Process Heating June 2011

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Process Heating June 2011

www.process-heating.com | June 2011 | Volume 18, Number 6 On Point C Convection ti and d conduction d ti heaters, incl

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www.process-heating.com | June 2011 | Volume 18, Number 6

On Point

C Convection ti and d conduction d ti heaters, including heat tracing, can put heat right where you need it, even in the most challenging environments.

Periodical Class

19 Insulating Hot Oil Systems 24 Controlling Temperatures with PLCs

These heaters will be fully assembled and checked at our factory before delivery.

Get a complete heater package Need a new heater? Get a complete heater package from Heatec. A complete package eliminates hassles, saves you time and saves you money. Our package includes design, manufacturing, factory assembly, on-site setup and startup. We also offer maintenance contracts and provide free phone support. Heaters have many components from a variety of manufacturers. It’s always best to mate these components with the heater and adjust them before the heater is shipped to you. This eliminates most compatibility problems. Our goal is that setup of our heater at your plant will be trouble free, without undue rework. Most setups should only require re-assembly of parts dismantled

for shipping, plus connection of electrical power and piping. Complete factory assembly eliminates last-minute fieldwork that can cause startup delays. It also eliminates buck passing if things don’t go right. Moreover, if a problem develops later, you won’t have to wrangle with a variety of component suppliers to fix it. So, when you buy a new heater, always choose a manufacturer that provides a complete package. Heatec has this capability, which sets us apart from others. Call today and let us answer any questions you have about our heater packages.

HEATEC

( % ! 4 % # DQ$VWHF,QGXVWULHV&RPSDQ\ :,/6215'‡&+$77$122*$7186$‡‡)$;‡KHDWHFFRP

Where Do I Go for Temperature Products?

omega.com, of Course! Your single source for process measurement and control products! Quick, Convenient Method for Measuring Temperature in Your Process Thermocouple Probes with M12 Molded Connectors Standard and Metric Visit omega.com/m12molded M12 Series Starts at $ 21

M12 4-pin connector Molded transition

⻬ Type J and K Thermocouple Calibrations ⻬ Single and Dual Element Configurations ⻬ Ungrounded Junctions ⻬ -50 to 90°C (-58 to 194°F) Connector Temperature Range MADE IN

USA

1 ⁄16 DIN Temperature, Process and Strain Meters and PID Controllers CNi16 Series Starts at $225

¼ DIN 10-Channel Automatic Temperature Scanner Visit omega.com/dp1001am DP1001AM $ 395

Universal Thermocouple Calibrator CL542-PLUS $ 1395

FREE! Hardbound Handbook and Encyclopedia

Find thousands of temperature measurement and control products in one place. Visit omega.com to reserve your New FREE copy of The Temperature HandbookTM and Encyclopedia 7 th Edition

Visit omega.com/cni16_series High Performance Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) Visit omega.com/cp1h CP1H Series Starts at $1060

For Sales and Service, Call TOLL FREE

Cover Art: Based on an Original Norman Rockwell Illustration ©1961 The Curtis Publishing Company.

Visit omega.com/cl542-plus 4-Channel Portable Thermometer/ Data Loggers

Sanitary RTD Probes Standard Duty with Integral Cable PRS-3-100-CB $120

RDXL4SD $300

Visit omega.com/ rdxl-sd_series

Visit omega.com/prs-3-100-cb

Shop Online at

© COPYRIGHT 2011 OMEGA ENGINEERING, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

When it’s your product’s job to provide heat to the customer...

...selecting the right controller keeps the heat off you.

For more information:

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June 2011 Volume 18 • Number 6

www.process-heating.com WEB EXCLUSIVES: READ MORE AT WWW.PROCESS-HEATING.COM Q Insulation Scenarios

page

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Q PLCs and HMI

Power Controls Be In Control Understanding short-circuit current rating (SCCR) assignment options for industrial control panels is the first step in avoiding risk.

19

Heat Transfer Fluids Insulating Hot Oil Systems When used in certain locations, porous insulation allows leaking thermal fluid to spread out inside the hot, enclosed space.

22

Q Effect of Fluid Velocity on Performance Doubling the flow rate in the laminar and transitional regions can more than double the heat exchanger performance. Is it worth it for your application?

Features 16

The online exclusive shows insulation scenarios for hot-oil applications, using bare 2" pipe, and pipe sizes from 2" to 20" with an insulation layer sized to keep outer insulation temperatures below 140°F (60°C).

Chillers Controlling Cooling Systems Woes

Historically, PLCs were used for discrete control applications, but today’s powerful PLCs have greatly expanded capabilities, particularly in the area of analog monitoring and closed loop control.

UPDATED DAILY Q New Products

Q Industry News

ALWAYS ONLINE Q Archives Q Calendar of Events Q Drying Files columns

Q Energy Notes column Q Equipment Overviews Q Heating Highlights

Q Digital Editions Q Buyers Guide Q Archived Webinars

Erosion corrosion and galvanic corrosion can be tricky to treat, making prevention an essential ingredient to a healthy cooling system.

24

Check out our redesigned site with more frequent updates and web exclusives!

Process Control Don’t Get Caught Short PLC-based temperature control works where single loop temperature controllers fall short.

26

Process Control Remote Possibilities Remote monitoring control systems track an array of system parameters in real time.

28

Equipment Overview: Convection and Conduction Heaters

Q Go Mobile Use your smart phone to read Process Heating, wherever you are! Simply visit http://gettag.mobi/ with your phone’s browser to install the Microsoft Tag app. Then, point your phone’s camera at the tag below to be taken to our current issue online — instantly. The reader works on most current smart and advancedd ffeature phones, h includi l d ing Windows Mobile (5.5 and above), iPhone, Blackberry, Symbian and J2ME.

On Point Convection and conduction heaters, including heat tracing, can put heat right where you need it, even in the most challenging environments.

33

Equipment Focus Case Histories Case histories from a heat transfer fluid manufacturer and a boiler supplier share ideas to emulate for success.

Columns & Departments 6 9 14 32

Editor’s Page Inner Workings Calendar Products

40 Classified Directory 41 Advertiser Index 42 Places & Faces

About the Cover An impedance pipe heating system from Banner-Day (www.banner-day.com), Saginaw, Mich., can provide freeze protection to -50°F (-45°C). In this installation, the impedance heating system heats inlet pipes to canola oil storage tanks in Western Canada. To learn more about conduction heating systems such as this one, or convection heaters, see page 28.

PROCESS HEATING (ISSN 1077-5870) is published 12 times annually, monthly, by BNP Media, 2401 W. Big Beaver Rd., Suite 700, Troy, MI 48084-3333. Telephone: (248) 362-3700, Fax: (248) 362-0317. No charge for subscriptions to qualified individuals. Annual rate for subscriptions to nonqualified individuals in the U.S.A.: $115.00 USD. Annual rate for subscriptions to nonqualified individuals in Canada: $149.00 USD (includes GST & postage); all other countries: $165.00 (int’l mail) payable in U.S. funds. Printed in the U.S.A. Copyright 2011, by BNP Media. All rights reserved. The contents of this publication may not be reproduced in whole or in part without the consent of the publisher. The publisher is not responsible for product claims and representations. Periodicals Postage Paid at Troy, MI and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: PROCESS HEATING, P.O. Box 2146, Skokie, IL 60076. Canada Post: Publications Mail Agreement #40612608. GST account: 131263923. Send returns (Canada) to Pitney Bowes, P.O. Box 25542, London, ON, N6C 6B2. Change of address: Send old address label along with new address to PROCESS HEATING, P.O. Box 2146, Skokie, IL 60076. For single copies or back issues: contact Ann Kalb at (248) 244-6499 or [email protected].

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5

Change Means Hundreds of Systems Will Not Require Change — Yet

By Linda Becker

Commentary

EPA Delays Boiler MACT, CISWI Rules On May 16, 2011, the Environmental Protection Agency again changed course with the Boiler MACT rules, issuing an indefinite stay. As its official notice states: The effective dates of the final rules published in the Federal Register on March 21, 2011 (76 FR 15608 and 76 FR 15704), are delayed until such time as judicial review is no longer pending or until the EPA completes its reconsideration of the rules, whichever is earlier. The rules, officially known as the “National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Major Sources: Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers and Process Heaters,” which is often called the major source Boiler MACT rule, and “Standards of Performance for New Sources and Emission Guidelines for Existing Sources: Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units,” often called the CISWI rule, regulate emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAP) and certain other air pollutants from industrial, commercial and institutional boilers, process heaters and industrial solid waste incineration units. When the EPA issued the final rules on March 21, 2011, the EPA

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established an effective date of May 20, 2011, for each rule. On the same day, however, the EPA also published a notice that the agency was reconsidering certain portions of the rules. In large part, the extra time was granted to allow more time for public comment. According to the May 16 announcement by the EPA, the stay was granted to give even more time for interested parties seeking reconsideration of both rules to offer public comment. Corporations and industry groups also have requested judicial review of both rules, and this litigation is pending. Finally, according to the agency, it has received petitions from a number of interested parties that identify specific issues that the EPA is being asked to reconsider. To allow adequate time for public comment, the EPA has extended the commenting period until July 15, 2011. To offer comment or learn about any further developments with these rules as they happen, visit http://www.epa.gov/airquality/ combustion/actions.html.

Linda Becker, Associate Publisher and Editor, [email protected]

3/24/10 9:43:09 AM

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Did you know that 90% of heat transfer fluid breakdowns are caused by equipment issues? If you just check your hot-oil on a regular basis you could practically eliminate unplanned shutdown or loss of production. The easy way to do this is by conducting a Fluid Analysis. Because Fluid Analysis isn't just to check your fluid; it's to test your system. When we test your fluid (we suggest annually or more frequently for demanding service) the values we get from boiling range, viscosity, and acidity tell us what's going on in there. Better yet, together with a one-to-one system review with you, those same test results can help pinpoint emerging issues with oxidation, overheating, or possible mismatches in those interrelated components that could lead to a downtime-causing problem. This can help you keep the system up when it's supposed to be up, and know in advance if any corrections are needed for when you do have scheduled downtime. Your system runs better, your fluid lasts longer, and your process earns its keep. The Fluid Services Program team of engineers can get deep into your process with you from the design stage, customizing maintenance plans, process expansions or, in cases where the Fluid Analysis and system review suggests it, just a good cleanout

of your system with one of Paratherm's three specialized system cleaners. Paratherm's nine heat transfer fluids are designed to cover a broad temperature range as well as a range of compatibility and performance criteria. The fluid chart below can give you a feel for their specifications, but to narrow it down to the right product for your application all it takes is a short conversation with one of Paratherm's sales engineers. Eliminate the downside risk and call Paratherm today or check us out on the web.

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Listing and temperature range chart for all Paratherm heat transfer fluids.

Copyright© Paratherm Corporation 2011

Inner Workings

NASA Wind Tunnel to be Retrofit with Massive Coils A 25' high wall of heat exchanger coils will soon to replace the coils in the Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) at NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland. When installed and commissioned late this summer, the new coils will enable the IRT to lower the air temperature faster and more efficiently to -40°F (-40°C), which is 15°F (8.3°C) colder than its current capacity. The new coils are manufactured by Super Radiator Coils in Chaska, Minn. The NASA wind tunnel has been in continuous operation since 1944. Aeronautic design engineers, aircraft manufacturers and airline companies use the facility to test wing design and other aircraft components under icing weather conditions. Its closed-loop tunnel uses a 5,200 hp motor and 14' prop-fan to recirculate air at speeds of 50 to 300 knots/hr (31 to 186 mi/ hr). Downstream from the bank of coils are misters that inject water into the airstream, which freezes upon contact

with the test specimen. “The new coils will incorporate the most advanced heat exchanger technologies available and have taken about four months to build,” said Jon Holt, chairman of Super Radiator Coils.“One of the main reasons we were chosen for this important project was because of our experience in custom designing and manufacturing coils for 14 other wind tunnels, including NASA’s Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California.” Designing the high efficiency, cascadestyle heat exchangers to meet NASA’s specifications was a collaborative effort between Super Radiator and Jacobs Technology Inc., Tullahoma, Tenn., a company that specializes in wind tunnel design. The innovative design tilts the heat exchanger coils forward in a slant configuration that effectively doubles the exposed face area of the coils. The result is an increase in the heat transfer capabilities of the coils while reducing the air Each of the six, 50'-long heat exchanger coils for NASA’s Icing Research Tunnel was assembled by hand. Inset: During manufacture at Super Radiator Coils, each of the copper tubes in a coil was carefully brazed to a copper header that will feed refrigerant to the tubes.

Because our products are top quality Despatch never cuts corners. The products we build are manufactured to the highest industrial standards. Despatch ovens have a reputation for superior process control and dependable operation. Every oven is thoroughly tested and inspected prior to shipment.

INSPIRED INNOVATION

Thermal Processing Technology

phone: 1-952-469-5424 [email protected] www.despatch.com © 2011 Despatch Industries. All rights reserved.

Inner Workings velocity and preventing ice shedding from the coils. The $1.2 million project includes six large coils, or modules of heat exchanger coils, that will be stacked on top of each other in the IRT to form a wall that air must pass through before entering the test chamber in the wind tunnel. Each module is 4.4' high, nearly 9' wide and 50' long. More than 30 miles of 0.625" dia. copper tubing were used to form the coils, which have enough heat-dissipating aluminum fins around them to cover a football field. All told, the six banks of coils will weigh 110 tons when a refrigerant is put inside the tubes. Besides the massive wall of heat exchanger coils, the IRT’s remodeling project involves replacing all of the refrigeration equipment, including compressors, piping, instrumentation and controls. The new system will use advanced low-temperature refrigerants. All of these upgrades will increase efficiency and provide better thermal controls, according to Super Radiator. “A project like this was not without its many challenges, beginning with its sheer size and scope,” Holt said. “Although we have designed and manufactured coils for a number of wind tunnels, this is by far the largest.” “The overall height, weight and length of the coils, along with the core weight of the multi-angled framework that will hold the coils in each module, were all manufactured to a non-standard design,” he continued.“Another challenge that is yet to come will be carefully placing all six coil modules on top of each other to perform as one gigantic heat exchanger coil, taking into account variances in thermal expansion and contraction.” The company has been working on plans for this project for more than a year. The six modules were assembled and tested by Super Radiator at its facilities in Chaska. Once transported to the IRT, they will be lowered through the roof into the wind tunnel. After final assembly, installation and additional testing, the research facility is expected to become operational by late fall.

ARI Valves can take the heat… There’s no margin of error when it comes to reliability of the valves in your system. While you may not have to protect against lava flow, we can solve your problems up to 800˚F! ARI Valves are the choice of industrial professionals. Our quality assurance system is in accordance with DIN ISO 9001. You can trust our bellows-seal valves to perform under adverse conditions and never need to replace stem packing. ARI Valves are in Heat Transfer Service Around the Globe. So if you are responsible for the security and safety of your company’s system, make certain that ARI Valves are the choice. When things get hot, you should specify ARI Valves for Thermal Transfer Fluid Applications. ARI Valves…The Obvious Choice

ARI Valve Corporation 1738 Sands Place, S.E. · Marietta, Georgia 30067 U.S.A. Fax: (770) 933-8846 · Phone: (770) 933-8845 www.arivalve.com 10

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Finisher Gets Energy Efficiency Recommendations After its energy assessment through the Industrial Assessment Center at the University of Delaware, Chrome Deposit Corp., received six suggestions to lower energy consumption at its Newark, Del., plating facility. 1. Insulate condensate tank and pipes. 2. Install stack dampers (not recommended by boiler manufacturer). 3. Install covers on plant exhaust fans. 4. Analyze flue gas air-fuel ratio. 5. Reduce compressed air pressure. 6. Replace motor drive belts with energy-efficient pulleys and cogs. Since implementing the DOE recommendations, Chrome Deposit Corp. has started on a new goal of increasing its truck fleet’s miles per gallon by 5 percent.

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Inner Workings Could the steps implemented by Chrome benefit your plant as well? To learn more about Chrome Deposit Corp.’s energy assessment and production upgrades, visit www.process-heating.com and search for “Fuel-Sucking Plating Process Totes Up Big Reductions.”

ticulate matter and used heat transfer fluid from a system prior to recharge or changeover from one fluid to another. FF-1 is compatible with all of the company’s heat transfer fluids and as well as most other manufacturers’ fluids.

Canada Certifies Flushing Fluid

Making synthetic fibers requires a lot of heat and precise control. So, when a North Carolina manufacturer of specialty synthetic fibers used in both industrial and home applications required a custom autoclave for a drying application, the company went to a specialist: Pittsburgh-based Chromalox. Rather than use equipment relying on a fossil fuel, the customer chose an autoclave that utilizes nitrogen as the heat transfer medium via forced convection. Temperatures range between 400 and 500°F (204 and 260°C) in the system’s base-heat load. Each of the nine individual zones within the sys-

Flushing fluid is intended for use during startup and general maintenance of heat transfer fluid systems. The FF-1 from MultiTherm Corp., Malvern, Pa., can be used in heat transfer fluid applications to remove loose material (weld splatter, fines, particulate matter, etc.) left in lines and equipment along with oil and some preservative coatings. Rated HT1 for incidental contact in food applications by NSF, the flushing fluid is now food certified in Canada. Flushing fluid also is useful for general maintenance for removing par-

Autoclave Uses Nitrogen for Heat Transfer

Because we have the most experience Despatch has over 100 years of proven success in partnering with customers to deliver complex thermal processing solutions. We are committed to working with you to learn the details of your unique process in order to design and engineer a custom piece of equipment that will meet your specific requirements.

INSPIRED INNOVATION

Thermal Processing Technology

phone: 1-952-469-5424 [email protected] www.despatch.com © 2011 Despatch Industries. All rights reserved.

Inner Workings tem has its own temperature- and power-control loop for precision control. Baseline heating of the nitrogen loop was provided by a Chromalox 35 KW GCHIS circulation heater; the company’s fintube tubular heating elements with Incoloy sheaths heated the autoclave’s interior. Nine 5 KW circulation heaters heated individual loops within the system. Each of the loops are controlled by the company’s SCR power controllers, part of the autoclave’s main control panel. The power control panels allow precision control of each loop, utilizing high temperatures and low gas flow. Satisfied with the fuel-cost savings and precision quality control for reliable product quality, the customer purchased a similar system retrofitted to an existing autoclave. For more information on Chromalox, go to www.chromalox.com.

5 Ways to Put Infrared to Use Adhesives activation is one of many popular applications for infrared heat. Here are five ways that customers of Hereaus Noblelight, Duluth, Ga., have applied the technology.

1

A production line producing metal machinery components needed a fast means of drying paint on parts. The existing hot-air oven had extensive heat losses and required a large area of plant floor space. Replacing it with a

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Inner Workings medium-wave infrared drying system provided faster preheating, higher throughput, increased quality and a smaller equipment footprint.

2

A coil of aluminum with adhesive applied in strips is dried using short-wave infrared heaters. The coil is cut into sheets that are overlaid with

brought to the necessary temperature without being overheated. Infrared heat can effectively apply process heat in many other applications. To see additional applications, visit www.noblelight.net and click on “Applications” and then “Infrared.”

Shell Simplifies Product Selection

adhesive strips. The adhesive is cured in an autoclave after which the sheets are pulled to produce a honeycomb structure. Previously, the manufacturer used a hot-air oven for adhesive drying. The infrared system runs faster and allows more homogeneous adhesive drying.

3

A manufacturer of electrical white boards heats glue with the company’s carbon twin-tube modules. Controlled by pyrometer, the system melts the glue evenly so that brass wires can be pressed into it.

4

A laminating process requires preheating of glue but the customer’s old method (a hot air oven) operated at low speed and required a long heating time. A medium-wave infrared modular system provided high speed, reduced heating time, and allowed for a shorter production line.

5

The company’s food processor customers benefit from infrared heating in multiple applications such as filling chocolates, preliminary browning of instant meals and bread sterilization. Infrared emitters transmit heat without contact and only for as long as necessary. In this way, food is

A simplified industrial lineup makes selecting a product easier for users of Houston-based Shell Lubricants’ goods. The chemical maker has launched an improved portfolio of industrial and transmission lubricants and greases. The result of a three-year process, the restructured portfolio will help customers select the appropriate level of protection for their equipment with greater ease, according to Shell. “Research into the way our customers choose and use lubricants revealed that they often find the array of choices confusing and complex,” says Craig Schneider, vice president of marketing for North America. “With this in mind, we have redesigned our range of industrial lubricants, removing products with overlapping applications, or whose technology had been replaced by more advanced formulas, while improving choice by selectively adding specialty and synthetic products.” The portfolio is based around four tiers — entry, mainline, premium and advanced — each offering increasingly efficient levels of protection. Products on the highest tier, advanced, often use synthetic technology, according to Shell. Each brand and product category is structured according to the tiers. Old-to-new conversion tools accompany the portfolio to help long-time Shell industrial lubricant users make the transition. The redesigned portfolio will show new packaging labels and product guides to aid selection using color coding and visual icons. The changes also are designed to reduce the chance of misapplication in the factory. For further information, visit www.shell.com/lubricants.

Now through July mention this ad and

SAVE $200 on LAC Series High Performance Ovens With a combination of forced convection and horizontal airflow, the Despatch LAC Oven provides exceptional uniformity and the shortest possible processing time. The result is proven reliability in demanding production and laboratory applications, such as curing, drying, sterilizing, aging, and process-critical applications. Special offer ends July 31, 2011

INSPIRED INNOVATION

Thermal Processing Technology

phone: 1-952-469-5424 [email protected] www.despatch.com © 2011 Despatch Industries. All rights reserved.

Calendar of Events June

August

16 — Pumping Systems Management Workshop, Morgantown, W.V. Call (304) 293-2867 or visit www.eere.energy.gov/industry.

16-18 — Ipsen-U Vacuum Furnace Technical Training, Rockford, Ill. Call (815) 332-2518 or visit www.ipsenusa.com.

28-July 2 — Thermprocess International Trade Fair and Symposium for Thermo Process Technology, Düsseldorf, Germany. Call (312) 781-5180 or visit www.mdna. com/shows/thermprocess.html.

July 12-14 — Semicon West, Moscone Center, San Francisco. Hosted by Semiconductor Equipment and Materials International (SEMI). Call (408) 943-6997 or visit www.semiconwest.org. 26-27 — Biomass ’11: Renewable Power, Fuels and Chemicals Workshop, Alerus Center, Grand Forks, N.D. Hosted by Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). Call (701) 777-5113 or visit www.undeerc.org/biomass11.

19 — Pumping Systems Management Workshop, Dayton, Ohio. Call (937) 216-9452 or visit www.eere.energy.gov. 22-24 — Ethanol Conference and Trade Show, Des Moines, Iowa. Hosted by American Coalition for Ethanol. Call (605) 334-3381 or visit www.ethanol.org. 23-24 — Web Coating and Drying Seminar, Brussels, Belgium. Call (803) 8027820 or visit www.convertingschool.com. 24 — Steam Systems Management Workshop, Downey, Calif. Call (562) 8037570 or visit www.eere.energy.gov.

September 7-9 — Semicon Taiwan, Taipei, Taiwan. Hosted by Semiconductor Equipment

and Materials International (SEMI). Call 886 3 573 3399, ext. 239, or visit www.semicontaiwan.org. 12-15 — International Pump Users Symposium, George R. Brown Convention Center, Houston, Texas. Hosted by Turbolab, Texas A&M University. Call (979) 845-7417 or visit turbolab.tamu.edu. 13-14 — Web Handling and Converting Seminar, Ontario, Calif. Hosted by AIMCAL. Call (803) 802-7820 or visit www.convertingschool.com. 14-17 — Association of Water Technologies (AWT) Annual Convention and Exposition, Atlanta. Hosted by Association of Water Technologies (AWT). Call (301) 740-1421 or visit www.awt.org. 17-20 — SPE Thermoforming Conference, Renaissance Hotel, Schaumburg, Ill. Call (706) 235-9298 or visit www.4spe.org.

WE KNOW ELECTRICITY Questions about SCR power control systems? We can help. • Fusing • Cooling • Heatsink Design • Voltage protection • Application assistance For more than 40 years we have been designing and building SCR controls for hundreds of thousands of users like you.

For answers to your solid state control questions

Call 1-800-331-1345 Box 70 Scott Depot, WV 25560-0070 • Fax: 304-757-7305 E-mail: [email protected] • www.payneng.com 14

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Need Thermal Fluid Heaters... To find them, turn here

www.process-heating.com/buyersguide Locate the industrial equipment, components and services specifically used in applying, transferring, measuring, monitoring and controlling heat in the manufacturing operations that you need! • Search by Company Name or Product Category • Downloadable Product Spec Sheets • Alpha Company Listings • Live Web & Email Links • Product Photos

2011 Buyers Guide Start your search today! • Watch for expanded - listings!

www.process-heating.com/buyersguide

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((.'').'*((

Power Controls

Be In

Control A

rticle 409 of the National Electric Code (NEC) is well known to many industrial control panel builders and facility managers. Effective on January 1, 2005, Article 409 requires industrial control panel assemblies to be clearly labeled with a respective shortcircuit current rating (SCCR). The SCCR represents the maximum amount of instantaneous current the equipment can with-

stand without compromising the physical integrity of the panel. This rating must meet or exceed the available “fault current” for the installation. The SCCR requirement was implemented as a safety consideration to prevent potential arc flash that could cause a fire, damage to the panel or property, or personal injury or even death. It is important to note that the SCCR is not represented

Understanding short-circuit current rating (SCCR) assignment options for industrial control panels is the first step in avoiding risk. By Monica Dickson, Watlow

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J u n e 2 0 1 1 • Process Heating

by the overcurrent protective device’s interrupt rating. Supplement SB, “Short Circuit Current Ratings for Industrial Control Panels,” has been added to UL 508A to provide one method of addressing Article 409 of the NEC. All panels that include one or more power circuit components as described in 49.5 of UL 508A require an SCCR, even if they are not otherwise designed for compliance with UL 508A. Excluded from this requirement are industrial panels that consist of only a control circuit. However, if the control circuit includes overcurrent protection that is connected to a power circuit, it does require an SCCR. If the panel includes a power circuit, in addition to control circuit with a separate supply, the control circuit also requires an SCCR. Responsibility for compliance with SCCR requirements lies with multiple parties. The electrical contractor that will install the panel must work with the respective consulting and facility engineers to determine the appropriate SCCR based upon the fault current of the installation. This should be part of their process in gathering the requirements of the panel. It

Power Controls Feeder Circuit

Enlarged Panel View Line 600 V

External Transformers Facility

Feeder Side Branch Side Breaker or Fused Disconnect Semiconductor Fuses A B

600 480

480 240

600 480

C

Note: Available fault current can increase after transformers

480 240

Line Side

Filter PE A protective earth (PE) connection is required.

Local Panel Disconnect

Filter = Across Line Component

Load Side

Branch Protection

Heater

Branch Circuit

See Enlarged View

is important that this information is clearly communicated to the panel manufacturer early in the design stage. The panel manufacturer is required to properly label the panel with the SCCR. The panel manufacturer is not required to confirm that the SCCR on the panel is sufficient for the installation. In compliance with the NEC, it is the responsibility of the authority having jurisdiction (AHJ) to confirm whether or not the panel’s

Alternate

Determine the SCCR of each component in the power circuit, including the components on the line side of the branch circuit and, as a separate calculation, the components in the feeder circuit (shown). In the illustration on the right, the power circuit elements for a 440 V, three-phase application use a power controller for protection from short circuits.

Planning for SCCR When Designing or Retrofitting Designing a panel, using the method described under supplement SB of UL 508A to the appropriate SCCR, or determining the rating for an existing panel, can be addressed in three basic steps. First, research must be conducted to determine the SCCR of each component in the power circuit. This must be determined for the components on the line side

The panel manufacturer is required to properly label the panel with the SCCR. SCCR is suitable for installation in a facility. In most facilities, the AHJ is the local electrical inspector. In the event of an accident or safety hazard due to an inadequate SCCR requirement on a panel, ultimate responsibility will lie with the electrical contractor who specified and installed the panel. The consulting engineer also will be held responsible as they are relied upon to determine or confirm the appropriate SCCR and fault current.

Power Control

of the branch circuit and, as a separate calculation, the components in the feeder circuit. Some exceptions to which components are required to have an SCCR considered are across-the-line components such as power transformers, and current transformers as listed in SB4.2 of UL 508A. If it is available, this can be found by researching specification sheets and instruction manuals, or it may be labeled on the component itself.

Once the SCCR for each component in the power circuit is identified, it must be done for the line side of the branch circuit as well. This can be accomplished by first identifying the lowest-rated component on the load side of the branch circuit’s protective device, then determining the rating of the control circuit overcurrent protective device. The two ratings then are compared, and the lower of the two is assigned to the line side of the branch circuit protection device. The second step is to see if there are any feeder circuit components that will limit the fault current. This may be a power transformer, current-limiting fuses or UL-listed current-limiting circuit breaker. If there are any of these devices in the feeder circuit, the SCCR can be adjusted as described under SB4.3 of UL 508A. The final step is to compare the SCCRs calculated by the lowest-rated feeder component, the line side of the branch circuit and the fault current as calculated from step two. The rating for the panel will be the smallest of the calculations. The most daunting step of the process is www.process-heating.com • J u n e 2 0 1 1

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17

Power Controls locating SCCR values for individual components. Unfortunately, many manufacturers of power controllers, connectors, switches and terminal blocks have not caught up, or perhaps they have found it cost prohibitive to test components to determine the SCCR. UL 508A provides a table under SB4.2.14 that includes an assumed maximum rating for components that do not have an SCCR identified. Many of these components are listed with a minimal SCCR of 5 kA or less. This may result in a maximum SCCR on the panel of 5 kA or less, and this is not sufficient to accommodate the fault current at most installations because most requirements are 35, 65 and 100 kA. An alternative method in determining an SCCR of a panel is to have the combination of components for the assembly tested by a third-party test laboratory. This method can be cost and time prohibitive as capable test laboratories are limited, and testing of the assembly will likely damage or destroy the panel. Therefore, this generally is not a viable

option for customized assemblies manufactured for unique installations. Yet it may be suited for an application where multiple panels with similar designs are being built for installations requiring the same SCCR. There may be a significant return on investment by reducing the cost of panel components by having the ability to utilize components that do not include a predetermined SCCR.

SYSTEM DOWN!

If neither of the aforementioned methods of determining the SCCR can be used, or if an existing panel requires modification to comply with Article 409 of the NEC, the installer will need to take measures to limit the available fault current to the panel. This can be done by installing a transformer in the feeder supply circuit. Article 409 of the NEC has a noble intention in improving the safety of industrial facilities. As demand increases for SCCRs to be included on power circuit components, suppliers will be expected to respond by providing those ratings. This will make assigning SCCRs to industrial control panels a much simpler task and compliance with the code more easily adoptable. PH Monica Dickson works as an account manager for the process industry at St. Louis-based Watlow. Other contributors to the article include Watlow’s Dennis Long, Don Commare, Larry Glentz, Larry Crane and Tom Bowman. The company can be reached at (800) 492-8569 or www.watlow.com.

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1-800-339-7549 www.multitherm.com 18

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J u n e 2 0 1 1 • Process Heating

Heat Transfer Fluids

Heat Transfer Fluids

Insulating Hot Oil Systems I

nsulation fires from leaked thermal fluid are one of the least understood potential hazards facing hot oil systems. The main theory suggests that the fluid degrades in an oxygen-starved environment until its chemical makeup reaches its autoignition temperature. Academic papers have studied the kinetics of the spontaneous ignition inside the insulation and developed estimates of the activation energy required. The bottom line, however, is that thermal fluid systems have two of the required items necessary for autoignition to occur: a combustible liquid and heat. Material selection and installation can significantly reduce the potential for these fires. Even if energy costs were zero, there would still be the need to protect company personnel from exposure to hot pipes. In boiler and heater rooms where insulation is absent or insufficient, operators have complained that they must use metal tools

When used in certain locations, porous insulation allows leaking thermal fluid to spread out inside the hot, enclosed space, coating the insulation. If a limited amount of air leaks in, the decomposing fluid will begin to smolder, creating a facility and personnel risk. By Jim Oetinger, Paratherm Corp.

with extra caution because they get so hot they can cause first-degree burns. In these conditions, wire-rimmed glasses are best left in a case on the desk.

A rule of thumb for specifying thermal insulation at elevated temperatures is to size the insulation to maintain a temperature at the outer surface not exceeding 140°F (60°C), according to Lee’s Loss Prevention in the Process Industries. Hydrocarbon-based heat transfer fluids present a unique insulating problem because fluid that leaks into the insulation can become a fire hazard. The very conditions that insulation create — for instance, preservation of heat and exclusion of air circulation — can lead to circumstances that promote self-ignition. The vast surface area within common insulation types — all those interstices — can further complicate the picture. The continued exposure to high temperatures inside the insulation and the limited fresh-air supply combine to partially Material selection and installation of steam pipe insulation can reduce the potential for fires. www.process-heating.com • J u n e 2 0 1 1

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Heat Transfer Fluids

Photo courtesy of Pittsburgh-Corning

Shown before cladding and coating, cellular glass insulation such as Foamglas from Pittsburgh-Corning must be purchased in either blocks or shapes to fit specific components, but its closed design reduces fire hazards in hot oil systems.

oxidize the fluid into very different material. Autoignition occurs when either:

But, there are materials, procedures and practices you can use to control the risk.

• The molecular rearrangement produces a compound that ignites at the existing temperature and oxygen level. • A sudden increase in oxygen allows ignition as is.

Minimizing the Fire Hazard Minimizing the fire hazard from insulation is straightforward, but the materials can be more expensive than conventional insulation.

Insulation is nothing more than a large number of air pockets that are held in place by some type of material. For high temperature systems pumping combustible liquids, these materials may consist of mineral fibers, compressed particles (calcium silicate or perlite) or cellular glass. When considering autoignition conditions, the cellular glass delivers some clear advantages. Because of the way the material is produced, the air pockets in the cellular glass material are not connected. So, any fluid entering the insulation remains isolated near the leak point, preventing the type of autoignition that causes fires. Often, weep holes are drilled through the material to allow pooled fluid to drain out, and this further

Need Thermal Fluid Heaters... To find them, turn here: www.process-heating.com/buyersguide Locate the industrial equipment, components and services specifically used in applying, transferring, measuring, monitoring and controlling heat in the manufacturing operations that you need! • •

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2011

BUYERS GUIDE

Periodical Class

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Heat Transfer Fluids reduces the fire hazard — unless, of course, the drain is right over an ignition source. In the other types of insulation, the hot fluid may spread throughout the vast interstitial surfaces. There, it shares the space with thousands of air pockets at elevated temperatures maintained by the insulation itself — the very conditions that can promote self-ignition. Because cellular glass is rigid, it must be purchased in either blocks or shapes to fit specific components such as valves or piping Ts. This increases the material cost. Installation costs also are higher because of the onsite cutting required to fit one rigid component to another.

Y-strainers and any pressure taps or other connections. Fiberglass or calcium silicate can be used elsewhere. Transitions from one type of insulation to another are critical. Horizontal pipe runs can transition at flanges or 12 to 18" from the potential leak point. If you want to keep the cladding intact, it is a good idea to leave 1 to 2" of space between the insulation and the flange, so you can retighten the bolts once the system is at operating temperature. The open end of the insulation should be sealed to keep any spills from above from leaking into the mat. Sealing the end is critical where the transition occurs on vertical pipe runs

Oxidizers Ovens Furnaces

Transitions from one type of insulation to another are critical. The trick to optimizing and minimizing insulation costs is to utilize cellular glass where it is necessary, and then use less expensive material where there is minimal potential for fluid leaks. For instance, if you get a leak on an uninterrupted pipe run, you have bigger problems than soaked insulation. Typical highpotential fluid leak areas include valves,

because any leakage will run along the pipe under the cellular glass. For short vertical runs, optimizing the insulation might dictate skipping the transition until the horizontal run starts — where thoroughly sealing the open end is less critical. And, as a reminder, never insulate flanges in a hot-oil system. If the bare flange presents a safety issue, install a protective sheet-metal cover with a drain hole. As an alternative, removable modular cladding/insulation systems that are non-permeable can be installed over flanges. These also work well for valves and Y-strainers. Once the equipment is up and running, the insulation should be inspected periodically to make sure that there is no fluid leaking into it. Any visible smoke or odor of hot fluid should be investigated. Weep holes should be drilled into the bottom of the cladding to allow leaked fluid to escape. Any darkening of the insulation or cladding indicates that fluid is leaking. Insulation that has been soaked with fluid should be removed carefully because any sudden increase in the oxygen level can result in autoignition. PH Jim Oetinger is the director of technology with Paratherm Corp., West Conshohocken, Pa. For more information, call (610) 941-4900 or visit www.paratherm.com.

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21

Heat Exchangers

Controlling Cooling Systems Woes C orrosion in cooling systems is a problem faced by all, but some types of corrosion are trickier to avoid or repair than others. Here, common causes and ways to prevent erosion corrosion and galvanic corrosion will be discussed. Heat exchangers and cold plates are used in cooling applications to remove and transfer heat from one place to another using a heat transfer fluid such as water, oil or ethylene glycol and water solution. Literally thousands of combinations of fluids and fluid path materials are used in these applications. One determining factor used for selecting the fluid path materials in process heating components should be the materials’ ability to resist corrosion. Corrosion comes in many different forms, including erosion corrosion, so it is important to know the fluid’s properties as well as the materials’ properties in order to minimize erosion corrosion and optimize system performance and life.

Controlling Erosion Corrosion

One of the main criteria for selecting the fluid path materials in these cold plates should be the materials’ ability to resist corrosion.

Erosion corrosion is the acceleration in the rate of corrosion in metal due to the relative motion of a fluid and a metal surface. It typically occurs in pipe bends, tube constrictions and other structures that alter flow direction or velocity. The mechanism for this type of corrosion is the continuous flow of fluid, which removes any protective film or metal oxide from the metal surface. It can occur both in the presence and in the absence of suspended matter in the flow stream. In the presence of suspended matter, the effect is similar to sandblasting,

and even strong films can be removed at relatively low fluid velocities. Once the metal surface is exposed, it is attacked by the corrosive media and eroded away by the fluid friction. If the passive layer of metal oxide cannot be regenerated quickly enough, significant damage may occur. Some materials are more resistant than others to erosion corrosion under the same fluid conditions. Erosion corrosion is most prevalent in soft alloys such as copper and aluminum. Although increas-

Erosion corrosion and galvanic corrosion can be tricky to treat, making prevention an essential ingredient to a healthy cooling system. By Engineering Staff, Lytron Inc. 22

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J u n e 2 0 1 1 • Process Heating

ing the flow rate of the fluid in a heating or cooling application may increase its performance, it also may increase erosion corrosion. Therefore, it is important to determine how great an impact increasing the flow rate will have on overall thermal performance. In some applications, the increased flow rate may produce only a minimal improvement in performance, yet the erosion corrosion will cause a significant drop in the longevity of the heat exchanger or cold plate. Some methods for minimizing erosion corrosion include: • Improving the flow lines within the pipe by deburring. • Allowing bends to have larger angles. • Changing pipe diameters gradually rather than abruptly. • Slowing the flow rate (minimizing turbulence). • Reducing the amount of dissolved oxygen.

Heat Exchangers Galvanic Materials The galvanic corrosion rate depends on the electrical potential between two metals. Adapted from MILSTD-889, the galvanic series orders metals based on the potential they exhibit in flowing seawater. The most reactive are at the top of the list and the least reactive at the bottom.

longevity in any cooling system. Increasing fluid flow will give users more cooling performance—up to a point. After that, the increased fluid velocities may rapidly begin to erode and corrode the inside metal surface of the tubing. Designers should consider many different factors to determine the best solution for an application.

Avoiding Galvanic Corrosion • • • • • • •

• • • • • •

Magnesium. Zinc. Aluminum (most types). Iron, plain carbon and low alloy steels. Lead, high lead alloys. Tin plate, tin/lead solder. Chromium plated materials, chromium alloys, chromium type steels. Brass. Copper. Nickel. Stainless steels. Silver. Gold.

• Changing the pH. • Switching the pipe material to a different metal or alloy. In addition to the fluid path material used, it also is important to consider the fluid’s temperature. At higher temperatures, flow rates should be lowered to minimize erosion corrosion. For example, as a general rule, water flow velocities should not exceed 8 ft/sec for cold water and 5 ft/sec for hot water (up to approximately 140°F [60°C]). In systems where temperatures routinely exceed 140°F (60°C), flow velocities should not exceed 3 ft/sec. Maximum recommended water velocities in other typical tube materials can be calculated using the formula in figure 1. There will always be a trade-off between thermal performance and reliability/

When selecting components for the cooling loop, it is important to consider material compatibility as well as individual performance. Although an aluminum cold plate paired with a copper-tube heat exchanger might meet the thermal requirements, it is not a reliable cooling circuit. Copper and aluminum have widely different electrochemical potentials, so when they are combined in a cooling system, galvanic corrosion is likely to occur. Galvanic corrosion — also called dissimilar metal corrosion — erodes metal, causing leaks over time. In a cooling loop, metallic materials in electrochemical contact can form a galvanic cell or battery. In a galvanic cell, when two metals with different electrical potentials are connected, there is a potential difference across them. The metal with the higher electrical potential becomes the anode while the lower becomes the cathode. A current will flow from the anode to the cathode. The anode dissolves or corrodes to form ions. These ions drift into the water, where they either stay in solution or react with other ions in the electrolyte. This process is known as galvanic corrosion. A galvanic cell requires three elements: • Two electrochemically dissimilar metals. • An electrically conductive path between the two metals. • An electrolyte to allow the flow of metal ions. In a typical liquid cooling circuit, the plumbing provides the electrically con-

Allowable Velocity for a Given Fluid = Allowable Velocity for Water x (Density of Water/Density of Given Liquid) ½

Figure 1. Maximum recommended water velocities in other typical tube materials can be calculated using the formula.

ductive path, and the aqueous coolant provides the electrolyte. In the copper/ aluminum scenario mentioned, the aluminum is the anode, the copper is the cathode, and the cooling fluid is the electrolyte. Over time, the aluminum corrodes as it dissolves into the water. Elevated temperatures, which are likely in cooling loops, accelerate galvanic corrosion. An 18°F (10°C) increase in temperature can approximately double the corrosion rate. Corrosion inhibitors can be added to the cooling water to retard, but not eliminate, galvanic corrosion. Corrosion inhibitors bind with the ions in solution to neutralize them. The inhibitors are consumed in this process so they need replacing regularly.

Heat exchangers are used in cooling applications to remove and transfer heat from one place to another. If not kept free of corrosion, the process will suffer.

Non-aqueous coolants such as oils eliminate galvanic corrosion because they do not support ions. However, the thermal performance is sacrificed as the thermal conductivities of heat transfer oils are generally lower than water-based coolants. Using the same materials, or materials with similar electrical potential, throughout the cooling loop is the recommended action to avoid galvanic corrosion. It should be ensured that piping, connectors and other components do not introduce a reactive metal into the system. PH This article was written by the engineering staff at Lytron Inc., Woburn, Mass., a manufacturer of cold plates, chassis, chillers, cooling systems and heat exchangers. The company can be reached at (781) 933-7300 or www.lytron.com. www.process-heating.com • J u n e 2 0 1 1

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23

Process Control

Don’t Get Caught

Short

Varying Rates of Thermal Expansion

PLC-based temperature control works where single loop temperature controllers fall short. By Tim Hanes, AutomationDirect

I

n many applications, single-loop temperature controllers are sufficient to provide control of heating and cooling. But in some applications, including the one detailed in this article, closely coordinated control among many temperature control loops is needed. In those cases and others, PLC-based temperature control can be the best solution.

Meltblown Machine A meltblown machine (figure 1) used to manufacture nonwoven materials consisted of four main components:

average block temperature around 425°F (218°C). Biasing setpoints for each of the 36 individual zone temperature controllers could be entered by the machine operators to adjust the temperature profile across the length of the spinbeam. Process air heated by a 320 kW electric circulation heater was delivered by a lowpressure blower through large air manifold assemblies. These assemblies were constructed of 0.75" thick 304 stainless steel plate attached to the die body using 28 ~0.47" (12 mm) grade-8 bolts.

into 36 zones spaced on 4" intervals down the length of the block. Each of the 36 zones had an RTD temperature sensor for feedback to that zone’s single-loop temperature controller. An output from each controller modulated a pair of cartridge heaters to maintain an

Normally, thermal expansion of metal as it is heated is not a problem if all assembled parts expand at the same rate, or if clearances with tolerances down to the thousandths of an inch are not required. But in this case, there were significantly different rates of thermal expansion for the die body and the air manifold. This was causing these two components to separate to the extent that the bolts connecting the assemblies were shearing. When the meltblown machine was started, the solid die body was heated with the cartridge heaters at a rate of 2°F per minute. The air manifold assemblies were heated only by the preheated process air;

Bicomponent Meltblown - Online Extruder B

Air Heater Screen Changer

Extruder A

Polymer Piping

• An extrusion system provided a steady supply of molten polymer. • A heated spinbeam distributed the polymer into an even sheet or web. • A heated process air system was used to attenuate, or stretch, the fibers. • A vacuum system removed the process air as the nonwoven web was formed. The spinbeam consisted of a large 304 stainless steel die body block (figure 2) weighing approximately 8 tons; it was heated by 72 electric cartridge heaters rated at 1.1 kW. The heaters were paired 24

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J u n e 2 0 1 1 • Process Heating

Cart - On/Off Line

Actuator Up/Down

Quench

Air Manifold Bicomponent Meltblown Die

Figure 1. The meltblown machine is used to manufacture nonwoven materials by extruding, heating and stretching fibers into a web.

Process Control Example of a Meltblown Die Assembly Heaters

RTD Die Body

Air Manifold Air Manifold

Spinneret

Figure 2. Significantly different rates of thermal expansion for the die body and the air manifolds were causing these two components to separate and the connecting bolts to shear.

thus, they were increasing in temperature at a rate of about 1°F per minute. With the two different heating rates, it did not take long to develop a significant temperature differential between the die body and the air manifold assemblies. Because the solid stainless steel die body was more efficient at conducting heat than the hollow air manifolds, it could expand in length by as much as 1 percent — or 1.4" — before the air manifolds could expand. Something had to give and, in this case, it was often one or more of the 28 bolts attaching the air manifold assemblies to the sides of the spinbeam. The workaround solution was continuous intervention from the machine operators to monitor the die body and air manifold temperatures and to adjust the temperature setpoints on the 36 individual controllers as required. A solution that replaced constant operator attention with automation control was needed.

The Power of the PLC After analysis and process trials, it was determined that the system could handle a maximum temperature differential of about 50°F (10°C) between the die body and the

air manifolds without shearing the bolts. One possible solution to maintain a maximum temperature differential was to install heaters and additional controls on the air manifold assemblies. However, due to the complex shape and space limitations, this solution was cost prohibitive. A better solution was an improved automation system in the form of a PLC and a human machine interface (HMI). On the meltblown machine, the individual single-loop controllers were eliminated and the 36 RTD zone temperature sensors were wired to individual analog inputs at the PLC. Also, temperature sensors were added to monitor the incoming temperature of the preheated process air entering the air manifolds. Using the internal math functions of the PLC, the 36 die-body-zone temperatures were averaged and compared to the incoming air temperature in the air manifolds. Based on the measured temperature differential, the PLC automatically ramped the setpoints of the die body zones to individually control each zone’s pair of cartridge heaters. Specifically, the PLC determined the correct setpoint for each of 36 PID con-

trol loops. Each loop read an RTD input as the process variable and used the internally derived setpoint to modulate a control variable analog output to control the heaters. This PLC-based control solution allowed the machine to automatically heat at a rate that was compatible with the thermal expansion of the different components. The bolt shearing problem was solved and the need for constant operator intervention was eliminated. In addition, preprogrammed biased setpoint temperature profiles in the PLC now can be used automatically as required, eliminating the need for machine operators to enter separate biasing setpoints in the individual single-loop controllers. And, the PLC continuously provides and trends valuable data to the HMI, including the process variable, the setpoint (including any biasing) and the loop output control variable. Alarm points and conditions, either globally or for each loop, also can be viewed at the HMI. Touchscreen HMI inputs allow changes depending on different conditions such as the polymer type. Prior to the use of PLC-based control, constant operator intervention was required to provide safeguards against damage and to manually track various process conditions. By introducing PLCbased control, possible machine damage due to varying rates of thermal expansion was eliminated, and insight was provided by tracking and trending data that was not readily available from the single-loop controllers. For complex temperature control applications with different heating or cooling profiles, PLC-based control offers a versatile, powerful solution. When paired with a touch screen HMI, additional process data can be viewed and analyzed, with adjustments to improve operations easily entered through the touchscreen. PH

Tim Hanes is a process instrumentation equipment product engineer with AutomationDirect, Cumming, Ga. The company can be reached at (800) 633-0405 or visit www.automationdirect.com. www.process-heating.com • J u n e 2 0 1 1

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25

Process Control

Remote Possibilities Y

ou can start your car from your bed and check your home security system from your smart phone. So it was only a matter of time before remote monitoring technology took hold in the manufacturing world as well. Although certain industries and larger machines have used such systems for a while, remote monitoring of central process cooling systems is relatively new, having been introduced to the market last year. Only a dozen or so manufacturers have been using the technology for process cooling. But, that is changing quickly due to the many clear benefits the new system provides. This article will take a closer look at the applications and advantages of remote monitoring for process heating and cooling systems.

Remote Monitoring Basics Available for use with complete process cooling systems as well as individual machine-side chillers and temperature con-

Remote monitoring for cooling systems can help your process and save money. By Al Fosco, Frigel North America

trol units, remote monitoring control systems track an array of system parameters in real time to help operators maximize process cooling efficiency, speed troubleshooting and facilitate preventive maintenance. The system incorporates an Ethernet cable run to the main unit with the rest of the system daisy chained together for monitoring the entire cooling system. The remote monitoring panel, called PMR, includes software for interface between the equipment and the Internet. If an alarm sounds, an email can be sent to plant operators and technicians from the process cooling equipment manufacturer. Often, technicians from the equipment provider can resolve common issues over the Internet, taking advantage of remote fea-

tures to monitor and manage ambient temperature, setpoint temperature, fan speed, pump pressure, flow rate, reservoir levels, valves and filter pressure. If the problem is a mechanical issue, the faulty part can be identified and shipped without delay. With remote monitoring, an equipment technician often can tell the processor what is wrong by looking at a screen and viewing machine settings, alarm readings and other available parameters. The most common alarms tend to be related to temperature setpoint issues. Issues such as these can cause the system to run harder than necessary, meaning it is not operating at maximum efficiency and opening it up to unnecessary wear and maintenance needs. This is easy to diagnose and repair to help ensure processors are running at optimal efficiency. If an on-site visit is necessary, the data provided by remote monitoring can ensure the visit is as short (and low cost) as possible.

Trend Analysis Monitoring software can record and retain as much 30 days’ data at a time, providing an additional benefit: the opportunity to analyze system trends for better problem

Available for use with complete systems as well as individual machine-side chillers and temperature control units, remote monitoring control technology tracks process parameters in real time. 26

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J u n e 2 0 1 1 • Process Heating

Process Control Remote monitoring of central process cooling systems facilitates troubleshooting and trend analysis.

Benefits of Remote Monitoring • Continuously optimized processing parameters. • Minimized maintenance and downtime. • Troubleshooting assistance. • Reduced on-site visits. • Peace of mind.

solving. Some software produces charts and graphs showing past events, fault logs, historical trends, performance analysis and troubleshooting. This provides experienced technicians with knowledge they can use quickly. For example, a processor observed that the process water temperature at his plant

Two Coils

had been rising over several weeks. A technician looked closely at the trend data and determined that the problem was dirty coils. A simple maintenance task fixed system issues that would have otherwise required an in-person service visit to the plant. Although remote monitoring technology is fairly new to the process heating and cooling realm, manufacturers can reduce downtime and maintenance costs by using it. In addition, the system can help a company on its path toward sustainability because the software also registers real-time energy and water consumption at the plant. Prompt adjustments can be made to optimize these parameters, saving valuable resources and costs. PH Al Fosco is the industrial markets sales manager for Frigel North America, East Dundee, Ill. For more information from Frigel, call (847) 540-0160 or vist www.frigel.com/na.

are Better than One Designed with twin helical coils the General Combustion HYT Series heaters offer the highest efficiency available. The HYT is designed for high temperature applications and its small, compact package makes it the ideal choice for limited space environments and easy installation. The General Combustion HYT is suitable for use with a wide range of fuels and thermal fluids making it the most versatile and efficient heater available. For reliability you can trust and efficiency you can bank on... Call the experts at General Combustion.

HERE’S WHY . . . • • • • • • •

Highest efficiency available Reduced operating costs Lower stack temperatures Compact construction for easy installation Safe, low-pressure operation No castable refractory Factory tested for optimum performance

5201 N. Orange Blossom Trail, Orlando, FL 32810 • Phone (407)290-6000 • Fax (407) 578-0577

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Equipment Overview

Convection and Conduction Heaters

Photo courtesy of Banner-Day

On Point

Convection and conduction heaters, including heat tracing, can put heat right where you need it, even in the most challenging environments.

www.process-heating.com Click on Equipment Overview, then on Convection and Conduction Heaters.

Companies

HEATER CONFIGURATION Band (Round): Cast-In Band (Round): Ceramic Band (Round): Coil Band (Round): Drum Band (Round): Mica Band (Round): Tubular Band (Round): Silicone Rubber Circulation: Cartridge Circulation: Direct-Steam Injection Circulation: Tubular Circulation: Thermal Fluid Flexible: Blanket Flexible: Drum Flexible: Etched Foil Flexible: Heating Cable Flexible: Silicone Rubber Flexible: Tape Flexible: Other Heat Tracing Heating System: Direct-Steam Injection Heating System: Packaged Heating System: Starch Cookers Heating System: Tank Heating System: Thermal Fluid Immersion: Finned Immersion: Screw Plug Immersion: Tubular, Bottom-Mounted Immersion: Tubular, Flanged Immersion: Tubular, Over-the-Side Immersion: Tubular, Pipe Thread Immersion: Tubular, Teflon-Coated Process Air: Duct Process Air: Heat Gun/Hot Air Blower Process Air: Open-Coil

You also can conduct your supplier search online!

Dalton Electric Heating Co. www.daltonelectric.com First Thermal Heaters www.firstthermal.com Heatec www.heatec.com General Combustion www.gencor.com Hubbell Electric Heater Co. www.hubbellheaters.com Parker Boiler Co. www.parkerboiler.com ASB Heating Elements Ltd. American Heating Co. Armstrong Engineering Associates Inc. Baelz North America Banner-Day BriskHeat Corp. CCI Thermal Technologies Chromalox Convectronics Custom Heat LLC DBK USA Inc. Davidon Industries Inc. Duratherm Processing Systems Inc. Durex Industries EGS Electrical Group, Nelson Heat Trace Exotherm Corp. Engineered Product Sales Corp. Fluorotherm Polymers Inc. Fostoria Process Equipment Div. of TPI Corp. Farnam Custom Products Fulton Thermal Corp. Gaumer Co. Inc. Hartzell Fan Inc. Heat Exchange & Transfer Heatcon Inc. Heatrex Heatron Inc. Hotwatt Indeeco Industrial Heater Co. Inc. Intelligent Heaters LLC/CLEPCO International Heat Exchange Leister USA Malcom Co. Micropyretics Heaters Intl./MHI Marathon Heater Inc. Master Appliance Mokon National Plastic Heater Sensor & Control Inc. Newpoint Thermal Nextron Ltd. Osram-Sylvania Process Heating Co. Pick Heaters Inc. ProFlow Inc.

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Companies within front of their names have an advertisement in this issue. *Contact manufacturer

Convection and conduction heaters take the shape, size and configuration you need to get heat where you need it. Find suppliers that will satisfy your process requirements in this print edition or online.

If you would like to contact a supplier directly, search our online Buyers Guide or send an e-mail to editor Linda Becker ([email protected]) requesting the contact information for the companies in which you are interested. MANUFACTURING PROCESS

INDUSTRIES SERVED

Process Air: Space Process Air: Tubular Process Air: Tubular, Finned Ring: Cast-In Ring: Ceramic Ring: Mica Strip (Flat/Plate): Cast-In Strip (Flat/Plate): Ceramic Strip (Flat/Plate): Etched Foil Strip (Flat/Plate): Finned Strip (Flat/Plate): Mica Strip (Flat/Plate): Silicone Rubber Strip (Flat/Plate): Tubular Electricity Hot Oil (Thermal Fluid) Hot Water Natural Gas Oil Propane Steam Other Bonding Curing Dehydrating Drying Embossing Evaporating Extruding Fusing Heat Setting Heat Shrinking Laminating Predrying/Preheating Soldering Sterilizing Tempering Thermoforming Chemicals/Petrochemicals Electronics Ethanol/Biodiesel Fuels Finishing Food Packaging/Printing Pulp/Paper/Converting Pharmaceuticals Plastics/Rubber Do You Supply Aftermarket Parts for Your Heaters?

ENERGY SOURCE

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You also can conduct your supplier search online! www.process-heating.com Click on Equipment Overview, then on Convection and Conduction Heaters.

Companies Process Technology Q Jet DSI Inc. Radiant Energy Systems Inc. SSM Industries LLC Sigma Thermal Stelter & Brinck Inc. TEI Struthers Wells Tempco Electric Heater Thermal Corp. Thermcraft Inc. Thermon Manufacturing Co. Trent Inc. Trimac Industrial Systems LLC Tyco Thermal Controls Thermal Fluid Systems Inc. Tutco Vapor Power Intl. Vulcan Electric Co. Watlow

Convection and Conduction Heaters HEATER CONFIGURATION Band (Round): Cast-In Band (Round): Ceramic Band (Round): Coil Band (Round): Drum Band (Round): Mica Band (Round): Tubular Band (Round): Silicone Rubber Circulation: Cartridge Circulation: Direct-Steam Injection Circulation: Tubular Circulation: Thermal Fluid Flexible: Blanket Flexible: Drum Flexible: Etched Foil Flexible: Heating Cable Flexible: Silicone Rubber Flexible: Tape Flexible: Other Heat Tracing Heating System: Direct-Steam Injection Heating System: Packaged Heating System: Starch Cookers Heating System: Tank Heating System: Thermal Fluid Immersion: Finned Immersion: Screw Plug Immersion: Tubular, Bottom-Mounted Immersion: Tubular, Flanged Immersion: Tubular, Over-the-Side Immersion: Tubular, Pipe Thread Immersion: Tubular, Teflon-Coated Process Air: Duct Process Air: Heat Gun/Hot Air Blower Process Air: Open-Coil

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SPOTLIGHT ON PRODUCT APPLICATIONS Alternative Energy Systems for Natural Gas Fueled Systems By Kevin Nesbitt, National Sales Manager, Pro-Environmental Inc.

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Gasifier has been operating since 2007 in an industrial kiln application. Unlike the direct burning of biomass, the producer gas is cleanburning with no resultant fly ash, slagging, soot or other environmental concerns and provides feedstock flexibility to the user. Outside of feedstock and biochar handling, the system utilizes a single rotating grate as its sole moving part. Proprietary software controls the feed cycle and resultant operating conditions based on the





Manufacturers listed in this Equipment Overview responded to a special mailing by Process Heating and do not necessarily represent the entire heaters market.

Sustainability and the cost and price volatility of natural gas are major operating concerns for U.S. manufacturing facilities. The environmental landscape has changed considerably with ever-increasing emphasis on renewable and sustainable energy. In addition, fossil fuel prices can change rapidly, making it difficult for manufacturers to manage costs and profitability effectively. Gasification is a demonstrated technology with the potential to provide combustible fuel using biomass, crop residue, urban wood waste, tire-derived fuel (TDF) or other select industrial and biomass residuals as feedstock. The combustible-portion producer gas is comprised of carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen (H2) and methane (CH4), and has potential process heat applications in regenerative thermal oxidizers (RTOs), kilns, boilers, industrial ovens and material/sludge dryers. Currently, Pro-Environmental’s PHG



feedstock properties and expected operating requirements. The temperature required is controlled by the existing burner’s control system, providing a consistent thermal atmosphere for combustion or production. Financial saving scenarios developed from current representative wood hog fuel and natural gas costs show a significant potential annual fuels-cost saving. In addition, potential environmental benefits include lower CO (5 to 10%), NOX and SOX, and particulate-matter emissions.

Pro-Environmental www.pro-env.com

MANUFACTURING PROCESS

INDUSTRIES SERVED

Process Air: Space Process Air: Tubular Process Air: Tubular, Finned Ring: Cast-In Ring: Ceramic Ring: Mica Strip (Flat/Plate): Cast-In Strip (Flat/Plate): Ceramic Strip (Flat/Plate): Etched Foil Strip (Flat/Plate): Finned Strip (Flat/Plate): Mica Strip (Flat/Plate): Silicone Rubber Strip (Flat/Plate): Tubular Electricity Hot Oil (Thermal Fluid) Hot Water Natural Gas Oil Propane Steam Other Bonding Curing Dehydrating Drying Embossing Evaporating Extruding Fusing Heat Setting Heat Shrinking Laminating Predrying/Preheating Soldering Sterilizing Tempering Thermoforming Chemicals/Petrochemicals Electronics Ethanol/Biodiesel Fuels Finishing Food Packaging/Printing Pulp/Paper/Converting Pharmaceuticals Plastics/Rubber Do You Supply Aftermarket Parts for Your Heaters?

ENERGY SOURCE

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* Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes * Yes Yes * Yes Yes * Yes * Yes * Yes

For contact information or to be included in future listings, contact Linda Becker at (847) 405-4020 or e-mail [email protected].

Need Thermal Fluid Heaters... To find them, turn here: www.process-heating.com/ buyersguide

3++XEEHOOLQGG

Locate the industrial equipment, components and services specifically used in applying, transferring, measuring, monitoring and controlling heat in the manufacturing manuffacturi t ingg operations operati t that you need! • Search by Company Name or Product Category • Downloadable Product Spec Sheets

• Alpha Company Listings • Live Web & Email Links • Product Photos

2011 Buyers Guide Start your search today! • Watch for expanded - listings! www.process-heating.com/buyersguide www.process-heating.com • J u n e 2 0 1 1

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Product Highlights Wondering where to find products beneficial to your process? This department provides a number of new products each month and allows you to easily request more information. Simply call those companies in which you are interested, or visit those companies’ web sites using the published web addresses.

Ultra Low Emissions Indirect Burner

Self Recuperative Burner

Model XPO helps ensure optimal fuel usage and reliable ultra-low emissions. The indirect burner produces single-digit NOX at minimal excess air without flue gas recirculation, exotic materials, or metal fiber while providing up to 6:1 turndown ratio. With capacities up to 8 MBTU, the burner is designed to be installed or retrofit into existing applications such as water bath heaters, thermal oil heaters, direct contact water heaters, solution heating/tanks and snow melters. Maxon, A Honeywell Co. (765) 284-3304 • www.maxoncorp.com

Model TJSR v5 combines a high velocity flame with fuel-saving recuperation. A space-saving integral eductor pulls the furnace exhaust through an internal ceramic recuperator, which preheats the incoming combustion air to high levels, improving furnace operating efficiency. The design of the ThermJet selfrecuperative burner for direct-fired furnace heating applications eliminates the need for the hot air ductwork required by external recuperators. The integrated gas and air orifices simplify burner piping, setup and adjustment. Eclipse Inc. • (815) 877-3031 • www.eclipsenet.com

Snack Food Dryers Model 2500 includes a 50" wide balanced-mesh weave, type 304 stainless steel conveyor belt. The dryer utilizes a natural gas burner with top-down high volume air supply and exhaust fan. Removable filters maximize clean airflow and ease maintenance. The dryer is capable of producing up to 2,400 lb of extruded snack products per hour. Lanly Co. • (216) 731-1115 • www.lanly.com

Boiler Room Control System Monitoring ModSync provides a private portal for remote web-based access to a facility’s boiler room controls. Used in conjunction with the Synex ModSync sequencing system, the inSite for ModSync interface provides real-time boiler system status using any web browser, including a web-enabled cell phone. Users can view current conditions, make adjustments, monitor maintenance schedules, receive email and text-message alerts, and review systems reports. Synex Controls • (315) 298-7182 • www.synexcontrols.com

Stationary Heat Transfer Fluid Systems Series HTF ST is designed for applications up to 600 kW and 650°F (343°C). It is designed with a low-watt-density electric heater mounted in a structural steel frame. The systems are prewired and available in single- and multiple-zone configurations with pumping capacities up to 120 gal/min. Mokon • (716) 876-9951 • www.mokon.com 32

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J u n e 2 0 1 1 • Process Heating

RTD-to-Wireless Connector, Converter Model UWRTD transmits process temperature, ambient temperature, signal strength and battery status in real time, wirelessly to your computer or the Internet. Users can interface up to 12 different wireless connectors with one receiver. Low power operation and sleep mode allow for long battery life. The CE-compliant connector/ converter is compatible with the company’s line of wireless receivers, which can accept signals from up to 48 wireless transmitters and display them on a PC. Omega Engineering Inc. (203) 359-1660 • www.omega.com

Indirect-Fired Gas Heater VariMax IFRG is used to heat process airstreams without contaminating the air with the products of combustion. The ultra-high-efficiency, indirectfired gas heater is useful for spray dryers and industrial processes with high temperature rises. The counterflow heat exchanger with hot-side recirculation yields efficiencies of more than 90 percent, says the manufacturer. Standard features include a stainless steel heat exchanger, FM or IRI certified gas trains, and complete heater controls. Munters Corp., DH Div. • (540) 291-1111 • www.munters.us

CASE STUDIES

Guide to

CASE STUDIES 34 Parker Boiler Made in America, Roasting Almonds in Chicago, IL

37 Duratherm Maximize Fluid Life with Careful Starts and Stops

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33

CASE STUDIES

Made in America, Roasting Almonds in Chicago, IL

H

ow many times have you been approached by a student or Scout at a grocery store selling candy bars for a fundraiser? If it was for a value priced caramel or chocolate bar, it was probably bearing the name “World’s Finest® Chocolate”. Well-known for their fundraising opportunities, World’s Finest® Chocolate is a family owned company and has over 60 years of experience in manufacturing chocolate, candy bars and other related products. They are one of only nine American companies that manufacture chocolate directly from the cocoa bean. The plant annually produces more than 16,000,000 lbs of chocolate products and roasts 1,200,000 lbs of almonds at the facility. They boast dedicated personnel and use the most modern machinery and the finest ingredients to make consistently delicious chocolates.

They are known for their consistency, quality, versatility and dependability. World’s Finest® Chocolate utilizes state of the art technology and high volume production efficiencies. We are pleased to be part of World’s Finest® Chocolate’s best-selling products, the Continental® Almonds; chocolate-covered almonds packaged in a one-pound gift box. Back in the mid ‘80s, Parker Boiler Sales Manager, Douglas W. Anderson, was approached by a long time Parker OEM, Sandvik Jahn of Huntington, England, for a Parker HT1008 Thermal Fluid Heater and related accessories to go with the Sandvik Jahn almond roaster. After fabrication, delivery and installation of our equipment and system, Parker usually does not hear from our customers for many, many years. As the saying goes, “No news is good news”.

Our Sales Manager, Michael Leeming, after a World’s Finest® Chocolate fundraiser event with his kids, decided to contact the company to see how the Parker Boiler was operating. After an array of internal emails, it was discovered that the original purchaser, Vice President of Engineering, Rich Kessell, who had originally been involved in the project is still with the company. According to Rich, the heater has been in service and is still running strong after 25 years. The reason it has lasted so long is the technology of thermal fluids as opposed to the potentially corrosive fluids of glycol, water or steam vapor. The only service done to the heater was a couple of burner cleanings. They have no purchase history of parts and we are proud to say that this is proof that we sell high quality, long lasting products.

1985 vintage Parker HT1008 hot oil heater and pump. 34

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J u n e 2 0 1 1 • Process Heating

CASE STUDIES

Sanvik Jahn almond roaster.

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For more information about Parker Boiler go to: www.parkerboiler.com, or for World’s Finest® Chocolate, go to www.worldsfinestchocolate.com

decades. We look forward to serving World’s Finest® Chocolate for their future needs and to continue to be one of the top American manufacturers of boilers, Thermal Fluid Heaters and related equipment.

There is no manufacturer like World’s Finest® Chocolate, and Parker Boiler is proud to be a partner in another American manufacturing story. We hope to continue the success of both our companies for multiple

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It’s Time for You to...

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Save Money Improve Efficiency Reduce Operating Costs Lower Utility Bills

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It’s Time for Your New...

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Thermal Fluid Heater Steam Boiler Medium Temp Process Heaters Heating Medium: Thermal Fluids Temp Range: 350° - 650°F BTUs: 126,000 - 6,250,000

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Available with: Expansion Tanks with Level Controls Distribution/Air Separation Tanks Air-Cooled 650° Pumps Custom Skid Mounts

Steam Boilers: NEVER A COMPROMISE FOR QUALITY OR SAFETY

Parker Boiler Co. 5930 Bandini Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90040 (323) 727-9800 Fax: (323) 722-2848 [email protected] www.parkerboiler.com

15 to 250 PSI HP: 1.5 to 150 HP

Available with: Feed Systems or DA Tanks Blow Off Tanks Softeners Chemical Feed Systems Custom Skid Mounts

Medium Temp Process Heaters Temp Range: 130° - 400°F BTUs: 300,000 - 6,800,000 Hot Water or Glycol

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All Units Available with: Expansion Tanks with Level Controls Distribution/Air Separation Tanks Air-Cooled 400° Pumps Custom Skid Mounts Natural Gas, #2 Oil, Propane, Combination Fired, Low NOx, or Bio Fuel Firing

All Parker Boilers Use a Flexible Staggered Tube Design with 8 to 10 Pass Flow with a 25-Year Guarantee Against Thermal Shock.

www.process-heating.com • J u n e 2 0 1 1

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35

CASE STUDIES

Maximize Fluid Life with Careful Starts and Stops

R

egardless of system design, size or heat source, there are a few basic procedures that should be followed when starting up or shutting down your heat transfer system. Following these procedures will help maximize the life of your fluid by reducing incidents of thermal degradation.

tures, slowly increase the temperature by 20°F - 30°F increments to allow for steady, even heating without overheating and thermally degrading the fluid. Consult your equipment manufacturer for help with these features.

System Start-Up

System Shutdown

A fluid at room temperature may have a viscosity higher than 100 cSt. If the system is outdoors and the ambient temperature is below 32˚F (0˚C), the viscosity could be as high as 1000 cSt, or higher. While a fluid can usually be pumped at these viscosities, it’s not yet ready for full heat. Both small electric and larger, gasfired heaters could apply heat during startup at the full rate even though the fluid is not yet prepared to take it. The fluid will be too thick to allow for efficient, turbulent flow and if a heater is allowed to fully fire during these periods it will most likely overheat and thermally degrade the fluid. The fluid is basically moving too slow through the heater under these conditions. It may not always be possible to completely avoid this situation but there are few measures that can be taken which can help mitigate the damage to your fluid. Typically electrically heated systems will have a controller start up option that will allow for slower, easier starts. Gas fired boilers will have a similar low fire start option. In either case, your equipment manufacturer should be able offer some guidance. If your system doesn’t have these fea-

When shutting your system down a few basic steps will help ensure that your thermal fluid isn’t damaged by overheating. During normal operation, your heat source will be cycling either on and off or from a low fire to a high fire in order to maintain your set point temperature. Keep in mind too that within a short period of time the boiler tubes or electric element’s chamber will become nearly as hot as the heat source itself. Therefore, it’s important to remember that your heater is actually hotter than your output temperature and if the flow is stopped, there’s a good chance it will quickly apply more heat than the fluid can handle. If a system is shut down without allowing the heat source and adjacent areas to cool before the fluid stops flowing, it can become trapped and subsequently ‘burn’ or thermally degrade. For this reason it’s important when shutting down any system to allow the fluid to cool below 250˚F (121˚C) before turning the pumps off. Using a heat exchanger or leaving your heater blower running will help speed up this cooling process.

About Duratherm Extended Life Fluid Duratherm Heat Transfer Fluids • • • • • •

-120°F to +650°F temp range Flashpoints as high as 615°F Non-Toxic, Non-Hazardous Open Bath Fluids Food Grade Fluids Heat/Cool Fluids

Duratherm System Cleaners • Clean systems while running production • Easily dissolve sludge and carbon • Large system concentrates • Pre-blended cleaners and heat transfer fluids up to 550°F • Fast-acting ‘solvent’ type cleaners

Contact Duratherm (800) 446-4910 [email protected] www.heat-transfer-fluid.com www.process-heating.com • J u n e 2 0 1 1

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37

Free Literature

To request any of these free brochures, use the contact information in the literature item in which you are interested, or consult our ad index for the phone, fax, web and e-mail information.

Portable Chillers

ARI Valve

Sterling’s new GP Series

ARI Valves are in service all around the globe in applications such as cars, ships, chemicals, food processing and heating technology. ARI also works where any fluid, liquid, gas or vapor needs to be isolated, secured or regulated. ARI Valve Corp., (800) 933-8845,

Portable Chillers offer increased efficiency with R410a refrigerant and is available in air, water and remote air-cooled models from 20-210 kW (5-60 tons). Visit Sterling online at www.sterlco.com

www.arivalve.com.

Split-Sheath Cartridge Heater Brochure Brochure describes how unique Watt-Flex“ split-sheath design permits independent expansion of heater halves for maximized heat transfer even in oversized bores. Continuous coil construction provides uniform temperature profile, allows heated tip, eliminates warping, and prevents bore seizures. Heater contracts when de-energized. Dalton Electric Heating Co., Inc. 978-356-9844

Despatch Thermal Technology Product Catalog

HYT Series Heaters

Heaters, Vaporizers, Heat Recovery Units

Despatch has specialized in thermal processing for over 100 years and uses this technical expertise to provide innovative solutions to critical applications in a broad range of markets worldwide.

The HYT Series heaters, designed with twin helical coils, offer the highest efficiency available. Designed for high temperature applications, their small compact package is ideal for limited space and easy installation. General Combustion. (407) 290-6000.

We make heaters, vaporizers and heat recovery units. Heaters are either horizontal or vertical with helical coils or serpentine coils. Applications include chemical plants, oil and gas refineries, and on off-shore platforms and barges. Heatec Inc., an Astec Industries Co. (800) 235-5200. www.heatec.com

www.despatch.com/industrial-ovens.

Fluid Analysis Program

Omega Engineering, Inc.

Heat Transfer Fluid

Omega’s New Temperature

ASTM D6743 testing shows New Paratherm HR™ Heat Transfer Fluid suffers half the thermal degradation of competitive aromatic-based fluids that cover similar temperature ranges (77°F to 650°F). PH: 800-222-3611. www.paratherm.com

prehensive Fluid Analysis Program that determines the physical/chemical condition of your fluid. Contact us at techinfo@ multitherm.com or 1-800-225-7440 to request a FREE Fluid Analysis Kit.

Measurement Handbook® 7th Edition contains information on the latest technology and new products in sanitary temperature sensors and devices, wireless connectors and instruments, profile temperature labels, thermal imagers and infrared temperature products, and automation products. www.omega.com

Heat Transfer System Cleaners

New Catalog of Solid State Controls

Duratherm offers a complete

Short form catalog describes the most complete line of solid state motor and power controls with ratings to 1,200 amps, 600 volts. Single phase and three phase, zero-fired and phase angle controls, relays, motor softstarters, reversing starters, and contactors are all available. Payne Engineering.

MultiTherm has a com-

line of Heat Transfer System Cleaners to dissolve sludge and carbon, most while you continue to run production. 1-800-446-4910. www.heat-transfer-fluid.com

Machine Controller

Instruments

Yokogawa’s Machine Controller bulletin exhibits Yokogawa’s PLC offering. The PLC offers a wide range of system configurations from small to large and employs building block system for hardware and software. Ph: 800258-2552; www.us.yokogawa.com

The 2011 Dwyer Catalog continues Dwyer’s commitment to our customers with convenient and easy-to-use catalog format that includes pricing, applications, product dimensions, specifications, and more. Available in print and on CD. Dwyer Instruments Inc., 800-872-9141; http://www.dwyer-inst.com

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J u n e 2 0 1 1 • Process Heating

Protectofier Service Manual This comprehensive Service Manual covers all Protectofier combustion safeguard units. Information on installation, service guides, testing and trouble shooting as well as specifications, features and applications on single and multi-burner units. Protection Controls Inc. www.protectioncontrolsinc.com

EWN – Enhanced Duty Walk-In Batch Oven The EWN is designed with combination airflow that provides uniform air distribution along the entire length of the work chamber resulting in quality cured finishes and optimum cure cycles. Wisconsin Oven Corp.; PH: 262-642-3938;. www.wisoven.com

Direct-Fired Hot Water Wall Boiler

Hubbell Electric Heater Co.

Despatch Industries

The Parker 204WW direct-fired hot water wall boiler is now available in sizes from 500,000 up to 2,500,000 BTU input. Available as straight gas-fired, straight oil or combination gas/oil with conventional power burner, or pre-mix low NOx for sub 20ppm NOx levels. All units are also listed by a North American testing laboratory as a complete gas-fired boiler/burner assembly in both the U.S. and Canada. Parker Boiler Co. (323) 727-9800; [email protected]. www.parkerboiler.com

www.hubbellheaters.com

www.despatch.com

Karl Dungs

Epcon Industrial Systems

Process Heating Magazine

www.dungs.com/usa

www.epconlp.com

www.process-heating.com

GET CONNECTED www.process-heating.com/connect g

Stay connected to the best source of useful on-the-job information in heat processing. www.process-heating.com • J u n e 2 0 1 1

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Send advertising copy to: Process Heating/Attn. Becky McClelland Phone: (412) 306-4355 • Fax: (248) 502-1076 E-mail: [email protected]

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Equipment for Sale

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Locate the industrial equipment, components and services specifically used in applying, transferring, measuring, monitoring and controlling heat in the manufacturing operations that you need! • Search by Company Name or Product Category • Downloadable Product Spec Sheets • Alpha Company Listings • Live Web & Email Links • Product Photos

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ACS Group/AEC

(847) 273-7700

(847) 273-7804

www.aecinternet.com

[email protected]

10

ARI Valve

(800) 933-8845

(770) 933-8846

www.arivalve.com

[email protected]

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Dalton Electric Heating Co.

(978) 356-9844

(978) 356-9846

www.daltonelectric.com

[email protected]

9

Despatch Industries

(952) 469-8278

(952) 469-8206

www.despatch.com

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Despatch Industries

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43

Despatch Industries

(952) 469-8278

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Dwyer Instruments/Love Controls

(800) 828-4588

(219) 872-9057

www.dwyer-inst.com

[email protected]

21

Epcon Industrial Systems

(936) 273-3300

(936) 273-4600

www.epconlp.com

[email protected]

12

First Thermal Heaters

(800) 665-4251

(502) 962-2883

www.first-thermal.com

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27

General Combustion

(407) 290-6000

(407) 578-0577

www.gencor.com

[email protected]

2

Heatec

(800) 235-5200

(423) 821-7673

www.heatec.com

[email protected]

44

Heatec

(800) 235-5200

(423) 821-7673

www.heatec.com

[email protected]

31

Hubbell Electric Heater Co.

(800) 647-3165

(203) 378-3593

www.hubbellheaters.com

[email protected]

18

MultiTherm

(800) 225-7440

(610) 408-8365

www.multitherm.com

[email protected]

3

Omega Engineering Inc.

(203) 359-1660

(203) 968-7192

www.omega.com

[email protected]

8

Paratherm Corp.

(800) 222-3611

(610) 941-9191

www.paratherm.com

[email protected]

14

Payne Controls

(800) 331-1345

(304) 757-7305

www.payneng.com

[email protected]

11

Protection Controls

(847) 674-7676

(847) 674-7009

www.protectioncontrolsinc.com

[email protected]

15

Southern California Gas Co.

(800) 427-2000

(866) 364-9024

www.socalgas.com

none

7

Wisconsin Oven

(262) 642-3938

(262) 363-4018

www.wisoven.com

[email protected]

4

Yokogawa

(770) 251-8700

(281) 340-3838

www.us.yokogawa.com

[email protected]

12/18/08 12:05:59 PM

www.process-heating.com • J u n e 2 0 1 1

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41

®

Places & Faces Munters, Amesbury, Mass., received USDA approval for its VariMax indirect-fired recirculating gas heater (IFRG). Often used with spray dryers in the dairy industry, the heater now is accepted for use in USDA-approved dairy plants.

First Thermal Heaters, Louisville, Ky., has revamped its website, www.firstthermal.com, to include easier navigation, quality photography, quoting and technical information. The site also includes in-depth information about custom applications, heater specifications, system schematics, pump skid packages and the company’s history.

Paratherm Corp., W. Conshohocken, Pa., has appointed T.J. Morris business-development engineer handling all sales and support work for the food processing Morris and poultry industries. Morris will troubleshoot systems and other services required by the industry. George Schreiber, who had held the position, was named general manager.

Buhler Aeroglide, Cary, N.C., welcomed Dave Reynolds to its capital sales team. He is responsible for the markets of fruits and vegetables, potato products, food ingreReynolds dients and bakery products in the Americas. Ashburn, Va.-based Invensys Operations Management named

Northwoods Process Technology, McHenry, Ill., an authorized sales representative for Invensys’ Eurotherm Maco brand of machine control solutions and services to plastic industrial and process customers in northern Illinois and southern Wisconsin. Also,

Suncoast Plastic Equipment Sales, Bradenton, Fla., was named an authorized sales representative for the line in Florida.

Wenger Manufacturing is expanding its dryer production facility in Sabetha, Kan., by 45,000 ft2. The larger facility will increase production capacity by nearly 50 percent. Blasdel Enterprises Inc.,

Super Radiator Coils, Minneapolis, has appointed Rob Holt CEO of the $70 million company, which manufactures heat exchanger coils. Holt will retain the post of president. Jon Holt, his father and former CEO, remains chairman. Colmac Coil Manufacturing Inc., Colville, Wash., hired Todd Shelden as a sales engineer specializing in industrial refrigeration and heat transfer coil applications, and Bruce Kietzman, as general manager of Colmac Coil Midwest. Kietzman is responsible for overall performance, quality and safety at the company’s second manufacturing plant, located in Paxton, Ill. In other company news, Colmac Coil signed two firms as sales representatives: New York City-based Balticare Inc. and Echelmeier Co. in St. Louis.

Greensburg, Ind., a manufacturer of custom infrared ovens and materialhandling equipment, redesigned its website at www.blasdel.net. It now includes a number of examples of systems and an applications page.

PUBLISHING STAFF Senior Group Publisher, Manufacturing Group TOM ESPOSITO • (610) 436-4220 ext. 8530 Publisher • ANNE ARMEL (847) 405-4043 • [email protected] Associate Publisher and Editor • LINDA BECKER (847) 405-4020 • [email protected] Contributing Editor • JOY LEPREE ANDERSON (856) 582-9554 • [email protected] Art Director • COURTNEY FATHERS (248) 244-1292 • [email protected] Production Manager • BETH MCCLELLAND (412) 306-4354 • [email protected] Reprint Sales • JILL DEVRIES (248) 244-1726 • [email protected] E-Media Sales • SUSAN HEINAUER (412) 306-4352 • [email protected] Classifieds • BECKY MCCLELLAND (412) 306-4355 • [email protected] Publishing Director, Manufacturing and Gaming Groups JOHN R. SCHREI • (248) 786-1637 Editorial Office 155 N. Pfingsten Road, Suite 205, Deerfield, IL 60015 (847) 405-4000 • FAX (248) 502-1001

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SUBSCRIPTIONS Contact Customer Service at Tel. (847) 763-9534 or Fax (847) 763-9538 or e-mail [email protected]. Via Web: to subscribe or submit an address change, visit www.process-heating.com and click on subscribe. Via Mail. Send your old address label along with your new address to Process Heating, PO BOX 2146, Skokie, IL 60076.

Marsh Bellofram Group acquired ServoTek Products Co. Inc.

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Hawthorne, N.J. ServoTek manufacturing has been moved to Marsh Bellofram global corporate headquarters in Newell, W.V.

• • • •

Control Instruments Corp.,



Fairfield, N.J., has volunteered to become an Ally organization in the

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J u n e 2 0 1 1 • Process Heating

Custom Composite Solutions Vacuum bagging ovens and control systems Despatch offers complete vacuum bagging systems with up to 24 vacuum ports. Jack panels allow you to connect as many thermocouples as needed for monitoring the curing process. Mold preparation, including preheating, drying and cleaning processes can also be provided. A control system is available to fully control your vacuum bagging process. A PC software package is utiliized to record all the necessary information relating to your thermocouples, vacuum transducers, temperatures, Hi-limits, user access and all related alarms. This system allows full control and to assure parts are reliable and cured to specification.

INSPIRED INNOVATION Thermal Processing Technology

LOCAL SALES AND SERVICE WORLDWIDE phone: 1-952-469-5424 [email protected] www.despatch.com -)..%!0/,)3s3(!.'(!)s"%2,).s3).'!0/2%s4!)0%)s4/+9/s3%/5,

© 2011 Despatch Industries

Got Maintenance? Plant operators are finding out the advantages of having their heaters serviced by Heatec on a regular basis. There are important benefits of having a contract for our service technicians to do preventative maintenance once or twice a year. An important benefit is safety. Our technicians make sure all limit devices are working properly. Insurance companies usually prefer that specialists, such as Heatec technicians, perform services related to safety. Fuel savings is another important benefit that results from maintenance that includes tuning the burner. Moreover, preventative maintenance usually eliminates unexpected heater

shutdowns at times that interrupt production. Preventative maintenance can usually be done without adversely affecting production schedules. Another benefit is usually a reduction in costs for each service call. This results from lower travel expenses when our technicians can make service calls at other plants in the same area. Moreover, many of our technicians reside in diverse locations that reduce travel to plant sites. Call today to find out what kind of service contract would work best for you.

HEATEC

( % ! 4 % # DQ$VWHF,QGXVWULHV&RPSDQ\ :,/6215'‡&+$77$122*$7186$‡‡)$;‡KHDWHFFRP