, click Delete, click Close, then click Close again.

FIGURE O-17: Deleting a backup

Backing Up and Restoring Your Files

Windows 353

UNIT

O Windows 7

Creating a System Repair Disc A system repair disc provides system recovery tools to help restore your computer if a serious system error occurs. After you create a system repair disc, store it along with your Windows 7 installation disc (which you might need to use as well) for safekeeping. If you have a problem starting your computer, insert the system repair disc into your disc drive, restart your computer, press a key to boot from the system repair disc, select a language setting, then select a recovery option, which includes Startup Repair, System Restore, System Image Recovery, Windows Memory Diagnostic, and Command Prompt. After backing up and restoring your computer, you realize that creating a system repair disc is an important step as well in case a serious problem with your computer occurs. You decide to create a system repair disc.

You need a blank DVD-R or DVD-RW disc to complete this lesson.

STEPS QUICK TIP You can also click Create system repair disc in the left pane of the Backup and Restore window.

1. Click the Start button on the taskbar, point to All Programs, click Maintenance, then click Create a System Repair Disc The Create a system repair disc dialog box opens, as shown in Figure O-18.

2. Insert a blank DVD-R or DVD-RW disc into your disc drive, then click the Close button , if necessary The Computer window opens, displaying the contents of your removable drive, in this case, BACKUP (F:).

3. Click the Drive list arrow, then select your disc drive Your disc drive appears in the Create a system repair disc dialog box.

4. Click Create disc Windows creates the system repair disc. Upon completion, a Create a system repair disc dialog box message appears, asking you to label the disc, as shown in Figure O-19.

5. Click A Create a system repair disc dialog box message appears, asking you to label the disc.

6. Click OK, then click

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, if necessary.

Backing Up and Restoring Your Files

Windows 7

FIGURE O-18: Create a system repair disc dialog box

Drive list arrow

Create disc button

FIGURE O-19: Create a system repair disc message

Label information

Creating a system image A system image is an exact copy of a drive, including Windows system files, program files, and your personal files. If you have problems with your hard drive, you can use the system image to restore it. You can create your own system image or let Windows create one for you. If your backup drive is formatted using NTFS, contains enough space, and you allow Windows to choose the files to back up, Backup and Restore automatically backs up your files and creates a system image of your programs, Windows, and all drivers and Registry settings.

To create a system image, click the Start button, point to All Programs, click Maintenance, then click Backup and Restore. In the left pane, click Create a system image, then select the location where you want to back up your computer. To select a network location, if available, click Select, type a username and password, click OK, click Next to continue, then click Start backup. If prompted, insert a CD or DVD, then click OK. If prompted to format the disc, click Format. The backup starts, displaying backup status.

Backing Up and Restoring Your Files

Windows 355

Practice

For current SAM information including versions and content details, visit SAM Central (http://samcentral.course.com). If you have a SAM user profile, you may have access to hands-on instruction, practice, and assessment of the skills covered in this unit. Since we support various versions of SAM throughout the life of this text, you will want to check with your instructor for instructions and the correct URL/Web site to access those assignments.

Concepts Review

Match the statements below with the elements labeled in the screen shown in Figure O-20. FIGURE O-20

a b f c

e

d

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Which element holds the backup job? Which element holds the backup files? Which element holds the compressed backup files? Which element holds an index of backup files? Which element lets you set a backup schedule? Which element allows you to delete backup files?

Match each term with the statement that best describes it. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

Backup medium Shadow copies Backup set Catalog Backup strategy

Windows 356

a. b. c. d. e.

Method for regularly backing up files Media to store a backup Files used to restore a previous version Compressed copies of the back files Index of backed-up files

Backing Up and Restoring Your Files

Select the best answer from the list of choices. 12. Which of the following is not an option in the Backup and Restore window? a. Back up files c. Restore files b. Back up files from another computer d. Restore files from another computer 13. Which of the following is the best backup interval for mission-critical data files? a. Daily c. Biyearly b. Monthly d. Yearly 14. Which of the following is not a backup medium? a. CD or DVD c. Internet b. External drive d. Network drive 15. Which of the following is used with the Previous Versions feature? a. Shadow copies c. Backup job b. Backup set d. Catalog 16. Which of the following contains compressed copies of backed-up files? a. Shadow copies c. Backup copies b. Backup set d. Catalog 17. Which of the following is added to the end of the backup folder name? a. Date c. Date and time b. Time d. None of the above 18. What is the name of the backup catalog file? a. Catalog.wbcat c. Catalog.cat b. GlobalCatalog.wbcat d. GlobalCatalog.cat

Windows 7

Concepts Review (Continued)

Skills Review 1. Explore Backup and Restore. a. Open the Control Panel, then open the System and Security window. b. Open the Backup and Restore window. c. Open the Windows Help and Support window. d. Click the How much storage space do I need to back up files? link. e. Read the information in the Help topic. f. Close the Windows Help and Support window. 2. Back up files. a. Insert or use the backup medium you used in Unit N. b. Start a backup, then change backup file settings. c. Back up Quest Travel folder files from the location where you store your Data Files. d. Save settings, then run the backup. 3. Manage and change backup settings. a. In the Backup and Restore window, open the manage space settings. b. View the backups. c. Close both windows. d. In the Backup and Restore window, change backup file settings. e. Select the check box for another folder, if available. f. Save settings, then exit the Backup Wizard.

Backing Up and Restoring Your Files Copyright 2010 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part.

Windows 357

Skills Review (Continued) 4. Schedule a backup. a. In the Backup and Restore window, change backup file settings. b. Change the scheduled backup day to Friday. c. Change the scheduled backup time to 1:00 AM. d. Save settings, then exit the Backup Wizard. e. Turn off the automatic backup schedule. 5. Restore backed-up files. a. In the Backup and Restore window, start the Restore Files Wizard. b. Restore files from the latest backup. c. Add the files and folder in the Quest Travel folder. d. Select the Documents folder on your hard disk to store the restored files. e. Start the restore. f. Close the Backup and Restore window. g. Display the restored files in the Documents window. h. Delete the restored files, then close the Documents window. 6. Restore previous file versions. a. Open the Computer window. b. Navigate to the location where you store your Data Files. c. Restore the previous version of QST People.rtf in the Company folder (located in the Quest Travel folder). d. Close the Explorer window. 7. Copy files from a backup. a. Open the Computer window. b. Open the backup medium with the backup files, then open the folder icon with the name of your computer. c. Open the Backup Set folder. d. Open the Backup Files folder. e. Open a compressed .zip folder, then navigate to display the Company folder in the Quest Travel folder. f. Copy the Company folder. g. Navigate to the Documents window, then paste the Company folder in this window. h. Select the Company folder, then delete it. i. Close the Documents window. 8. Delete a backup set. a. Open the Computer window. b. Open the backup medium with the backup files. c. Open the folder icon with the name of your computer. d. Select the Backup Set folder, then delete it. e. Close the Computer window. 9. Create a system repair disc. a. Start Create a System Repair Disc. b. Insert a blank DVD-R or DVD-RW disc, then close the AutoPlay dialog box, if necessary. c. Select your disc drive. d. Create a disc. e. Close all open dialog boxes.

Independent Challenge 1 You are the manager of the computer systems division for Global Telecommunications, Inc. (GTI), a worldwide manufacturer and distributor of telephone systems. To help safeguard the computer systems, you want to create a consistent backup strategy that systems administrators at each location can implement.

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Backing Up and Restoring Your Files

a. Use WordPad to create a document that explains a strategy and the necessary steps for backing up network drives. Save the file as Backup Strategy.rtf to the location where you store your Data Files. b. Implement the backup strategy. Capture at least one screen of a wizard dialog box or the Backup Files Wizard as you go through the material, then insert the picture in the WordPad document. To capture a screen of a window and then insert it into the WordPad document, press [Alt][Print Screen], switch to the WordPad document, click where you want to insert the picture, then click the Paste button on the WordPad toolbar. c. Save the document, print it, then close WordPad.

Windows 7

Independent Challenge 1 (Continued)

Independent Challenge 2 You are a graphic artist for Zero Gravity Designs, Inc., a company that specializes in logos. You are working on multiple designs for different projects. Because your designs are too time consuming to re-create, you want to make sure they are backed up on a daily basis. a. Locate and download two or three picture files from the Web, if you don’t have any. Use media files from the Web that are free for both personal and commercial use (check the copyright information for any such file before downloading it). b. Store the picture files in a folder in the Pictures folder on your computer. c. Start Backup and Restore, then insert a backup medium (such as a removable disk) into the appropriate drive. d. Start the backup, then change backup file settings. e. Back up the picture files in the Pictures folder. f. Schedule to back up picture files on a daily basis after hours. g. Perform another backup. h. Restore the folder with the picture files from the latest backup. i. Restore the previous version of a backed-up picture file.

Independent Challenge 3 You are a video producer at Video Mania, Inc. Because the video files you develop are critical to your business, you want to make sure they are backed up on a regular basis. a. Locate and download two or three video files from the Web, if you don’t have any you’ve created. Use media files from the Web that are free for both personal and commercial use (check the copyright information for any such file before downloading it). b. Store the video files in the Documents folder on your computer. c. Start Backup and Restore, then insert a backup medium (such as a removable disk) into the appropriate drive. d. Start the backup, then change backup file settings. e. Back up only video files. f. Schedule to back up video files on a weekly basis after hours. g. Perform another backup. h. Restore a video file from the latest backup. Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Restore a video file from an earlier backup. ■ Perform a backup on another computer with video files to a DVD. ■ Restore a video file on a DVD to another computer.

Backing Up and Restoring Your Files

Windows 359

Real Life Independent Challenge Having recently learned about the importance of performing regular backups for your data, you are eager to implement a backup plan. You begin by backing up all your important files. a. b. c. d. e.

Start Backup and Restore, then insert a backup medium (such as a removable disk) into the appropriate drive. Start the backup, then change backup file settings. Back up all file types. Schedule to back up files on a monthly basis. Restore a folder from the backup.

Advanced Challenge Exercise ■ Perform a backup of the entire computer. ■ Back up the files to a DVD. ■ Restore the backup of an entire computer. ■ Create a system repair disc.

Visual Workshop Re-create the screen shown in Figure O-21, which shows the settings of a backup on a network. If you are working in a lab setting, check with your instructor or technical support person for authorization to make the backup. FIGURE O-21

Windows 360

Backing Up and Restoring Your Files

UNIT

P Windows 7

Managing Hardware

Files You Will Need:

A hardware device is any physical device that you plug into and that is controlled by

Quest Travel (folder)

install internally, or a printer or digital camera that you plug into the outside of the

Business (folder)

computer. Windows 7 makes it easy to manage your hardware. In this unit, you learn how

QST Focus.rtf QST Press Release.rtf QST Logo.bmp QST New Logo.bmp Hosanna (folder)

your computer. An example of a hardware device is a network or sound card that you

to install hardware automatically with Windows plug and play, install a printer using the Add Printer Wizard, manage printers and print jobs, view hardware properties with Device Manager, and remove hardware from the computer.

Quest Specialty Travel, you often need to install, manage, and remove different computer hardware devices, such as printers, to keep company computers up to date.

June Donor.rtf June State.rtf

OBJECTIVES

As a computer specialist at

Understand Windows hardware Install a printer View printer properties Share a printer Manage printers and print jobs Install hardware devices View system hardware Remove hardware devices Check Windows Update driver settings

UNIT

P Windows 7

Understanding Windows Hardware Windows uses plug and play technology for hardware, making it easy to install and uninstall devices quickly. With plug and play support, you simply plug the device in, and Windows configures the device to work with your existing hardware and resolves any system conflicts. When you install a hardware device, Windows installs related software, known as a driver, which allows the hardware to communicate with Windows and other software applications. Plug and play matches up physical hardware devices with the software device drivers that operate them and establishes channels of communication between each physical device and its driver. With plug and play, you can be confident that any new device will work properly with your computer and that your computer will restart correctly after you install or uninstall hardware. Windows automatically notifies all other devices of the new device so there are no conflicts and manages the power requirements of your hardware and peripherals by shutting them down or conserving power when you are not using them. In addition, if you are working in another program when you install or uninstall a device, plug and play lets you know that it is about to change your computer configuration and prompts you to save your work. The Marketing Department at Quest Specialty Travel just purchased a new printer. Before you install it, you check to make sure that you have everything you need, including the Windows 7 install DVD, for a successful installation.

DETAILS To install a plug and play device, you need to do the following: • Gather your original Windows 7 installation disc(s), the hardware device that you want to install, and the program download or discs that came with the device, if available. • Turn off your computer before you install an internal hardware device, such as a network card or a sound card, into your computer. For some external hardware devices, such as a USB flash drive, you don’t need to turn off your computer; check your device for details. • Follow the manufacturer’s instructions to plug in or attach the new device to your computer. • Turn on your computer if necessary. Windows tries to detect the new device and install the device drivers. If the device driver is not available on your computer, you are prompted to insert the Windows 7 installation DVD or the discs that come with the device from the manufacturer to the appropriate drive. If Windows still doesn’t recognize the new hardware device, the device might be an older hardware device, known as a legacy device, which is no longer compatible. Else, the device might not be plug-and-play compatible or it might not have installed correctly. To install the hardware device manually, you can use the Add a device Wizard in the Devices and Printers window, as shown in Figure P-1, and then follow the wizard instructions, as shown in Figure P-2.

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FIGURE P-1: Devices and Printers window

Add a printer button

Windows 7

Add a device button

Installed hardware devices; your devices might differ Installed printer and fax devices; your devices might differ Hardware details for the selected device

FIGURE P-2: Add a device Wizard dialog box

Add a device Wizard dialog box Discovered device for installation; yours might differ

Understanding printers Although there are many different kinds of printers, there are two main categories: ink- or bubble-jet, and laser. An ink-jet printer works by spraying ionized ink at a sheet of paper. Ink-jet printers are less expensive and considerably slower than laser ones, but still produce a good quality output. A laser printer utilizes a laser beam to produce an image on a drum, which is rolled through a reservoir of toner and transferred to the paper through a combination of heat and pressure. Laser printers are faster and produce a higher quality output than ink-jets, but are also more expensive. Printers are classified by two main characteristics: resolution and speed. Printer resolution refers to the sharpness and

clarity of a printed page and is measured by the number of dots per inch (dpi). For example, a 300-dpi printer is one that is capable of printing 300 distinct dots in a line one-inch long, or 90,000 dots per square inch. The higher the dpi, the sharper the print quality. Printer speed is measured in pages per minute (ppm); the higher the ppm, the faster the print speed. In general terms, ink-jet printers range from about 4 to 10 ppm, while laser printers range from about 10 to 30 ppm. The speed depends on the page’s contents; text and/or one-color pages will print faster than those containing graphics and/or using multiple colors.

Managing Hardware

Windows 363

UNIT

P Windows 7

Installing a Printer To install a printer, you do not need to shut down your computer. Simply attach the printer cable to the appropriate connector on your computer, according to the manufacturer’s instructions, and plug in the power cord. If you connect your printer to your computer through a USB port, Windows should automatically detect the new hardware device and install the printer. In this case, the Found New Hardware Wizard displays several messages informing you of the progress. If the Found New Hardware Wizard doesn’t detect your printer, you can also use the Add Printer Wizard to perform the task manually. The Add Printer Wizard asks you a series of questions to help you install either a network or local printer, establish a connection, and print a test page. A local printer is a printer that is directly connected to your computer, whereas a network, wireless, or Bluetooth printer is one that is connected to either a wired or wireless network to which you have access. Bluetooth is a wireless short-range radio connection aimed at simplifying communications among Internet devices and between devices and the Internet. The Marketing Department at Quest Specialty Travel is trying out a new HP Color LaserJet 9500 printer. You want to install the driver for the new printer so they can evaluate its performance in relation to their color printing needs.

The printer does not need to be attached to your computer to follow the steps to install the printer driver.

STEPS 1. Click the Start button

on the taskbar, then click Devices and Printer

The Devices and Printers window opens, as shown in Figure P-3, listing all of the currently installed devices and printers on your computer.

2. Click Add a printer on the toolbar The Add Printer Wizard dialog box opens, as shown in Figure P-4, asking you to specify whether you are installing a local or network, wireless, or Bluetooth printer.

3. Click Add a local printer The next wizard dialog box appears, asking which port you want to use with this printer. A port is the location on the back of your computer where you connect the printer cable. You can connect the cable to either a printer port, which is labeled LPT1 or LPT2, to a communications port, which is labeled COM1 or COM2, or to a Universal Serial Bus port, which is labeled USB.

4. Click the Use an existing port option button if necessary, make sure the recommended port is selected in the list box, then click Next The next wizard dialog box appears, asking you to select a printer. The list is sorted alphabetically by manufacturer. You can quickly scroll this list by pressing the first letter of the manufacturer of your printer. TROUBLE If an HP Color LaserJet 9500 PCL 6 printer is already installed on your computer, select another printer or click the Use the driver that is currently installed (recommended) option button if necessary, then click Next.

5. Press [H], click HP in the Manufacturer list, if necessary, click HP Color LaserJet 9500 PCL 6 in the Printers list, then click Next The next wizard dialog box appears, asking you to type a name for the printer. Use the default name.

6. Click Next, if necessary, click the Do not share this printer option button, then click Next The next wizard dialog box appears, asking if you want to set the printer as the default and print a test page. If you have access to several printers, the default printer is the printer that you use most often. When you start a print job without specifying a particular printer, the job is sent to the default printer. The default printer is indicated in the Printers folder with a green circle containing a checkmark, as shown in Figure P-3. Printing a test page is an important final step to make sure the printer is working properly. However, in this example, the printer is not connected, so you do not print a test page.

7. Click the Set as the default printer check box to deselect it, if necessary, then click Finish The Devices and Printers window reopens with the HP Color LaserJet 9500 printer listed, as shown in Figure P-5.

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Windows 7

FIGURE P-3: Devices and Printers window

Add a printer button

Local printer

Network printer Shared printer Default printer Details pane FIGURE P-4: Add Printer Wizard dialog box

Add a local printer link Add a network, wireless or Bluetooth printer link

FIGURE P-5: Devices and Printers window with the new printer

New local printer installed

Understanding USB ports A printer port is called a parallel port, as it can send more than one byte simultaneously. A communications port is called a serial port because it can send information only one byte at a time. A USB (Universal Serial Bus) port uses high-speed technology to replace parallel and serial ports. A USB port is a hardware interface on the computer that enables you to connect a USB device to use as a plugand-play device. A single USB port can be used to connect up to 127

peripheral devices, such as mice, modems, and keyboards, and supports data transfer rates of 480 Mbs (480 million bits per second). USB supports plug-and-play installation and hot plugging, which is the ability to add and remove devices to a computer while the computer is running. With hot plugging, the operating system automatically recognizes the hardware change on the computer and performs any necessary changes.

Managing Hardware

Windows 365

UNIT

P Windows 7

Viewing Printer Properties Once you install a printer, it appears in the Devices and Printers window and is accessible in the Print dialog box for all of the programs installed on the computer. You can view printer properties to get information about a printer’s computer connection or network location, sharing options, related software drivers, color management options, graphics settings, installed fonts, and other advanced settings, such as spooling. Spooling, also known as background printing, is the process of storing a temporary copy of a file on the hard disk and then sending the file to the print device. Spooling allows you to continue working with the file as soon as it is stored on the disk instead of having to wait until the file is finished printing. In addition to printer properties, you can also view and change personal printer preferences, such as orientation, page order, pages per sheet, paper size, paper tray selection, copy count, and print quality and color. When you change personal printing preferences from the Devices and Printers window, the default settings are changed for all documents you print to that printer. You can also change personal printing preferences from the Print or Page Setup dialog boxes within a program. In this case, the settings are changed only for the individual document you are printing. After installing the new printer, you decide to check printer properties and print a test page to make sure everything is working properly.

STEPS TROUBLE If a connected printer is not available, click the icon for the HP Color LaserJet 9500 PCL 6.

1. In the Devices and Printers window, click the printer icon of a printer connected to your computer When you select a printer icon, status information for that printer appears in the Details pane at the bottom of the window and, if the window is in Tiles view, under the icon in Tiles view, as shown in Figure P-6. The status information includes the number of documents to be printed and whether the printer is ready to print.

2. Right-click the printer icon, then click Printer properties The Properties dialog box opens displaying the General tab, similar to the one shown in Figure P-7. Table P-1 describes the printer Properties tabs in the dialog box; your tabs might differ.

3. Click Preferences The Printing Preferences dialog box opens, displaying your printer’s specific options. Tabs and options vary from printer to printer. When you change these printing preferences, the default settings are changed for all documents you print to this printer.

4. Click each available tab to display your printer’s specific options, then click Cancel The Properties dialog box opens, displaying the General tab. TROUBLE If you do not have a printer connected to your computer, skip Step 5.

5. Click Print Test Page The page prints, and then a dialog box opens, asking if the test page printed correctly.

6. Click OK to close the dialog box, then click the Ports tab The Ports tab displays a list of ports available on the computer. A check mark appears in the check box next to the port to which the printer is connected.

7. Click the Advanced tab The Advanced tab displays the printer’s current driver and indicates your specific printing choices, including print spooling options.

8. Click Cancel The printer Properties dialog box closes and the Devices and Printers window reopens.

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Windows 7

FIGURE P-6: Devices and Printers window

Number of documents to be printed Printer ready to print

Printer status information

Details pane

FIGURE P-7: HP Color LaserJet 9500 PCL 6 Properties

dialog box with the General tab displayed Title of the Properties dialog box reflects the name of the printer

Your tabs might differ

Name of the printer

Print Test Page button

Preferences button

TABLE P-1: Printer options tabs in the printer Properties dialog box

tab

description

General ListsLearning. general information the printer andbe allows you scanned, to print a or testduplicated, page Copyright 2010 Cengage All Rights about Reserved. May not copied, in whole or in part. Sharing

Allows you to share the printer over a network

Ports

Lists the printer’s connection port and software drivers

Advanced

Lists software drivers and allows you to change printer options

Color Management

Allows you to adjust color settings and select color profiles to correctly print colors for a specific printer

Security

Allows you to set permissions to print and manage printers and documents

Device Settings

Allows you to change printer device and related settings

About

Displays information about the manufacturer, printer version, device drivers, and configuration status

Managing Hardware

Windows 367

UNIT

P Windows 7

Sharing a Printer If you have a printer connected to your computer and your computer is connected to a network, you can share your printer with other network users. This type of printer is called a shared printer. Before you can share a printer, you need to turn on printer sharing in the Network and Sharing Center window, which you can accomplish by using the Sharing tab in the printer Properties dialog box. A shared printer is indicated by an icon of two heads attached to the printer icon in the Devices and Printers window. For security purposes, if Windows Firewall is enabled (the default setting) on the computer with the shared printer, you need to select the File and Printer Sharing check box on the Exceptions tab in Windows Firewall for others to use the shared printer. Because all of the employees in the Marketing Department need to use the new printer, you want to set it up for sharing over the network.

STEPS QUICK TIP To rename a printer, select the printer, right-click the printer icon, click Printer properties, type a new name on the General tab, then click OK.

1. In the Devices and Printers window, right-click the HP Color Laserjet 9500 PCL 6 icon, click Printer properties, then click the Sharing tab The HP Color LaserJet 9500 PCL 6 Properties dialog box opens displaying the Sharing tab options, as shown in Figure P-8.

2. Click the Network and Sharing Center link The Network and Sharing Center window opens, displaying network and sharing options.

3. Click the Change advanced sharing settings link in the task pane The Advanced sharing settings window displays the current settings for the printer, as shown in Figure P-9. To share your printer with other network users, you need to enable the Turn on file and printer sharing option and if you want to password protect the use of your shared printer, you need to enable the Turn on password protected sharing option (scroll down to view in Figure P-9). You keep the current settings.

QUICK TIP To enable file and printer sharing in Windows Firewall, open the Control Panel, click System and Security, click the Allow a program through Windows Firewall link, click Yes, select the File and Printer Sharing check box in the list in the Allowed programs and features list, then click OK.

4. Click the Close button

in the Advanced sharing settings window

The Advanced sharing settings window closes and the printer Properties dialog box reopens.

5. Click the Share this printer check box to select it The additional print sharing options now available are listed in the printer Properties dialog box, as shown in Figure P-10. The name of the printer appears as the share name for the printer in the Share name text box and the Render print jobs on client computers check box is selected by default. This option spools print jobs on the user’s computer instead of the computer with the shared printer.

6. Click Additional Drivers The Additional Drivers dialog box opens, displaying the drivers available for installation if your printer is going to be used by other users running different versions of Windows.

7. Click Cancel, then click OK to close the HP Color LaserJet 9500 PCL 6 Properties dialog box The Devices and Printers window reopens. Two heads appear in the lower-left corner of the HP Color LaserJet 9500 PCL 6 printer icon, indicating that the printer is a shared printer.

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Windows 7

FIGURE P-8: HP Color LaserJet 9500 PCL 6 Properties

dialog box with the Sharing tab displayed

Network and Sharing Center link

FIGURE P-9: Advanced sharing settings window

Printer sharing options; your setting might differ

FIGURE P-10: Printer sharing options

Share this printer check box selected Shared printer name on the network Render print jobs on client computers check box

Managing Hardware

Windows 369

UNIT

P Windows 7

Managing Printers and Print Jobs After you send a print job to the printer from the Print dialog box in a program, from a shortcut menu in an Explorer window, or drag files in the Explorer window to the printer icon in the Devices and Printers window, you can check the status. To check the status of a printer or manage multiple print jobs, you can double-click the appropriate printer icon in the Devices and Printers window or on the taskbar in the notification area. A window opens showing the print queue, which is the list of files to be printed. You can use this window to cancel print jobs, temporarily pause print jobs, view printer properties, and so on. If you are having problems with a printer or print job, you can defer, or halt, the printing process to avoid receiving error messages. With deferred printing, you can send a job to be printed even if your computer is not connected to a printer. To do this, you pause printing, and the file remains in the print queue until you turn off pause printing. As part of your job as a computer specialist, you manage printers and print jobs. Because you are not actually printing to an existing printer, you will use deferred printing in this lesson.

STEPS QUICK TIP To print a document in an Explorer window, right-click the document icon, then click Print on the shortcut menu.

1. In the Devices and Printers window, click the HP Color LaserJet 9500 PCL 6 icon if necessary, click See what’s printing on the toolbar, click Printer on the menu bar, then click Pause Printing The HP Color LaserJet 9500 PCL 6 window opens with Paused listed after the printer name in the Title bar.

2. Click the Start button on the taskbar, point to All Programs, click Accessories, then click WordPad to open the program , click Open, navigate to the location where you store 3. Click the WordPad button your Data Files, double-click the UnitP folder, double-click the Quest Travel folder, double-click the Business folder, then double-click QST Focus.rtf to open it , click Print, click the HP Color LaserJet 9500 PCL 6 icon in the Print dialog box, 4. Click as shown in Figure P-11, if necessary, then click Print A dialog box briefly appears indicating that the file was sent to the printer, and a printer icon appears in the notification area on the taskbar. Because you paused the printer, nothing prints; the job simply remains in the print queue until you either delete the job or unpause the printer to your computer.

5. Click the Devices and Printers button on the taskbar, then click the HP Color LaserJet 9500 PCL 6 icon in the Devices and Printers window In Tiles view or the Details pane, the number of files to be printed changes from 0 to 1.

6. Switch back to the WordPad window, open the QST Press Release.rtf file from the location where you store your Data Files, print the file to the HP Color LaserJet 9500 PCL 6 printer, then close the WordPad window The QST Press Release.rtf file is sent to the HP Color LaserJet 9500 PCL 6 printer. In the Devices and Printers window, the status of the printer indicates that the number of files to be printed is now 2.

7. Double-click the HP Color LaserJet 9500 PCL 6 icon in the Devices and Printers window, then double-click the See what’s printing link The HP Color LaserJet 9500 PCL 6 – Paused window opens, as shown in Figure P-12. QUICK TIP To print the paused file, right-click the file, then click Resume.

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8. In the HP Color LaserJet 9500 PCL 6 – Paused window, right-click QST Focus.rtf, then click Pause to pause the printing of the file 9. Click Printer on the menu bar, click Cancel All Documents, click Yes to confirm the cancellation, for all open windows then click the Close button Managing Hardware

Windows 7

FIGURE P-11: Printing a file to a paused printer

Selected printer

Printer status information

FIGURE P-12: HP Color LaserJet 9500 PCL 6 window with paused print jobs

Printer currently paused

Files in the print queue

Adding a separator page to print jobs If you work in a network environment where many print jobs are sent to the same printer, adding a separator page to your files can be helpful. A separator (or banner) page lists the name, author, date, and time of the print job. You can only set up separator pages to a network printer with an administrator’s permission. To add a separator page, right-click the network printer icon in the Devices and Printers window, then click Printer properties. In the printer Properties dialog box, click the Advanced tab, then click Separator Page. In the Separator Page

dialog box, click Browse, select one of the separator files that Windows provides in the System32 folder or navigate to and select a custom separator page, then click Open. Click OK in both the Separator Page and the printer Properties dialog boxes. The separator files provided by Windows might not work with some printers. To turn off the Separator Page feature, delete the file name and path in the Separator Page dialog box.

Managing Hardware Copyright 2010 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part.

Windows 371

UNIT

P Windows 7

Installing Hardware Devices Before you install a new hardware device, be sure to carefully read the product documentation and installation guide provided by the manufacturer. If the hardware device comes with an installation disc, it is recommended that you do not use the Add a device Wizard provided by Windows 7 and use the manufacturer’s disc and related instruction to install the hardware instead. If the product documentation instructs you to perform a typical plug-and-play installation, physically connect your hardware to your computer. In most cases, Windows automatically detects your new hardware device and installs its related device driver software. If Windows doesn’t detect the new hardware, you can start the Add a device Wizard in the Devices and Printers window and select the new hardware device to install it. The wizard detects the hardware attached to your computer and asks you a series of questions to help you set up the necessary software for the new hardware device to work properly on your computer. The Marketing Department just received some new hardware, including a digital camera, for an upcoming project. After connecting the hardware device to your computer, you watch for Windows 7 to automatically install the device or use the Add a device Wizard to search for and install it.

If you do not have a hardware device, simply read through the rest of the unit without completing the steps.

STEPS 1. Attach a hardware device to your computer, then wait for Windows to detect and install it Windows 7 automatically tries to detect and install the hardware device, in this case a Canon PowerShot A95 IS digital camera, and its related device driver software, as shown in Figure P-13. If the hardware device is automatically installed by Windows 7, skip to the next lesson; otherwise, continue with the next step.

2. Click the Start button

on the taskbar, then click Devices and Printer

The Devices and Printers window opens, displaying the currently installed devices and printers on your computer. If Windows 7 installed the hardware device, the device icon appears under the Devices heading; skip to the next lesson.

3. Click Add a device on the toolbar TROUBLE If the hardware device doesn’t appear in the Add a device Wizard, click Cancel.

TROUBLE If the Windows 7 installation disc is not available, click OK, then click Cancel.

The Add a device Wizard opens and starts to search for any attached hardware devices, as shown in Figure P-14.

4. If the attached hardware device appears in the list, select the device icon, then click Next 5. Follow the Add a device Wizard instructions to complete the installation; steps vary depending on the hardware device 6. If necessary, insert the Windows 7 installation DVD in the appropriate drive, click OK, in the Windows 7 DVD window then click the Close button Windows installs the appropriate driver to complete the installation. The newly installed hardware device appears in the Devices and Printers window.

7. Click

in the Devices and Printers window

The Devices and Printers window closes.

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Windows 7

FIGURE P-13: Windows 7 detects and installs a hardware device

Windows 7 alert message indicates that the hardware device is installed successfully

FIGURE P-14: Add a device Wizard

Detected hardware devices; your list might differ

Creating and viewing an XPS document If you ever used Adobe Reader to view a document or create a PDF document, you can accomplish the same type of tasks with Microsoft’s XPS (XML Paper Specification). With XPS, you can share files with others even if your software programs are different. In addition, you can set permissions and add digital signatures to protect a document from unauthorized viewing and printing. You create an XPS document by printing a file using the Microsoft XPS Document Writer printer. The XPS Viewer—available in Windows 7—allows you to open any XPS document. When you open an XPS document, it looks the same on the destination as it would on the source computer. To create and view an

XPS document, open the program and document you want to create as an XPS document, click File on the menu bar, click Print, select Microsoft XPS Document Writer as your printer, click Print, specify a location, name the XPS document, then click Save. Click the Start button, point to All Programs, click XPS Viewer, click File on the menu bar, click Open, navigate to and select the XPS document you want to view, click Open, then use the buttons on the toolbar to set and remove security permissions, add a digital signature (an electronic stamp like a written signature), print the document, or change the view percentage. When you’re done, click the Close button.

Managing Hardware

Windows 373

UNIT

P Windows 7

Viewing System Hardware When you install a new operating system, such as Windows 7, it is important to make sure that you are using the latest software drivers with your system hardware. If not, your hardware devices might not work properly. You can view your system hardware using a Windows utility called Device Manager. Device Manager organizes all the hardware devices attached to your computer by hardware types, also known as hardware classes. If an exclamation point within a yellow triangle icon appears next to a specific device, it indicates a conflict with some other device. To fix it, you can try to uninstall and reinstall the device or seek technical support from the device manufacturer. With Device Manager, you can determine the software driver versions being used with your system hardware, update the software driver with a newer version, roll back to a previous driver version if the device fails with the new one, or uninstall a driver. After viewing your software driver version numbers, you can contact the manufacturer or visit their Web site to determine the latest versions. Most manufacturers allow you to download drivers from their Web sites for free. After installing the new hardware device, you want to make sure that you’re using the latest software driver version.

STEPS 1. In the Control Panel, click the Hardware and Sound link, click the Device Manager link under Devices and Printers, then click Yes to grant permission to make changes, if necessary The Device Manager window opens.

2. Click the Expand indicator

next to the Display adapters icon

The display expands to show the name of the display adapter attached to your computer, as shown in Figure P-15. QUICK TIP To disable a hardware device, click the hardware device in Device Manager, click the Disable button on the toolbar, then click Yes. To enable the device, click the Enable button on the toolbar.

3. Click the display adapter name that is attached to your computer, then click the Properties button on the toolbar The Properties dialog box for your display adapter type opens with the General tab displayed, showing identification and status information about the display adapter. Two of the other tabs in the dialog box are Driver and Resources. The Driver tab lists the software drivers related to the hardware device and other options, whereas the Resources tab lists the memory settings related to the hardware device.

4. Click the Driver tab The Driver tab displays driver information, such as manufacturer name, date published, and version number, similar to Figure P-16. The buttons on this tab allow you to learn more about the current version of the software driver (Driver Details), install the latest driver for the display adapter that is attached to your computer (Update Driver), revert back to the previous driver installed (Roll Back Driver), or disable or remove the driver.

5. Click Driver Details The Driver File Details dialog box opens, displaying details for the current driver such as the driver file version number. QUICK TIP To view hardware devices according to how they are attached to your computer, click View on the menu bar, then click Devices by connection.

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6. Click OK, then click Close The Driver File Details dialog box and the Display Adapter Properties dialog box both close.

7. Click the Collapse indicator

next to the Display adapters icon

The list of display adapters collapses and the Device Manager window remains open.

Managing Hardware

Windows 7

FIGURE P-15: Device Manager window

White arrow denotes expand indicator Hardware types attached to your computer; your list might differ

Exclamation mark indicates a hardware device conflict

Collapse indicator

FIGURE P-16: Display Adapter Properties dialog box

Selected display adapter device; yours might differ Driver information

Driver-related buttons

Getting system information If you encounter a system problem, you should contact a support technician. Support technicians require specific information about your computer so that they can resolve any system problems. In Windows 7, you can use the System Information window to quickly collect and display your system configuration data, as shown in Figure P-17. To open the System Information window, click the Start button on the taskbar, point to All Programs, click Accessories, click System Tools, then click System Information. For information about working in the System Information window, click Help on the menu bar in the System Information window, then click Contents.

FIGURE P-17: System Information window

Managing Hardware

Windows 375

UNIT

P Windows 7

Removing Hardware Devices If you no longer use a hardware device, or you have an older hardware device that you want to upgrade, you need to remove the hardware device drivers and related software before you remove the physical hardware device from your computer. With Device Manager, you can quickly and easily remove hardware devices and any related device drivers. You can also use the windows specific to a hardware device to remove that device; for example, just as you used the Devices and Printers window to install a printer, you can remove a printer in the Devices and Printers window as well. If you have a USB device, you can remove it by simply unplugging it when the device is not actively in use. The marketing manager decides that the new printer would be best suited to the needs of the Advertising Department. You want to delete both the printer and the hardware device drivers that you installed.

STEPS 1. Click the Expand indicator hardware device

next to the hardware device type icon for your installed

The hardware device currently installed on the computer appears under the Portable Devices icon.

2. Click your installed hardware device to select it The hardware device, in this case the Canon PowerShot A590 IS digital camera, is selected, as shown in Figure P-18.

3. Click the Uninstall button

on the toolbar

The Confirm Device Uninstall dialog box opens. TROUBLE If the HP Color LaserJet 9500 PCL 6 printer was already installed on your computer, skip Steps 6 and 7 so you do not delete it.

TROUBLE If a printer contains a print job, the Delete command will not work. You need to purge all print jobs before you can delete a printer.

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4. Click OK to remove the device, then click the Close button window

in the Device Manager

The Hardware and Sound window reopens.

5. Click the Devices and Printers link, then click the HP Color LaserJet 9500 PCL 6 icon The HP Color LaserJet 9500 PCL 6 icon appears highlighted in the Devices and Printers window, as shown in Figure P-19.

6. Click the Remove device button on the toolbar The Remove Device dialog box opens, asking if you want to delete the printer.

7. Click Yes to confirm the deletion The Devices and Printers window reopens without the HP Color LaserJet 9500 PCL 6 listed.

8. Click the Back button

twice

The Control Panel window reopens.

Managing Hardware

Uninstall button

Windows 7

FIGURE P-18: Device Manager window

Selected hardware device for deletion; your device might differ

FIGURE P-19: Devices and Printers window

Remove device button

Selected printer for deletion

Managing Hardware

Windows 377

UNIT

P Windows 7

Checking Windows Update Driver Settings When you connect a new device to your computer, you can specify how you want Windows Update to find the software driver for the device. The default is to automatically check for a driver on your computer or online from the Microsoft Windows Update Web site. However, if you want more control over the process, you can use System Properties to specify the option you want. For example, you can change the default setting to have Windows ask you each time you connect a new device to check for drivers or never check for drivers. As part of the maintenance program at Quest Specialty Travel, you want to check the Windows Update settings to make sure options are correctly set for updating device drivers.

STEPS 1. In the Control Panel, click the System and Security link, then click the System link The System window opens, displaying basic information about your computer, including the Windows edition, computer system hardware, computer name and description, domain or workgroup settings, and Windows activation information.

2. Click the Advanced system settings link in the task pane, then click Yes to grant permission to make changes, if necessary The System Properties dialog box opens.

3. Click the Hardware tab The Hardware tab options display, as shown in Figure P-20.

4. Click Device Installation Settings The Device Installation Settings dialog box opens, as shown in Figure P-21, displaying Windows Update options for device drivers. You can select the option to automatically check for drivers (the recommended default) or never check for drivers when you connect a device.

5. Click Cancel The Device Installation Settings dialog box closes.

6. Click OK The System Properties dialog box closes.

7. Click the Close button The System window closes.

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Managing Hardware

in the System window

Windows 7

FIGURE P-20: System Properties dialog box with the Hardware

tab displayed

Device Manager button

Device Installation Settings button

FIGURE P-21: Device Installation Settings dialog box

Windows Update driver options

Managing Hardware

Windows 379

Practice

For current SAM information including versions and content details, visit SAM Central (http://samcentral.course.com). If you have a SAM user profile, you may have access to hands-on instruction, practice, and assessment of the skills covered in this unit. Since we support various versions of SAM throughout the life of this text, you will want to check with your instructor for instructions and the correct URL/Web site to access those assignments.

Concepts Review

Match the statements below with the elements labeled in the screen shown in Figure P-22. FIGURE P-22

i h g

f

e

a b c

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

d

Which element points to a local printer? Which element points to a shared printer? Which element points to a network printer? Which element indicates the default printer? Which element points to a hardware device? Which element points to a hardware device with a conflict? Which element points to a paused printer? Which element points to a paused file? Which element points to an unpaused file?

Match each term with the statement that best describes it. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

Driver Hot plugging Port Device Manager Hardware device Hardware classes

Windows 380

a. b. c. d. e. f.

Location on a computer where you connect a cable Location where you work with device drivers A way to add and remove devices while the computer runs The way hardware communicates with Windows and other software Hardware types attached to a computer Any physical device you connect to a computer

Managing Hardware Copyright 2010 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part.

Select the best answer from the list of choices. 16. When you install a hardware device, Windows installs related software called a _______________. a. Wizard c. Port b. Driver d. None of the above 17. Which of the following printers is not connected directly to your computer? a. Local printer c. Network printer b. Shared printer d. None of the above 18. An icon containing a green circle with a check mark indicates a ____________ printer. a. Shared c. Local b. Default d. Networked 19. An icon containing two heads indicates a ____________ printer. a. Shared c. Local b. Default d. Networked 20. The physical location on the back of your computer where you connect a hardware device is called a _______________. a. Wizard c. Port b. Driver d. None of the above 21. Which of the following is a port name? a. LPT1 c. USB b. COM1 d. All of the above 22. Which of the following sends information one byte at a time? a. Parallel c. USB b. Serial d. None of the above 23. Which of the following is a way to print a document? a. Select the Print command from a program. c. Drag a document to the printer icon. b. Right-click a document, then click Print. d. All of the above 24. The list of files to be printed is called the print ___________________. a. Queue c. Spool b. Window d. List 25. The process of storing a temporary copy of a file on the hard disk before sending it to be printed is called print ___________________. a. Management c. Sharing b. Spooling d. Deferring 26. Device Manager provides you with a list of the hardware types, also known as hardware ___________________, which are attached to your computer. a. Adapters c. Drivers b. Resources d. Classes

Windows 7

Concepts Review (Continued)

Skills Review 1. Install a printer. a. Open the Control Panel, then open the Devices and Printers window. b. Use the Add Printer Wizard to add a local printer. c. Use an existing port. d. Choose Ricoh as the manufacturer, then Ricoh Aficio MP 1350 PCL as the model. (If the Ricoh Aficio MP 1350 PCL is already installed on your computer, select another printer or keep the existing driver.) e. Use the default printer name, and do not set the printer as the default.

Managing Hardware

Windows 381

Skills Review (Continued) 2. View printer properties. a. Select the printer icon in the Devices and Printers window for a printer connected to your computer. b. View the various printer properties. c. View the printer preferences. d. Print a test page. e. Close the printer Properties dialog box. 3