Quick Selection Guide to Chemical Protective Clothing, Fourth Edition

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Quick Selection Guide to Chemical Protective Clothing, Fourth Edition

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Quick Selection Guide to Chemical Protective Clothing Fourth Edition

Quick Selection Guide to Chemical Protective Clothing Fourth Edition Krister Forsberg Lidingo, Sweden

S.Z. Mansdorf Paris, France

A JOHN WILEY & SONS PUBLICATION

This guide contains a compilation of chemical resistance data from a variety of published and unpublished sources collected by the authors. No attempt has been made to ensure the validity of the data as presented. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. assumes no responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of the recommendations. Users of this guide are cautioned to consult a qualified industrial hygienist or other qualified professional before implementing the recommendations from this guide. Copyright © 2002 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, New Jersey. Published simultaneously in Canada. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, scanning, or otherwise, except as permitted under Section 107 or 108 of the 1976 United States Copyright Act, without either the prior written permission of the Publisher, or authorization through payment of the appropriate per-copy fee to the Copyright Clearance Center, Inc., 222 Rosewood Drive, Danvers, MA 01923, 978-750-8400, fax 978-750-4470, or on the web at www.copyright.com. Requests to the Publisher for permission should be addressed to the Permissions Department, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 111 River Street, Hoboken, NJ 07030, (201) 748-6011, fax (201) 748-6008, e-mail: [email protected]. Limit of Liability/Disclaimer of Warranty: While the publisher and author have used their best efforts in preparing this book, they make no representations or warranties with respect to the accuracy or completeness of the contents of this book and specifically disclaim any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose. No warranty may be created or extended by sales representatives or written sales materials. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation. You should consult with a professional where appropriate. Neither the publisher nor author shall be liable for any loss of profit or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages. For general information on our other products and services please contact our Customer Care Department within the U.S. at 877-762-2974, outside the U.S. at 317-572-3993 or fax 317-572-4002. Wiley also publishes its books in a variety of electronic formats. Some content that appears in print, however, may not be available in electronic format. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data: Forsberg, Krister, 1943– Quick selection guide to chemical protective clothing / Krister Forsberg, S.Z. Mansdorf.—4th ed. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 0-471-27105-5 (cloth) 1. Chemical engineering—Safety measures. 2. Protective clothing. I. Mansdorf, S.Z. (Seymour Zack), 1947– II. Title. TP149.F67 2003 604.7⬘028⬘9—dc21 Printed in the United States of America 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

2002033120

Important Instructions This guidebook contains information on hazardous chemicals and recommendations for the selection of chemical protective clothing materials based on published and unpublished scientific test data. NO attempt has been made to ensure either the accuracy or precision of these compiled data. The guide also does not take into consideration the intended use or physical demands (resistance to tear, puncture resistance, etc.) of the chemical protective clothing. These factors are critical in the selection process. ALL selections based on this guide MUST be reviewed by a person competent in the selection of chemical protective clothing, such as a certified industrial hygienist or a certified safety professional with training in this area.

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Contents Preface vii Acknowledgments viii Section I Introduction 1 Rational for Selecting Chemical Protective Clothing 2 How to Use This Guide 4 Section II Selection and Use of Chemical Protective Clothing 7 Introduction to Some Important Terms 7 Selection and Use of Protective Clothing 9 Twelve Important Considerations for the Selection and Use of Protective Clothing 15 Section III Chemical Index 17 Chemical Class Numbers 17 Chemical Names 18 Synonyms 18 Chemical Abstract Service Number (CAS #) 18 Risk Code 18 Chemical Warfare Agents 19 Special Notes 20 Chemical Index Listings 21

Section IV Selection Recommendations 53 Barriers 53 Color Codes 54 Important Notes and Warnings 55 Selection Recommendation Tables 57 Section V Glossary 117 Section VI Standards for Chemical Protective Clothing 131 Section VII Manufacturers of Chemical Protective Clothing 137

vi

Preface The fourth edition of the Quick Selection Guide to Chemical Protective Clothing has been revised significantly, including 100 new chemicals and approximately 1000 more selection recommendations compared to the previous edition. The increased number of chemicals has also resulted in creation of several new chemical classes. The chemical index now includes 700 chemicals, additional synonyms, CAS numbers, risk codes and special notations to alert the user, to those chemicals which may be of most concern for worker protection. A change in the Chemical Index is classifications of chemicals into two different functional groups, where appropriate. A subsection of Chemical Warfare Agents has also been included in this edition. The color-coded tables of recommendations containing 16 representative protective clothing materials have been updated by replacing two of the barriers with the Viton/Butyl and PE/PA/PE laminates. We believe these barrier listings now include a wider range of gloves, boots, and suits on the market. The selection recommendations are now organized in 90 chemical classes plus a designated chemical class on Chemical Warfare Agents.

Other changes include an expanded glossary, updated list of standards for chemical protective clothing, and updated information on manufacturers. The section on manufacturers has also been improved to include information on the specific type of barrier material used in their products, and includes registered trade names and web addresses for easy access to information. It is hoped by the authors that this revised edition will receive the same enthusiastic response as the prior editions in assisting supervisors, industrial hygiene and safety professionals, and others who select or use personal protective clothing for control of chemical exposures to protect workers using the “last line of defense.” Hazardous materials spill responders and other emergency response personnel should find this guide especially useful. Krister Forsberg and S.Z. Mansdorf

vii

Acknowledgments The authors acknowledge Ms. Brenda Hinds Pool, MSPA, CIH, Georgia State University in Atlanta, Georgia, and Mr. Norman Henry III, CIH, DuPont Company, Stine–Haskell Research Center in Newark, Delaware, for their contribution in reviewing this latest edition. We also thank the manufacturers of the chemical protective clothing for providing us with test reports and technical assistance.

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SECTION I

Introduction The intent of the Quick Selection Guide to Chemical Protective Clothing is to assist workers, supervisors, safety and health professionals, spill responders, industrial hygienists, and others in the initial selection of protective clothing materials against specific chemical challenges on the job. This is accomplished by use of the color-coded tables that summarize the chemical breakthrough performance of 16 common barrier materials against 700 chemicals organized in 90 chemical classes. This guide is only a summary of data and should not be the sole basis for the final selection of the chemical protective clothing. More complete and comprehensive information of tested products and test reports are contained in the following publications:

Performance Data ●



Krister Forsberg’s Instant Gloves ⫹ CPC Database for Windows, (1999), 9th edition includes data from 11,000 chemical permeation and 3,000 degradation tests. Instant Reference Sources, Inc. 890 Providence Club Dr., Monroe, GA 30656 USA. http://www.instantref.com/cpc.htm Chemical Protective Clothing Performance Index by Krister Forsberg and Lawrence H. Keith, 2nd edition (1999), John Wiley & Sons, Inc. http://www.wiley.com

Visit the Chemical Protective Clothing Site (http://www.kristerforsberg.com/cpc/) for access to the 1

publisher of performance data publications or manufacturers sites via the Internet. The Chemical Protective Clothing Site also announces updates of publications or other information of significant interest. As noted in the preface, it is important to contact the manufacturers for the latest test results (see Section VII). The Quick Selection Guide to Chemical Protective Clothing also provides users with knowledge about the permeation process and other factors that adversely affect protective clothing. In addition, this Guide also contains a discussion on the selection and use of protective clothing. Finally, a glossary of terms common to chemical protective clothing and related health and safety terminology and a section on relevant standards for chemical protective clothing has been included to assist the users of the Guide.

Rational for Selecting Chemical Protective Clothing All chemicals, including water and table salt, present some level of risk to workers. In large part, this level of risk is deter-

mined by the amount of the chemical that is inhaled, absorbed, ingested, injected, or otherwise contacts or enters the body (the dose) and the inherent toxicity of the chemical. Inhalation hazards have traditionally been of greatest concern; however, dermal (skin) hazards are much more common. There are many types and degrees of dermal hazard. Chemicals that can damage the skin (i.e., corrosives), cause a reaction (i.e., sensitizers and irritants), or produce toxicity by permeation through the skin present dermal hazards. The purpose of chemical protective clothing is the prevention of contact with chemicals potentially hazardous to the skin, thus lowering the risk of injury or illness. Chemical protective clothing ranges in complexity from simple finger cots to fully encapsulating gas-tight suits. Although a wide variety of well-designed and constructed products are available, research has shown that toxic chemicals can easily pass through or damage some of these clothing materials and have direct contact with the skin and/or be absorbed into the blood. This led to a considerable amount of research by chemical protective clothing manufacturers, users of chemical protective clothing, researchers, and others to find the materials of 2

construction best suited for specific chemical challenges. This work largely began in 1981, when Henry and Schlatter published an article* on “The Development of a Standard Test Method for Evaluating Chemical Protective Clothing to Permeation by Liquids.” Henry and Schlatter developed a specific permeation test cell (Figure 1). The method and the test cell were adopted by the American Society for Testing and Materials’ (ASTM) committee as Standard Test Method F739 in 1981. Most of the material testing has been conducted using the ASTM F739-99, Standard Test Method for Resistance of Protective Clothing Materials to Permeation by Liquids or Gases Under Conditions of Continuous Contact or previous versions of this test method from the ASTM. This laboratory test method provides both a breakthrough time and a steady-state permeation rate based on direct contact of the challenge liquid or gas with the normal outside surface of the protective material. The breakthrough time is the time to the first indication of the presence of the test liquid or gas in the collection media on the other side *Henry, N.W. and C.N. Schlatter, “The Development of a Standard Test Method for Evaluating Chemical Protective Clothing to Permeation by Liquids,” American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Vol. 42, March 1981, pp. 202–207.

Protective fabric

Fill level

Challenge chamber for hazardous material Figure 1

To Analyzer

Permeation Test Cell Schematic.

3

(normal inside surface) of the test material. Thus, the data given in this guide are based on laboratory tests of either degradation or permeation. The recommendations are not based on actual use of the materials as protective clothing. Nevertheless, if the glove, boot, or suit is not damaged and has no defects, the laboratory test data should be equal to the worst-case chemical challenge in the work environment.

How to Use This Guide A three-step process in this guide completes the selection of the barriers offering the best chemical resistance. First, the chemical name or synonym is found in the alphabetically sorted CHEMICAL INDEX. The second step is to use the Chemical Class Number, which appears to the left of the chemical name to search the SELECTION RECOMMENDATIONS. This section is in numeric order by chemical class. The final step is to find the chemical within the class listing and note the colorcoded recommendations by barrier material. For example, to find the recommendations for protection from acetone, the user

must first find the chemical class number in the Chemical Index section (Section III). We find the chemical acetone listed on the first page of the CHEMICAL INDEX. This listing shows a class number of 391. This is the chemical class for Ketones (aliphatic or alicyclic) under the ASTM F-1186, Standard Classification System for Chemicals According to Functional Groups. This listing also shows the chemical abstract service (CAS) number assigned to acetone as 67-64-1. The main purpose for listing the unique CAS number is to be sure that this chemical is the one that we are interested in and not another chemical by a similar name. The next column under acetone lists the “Risk Code.” For acetone, it is listed as a “V.” This means that the chemical has received a designation of “potentially harmful” based on the Official Gazette of the European Community’s “Guide to Classification and Marking of Hazardous Substances.” This is the lowest level of warning under this classification scheme (i.e., least potentially hazardous). There are no special notes for acetone. The next step is to go to the SELECTION RECOMMENDATIONS section and find chemical class number 391. Acetone is listed first within this group. Reading the color codes from left to right, we find eight recommended barriers (color coded green) with eight barriers that are not recommended 4

(color coded red). Natural rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile rubber, Polyethylene, Polyvinyl alcohol, Polyvinyl chloride, Viton, and Tychem SL are not recommended for use against acetone. Butyl rubber, Viton/Butyl Rubber, Barrier, Silver Shield/4H, Responder, Trellchem HPS, and Tychem BR/LV and Tychem TK are recommended for at least 8 hours of breakthrough resistance.

5

SECTION II

Selection and Use of Chemical Protective Clothing Introduction to Some Important Terms The guide includes information based on permeation data. Permeation is the diffusion of a chemical on a molecular basis through chemical protective clothing. This movement of the chemical through the protective material may not be readily noticeable because it occurs on a molecular or microscopic level. This process is represented by the illustration shown in Figure 2. The time it takes the chemical to pass through the protective material until it is first detected by an analytical instrument is called the breakthrough time. The test for perme-

ation and breakthrough time is represented by the illustration in Figure 3. The rate or speed of the movement of the chemical through the protective material, once it has broken through, is called the permeation rate. In theory, this rate reaches steady state after a period of time, assuming the gradient (difference in concentration on both sides of the barrier) continues to exist. The effect the chemical has as it interacts with the material can range from no effect to an effect as severe as dissolving the material. The change in the physical properties of the material as a result of adverse effects of the chemical is called degradation. A representation of degradation is shown in Figure 4. 7

60 15

45 30

ANALYZER Figure 2 Permeation.

Figure 3 Permeation test.

The guide does not include any consideration of manufacturer defects or user-caused damages. Tears, rips, pinholes, and other damage or manufacturing defects can result in penetration of the chemical through these openings no matter how resistant the

material is to the chemical challenge. Penetration is defined as the bulk flow of chemical (not on a molecular basis) through the protective material. A representation of penetration is shown in Figure 5. Penetration may not be visible to the naked eye. 8

Figure 5 Penetration.

Figure 4 Degradation.

Selection and Use of Protective Clothing Chemical protective clothing (CPC) selection is a process governed by a number of factors. Some uses of protective clothing that

involve unique situations or very serious hazards will require a detailed analysis of the tasks to be completed and perhaps expert assistance. In all cases, it is the risk to the user that will govern the selection. The general process for selection can be simply stated. The seven key factors to be determined in the selection process are as follows: 9

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Determining if the job can be done without CPC Determining the type of exposure most likely to occur Determining the adverse effects of contact with the chemical Determining the physical resistance properties required Determining the chemical resistance properties required Determining the human factors required Determining the cost of use

Determining the type of exposure most likely to occur is important in the selection of CPC. A job where the contact is likely to be immersion in a solvent may require a different approach than one where contact is minimal and limited to an accidental splash. Typical categories of contact or exposure potential are: ● ●

These seven steps are compatible with the requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in the United States to conduct a hazard assessment before assignment of protective clothing. The first important question to be answered in our selection process is whether CPC must be used. This includes a consideration of other options, such as the replacement of the chemical with a less harmful one (substitution), the use of tools or other techniques to reduce or eliminate the need to be in close proximity to the chemical(s), a redesign of the job, or the use of robotics, to name a few examples. Even if CPC must be used for economic, feasibility, or other reasons, it may still be possible to reduce the level of hazard that the situation presents through a combination of administrative, engineering, or other control methods along with the use of CPC.

● ● ● ●

Immersion (continuous or intermittent) Spray (pressurized or nonpressurized) Splash (continuous, intermittent, or not expected) Surface contact (continuous or intermittent) Mist (continuous or intermittent) Vapors (gaseous contact)

In all cases, the CPC should protect the user from the effects of contact with the chemical. For example, job tasks with the potential for contact in the form of a pressurized spray (from a source that is under pressure) should include the requirement for sealing all exposed surfaces against penetration including any mist or vapor penetration. An assessment of the adverse health effects from chemical contact is the most important factor in the determination of the right 10

CPC to use if it is decided that CPC should be used. This should include the general toxicity and all hazards from use of the chemical (e.g., fire hazard) with an emphasis on the local effects on the skin (e.g., effects of skin contact, such as chemical burns, corrosion, staining, irritation), and the systemic effects of chemicals that might permeate the skin and enter the blood stream. Obviously, the more harmful the effects of chemical contact, the more protection the user needs and the more important the proper selection becomes. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and several other agencies such as the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) have developed a selection scheme for personal protective equipment for hazardous waste operations and emergency response by level of protection required. Their scheme consists of four levels designated by the letters A, B, C, and D. The following list summarizes this scheme. Level A: Self Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) or Positive Pressure Airline System (PPAS) with escape SCBA and totally encapsulating chemical protective suit, gloves (double layer), chemically resistant boots, plus other safety equipment.

Level B: Same respirator as level A and hooded chemicalresistant suit, gloves (double layer), chemically resistant boots, plus other safety equipment. Level C: Full face or half-mask air purifying respirator and protective clothing as in level B, plus other safety equipment. Level D: No respiratory protection and “coveralls” with an option for gloves, boots, boot coverings, and other related safety equipment. It should be noted that although level A requires a gas-tight totally encapsulating suit, levels B and C are basically the same splash suit, and level D has essentially no chemical protective clothing requirement (other than optional gloves and boots). Therefore, these standard ensembles represent only two major options in terms of chemical protective clothing: totally encapsulating suits and other chemically protective clothing. Most industrial situations require a much more specific selection of protective clothing. This is usually easier to accomplish because the chemicals and exposure situations are better known. 11

The physical resistance and properties required must be determined. As stated earlier, the best chemically resistant material will be ineffective if torn, cut, punctured, or otherwise damaged. In addition, contamination within protective clothing can actually be worse than normal contact because the chemical can be held against the skin for long periods of time. Many of the materials that offer excellent chemical resistance may offer poor resistance to abrasion, cut, and puncture. Using gloves as an example, possible solutions to this problem are double gloving (use of two of the same or different gloves on the same hand), the use of gloves that are composed of more than one compound (e.g., dipped gloves), or the use of multilayered gloves. Some of the physical resistance factors to consider before evaluating chemical resistance needed are ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Abrasion resistance Cut resistance Puncture resistance Tear strength Tensile strength Flammability Resistance to the effects of heat and cold (insulation)

Some other physical properties to consider for articles of protective clothing are closure strength (zippers, etc.), seam strength, bursting strength, flexibility, and weight. The exact properties desired depend on the hazards of the work and the requirements of the job to be performed. Determining the chemical resistance required from the protective clothing is necessary. This guide provides recommendations based on breakthrough data reported by researchers including those of the manufacturer of the CPC. As stated earlier, the ASTM method is a test of the barrier against direct liquid or gaseous contact and for most situations represents a worst case scenario. Second, very little is known about the relationship between the breakthrough of protective clothing and human toxicity, given that most permeation rates are extremely low (micrograms per square meter per minute). For protection against most potentially hazardous materials, we try to use CPC that offers at least 4 hours of breakthrough resistance. In some cases, finding a barrier that offers breakthrough resistance of at least 4 hours is not possible. In this situation, a low permeation rate may be the best choice of the options immediately available (e.g., a yellow or red block with an asterisk). In these cases, it is best to review actual permeation data to 12

make the choice of the most chemically resistant CPC. Vendors of CPC are usually a good source of current information on the chemical and physical resistance of their products. For those chemicals that have not been tested, some generalizations can be made about their ability to permeate various barriers based on their chemical class. However, caution must be exercised because the only way to be sure of the performance of CPC is to test it against the chemical of interest. Mixtures are another complicating factor. These are commonly encountered, but little data exists on the performance of protective materials against mixtures. They do not always behave as might be expected in terms of permeation behavior. Again, the best approach to this problem is to have the mixture actually tested. Human factors of the job or task must also be considered. Human factors (ergonomics) are those factors that affect our ability to accomplish our jobs in an efficient and effective manner. Ideally, CPC should make our jobs and us more productive. Unfortunately, this is rarely the case. We must be careful that the job we want to accomplish can be done while wearing CPC. In most cases, the use of CPC at any level increases errors and decreases productivity. The CPC can even present safety hazards (e.g., get

caught in machinery) that would not exist without the use of it. It is important to select the best mix of protection and comfort for the worker while maintaining or improving productivity. Probably the three major human factor problems in the use of CPC are proper sizing, heat stress, and the loss of the tactile senses (i.e., touch and feel). The axiom, “ One size fits all” does not apply to protective clothing. Size is important to be able to function properly, and heat stress is common to any article of protective clothing that offers good chemical resistance (especially suits). For some jobs in high radiant or ambient environments, heat stress can be the limiting factor in the use of CPC. Finally, with increases in glove thickness and hence chemical resistance, there is a corresponding decrease in dexterity, touch, and feel. The best prevention for human factor related problems is to try several different approaches, products, and materials to determine which combination works best for the user. The last factor to be determined is cost. This is not because it is least important (nor is it most important). The reason for discussing cost here is that it is always an important factor, but not the single most important factor. First, the “best” selection of CPC is a result of considering many factors, such as those 13

previously listed in this section. The best selection may not be the most chemically resistant material. Like generic drugs, there may be materials that offer more than adequate resistance at a much lower cost than some name brand product. Therefore, cost should be considered and given an equal weight with the other factors listed in this section. It may also result in a conclusion that the cost of reengineering the process or providing engineering controls is more cost effective than the cost of CPC. There are many persons who will use this guide and not have the expertise or resources to adequately evaluate all of the factors listed in this section. For these persons and others, there are several approaches to the selection of protective clothing. First, most vendors of CPC provide information on the performance of their products against national consensus tests and standards such as the ASTM standards for protective clothing. Many of these vendors also offer technical assistance in the proper selection, use, and maintenance of their products without charge. Second, the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) has developed minimum standards for the performance of protective clothing that is used by the fire service. These standards have application for some industrial uses as well. These standards are

NFPA 1991, Standard on Vapor-Protective Suits for Hazardous Chemical Emergencies NFPA 1992, Standard on Liquid Splash Suits for Hazardous Chemical Emergencies NFPA 1993, Standard on Single Use Splash Protective Suits for Non-Flammable Hazardous Chemical Situations NFPA 1999, Standards on Protective Clothing for Emergency Medical Operations Compliance with NFPA standards requires third-party certification and independent testing. Those products meeting the battery of NFPA performance requirements are labeled as meeting the applicable standard. Safety Equipment Institute (SEI) maintain a list of products completed certification testing based on NFPA requirements (http://www.seinet.org/CPL/content.htm) In summary, there are several key factors to be considered when selecting chemical protective clothing. These include determining whether other options are available for control of exposures, type of exposure and toxicity of the chemicals to be used, physical and chemical resistance needed, what is required from the protective clothing to be able to perform the job, and finally, a consideration of costs in the final selection. 14

The following contains a listing of 12 simple but important considerations for the selection and use of protective clothing. 4.

Twelve Important Considerations for the Selection and Use of Protective Clothing 1. In general, chemicals that are soluble in both water and lipids (fat) will permeate the skin. Most, but not all, of these are designated by the “skin” notation in the index to the guide. 2. All chemicals pass or permeate through protective barriers sooner or later. Remember, permeation can take place without any visible evidence or change in the protective materials. Color changes or changes in texture, as well as hardening or softening of protective barriers after use, usually indicate degradation. 3. Even the best protective clothing products will not perform properly if they are torn, cut, or damaged. You should always inspect protective clothing before and after each use. Gloves can be checked for their integrity by inflation with air or even water. Most limited- and single-use suits can be held up to a strong light or window to inspect for

5.

6.

7.

imperfections or breaks in the barrier. Gas-tight totally encapsulated suits may require pressure testing. If your protective equipment becomes torn or damaged, replace it. A barrier may protect against one chemical very well, but perform poorly against another or a mixture of chemicals. Each chemical and material combination must be considered. No single protective material is an absolute barrier against all chemicals. The recommendations listed in this guide are generally based on tests that have been performed at room temperature. Higher temperatures usually decrease the breakthrough time of chemicals (faster breakthrough), whereas lower temperatures increase the time to breakthrough. Generally, thicker is better. Increasing the thickness of the protective article, such as a glove, normally increases the time to breakthrough, but the benefits may be offset by a reduction in tactility and dexterity. The use of multiple layers (e.g., double gloving) can increase thickness and provide desirable properties of different materials. Protective gloves and other chemical protective clothing may all look alike. Be sure that the material you are using is the right one for the job you are doing. Do not depend only 15

on the appearance or color of the material because most barriers are available in many different forms and colors. 8. If a chemical has been absorbed by a protective clothing material, it continues to permeate (pass through) the material. If the protective material has been contaminated to the point of breakthrough, it must be decontaminated before it may be used again. Once the protective clothing has been permeated, additional exposures usually result in shorter time periods to subsequent permeation. Chemicals such as powders, acids, and bases typically have no permeation potential but still must be neutralized or removed to prevent skin contamination when the clothing is removed or reused. 9. Some of the recommendations have been made on a generic basis—that is, the materials are shown by their common or generic name. Most of the polymer formulations vary by manufacturer and from product lot to product lot. Research has shown this variation in chemical resistance can be significant for Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC. Users should check with the specific manufacturer selected to confirm the performance of their products. 10. Some protective clothing has a shelf life and/or requires special storage measures, such as the avoidance of sunlight,

ozone, or moisture. Check with the manufacturer for the proper storage, maintenance, and care. Also, remember that alterations to suits or equipment may void the manufacturer’s warranty and change the performance of the equipment. 11. Medical gloves are generally not appropriate for industrial applications because they are thin or offer poor chemical resistance. Latex gloves also present a significant problem of allergic reactions from some persons. 12. The best way to select the proper chemical protective clothing is to have the material specifically tested under the work conditions and chemicals being used. Once the selection process is completed, there are still other issues to address. This includes training of the users in when to use the protective clothing; proper inspection and maintenance; how to properly put on, wear, and take off the protective clothing; knowing the useful life of the equipment; and how to properly dispose of the protective clothing. Finally, it is useful to have the users try the protective clothing options available before making a purchasing decision. They are the ultimate customers. 16

SECTION III

Chemical Index This section contains the listing of chemical names and synonyms (in alphabetical order) that are used to find the chemical class number. Other information provided is the chemical abstract service (CAS) registry number, risk codes, and special notes.

Chemical Class Numbers The chemical class numbers are shown in the first column and are used to find the recommended barriers in the SELECTION RECOMMENDATIONS section (Section IV). Chemicals have been grouped together into chemical classes according to the American Society for Testing and Materials—ASTM F-1186

Standard Classification System for Chemicals According to Functional Groups because chemicals of the same family or type have similar effects on barriers. This also permits the user to estimate performance if no chemical resistance data are known. For chemicals classified into two different functional groups, both chemical classes are indicated in the first column. As an example, Ethanolamine belongs to Amines as well as Hydroxyl Compound (i.e., class 141/311). Class 590 contains miscellaneous chemicals (e.g., Cutting fluids or AZT). All Chemical Warfare Agents (CW Agents) have been organized in class 600. Please note that the classes 590 and 600 are not based on functional groups. 17

Chemical Names

Chemical Abstract Service Number (CAS #)

Chemical names are shown in the second column of the CHEMICAL INDEX. Even though they appear in the second column, the index is organized alphabetically by the chemical names and not by the numeric class number. In most cases, the chemical names are those most commonly used by occupational health and safety professionals or the researchers that reported the data. Common synonyms are given for many of the listings as well.

The CAS registry numbers are unique identifiers of chemical substances assigned and maintained by the Chemical Abstract Service. There are more than seven million chemical substances assigned CAS numbers based on atomic structure, valence bonds, and stereochemistry. These numbers are routinely used by government agencies to specify chemicals being regulated to assure that there is no confusion over the identity of the substance. The CAS number is made up of three groups of numbers separated by hyphens. The first group can be up to six digits, the second group is composed of two digits, and the third is a single digit (e.g., XXXXXX-XX-X).

Synonyms Common synonyms (other names) for many of the chemicals listed in the index are shown in parentheses. For example, Isopropanol is also called 2-propanol, or the abbreviation IPA. These are other names used to identify the same chemical. These other names are listed in alphabetical order in parentheses with a reference to the proper name to use for searching the index. Matching the CAS number can make confirmation that your selection is correct.

Risk Code The column titled “Risk Code” contains a listing based on the designations published in the Official Gazette of the European Community’s “Guide to Classification and Marking of Hazardous Substances.” These codes are shown in the following table. 18

Risk Code Tx T Cx C X Xi V

Hazard Rating Highly toxic Toxic Highly corrosive, causes severe burns Corrosive, causes burns Harmful Irritant Potentially harmful

These ratings are shown in descending order of severity (most hazardous at the top; least hazardous at the bottom). Although risk is a relative measure dependent on many factors, this table can determine some general measure of the relative risk presented by each chemical. Three additional notations may also appear with the risk codes. These are a cancer notation for those chemicals thought to be potential carcinogens; genetic notation for those chemicals, which may cause inheritable genetic damage; and a sensitization notation for those chemicals with a skin sensitization potential. Measures that can be used to control exposure to these chemicals and reduce the user’s risk include the use of engineering controls including ventilation, proper work practices, and a number of other measures.

Chemical Warfare Agents Specific test methods conforming to military standards are used for Chemical Warfare Agents (CW Agents). Therefore, class 600 has been designated for these CW Agents, but is not based on functional groups. CW Agents can be classified in many different ways. There are, for example, volatile substances, which mainly contaminate the air; or persistent substances, which are not volatile and therefore mainly cover surfaces. CW agents mainly used against people may also be divided into lethal and incapacitating categories. A substance is classified as incapacitating if less than 1/100 of lethal dose causes incapacitation. CW Agents are generally also classified according to their effect on the organism. There are “caution” notations given for all of the CW agents listed because OSHA or American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) does not list them in their Permissible Exposure Limits (PEL) or Threshold Limit Value (TLV) lists. However, it is important to note that all are extremely dangerous by the dermal route. This is particularly important for the nerve agents (Tabun, Sarin, Soman, and VX). Of the four, Sarin 19

is the most volatile (has a similar vapor pressure as water), and hence is less likely to enter the body through the dermal route or permanently contaminate protective clothing. Of the four nerve agents listed, the most toxic by skin or inhalation is VX, followed by Soman, Sarin, and Tabin, respectively. In all cases, it is very important that all areas of the body be protected and that there be no possibility of exposed skin (e.g., single piece garment or airtight closures among the components). Protection against terrorist threats and actions has generated significant interest in the selection of chemical protective clothing for this purpose. Although most readers and users of this Guide will never have need for this information, it has been added for those in the public and private services who must deal with these threats.

Special Notes The last column contains skin and caution designations. The sources for the skin designation are the Threshold Limit

Values for Chemical Substances and Physical Agents published by the ACGIH and OSHA’s PELs published under 29 CFR 1910.1000 table Z-1-A. The skin designation alerts the user to those chemicals that are believed to present a significant risk of skin absorption and consequent toxicity. The caution designation is meant to alert the user of this guide to chemicals that could cause serious skin injury (e.g., strong corrosives) or other significant adverse effects, including skin absorption, reported in the literature, but not noted by ACGIH or OSHA. Many materials, such as hydrofluoric acid, can cause serious and permanent injury to an unprotected or improperly protected user. Therefore, the skin and caution notations are meant to alert the reader to the need for a special emphasis on the careful selection of protective equipment for these chemicals. Protective clothing users are cautioned that not all chemicals that can cause significant toxic or adverse effects are shown by either the skin or caution notations. Those most widely recognized in the literature or by the authors are listed. 20

Class # 121 102 161

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

CAS #

Risk Code

Acetaldehyde (Ethanal) 75-07-0 Xi Acetic acid 64-19-7 Cx Acetic anhydride (Acetyl oxide) 108-24-7 C (Acetomethoxane) see Dimethoxane 391 Acetone (2-Propanone) 67-64-1 V 431 Acetone cyanohydrin 75-86-5 Tx (2-Methyllactonitrile) 431 Acetonitrile (Methyl cyanide) 75-05-8 T Cancer 392 Acetonphenone (1-Penylethanone) 98-86-2 X (Acetylaceton) see 2,4-Pentanedione 111/261 Acetyl chloride 75-36-5 C (Acetyl oxide) see Acetic anhydride 121 Acrolein (Acrylaldehyde ) 107-02-8 Tx C 135 Acrylamide (2-Propenamide) 79-06-1 T Cancer 102 Acrylic acid (2-Propenoic acid) 79-10-7 C 431 Acrylonitrile (Propenenitrile ) 107-13-1 T Cancer 431 Adiponitrile 111-69-3 X 590 AFFF (Aqueous Fire Fighting Foam) 340 Aluminium sulfate hydrate 57292-32-7 223 Allyl acrylate (Allyl999-55-3 propenoate) 311 Allyl alcohol (2-Propenol) 107-18-6 T

Special Notes

Class # 141

Caution Caution

Skin

Caution Skin Skin Skin Skin

Caution Skin

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

CAS #

Allylamine 107-11-9 (3-Aminopropy lene) 265 Allyl bromide 106-95-6 (3-Bromopropene) 265 Allyl chloride 107-05-01 (3-Chlorpropy lene) 224/318 Ambush® (Permethrin) 52645-53-1 550 9-Aminoacridine 90-45-9 hydrochloride (1-Aminobutane) see n-Butylamine (2-Aminobutane) see sec-Butylamine (2-Aminoethanol) see Ethanolamine 141/311 2-(2-Amino ethoxy) ethanol 929-06-6 148/274 1-(2-Aminoethyl) piperazine 140-31-8 (N-(beta-Aminoethyl)piperazine) (1-Amino-2-propanol) see Isopropanolamine (3-Aminopropylene) see Allylamine 350 Ammonia, gas 7664-41-7 380 Ammonia, liquid 7664-41-7 340 Ammonium acetate, sat. 631-61-8 340 Ammonium carbonate, sat. 506-87-6 340 Ammonium fluoride, 30–70% 12125-01-8 380 Ammonium hydroxide, ⬍30% 1336-21-6

Risk Code

Special Notes

T T TC X X

C X

TC TC Xi

Caution

T C

21

Class # 380 340 340

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

CAS #

Ammonium hydroxide, 30–70% 1336-21-6 Ammonium nitrate 6884-52-2 Ammonium nitrate, 30–70 % 6884-52-2 (n-Amyl acetate) see n-Pentyl acetate (Amyl alcohol) see n-Pentanol (n-Amylamine) see n-Pentylamine 241 tert-Amyl methyl ether 994-05-8 (Methyl tert-amyl ether) 145 Aniline (Phenylamine) 62-53-3 370/590 Aqua regia (Hydrochloric 20-05-1 acid, 25–37% and Nitric acid, 63–75%) (Arochlor) see Polychlorinated biphenyls 350 Arsine (Arsenic trihydride) 7784-42-1 (4-Azahepthamethylenediamine) see 3,3⬘-Iminobis(propylamine) (Azine) see Pyridine (Azinphos-methyl) see Guthion (Aziridine) see Ethyleneimine 590 AZT® (3⬘-Azido-3⬘30516-87-1 deoxythymidine) 590 Battery acid 7664-93-9 17804-35-2 274 Benlate® (Benomyl)

Risk Code

Special Notes

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

C Xi Xi

Caution

122

Benzaldehyde (Benzamine) see Aniline Benzene (Bensol) (Benzene methanol) see Benzyl alcohol (Benzenesulfonic acid) see Phenolsulfonic acid Benzenesulfonyl chloride Benzethonium chloride (Hyamine 1622) Benzonitrile (Phenyl cyanide) 3,3⬘,4,4⬘-Benzophenonetetracarboxylicdianhydride (BDTA) Benzo(a)pyrene p-Benzoquinone (Quinone) Benzotrichloride (alpha,alpha,alphaTrichlorotoluene) Benzoyl chloride (Benzoic acid chloride) Benzyl acetate Benzyl alcohol (Benzene methanol or Phenyl cyanide)

292

Xi T Cx

Skin Caution

505 550 432 162

Tx

293 410 266

112

C

222 311

CAS #

Risk Code

100-52-7

X

71-43-2

T Cancer

98-09-9 121-54-0

C Xi

Special Notes

Skin

100-47-0 Tx 2421-28-5 X Sensitization

50-32-8 106-51-4 98-07-7

T Cancer Caution T Caution T Cancer Skin

98-88-4

C

140-11-4 100-51-6

V Xi

22

Special Notes

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

141

Benzylamine (alpha100-46-9 C Aminotoluene) Benzyl bromide (alpha100-39-0 Xi Bromotoluene) Benzyl chloride 100-44-7 T Cancer (Chloromethyl benzene) (Benzyl cyanide) see Phenylacetonitrile n-Benzyl dimethylamine 103-83-3 C (N,N-Dimethylbenzylamine) (Benzyl nitrile) see Phenylacetonitrile Benzyl neocaprate (BNC) 66794-75-0 (Bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide) see Mustard gas (Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate) see Di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (Bis-2-hydroxyethyl ether) see Diethylene glycol (Bis(trimethylsilyl)amine) see 1,1,1,3,3,3Hexamethyldisilazane Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether 1675-54-3 X Sensitization (Diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A or DGBA)

266 266

143

224

275

CAS #

Risk Code

Class #

Class # 590 530

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

Blood, human Borane pyridine complex (Pyridine borane) 370 Boric acid 360 Boron trichloride 360 Boron trifluoride 360 Boron trifluoride etherate (Borone trifluoride diethyl etherate) 330 Bromine (Bromine cyanide) see Cyanogen bromide gas 360 Bromine trifluoride 261/431 Bromoacetonitrile 264 Bromobenzene (Phenyl bromide) (Bromochlophos) see Naled® (2-Bromo-2-chloro-1,1,1trifluoroethane) see Halothane 261 Bromochloromethane (Chlorobromomethane) 261 Bromodichloromethane (Dichlorobromomethane) (Bromoethane) see Ethyl bromide

CAS #

Risk Code

Special Notes

20-05-7 110-51-0

T

10043-35-3 10294-34-5 7637-07-2 109-63-7

Xi TC TC C

7726-95-6

T Cx

Caution

7787-71-5 590-17-0 108-86-1

Tx Cx

Caution

74-97-5

X

75-27-4

X

Caution Caution

Xi

23

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

CAS #

Risk Code

261/315 2-Bromoethanol 540-51-2 Tx (Ethylene bromohydride) 232 1-Bromoethylethyl carbonate 89766-09-6 (Carbonic ester, 1-Bromoethylethyl ester) 264 1-Bromo-4-fluorobenzene 460-00-4 X (p-bromofluorobenzene) (Bromoform) see Tribromomethane (Bromomethane) see Methyl bromide 261 Bromopropane (Propyl bromide) 106-94-5 X 261/315 1-Bromo-2-propanol 19686-73-8 C 261/315 3-Bromo-1-propanol 6271-18-9 Xi (3-Bromopropene) see Allyl bromide 103/261 3-Bromopropionic acid 590-92-1 C 294 1,3-Butadiene 106-99-0 T Cancer 291 n-Butane (Butane) 106-97-8 V (1,4-Butanediol) see 1,4-Butyleneglycol 275 1,4-Butanediol diglycidyl ether 2425-79-8 Xi 311 n-Butanol (n-Butyl alcohol 71-36-3 X or 1-Butanol) 312 sec-Butanol (sec-Butyl alcohol 78-92-2 X or 2-Butanol) 313 tert-Butanol (tert-Butyl alcohol) 75-65-0 X

Special Notes

Class #

300 294

245

222

223

Skin 141 141 141 226

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

CAS #

Risk Code

Special Notes

(2-Butanone) see Methyl ethyl ketone (2-Butanone exime) see Methyl ethyl ketoxime 2-Butanone peroxide 1338-24-4 T 2-Butene 107-01-7 V (Butoxydiglycol) see Butyldiglycol (2-Butoxyethanol) see Butyl glycol (2-Butoxyethyl acetate) see Butyl glycol acetate 1-Butoxy-2-propanol 5131-66-8 X (Propylene glycol monebutyl ether) (Butoxytriglycol) see Butyltriglycol n-Butyl acetate 123-86-4 V (Butyl acetic acid) see 2-Ethylhexanoic acid Butyl acrylate (Butyl141-32-2 Xi Sensitization 2-propenoate) (n-Butyl alcohol) see n-Butanol (sec-Butyl alcohol) see sec-Butanol (tert-Butyl alcohol) see tert-Butanol n-Butylamine (1-Aminobutane) 109-73-9 CX Skin sec-Butylamine (2-Aminobutane) 513-49-5 CX tert-Butylamine 75-64-9 CX Butylbenzyl phthalate 85-68-7

24

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

(Butyl carbitol) see Butyldiglycol (Butyl cellosolve) see Butyl glycol (Butyl cellosolve acetate) see Butyl glycol acetate 261 n-Butyl chloride (1-Chlorobutane) 245 Butyldiglycol (Ethylene glycol monobutyl ether) (Butylethylene) see 1-Hexene 314 1,4-Butylene glycol (1,4-Butanediol) (1,2-Butylene oxide) see 1,2-Epoxybutane 241 Butyl ether (Dibutyl ether) (n-Butylethylamine) Ethyl-n-butylamine 245 Butyl glycol (2-Butoxyethanol ) 222/245 Butyl glycol acetate (2-Butoxyethyl acetate) 300 tert-Butyl hydroperoxide (tert-Butyl methyl ether) see Methyl tert-butyl ether 300 tert-Butyl peroxybenzoate (n-Butyl phthalate) see Di-n-butyl phthalate

CAS #

Risk Code

Special Notes

Class #

292 109-69-3 112-34-5

X X

110-63-4

X

142-96-1

Xi

111-76-2 112-07-2

X X

75-91-2

C

614-45-9

Xi

245

121 102 225 225 340 340 380 Skin 102

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

CAS #

Risk Code

Special Notes

(Butyl-2-propenoate) see Butyl acrylate p-tert-Butyltoluene 98-51-1 T (4-Methyl-tert-butylbenzene) Butyltriglycol 143-22-6 X (Butoxytriglycol or Triethylene glycol monobutyl ether) Butyraldehyde (n-Butyl aldehyde) 123-72-8 Xi Butyric acid 107-92-6 C beta-Butyrolactone 3068-88-0 X gamma-Butyrolactone 96-48-0 X Cadmium oxide, solid 1306-19-0 T Cancer Calcium chloride, 30–70% 10043-52-4 Xi Calcium hydroxide 1305-62-0 CX Caution (Caperaldehyde) see Decanal (Captan) see Orthocid 83® Caprylic acid (Octanoic acid) 124-07-2 C (Carbaryl) see Sevin 50W (Carbitol acetate) see Ethyldiglycol acetate (Carbolic acid) see Phenol (Carbon bisulfide) see Carbon disulfide

25

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

CAS #

Risk Code

Special Notes

502/508 Carbon disulfide 75-15-0 T Skin (Carbon bisulfide) 350 Carbon monoxide 630-08-0 T 261 Carbon tetrachloride 56-23-5 T Cancer Skin (Tetrachloromethane) (Carbon trifluoride) see Trifluoromethane (Carbonyl chloride) see Phosgene 154-93-8 590 Carmustin® (1,3bis(2-chloroethyl)nitrosourea) 590 Castor oil 8001-79-4 (Caustic soda) see Sodium hydroxide (Cellosolve acetate) see Ethyl glycol acetate (CFC 114) see 1,1-Dichlorotetrafluoroethane (Choline) see 2-Hydroxy ethylN,N,N-trimethyl ammonium hydroxide (Chloral) see Trichloroacetaldehyde 261 Chlordane, ⬎70% 57-74-9 Tx Skin 350 Chlorine, gas 7782-50-5 T Caution 330 Chlorine, liquid 7782-50-5 T Caution 350 Chlorine dioxide gas, ⬍30% 10049-04-4 T Caution 360 Chlorine trifluoride 7790-91-2 (Chlorinefluoride)

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

103

Chloroacetic acid 79-11-8 TC (Monochloroacetic acid) Chloroacetone 78-95-5 T (Chloro-2-propanone) Chloroacetonitrile 107-14-2 T 2-Chloroacetophenone (Tear gas) 532-27-4 T Xi Chloroacetyl chloride 79-04-9 TC 2-Chloroacrylonitrile 920-37-6 Tx Cancer 4-Chloroaniline (p-Chloroaniline) 106-47-8 T Chlorobenzene 108-90-7 X (Monochlorobenzene) 4-Chlorobenzotrichloride 5216-25-1 Xi (p-Trichloromethylchlorobenzene) 4-Chlorobenzotrifluoride 52181-51-8 X (1-Chloro-4-(trichloromethyl) benzene) (Chlorobromomethane) see Bromochloromethane (2-Chloro-1,3-butadiene) see Chloroprene (Chlorodibromomethane) see Dibromochloromethane Chloroethane (Ethyl chloride) 75-00-3 X 2-Chloroethanol 107-07-3 Tx (Ethylene chlorohydrin)

391 261/431 392 111/261 261/431 145 264 264 264

261 261/315

CAS #

Risk Code

Class #

Special Notes Caution Skin

Caution Caution

Caution

26

Class # 261

261 103/243 103/243 265 264 264/441 264/441 261/442 264/316 442

Chemical Names (and Synonyms) (Cloroethene) see Vinyl chloride Chloroform (Trichloromethane) (Chloromethane) see Methyl chloride (Chloromethyl benzene) see Benzyl chloride Chloromethyl methyl ether (Chloromethoxy methane) 4-Chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) 2-(4-Chloro-2-methylphenoxy) propionic acid 3-Chloro-2-methylpropene (2-Methallyl chloride) 1-Chloronaphthalene (Naphthyl chloride) 2-Chloronitrobenzene (o-Nitrochlorbenzene) 2-Chloronitrobenzene (p-Nitrochlorbenzene) 2-Chloro-2-nitropropane p-Chlorophenol Chloropicrin (Trichloronitromethane)

CAS #

Risk Code

Special Notes

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

CAS #

Risk Code

Special Notes

263

67-66-3

X Cancer Caution

107-30-2

T Cancer

94-74-6

X

93-65-2

X

563-47-3

X

91-58-7

X

88-73-3

T

100-00-5

T

594-71-8 106-48-9 76-06-2

X Tx

Caution

Chloroprene (2-Chloro126-99-8 X Skin 1,3-butadiene) 261 1-Chloropropane (Propyl chloride) 540-54-5 X 261/315 1-Chloro-2-propanol 127-00-4 X 261/315 3-Chloro-1-propanol 627-30-5 X (Chloro-2-propanone) see Chloroacetone (2-Chloro-2-propenyldiethyldithiocarbamate) see Sulfallate (3-Chlorpropylene) see Allyl chloride 370/504 Chlorosulfonic acid 7790-94-5 Cx Caution (Chlorothene VG) see 1,1,1-Trichloro ethane 264 o-Chlorotoluene (2-Chlorotoluene) 95-49-8 X 264 p-Chlorotoluene (4-Chlorotoluene) 106-43-4 X 480 Chlorotrimethylsilane 75-77-4 C (Trimethylchlorosilane) 370 Chromic acid 7738-94-5 T Cx Sen- Caution sitization Cancer 370 Chromium trioxide 1333-82-0 T Cx Caution Cancer (Chromium anhydride) 170 C I Pigment Yellow 74 6358-31-2

27

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

104 590 340 590 316

Citric acid, 30–70% Coal tar extract Cobalt sulfate heptahydrate Corn oil Creosote

316 292/316 292/316 292/316 121 294/590 292 300 590

345

CAS #

Risk Code

Special Notes

77-92-9 65996-92-1 Caution 10026-24-1 T 8001-30-7 8001-58-9 T Cancer Sensitization Creosote (Wood creosote) 8021-39-4 TC Caution m-Cresol (3-Methylphenol) 108-39-4 TC Skin p-Cresol (4-Methylphenol) 106-44-5 TC Skin Cresols, isomeric mixtures 1319-77-3 TC Skin Crotonaldehyde (2-Butenal) 4170-30-3 T Caution Crude oil 8002-05-9 X Cumene (Isopropyl 98-82-8 X Skin benzene or 1-Methylethyl benzene) Cumene hydroperoxide 80-15-9 Cx Caution Cutting fluids 20-04-5 X (CW Agent GA) see Tabun (CW Agent GB) see Sarin (CW Agent GD) see Soman (CW Agent HD) see Sulfur mustard (CW Agent L) see Lewisite (CW Agent VX) see VX Cyanogen bromide gas 506-68-3 Tx Caution (Bromine cyanide)

Class # 345 291 312 391 141

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

Cyanogen chloride gas Cyclohexane Cyclohexanol Cyclohexanone Cyclohexylamine (Cyclohexyldimethylamine) see N,N-Dimethylcyclohexylamine 291 Cyclopentane (Pentamethylene) 391 Cyclopentanone 291 Cyclopropane (HEF) 224/590 Cypermethrin (Cymbush®) (2,4D amine96) see 2,4-D dimethylamine ammonium salt (DBP) see Di-n-butyl phthalate 550 2,4-D dimethylamine ammonium salt ((2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) acetic acid dimethyl ammonium salt) 121 Decanal (Capraldehyde) (Diacetone alcohol) see 4-Hydroxy-4-methyl2-pentanone

CAS #

Risk Code

Special Notes

506-77-4 110-82-7 108-93-0 108-94-1 108-91-8

Tx Xi Xi X CX

Caution

287-92-3 120-92-3 75-19-4 52315-07-8

V Xi

2008-39-1

X

112-31-2

Xi

Skin Skin Caution

X

28

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

142

Diallylamine (Diamine) see Hydrazine (1,2-Diaminoethane) see Ethylenediamine (1,6-Diaminohexane) see 1,6-Hexane-diamine (1,5-Diamino-2-methylpentane) see 2-Methylpentamethylenediamine (1,2-Diaminopropane) see Propylenediamine (1,3-Diaminopropane) see 1,3-Propanediamine (Di-n-amylamine) see Di-n-pentylamine Diborane (1,2-Dibromoethane) see Ethylene dibromide Dibromochloromethane (Chlorodibromomethane) (Dibromomethane) see Methylene bromide Di-n-butylamine (Dibutylamine)

350

261

142

CAS #

Risk Code

124-02-7

X

19287-45-7

Special Notes

Tx

124-48-1

X

111-92-2

CX

Caution

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

(Dibutyl ether) see Butyl ether 226 Di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP or n-Butyl phthalate) 261/391 Dichloroacetone (1,3-Dichloro-2-propanone) 111/261 Dichloroacetyl chloride 145/264 3,4-Dichloroaniline 264 1,2-Dichlorobenzene (o-Dichlorobenzene) 264 1,3-Dichlorobenzene (m-Dichlorobenzene) 264 1,4-Dichlorobenzene (p-Dichlorobenzene) (Dichlorobromomethane) see Bromodichloromethane 265 1,3-Dichloro-2-butene 265 1,4-Dichloro-2-butene (Dichlorodifluoromethane) see Freon 12 (Dichlorodimethylsilane) see Dimethyldichlorosilane 261 1,1-Dichloroethane (Ethylidene dichloride)

CAS #

Risk Code

84-74-2

T

534-07-6

TC

79-36-7 95-76-1 95-50-1

Cx T Xi

541-73-1

Xi

106-46-7

Xi

926-57-8 764-41-0

T Tx

75-34-3

X

Special Notes

Caution Skin

Skin

29

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

CAS #

(1,2-Dichloroethane) see Ethylene dichloride (1,1-Dichloroethylene) see Vinylidene chloride 263 cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene 156-59-2 263 trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene 156-60-5 263 cis,trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene 540-59-0 (1,2-Dichloroethylene) 241/261 1,2-Dichloroethyl ether 111-44-4 (Dichloromethane) see Methylene chloride ((2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) acetic acid dimethyl ammonium salt) see 2,4-D dimethylamine ammonium salt 103/243 2-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy)propionic 120-36-5 acid (Dichloroprop) 261 1,2-Dichloropropane 78-87-5 (Propylene dichloride) 265 2,3-Dichloro-1-propene 78-88-6 265 1,3-Dichloropropene 542-75-6 480 Dichlorosilane 4109-96-0 261 1,1-Dichlorote374-07-2 trafluoroethane (CFC 114)

Risk Code

Special Notes

Class # 550

X X X T Cancer

Skin

X X X X TC

Skin Caution

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

2,4-D dimethylamine ammonium salt ((2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) acetic acid dimethylamine salt) 291 Diesel fuel 142/311 Diethanolamine 132 Diethylacetamide (N,N-Diethylacetamide) 142 Diethylamine 143 2-(Diethylamino)ethanol (N,N-Diethylethanolamine) 146 N,N-Diethylaniline, crude 292 Diethyl benzene 232 Diethyl carbonate 480 Diethyldichlorosilane (Dichlorodiethylsilane) (Diethylenediamine) see Piperazine 314 Diethylene glycol (Bis-2-hydroxyethyl ether) (Diethylene glycol monobutyl ether) see Butyldiglycol (Diethylene glycol monoethyl ether) see Ethyldiglycol

CAS #

Risk Code

2008-39-1

Caution

68474-34-6 111-42-2 685-91-6

X Xi X

109-89-7 100-37-8

CX CX

91-66-7 25340-17-4 105-58-8 1719-53-5

T X X C

111-46-6

X

Special Notes

Skin Skin

Caution Caution

30

Class #

148

226

226 145 507

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

CAS #

Risk Code

Special Notes

(Diethylene glycol Monoethyl ether acetate) see Ethylenediglo col acetate (Diethylene glycol monohexyl ether) see Hexyldiglycol (Diethylene glycol monomethyl ether) see Methyldiglycol (Diethylene glycol monopropyl ether) see Propyldiglycol (Diethylene oxide) see 1,4-Dioxane Diethylenetriamine 111-40-0 C X Sensiti- Skin zation (N,N-Diethylethanolamine) see 2-(Diethylamino)ethanol (Diethyl ether) see Ethyl ether Di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate 117-81-7 T (Bis(2-Ethylhexyl)phthalate or DEHP) (N,N-Diethylnitrosamine) see N-Nitrosodiethylamine Diethyl phthlate 84-66-2 Xi (Phthalic acid, diethylester) N,N-Diethyl-m-toluidine, crude 91-67-8 Diethyl sulfate 64-67-5 T Cancer Caution

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

CAS #

Risk Code

Special Notes

(Diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A) see Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (1,1-Difluorethylene) see Vinylidene fluoride 142 Diisobutylamine 110-96-3 X 391 Diisobutyl ketone 108-83-8 X (2,6-Dimethyl-4-heptanone) (1,6-Diisocyanatohexane) see Hexamethylene-1,6-diisocyanate 226 Diisooctyl phthalate 27554-26-3 (2,4-Diisocyanate toluene) see Toluene-2,4-diisocyanate 142 Diisopropylamine 108-18-9 CX Skin (Diisopropyl ether) see Isopropyl ether 278 Dimethoxane (Acetomethoxane) 828-00-2 (1,2-Dimethoxyethane) see Ethylene glycol dimethyl ether 132 Dimethylacetamide (DMAC) 127-19-5 T Skin 142 Dimethylamine 124-40-3 CX Skin 143/311 2-(Dimethylamino)ethanol 108-01-0 Xi (N,N-Dimethylethanolamine) 148 3-(Dimethylamino)propylamine 109-55-7 X Sensitization 146 N,N-Dimethylaniline (DMA) 121-69-7 T Skin

31

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

(Dimethyl benzene) see Xylene (N,N-Dimethylbenzylamine) see n-Benzyl dimethylamine 141 1,3-Dimethylbutylamine (Cyclohexyldimethylamine) 143 N,N-Dimethylcyclohexylamine 480 Dimethyldichlorosilane (Dichloro dimethylsilane) 502 Dimethyl disulfide (Methyl disulfide) (N,N-Dimethylethanolamine) see 2-(Dimethylamino)ethanol 241 Dimethyl ether (Methyl ether) 143 N,N-Dimethylethylamine (N-Ethyldimethylamine) 132 Dimethylformamide (DMF) 280 1,1-Dimethylhydrazine (unsym-Dimethylhydrazine) 142/294 2,6-Dimethylmorpholine (N,N-Dimethylnitrosamine) see N-Nitrosodimethylamine (Dimethyl phenol) see Xylenol 148/274 N,N-Dimethyl piperazine (1,4-Dimethyl piperazine)

CAS #

Risk Code

Special Notes

507

Dimethyl sulfate 77-78-1 T Cancer Skin (Methyl sulfate or DMS or Sensitization Sulfuric acid dimethyl ester) Genetic Dimethyl sulfide (Methyl sulfide) 75-18-3 X Dimethyl sulfoxide 67-68-5 X Caution (DMSO or Methyl sulfoxide) Dimethyl-d6-sulfoxide 2206-27-1 X (Hexadeuterodimethyl sulfoxide) Dimethylvinyl chloride 513-37-1 (2-Methyl-1-chloropropene or Methyl allyl chloride) 2,4-Dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT) 121-14-2 T Skin Di-n-octyl phthalate (DNOP) 117-84-0 T 1,3-Dioxane 505-26-6 X 1,4-Dioxane (Diethylene oxide) 123-91-1 X Skin (Dipentene) see d,l-Limonene Di-n-pentylamine (Di-n-amylamine) 122-39-4 X 1,3-Diphenylguanidine 102-06-7 X Diphenyl phosphite 4712-55-4 Xi Caution Di-n-propylamine 142-84-7 CX Caution (Dipropylamine) Dipropylene glycol 25265-71-8 Xi 85-00-7 Diquat dibromide (Reglone®) Divinyl benzene (Vinylstyrene) 1321-74-0 T

X

98-94-2 75-78-5

Xi Xi

624-92-0

T

263

115-10-6 598-56-1

V C

441 226 278 278

68-12-2 57-14-7

502 503 Caution

T Skin TC Skin Sensitization 141-91-3 X

106-58-1

Special Notes

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

108-09-8

503

142 137 462 142 314 274 292

CAS #

Risk Code

Class #

32

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

(DMA) see N,NDimethylaniline (DMAC) see Dimethylacetamide 291 Dodecane (DOP) see Di-n-octyl phthalate 510 Dynamite (Ethylene glycol dinitrate, 70% and Nitroglycerine, 30%) (EHA) see 2-Ethylhexyl acrylate 275 Epibromohydrin (1,2-Epoxy-3-bromopropane) 261/275 Epichlorohydrin (1,2-Epoxy-3-chloropropane) 590 Epoxy, accelerator 590 Epoxy, base 275 1,2-Epoxybutane (1,2Butylene oxide) (1,2-Epoxy-3-bromopropane) see Epibromohydrin (1,2-Epoxy-3-chloropropane) see Epichlorohydrin (1,2-Epoxypropane) see 1,2-Propylene oxide

Risk Code

CAS #

Special Notes

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

CAS #

Risk Code

Special Notes

275

112-40-3 Tx

3132-64-7 106-89-8

106-88-7

Caution

Tx

T Cancer Skin Sensitization X Sensitization X

Epoxytrichloropropane 67664-94-2 (Trichloroepoxypropane) (Ethanal) see Acetaldehyde 291 Ethane 74-84-0 V 311 Ethanol (Ethyl alcohol) 64-17-5 V (Ethane thiol) see Ethyl mercaptan 141/311 Ethanolamine 141-43-5 Xi Caution (1-Aminoethanol or Monoethanolamine) (Ethene) see Ethylene (2-Ethoxyethanol) see Ethyl glycol (2-(2-Ethoxyethoxy)ethanol) see Ethyldiglycol (2-Ethoxyethyl acetate) see Ethyl glycol acetate 245 1-Ethoxy-2-propanol 107-98-2 X (Propylene glycol monoethyl ether) 245 2-Ethoxy-1-propanol 19089-47-9 X 245 1-Ethoxy-2-propylacetate 54839-24-6 222 Ethyl acetate 141-78-6 Xi 223 Ethyl acrylate 140-88-5 Xi Sensiti- Skin (Ethylpropenoate) zation (Ethyl alcohol) see Ethanol

33

Class # 141 292 261 142

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

Ethylamine (Monoethylamine) Ethyl benzene Ethyl bromide (Bromoethane) Ethyl-n-butylamine (n-Butylethylamine) (Ethyl cellosolve) see Ethyl glycol (Ethyl cellosolve acetate) see Ethyl glycol acetate (Ethyl chloride) see Chloroethane 113 Ethyl chloroformate (Ethyl cyanide) see Propionitrile 245 Ethyldiglycol (Diethylene glycol monoethyl ether or 2-(2-Ethoxyethyoxy) ethanol) 222/245 Ethyldiglycol acetate (Carbitol acetate) (N-Ethyldimethylamine) see N,N-Dimethylethylamine 294 Ethylene (Ethene) (Ethylene chlorohydrin) see 2-Chloro-ethanol

CAS #

Risk Code

Special Notes

75-04-7 100-41-4 74-96-4 13360-63-9

Xi X X T

Caution Skin Skin

541-41-3

Tx C

111-90-0

X

112-15-2

T

74-85-1

X

Caution

Class # 148

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

Ethylenediamine (1,2Diaminoethane) 261 Ethylene dibromide (1,2-Dibromoethane) 261 Ethylene dichloride (1,2Dichloroethane or EDC) 314 Ethylene glycol (Ethanediol) (Ethylene glycol acrylate) see 2-Hydroxy-ethyl acrylate 245 Ethylene glycol dimethyl ether (1,2-Dimethoxyethane) (Ethylene glycol monobutyl ether) see Butyl glycol (Ethylene glycol monoethyl ether) see Ethyl glycol (Ethylene glycol monohexyl ether) see Hexyl glycol (Ethylene glycol monomethyl ether) see Methyl glycol (Ethylene glycol monopropyl ether) see Propyl glycol 142/274 Ethyleneimine (Aziridine) 275 Ethylene oxide (Oxirane)

CAS #

Risk Code

Special Notes

107-15-3 C X Sensiti- Skin zation 106-93-4 T Cancer Skin 107-06-2

T Cancer

107-21-1

X

110-71-4

X

151-56-4 75-21-8

Tx Cancer T Cancer Genetic

Skin

Skin

34

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

CAS #

Risk Code

Special Notes

241 Ethyl ether (Diethyl ether) 60-29-70 X 245 Ethyl glycol (2-Ethoxyethanol) 110-80-5 T Skin 222/245 Ethyl glycol acetate 111-15-9 T Skin (2-Ethoxyethyl acetate) 102 2-Ethylhexanoic acid 149-57-5 XC (Butyl acetic acid) 311 2-Ethyl-1-hexanol 104-76-7 Xi 223 2-Ethylhexyl acrylate (EHA) 103-11-7 X Caution (Ethylidene dichloride) see 1,1-Dichloro-ethane 501 Ethyl mercaptan (Ethanethiol) 75-08-1 X 223 Ethyl methacrylate (Ethyl 97-63-2 Xi Sensi2-methylpropenoate) tization (Ethyl methyl ketone oximine) see Methyl ethyl ketoxime 462 Ethyl parathion (Parathion) 56-38-2 T Skin (Ethyl phenyl ketone) see Propiophenone (Ethylpropenoate) see Ethyl acrylate 245 Ethyltriglycol (Triethylene 112-50-5 X glycol monoethyl ether) 246 Ethyl vinyl ether 109-92-2 V 391 Ethyl vinyl ketone 1629-58-9 (1-Penten-3-one)

Class # 340

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

Ferric chloride (Ferric trichloride) 340 Ferrous chloride (Fluazitop-butyl) see Fusilade 250EC 350 Fluorine 264 Fluorobenzene (Fluoroboric acid) see Tetrafluoroboric acid 370 Fluorosilic acid (Fluosilic acid) 370/504 Fluorosulfonic acid 121 Formaldehyde, 30–70% (Formalin, solution of formaldehyde) 102 Formic acid (Methanoic acid) 261 Freon 12 (Dichlorodifluoromethane) 261 Freon 113 or TF (Trichlorotrifluoroethane) Freon 116 (see Hexafluoroethane) 261 Freon TMC (Freon TF, 50% and Dichloromethane, 50%) (2-Furaldehyde) see Furfural

CAS #

Risk Code

7705-08-0

C

7758-94-3

C

7782-41-4 462-06-6

Tx Cx

16961-83-4 C 7789-21-1 Cx 50-00-0 T Sensitization Cancer 64-18-6 Cx 75-71-8 76-13-1

Special Notes

Caution

Caution Caution Caution

Caution

V

X

35

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

277 Furan (Furfuran) 122/277 Furfural (2-Furaldehyde) (Furfuran) see Furan 311 Furfuryl alcohol 224 Fusilade 250EC (Fluazitop-butyl) 590 Gasohol (Ethanol & Gasoline & Methanol) 292 Gasoline, 40–55% aromatics 292 Gasoline, unleaded 121 Glutaraldehyde (1,5-Pentanedial) 314 Glycerol (Glycerine) 224/501 Glycerol monothioglycolate, ⬎70% 223 Glycerol propoxy triacrylate (GPTA) 223 Glycidyl methacrylate 103 Glycolic acid, sat. (GLYMA or Methacrylic acid 2,3-epoxypropylester) (Glyphosate) see Round Up®) 462 Guthion (Azinphos-methyl)

CAS #

Risk Code

Special Notes

110-00-9 98-01-1

Xi T

Skin

98-00-0 69806-50-4

X

Skin

8006-61-9 8006-61-9 111-30-8

261

T Cancer T Cancer T Sensi- Caution tization

56-81-5 68148-42-5 5459-38-1 106-91-2 79-14-1

86-50-0

Xi C

T

Class #

Caution

Skin

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

Halothane (2-Bromo-2-chloro1,1,1-trifluoroethane) (HDDA) see 1,6-Hexanediol diacrylate (HEMA) see 2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate 291 Heptane (2-Heptanone) see Methyl pentyl ketone 263 Hexachloro-1,3-butadiene (HCBD or Perchlorobutadiene) 265 Hexachlorocyclopentadiene (Hexadeuterodimethyl sulfoxide) see Dimethyl-d6-sulfoxide 261 Hexafluoroethane (Freon 116) 261 Hexafluoroisobutylene (1-Propen) (Hexahydropyridine) see Piperidine 142/480 1,1,1,3,3,3-Hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS or Bis(trimethylsilyl)amine) 211 Hexamethylene-1,6-diisocyanate

462

CAS #

Risk Code

Special Notes

151-67-7

142-82-5

X

87-68-3

T Cancer

77-47-4

T

76-16-4 382-10-5 999-97-3

XC

822-06-0

T Sensitization

(HMDI or 1,6-Diisocyanatohexane) Hexamethylphosphoramide 680-31-9

T Cancer

Skin

36

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

291 148

n-Hexane 110-54-3 X 1,6-Hexanediamine 124-09-4 X (1,6-Diaminohexane) 1,6-Hexanediol diacrylate (HDDA) 13048-33-4 Xi Sensitization 1-Hexene (Butylethylene) 592-41-6 X Hexyldiglycol (Diethylene glycol 112-59-4 X monohexyl ether) Hexyl glycol (Ethylene glycol 1559-35-9 X monohexyl ether) (HMDI) see Hexamethylene1,6-diisocyanate (HMDS) see 1,1,1,3,3,3Hexamethyldisilazane Hydraulic oil Hydrazine (Diamine) 302-01-2 T C Cancer Hydrazine hydrate 7803-57-8 Tx C Cancer Hydriodic acid, 30–70% 10034-85-2 C Hydrobromic acid 10035-10-6 Cx Hydrochloric acid, 37% 7647-01-0 T Cx (Muriatic acid) Hydrochloric acid, ⬍30% 7647-01-0 TC Hydrofluoric acid, 30–70% 7664-39-3 Tx Cx

223 294 245 245

590 280 280 370 370 370 370 370

CAS #

Risk Code

Class #

Special Notes

Class # 350 350 345 350 300

Skin Caution

Caution Caution Caution Caution

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

CAS #

Risk Code

Hydrogen bromide 10035-10-6 Cx Hydrogen chloride 7647-01-0 Cx Hydrogen cyanide 74-90-8 Tx Hydrogen fluoride (HF) 7664-39-3 Tx Cx Hydrogen peroxide, 30–70% 7722-84-1 C (Hydrogen phosphide) see Phosphine 350 Hydrogen selenide 7783-07-5 350/502 Hydrogen sulfide 7783-06-4 Tx 480 Hydrogentrichlorosilane 1333775-79-8 316 Hydroquinone 123-31-9 X Sensitization (Hydroxybenzenesulfonic acid) see Phenolsulfonic acid 223 2-Hydroxyethyl acrylate (Ethylene 818-61-1 T Sensitiglycol acrylate) zation 223 2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate 868-77-9 Xi Sensiti(HEMA) zation 550 2-Hydroxy ethyl-N,N,N-trimethyl 62-49-7 Xi ammonium hydroxide (Choline) 391 4-Hydroxy-4-methyl-2-pentanone 123-42-2 X (Diacetone alcohol) 148 3,3’-Iminobis(propylamine) 56-18-8 CX (Azahepthamethylenediamine) (IDI) see Isophorone diisocyanate

Special Notes Caution Caution Skin Caution Caution Caution

37

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

330

Iodine, solid 7553-56-2 (Iodomethane) see Methyl iodide beta-Ionone 79-77-6 (IPA) see Isopropanol (Isoamyl acetate) see Isopentyl acetate (Isoamyl alcohol) see Isopentyl alcohol (Isoamylnitrite) see Isopentylnitrite Isobutane (2-Methylpropane) 75-28-5

391

291 311 223

141 292 510 121 431 291 222 311

CAS #

Isobutanol (Isobutyl alcohol) 78-83-1 Isobutyl acrylate 106-63-8 (Isobutylpropenoate) (Isobutyl alcohol) see Isobutanol Isobutylamine (2-Methylpropy 78-81-9 lamine) Isobutylbenzene (2-Methyl-1538-93-2 phenylpropane) Isobutylnitrite 542-56-3 Isobutyraldehyde 78-84-2 Isobutyronitrile 78-82-0 Isooctane 26635-64-3 Isopentyl acetate (Isoamyl acetate) 123-92-2 Isopentyl alcohol (Isoamyl alcohol 123-51-3 or 3-Methyl-1-butanol)

Risk Code

Special Notes

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

X

Caution

510

Isopentylnitrite (Isoamylnitrite or 3-Methylbutylnitrite) Isophorone Isophorone diisocyanate (IDI)

V

T Cancer Genetic X X Sensitization C V

Xi T Xi V X

391 211

294 Isoprene (2-Methyl-1,3-butadiene) 141/312 Isopropanolamine (Monoisopropanolamine) 222 Isopropylacetate (sec-Propylacetate) 312 Isopropanol (2-Propanol ) (Isopropyl alcohol) see Isopropanol 141 Isopropylamine (Monoisopropylamine) (Isopropyl benzene) see Cumene 241 Isopropyl ether (Diisopropyl ether) (Isopropylidene acetone) see Mesityl oxide 223 Isopropyl methacrylate (Isopropylpropenoate) 510 Isopropylnitrite 121 Isovaleraldehyde (3-Methylbutyraldehyde)

CAS #

Risk Code

110-46-3

X

78-59-1 4098-71-9 78-79-5 78-96-6

Xi T Sensiti zation Xi Xi

108-21-4

X

67-63-0

Xi

75-31-0

CX

108-20-3

V

Special Notes

Skin

Caution

4655-34-9 1712-64-7 590-86-3

Xi

38

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

291

Jet fuel, ⬍30% aromatics X (73–248 ⬚C) (JP-4) (Kerb 50®) see Propyzamide Kerosene (Naphtha, 15–20% 8008-20-6 X aromatics, 180–260 ⬚C) Lactic acid, ⬎70% 50-21-5 C (Lannate® LV) see Methomyl (Laughing gas) see Nitrous oxide Lauric acid 143-07-7 V Lewisite (CW Agent L) 541-25-3 Tx d,l-Limonene (Menthadiene 5989-27-5 Xi Sensior Dipentene) tization Lithium chloride, ⬍30% 7447-41-8 Xi Lithium hydroxide, ⬍30% 1310-65-2 C Lubricating oil 64742-52-5 X Malathion, 30–70% 121-75-5 X Maleic acid 110-16-7 Xi Maleic anhydride 108-31-6 Xi (MCPA) see 4-Chloro2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MDA) see 4,4⬘-Methylenedianiline (MDI) see Methylene bisphenyl4,4⬘-diisocyanate

291 103

102 600 294 340 380 590 462 104 161

CAS #

Risk Code

Class #

Special Notes

Caution

Caution

Caution Skin Caution

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

CAS #

(Menthadiene) see d,l-Limonene (Menthane thiol) see Methyl mercaptan 103/501 Mercaptoacetic acid 68-11-1 (Thioglycolic acid) 311/501 2-Mercaptoethanol 60-24-2 340 Mercuric chloride, sat. 7487-94-7 330 Mercury (Quicksilver) 7439-97-6 391 Mesityl oxide 141-79-7 (Isopropylidene acetone) 102 Methacrylic acid 79-41-4 (2-Methylpropanoic acid) (Methacrylic acid 2,3-epoxypropylester) see Glycidyl methacrylate 431 Methacrylonitrile 126-98-7 (2-Methylpropennitrile) (2-Methallyl chloride) see 3-Chloro-2-methylpropene 291 Methane 74-82-8 504 Methanesulfonic acid 75-75-2 504 Methanesulfonic acid 75-75-2 (Methylsulfonic acid) (2-Methallyl chloride) see 3-Chloro-2-methylpropene

Risk Code

Special Notes

TC T Tx C T X

Skin Skin

Cx X

Caution

T Sensiti zation

V XC C

39

Class # 504

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

CAS #

Methane sulfonyl chloride 124-63-0 (Methanoic acid) see Formic acid 311 Methanol (Methyl alcohol) 67-56-1 233 Methomyl (Lannate) 16752-77-5 (2-Methoxyethanol) see Methyl glycol (2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethanol) see Methyldiglycol (2-Methoxyethyl acetate) see Methyl glycol acetate 222/245 1-Methoxy-2-propylacetate 108-65-6 (Propylene glycol monomethyether acetate) 391 4-Methoxy-4-methyl-2-pentanone 107-70-0 245 1-Methoxy-2-propanol (Propylene 107-98-2 glycol monomethyl ether) 222 Methyl acetate 79-20-9 223 Methyl acrylate (Methylpropenoate) 96-33-3 (Methyl alcohol) see Methanol 102 Methylacrylic acid (2-Methyl79-41-4 propenoic acid) (Methyl allyl chloride) see Dimethylvinyl chloride

Risk Code

Special Notes

Class #

T Cx

Caution

141

T T

Skin

X

Caution

X V Xi X C

Skin

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

CAS #

Methylamine (Monomethylamine) 74-89-5 (2-(Methylamino)ethanol) see N-Methylethanolamine 148 3-Methylaminopropylamine 6291-84-5 (Methyl amyl ketone) see Methyl pentyl ketone (Methylbenzene) see Toluene 261 Methyl bromide (Bromomethane) 74-83-9 (2-Methyl-1,3-butadiene) see Isoprene (3-Methyl-1-butanol) see Isopentyl alcohol (3-Methylbutylnitrite) see Isopentylnitrite (3-Methylbutyraldehyde) see Isovaleraldehyde (Methyl carbitol®) see Methyldiglycol (Methyl cellosolve) see Methyl glycol (Methyl cellosolve acetate) see Methyl glycol acetate 261 Methyl chloride (Chloromethane) 74-87-3 224/261 Methyl chloroacetate 96-34-4 (Methyl chloroform) see 1,1,1-Trichloroethane

Risk Code

Special Notes

Xi

Caution

X

TC

Skin

X T

Skin

40

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

113

Methylchloroformate (2-Methyl-1-chloropropene) see Dimethylvinyl chloride (Methyl cyanide) see Acetonitrile 480 Methyldichlorosilane 245 Methyldiglycol (Diethylene glycol monomethyl ether or Methyl carbitol®) (Methyl disulfide) see Dimethyl disulfide 145/149 4,4⬘-Methylene bis (2-chloroaniline) (MOCA) 212 Methylene bisphenyl4,4⬘-diisocyanate (MDI) 261 Methylene bromide (Dibromomethane) 261 Methylene chloride (Dichloromethane) 145/149 4,4⬘-Methylenedianiline

(MDA or p,p⬘-Diaminodiphenylmethane)

CAS #

Risk Code

79-22-1

T

75-54-7 111-77-3

C X

101-14-4

Tx

101-68-8 74-95-3

X Sensitization X

75-09-02

X

101-77-9

T Sensitization Cancer

Special Notes

Skin

Skin

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

CAS #

Risk Code

142/311 N-Methylethanolamine 109-83-1 Xi (2-(Methylamino)ethanol) (Methyl ether) see Dimethyl ether (2-Methylethanol acetate) see Methyl glycol acetate (1-Methylethyl benzene) see Cumene 150 Methyl ethyl ketoxime 96-29-7 X Sensiti(2-Butanone exime) zation 391 Methyl ethyl ketone 78-93-3 V (2-Butanone or MEK) 242 Methyl eugenol (Methyleugenyl ether) 93-15-2 261 Methyl fluoride 593-33-3 431 Methylglutaronitrile, ⬎70% 4553-62-2 X (2-Methyl-1,5-valerodinitrile) 245 Methyl glycol (2-Methoxyethanol) 109-86-4 T Genetic 222/245 Methyl glycol acetate 110-49-6 T Genetic (2-Methylethanol acetate ) 391 5-Methyl-2-hexanone 110-12-3 Xi (Methyl isopentyl ketone) 280 Methylhydrazine 60-34-4 T 261 Methyl iodide (Iodomethane) 74-88-4 T Cancer 391 Methyl isobutyl ketone 108-10-1 X (4-Methyl-2-pentanone or MIBK)

Special Notes

Skin Skin

Skin Skin

41

Special Notes

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

211

Methyl isocyanate (MIC) 624-83-9 Tx Skin (Methyl isopentyl ketone) see 5-Methyl-2-hexanone (2-Methyllactonitrile) see Acetone cyanohydrin Methyl mercaptan (Methane thiol) 74-93-1 X N-Methylmethacrylamide 3887-02-3 Methyl methacrylate (Methyl 80-62-6 Xi Sensiti2-methylpropenoate) zation (Methyl 2-methyl-2-butyl ether) see tert-Amyl methyl ether Methylnadic anhydride 25134-21-8 Xi (Methyl-5-norbornene2,3-decarboxylic anhydride or Nadic methyl anhydride) Methyl parathion, 30–70% 298-00-0 T Skin 2-Methylpentamethylenediamine 15520-10-2 T C Cancer (1,5-Diamino-2-methylpentane) (4-Methyl-2-pentanone) see Methyl isobutyl ketone Methyl pentyl ketone 110-43-0 X (2-Heptanone) (2-Methyl-1-phenylpropane) see Isobutylbenzene

501 135 223

161

462 141

391

CAS #

Risk Code

Class #

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

CAS #

(2-Methylpropane) see Isobutane (2-Methylpropenoic acid) see Methyl acrylic acid (Methylpropenoate) see Methyl acrylate (2-Methylpropylamine) see Isobutylamine (Methylpyridine) see beta-Picoline 132/391 N-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) 872-50-4 226 Methyl salicylate 119-36-8 292 alpha-Methylstyrene 98-83-9 (Methyl sulfate) see Dimethyl sulphate (Methyl sulfide) see Dimethylsulfide (Methylsulfonic acid) see Methanesulfonic acid (Methyl sulfoxide) see Dimethyl sulfoxide (Methyl tert-amyl ether) see tert-Amyl methyl ether 241 Methyl tert-butyl ether 1634-04-4 (tert-Butyl methyl ether or MTBE) (Methyl propyl ketone) see 2-Pentanone 480 Methyl trichlorosilane (Trichloro methylsilane) 75-79-6

Risk Code

Special Notes

Xi Xi Xi

Xi

Xi

42

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

245

Methyltriglycol (Triethylene glycol 112-35-6 monomethyl ether) (2-Methyl-1,5-valerodinitrile) see Methylglutaronitrile Methyl vinyl ether 107-25-5 (Methoxyethylene) Methyl vinyl ketone (3-butene-one) 78-94-4 (MIBK) see Methyl isobutyl ketone (MIC) see Methyl isocyanate (Mineral Spirit) see Naphtha, 15–20% (MOCA) see 4,4⬘-Methylene bis (2-chloroaniline) (Monobutylamine) see n-Butylamine (Monochloroacetic acid) see Chloroacetic acid (Monochlorobenzene) see Chlorobenzene (Monoethanolamine) see Ethanolamine (Monoethylamine) see Ethylamine (Monoisopropanolamine) see Isopropanolamine (Monoisopropylamine) see Isopropylamine (Monomethylamine) see Methylamine Morpholine (Tetrahydro110-91-8 1,4-oxazine)

246 391

142

CAS #

Risk Code

Special Notes

X

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

CAS #

(Muriatic acid) see Hydrochloric acid, 37% 502/600 Mustard gas (Bis(2505-60-2 chloroethyl)sulfide) (Nadic methyl anhydride) see Methylnadic anhydride 462 Naled® (Bromochlophos) 300-76-5 291 Naphtha, ⬍3% aromatics, 64741-65-7 150–200 °C 291 Naphtha, 10–15% aromatics, 8030-30-6 120–140 ⬚C (Naphtha V.M.&P) 291 Naphtha, 15–20% aromatics, 8052-41-3 150–200 ⬚C (Mineral spirits) (Naphtha, 15–20% aromatics, 8008-20-6 180–260 ⬚C) see Kerosene 293 Naphthalene 91-20-3 (Naphthol methyl carbamate) see Sevin 50W (Naphthyl chloride) see 1-Chloronaphthalene (Nerve gas) see Sarin, Soman, Tabun, or VX 470 Nickel carbonyl 13463-39-3

V Tx

C Xi

Class #

Skin

Risk Code

Special Notes

Tx

Caution

T X

Skin

X

X

X

TX Cancer

(Nickel tetracarbonyl)

43

Class # 380 271 370 370 370 370 350 441

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

CAS #

Risk Code

Nickel subsulfide 11113-75-0 T Cancer Nicotine 54-11-5 Tx Nitric acid, red fuming 8007-58-7 Cx Nitric acid, ⬎70% 7697-37-2 Cx Nitric acid, 30–70% 7697-37-2 Cx Nitric acid, ⬍30% 7697-37-2 C Nitric oxide (Nitrogen monoxide) 10102-43-9 T Nitrobenzene 98-95-3 T (o-Nitrochlorobenzene) 2-Chloronitrobenzene (p-Nitrochlorobenzene) 4-Chloronitrobenzene 146/442 4-Nitrodiphenylamine 836-30-6 (p-Nitrodephenylamine) 441 Nitroethane 79-24-3 X 350 Nitrogen dioxide 10102-44-0 Tx (Nitrogen monoxide) see Nitric oxide 350 Nitrogen tetroxide 10544-72-6 Tx 350 Nitrogen trifluoride 7783-54-2 (Nitrogen fluoride) 442/510 Nitroglycerol (Nitroglycerin) 55-63-0 442/510 Nitroglycol 628-96-6 441 Nitromethane 75-52-5 X 441 1-Nitropropane 108-03-2 X

Special Notes Caution Skin Caution Caution Caution

Skin

441 450

2-Nitropropane 79-46-9 T Cancer N-Nitrosodiethylamine 55-18-5 X (N,N-Diethylnitrosamine) N-Nitrosodimethylamine 62-75-9 Tx Cancer Skin (N,N-Dimethylnitrosamine) 2-Nitrotoluene (o-Nitrotoluene) 88-72-2 T Skin 4-Nitrotoluene (p-Nitrotoluene) 99-99-0 T Nitrous oxide (Laughing gas) 10024-97-2 Nonylamine 112-20-9 Nonylphenol 25154-52-3 TC n-Octane 111-65-9 V (Octanoic acid) see Caprylic acid n-Octanol (Octyl alcohol) 29063-28-3 X Oleic acid 112-80-1 Xi (Oleum) see Sulfuric acid, fuming 133-06-2 Orthocid 83® (Captan) Oxalic acid 144-62-7 X Caution 4,4⬘-Oxidianiline 101-80-4 X (Oxirane) see Ethylene oxide Palmitic acid 57-10-3 Xi Caution (p-Bromofluorobenzene) see 1-Bromo-4-fluorobenzene (Parathion) see Ethyl parathion (PCB) see Polychlorinated biphenyls

441 441 350 141 316 291 311 102

Caution

501 104 145 102

Skin Caution

Special Notes

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

450

CAS #

Risk Code

Class #

44

Special Notes

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

316 291

Pentachlorophenol 87-86-5 Tx Skin n-Pentane 109-66-0 X (1,5-Pentanedial) see Glutaraldehyde 2,4-Pentanedione (Acetylacetone) 123-54-6 X (1-Pentanonitrile) see Valeronitrile n-Pentanol (Pentyl alcohol 71-41-0 X or Amyl alcohol) 2-Pentanone (Methyl propyl ketone) 107-87-9 X Caution n-Pentene (Pentene or 1-Pentene) 109-67-1 2-Pentenenitrile 13284-42-9 T 3-Pentenenitrile 4635-87-4 T n-Pentyl acetate (Amyl acetate) 628-63-7 V (Pentyl alcohol) see n-Pentanol n-Pentylamine (n-Amylamine) 110-58-7 CX Caution Pentyltrichlorosilane l07-72-2 (Trichloropentylsilane) Perchloric acid, 30–70% 7601-90-3 Cx Caution (Perchlorobutadiene) see Hexachloro-1,3-butadiene Perchloroethylene 127-18-4 X Cancer (Tetrachloroethylene) (Perchloromethane) see Carbon tetrachloride

391 311 391 294 431 431 222 141 480 370

263

CAS #

Risk Code

Class #

Class #

300 291

316 316 504 431 315 501

350 350 370 360 360 360

Chemical Names (and Synonyms) (Perfluoroacetic acid) see Trifluoroacetic acid (Permethrin) see Ambush® Peroxyacetic acid Petroleum ethers, 80–110 ⬚C (Petroleum ethers ⬍1% aromatics) Phenol, ⬎70% (Carbolic acid) Phenolphthalein Phenolsulfonic acid (Hydroxybenzenesulfonic acid) Phenylacetonitrile (Benzyl nitrile) (Phenylamine) see Aniline 1-Phenyl ethyl alcohol Phenyl mercaptan (Thiophenol) (Phenyl cyanide) see Benzyl alcohol Phosgene (Carbonyl chloride) Phosphine (Hydrogen phosphide) Phosphoric acid, ⬎70% Phosphorus oxychloride (Phosphoryl chloride) Phosphorus tribromide Phosphorus trichloride

CAS #

Risk Code

Special Notes

79-21-0 8032-32-4

C X

108-95-2 77-09-8 1333-39-7

TC X Xi

140-29-4

T

98-85-1 108-98-5

X Tx C

Caution Caution

75-44-5 7803-51-2 7664-38-2 10025-87-3

Tx Tx C Cx

Caution Caution

7789-60-8 7719-12-2

C Cx

Caution

Skin

45

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

(Phosphoryl chloride) see Phosphorus oxychloride 161 Phthalic acid anhydride (Phthalic acid diethylester) see Diethylphthalate 271 alpha-Picolin (2-Picoline or 2-Methylpyridine) 271 beta-Picoline (3-Picoline or 3-Methylpyridine) 316/442 Picric acid (2,4,6-Trinitrophenol) 148/274 Piperazine (Diethylenediamine) 142/274 264 314 212 340 340 345 340 380 340

Piperidine (Hexahydropyridine) Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) Polyethylene glycol Polymethylene polyphenyl isocyanate Potassium acetate, sat. Potassium chromate, sat. Potassium cyanide Potassium fluoride, 30–70% Potassium hydroxide, 30–70% Potassium iodide

CAS #

Risk Code

85-44-9

Xi

109-06-8

X

108-99-6

X

88-89-1 110-85-0 110-89-4 1336-36-3 25322-68-3 9016-87-9

Special Notes

Caution

T Skin C Sensitization TC Caution X Skin

127-08-2 Xi 7789-00-6 Xi 151-50-8 Tx 7789-23-3 Tx Cancer 1310-58-3 C 7681-11-0 X Sensitization

Caution Caution Caution Caution

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

CAS #

Risk Code

Special Notes

340 Potassium permanganate, sat. 7722-64-7 X Caution 274 Pramitol 1610-18-0 143/550 Promethazine hydrochloride 58-33-3 X (Propanal) see Propionaldehyde 291 Propane 74-98-6 148 1,3-Propanediamine 109-76-2 C (1,3-Diaminopropane) (1,2-Propanediol) see Propylene glycol 311 n-Propanol (n-Propyl alcohol) 71-23-8 X Skin (2-Propanol) see Isopropanol (2-Propanone) see Acetone (2-Propenal) see Acrolein (2-Propeneamide) see Acrylamide (Propenenitrile) see Acrylonitrile (2-Propenoic Acid) see Acrylic acid (2-Propenol) see Allyl alcohol 225 beta-Propiolactone 57-57-8 Tx Cancer Caution 121 Propionaldehyde (Propanal) 123-38-6 Xi 102 Propionic acid 79-09-4 C 431 Propionitrile (Ethyl cyanide) 107-12-0 T Caution 392 Propiophenone (Ethyl phenyl ketone) 93-53-0 245 1-Propoxy-2-propanol 1569-01-3 (Propylene glycol monopropyl ether)

46

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

222

Propyl acetate 109-60-4 (n-Propyl alcohol) see n-Propanol n-Propylamine (Monopropylamine) 107-10-8 (Propyl bromide) see Bromopropane (Propyl chloride) see 1-Chloropropane Propyldiglycol (Diethylene glycol 6881-94-3 monopropyl ether) Propylenediamine (1,2-Diaminopropane) 78-90-0 (Propylene dichloride) see 1,2-Dichloropropane Propylene glycol (1,2-Propanediol) 57-55-6 (Propylene glycol moneobutyl ether) see 1-Butoxy-2-propanol (Propylene glycol monoethyl ether) see 1-Ethoxy-2-propanol (Propylene glycol monomethyl ether) see 1-Methoxy-2-propanol (Propylene glycol monopropyl ether) see 1-Propoxy-2-propanol (Propylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate) see 1-Methoxy2-propyl acetate

141

245 148

314

CAS #

Risk Code Xi Xi

Special Notes

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

275

1,2-Propylene oxide

C

V

75-56-9

(1,2-Epoxypropane) Propyl glycol (Ethylene glycol 2807-30-9 monopropyl ether) 223 Propyl methacrylate (Propyl 2210-28-8 2-methylpropenoate) 133 Propyzamide, ⬍30% (Kerb 50®) 23950-58-5 (Pseudocumene) 1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene 271 Pyridine (Azine) 110-86-1 (Pyridine borane) see Borane pyridine complex 274 Pyrrolidine (Tetramethyleneimine) 123-75-1 (Quicksilver) see Mercury 274 Quinoline 91-22-5 (Quinone) see p-Benzoquinone (Reglone®) see Diquat dibromide 462 Round Up® (Glyphosate) 1071-83-6 600 Sarin (CW Agent GB or Nerve gas) 107-44-8 233 Sevin 50W (Carbaryl) 63-25-2 590 Shale oil 68308-34-9 590 Silicon etch 360/480 Silicon tetrachloride 10026-04-7 480 Silane (Silicon tetrahydride) 7803-62-5 245

X

CAS #

Risk Code

Special Notes

T Cancer Genetic X

X X

C X

X Tx T

Xi X

Caution Caution

Caution

47

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

480

Silicon tetrachloride (Tetrachlorosilane) Silver cyanide, ⬍30% Skydrol hydraulic fluids Sodium carbonate Sodium chloride, sat. Sodium cyanide, solid Sodium cyanide, ⬎70% Sodium cyanide, ⬍30% Sodium dichromate, ⬍30%

345 590 340 340 345 345 345 340

340 340 380 380 340

(Sodium dimethylbenzene sulfonate) see Xylenesulphonic acid sodium salt Sodium fluoride, sat. Sodium hydrogen sulfide Sodium hydroxide, 30–70% (Caustic soda) Sodium hydroxide, ⬎70% (Caustic soda) Sodium hypochlorite, 30–70%

CAS #

Risk Code

Special Notes

10026-04-7

Xi

Caution

506-64-9 X 497-19-8 Xi 7647-14-5 143-33-9 Tx C 143-33-9 Tx C 143-33-9 Tx C 10588-01-9 Xi Sensitization Cancer

Caution

Caution Caution Caution

7681-49-4 16721-80-5 1310-73-2

T C Cx

Caution

1310-73-2

Cx

Caution

7681-52-9

C

Caution

Caution

Class # 550 340

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

Sodium methylate, 30–70% Sodium thiosulfate (Sodium hyposulfite) 600 Soman (CW Agent GD) 291/590 Stoddard solvent 292 Styrene (Vinylbenzene) 233 Sulfallate (2-Chloro-2-propenyl diethyldithiocarbamate) 502 Sulfur dichloride 350 Sulfur dioxide 509 Sulfur hexafluoride (Sulfur fluoride) 370 Sulfuric acid, fuming (Oleum) 370 Sulfuric acid, ⬎70% 370 Sulfuric acid, 30–70% 370 Sulfuric acid, ⬍30% 502 Sulfur monochloride 502/600 Sulfur mustard (CW Agent HD) 365 Sulfur trioxide 360 Sulfuryl chloride 600 Tabun (CW Agent GA)

Risk Code

Special Notes

124-41-4 7772-98-7

Tx

Caution

99-64-0 8052-41-3 100-42-5 95-06-7

Tx X X

Caution

10545-99-0 7446-09-5 2551-62-4

C T

8014-95-7

T Cx

Caution

7664-93-9 7664-93-9 7664-93-9 10025-67-9 505-60-2

Cx Cx C T Cx Tx

Caution Caution

7446-11-9 7791-25-5 77-81-6

Cx C Tx

Caution Caution Caution

CAS #

Skin

Caution Caution

Caution Caution

48

Special Notes

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

316

Tannic acid 1401-55-4 T C Cancer (Tear gas) see 2-Chloroacetophenone 1,2,4,5-Tetrachlorobenzene 95-94-3 X (TBP) see Tributyl phosphate (TBTO) see Tributyltin oxide (TCP) see Tricresyl phosphate (TDI) see Toluene-2,4-diisocyanate (TEA) see Triethanolamine (TED) see Triethylenediamine (TEL) see Tetraethyl lead (TETA) see Triethylenetetraamine 1,1,2,2-Tetrabromoethane 79-27-6 X Caution (Acetylenetetrabromide) 1,1,1,2-Tetrachloroethane 630-20-6 T 1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane 79-34-5 T Skin (Tetrachloroethylene) see Perchloroethylene (Tetrachloromethane) see Carbon tetrachloride (Tetrachlorosilane) see Silicon tetrachloride Tetraethoxysilane (Tetraethyl 78-10-4 X Caution orthosilicate)

264

261 261 261

480

CAS #

Risk Code

Class #

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

148

Tetraethylenepentamine

470 261 263 370

CAS # 112-57-2

Tetraethyl lead (TEL) 78-00-2 1,1,1,2-Tetrafluoroethane (R-134a) 811-97-2 Tetrafluorethylene 116-14-3 Tetrafluoroboric acid, 30–70% 16872-11-0 (Fluoroboric acid) 241/277 Tetrahydrofuran (THF) 109-99-9 (Tetrahydro-1,4-oxazine) see Morpholine 391 beta-Tetralone 529-34-0 550 Tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide 75-59-2 148 N,N,N⬘,N⬘-Tetramethylenediamine 110-18-9 (TMEDA) (THF) see Tetrahydrofuran 137 Thiocarbamide, ⬍30% (Isothiourea) 62-56-6 (Thioglycolic acid) see Mercaptoacetic acid 501 Thionyl chloride 7719-09-7 279/502 Thiophene (Thiofuran) 110-02-1 (Thiophenol) see Phenyl mercaptan (Thiourea) see Thiocarbamide 360 Titanium tetrachloride 7550-45-0

Risk Code

Special Notes

X Sensitization

Xi C

Caution

Xi

T Xi Xi

Caution

X

C X

C

49

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

CAS #

Risk Code

Special Notes

(TMEDA) see N,N,N⬘,N⬘Tetramethylene diamine (TMPTA) see Trimethylolpropane triacrylate 292 Toluene (Methylbenzene) 108-88-3 X Skin 212 Toluenediisocyanate, mixed 26471-62-5 X Caution isomers 212 Toluene-2,4-diisocyanate 584-84-9 Tx Sensi(2,4-Diisocyanate toluene or TDI) tization 504 p-Toluenesulfonic acid 104-15-4 XC 145 m-Toluidine (3-Methylaniline) 108-44-1 T Cancer 145 o-Toluidine (2-Methyliniline) 95-53-4 T Cancer Skin 146/442 Treflan EC (Trifluralin) 1582-09-8 X 143 Triallylamine 102-70-5 Xi 261 Tribromomethane (Bromoform) 75-25-2 T Skin 316 2,4,6-Tribromophenol 118-79-6 X (2,4,6-Tribromohydroxybenzene) 462 Tributyl phosphate (TBP) 126-73-8 X Caution 470 Tributyltin oxide 56-35-9 T (Bis(tributyltin)oxide) 121/261 Trichloroacetaldehyde (Chloral) 95-87-6 T Xi 103/261 Trichloroacetic acid 76-03-9 Cx Caution

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

CAS #

261/431 Trichloroacetonitrile 545-06-2 (Trichloromethyl cyanide) 264 1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene 120-82-1 (Trichloroepoxypropane) see Epoxy trichloropropane 261 1,1,1-Trichloroethane 71-55-6 (Methyl chloroform) 261 1,1,2-Trichloroethane 79-00-5 (Chlorothene V6) 261/315 2,2,2-Trichloroethanol 115-20-8 (Trichloroethene) see Trichloroethylene 263 Trichloroethylene (Trichloroethene) 79-01-6

261

(Trichloromethane) see Chloroform (p-Trichloromethylchlorobenzene) see 4-Chlorobenzotrichloride (Trichloromethylsilane) see Methyl trichlorosilane (Trichloronitromethane) see Chloropicrin (Trichloropentylsilane) see Pentyltrichlorosilane 1,2,3-Trichloropropane

96-18-4

Risk Code

Special Notes

T X

X X

Skin

T T Cancer Genetic

X

Skin

50

Class # 480

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

CAS #

Risk Code

Special Notes

Trichlorosilane 10025-78-2 Cx Caution (alpha,alpha,alpha-Trichlorotoluene) see Benzyl trichloride (1,1,2-Trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane) see Freon 113 TF (Trichlorovinlylsilane) see Vinlyltrichlorosilane 462 Tricresyl phosphate (Tritolyl 95-95-4 T phosphate or TCP) 143/311 Triethanolamine (TEA) 102-71-6 Xi 480 Triethoxysilane 998-30-1 X 143 Triethylamine 121-44-8 CX Caution 143 Triethylenediamine (TED) 280-57-9 CX (Triethylene glycol monobutyl ether) see Butyltriglycol (Triethylene glycol monoethyl ether) see Ethyltriglycol (Triethylene glycol monomethyl ether) see Methyltriglycol 148 Triethylenetetraamine (TETA) 112-24-3 X Sensitization 103/261 Trifluoroacetic acid 76-05-1 C Caution (Perfluoroacetic acid) 111/261 Trifluoroacetylchloride 354-32-5 C

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

261/315 2,2,2-Trifluorethanol 261 Trifluoromethane (Carbon trifluoride) 504 Trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (Trifluralin) see Treflan EC 143 Trimethylamine 292 1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene (Pseudocumene) 223 Trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA) 462 Trimethyl phosphate (Trimethylchlorosilane) see Chlorotrimethylsilane (2,4,6-Trinitrophenol) see Picric acid 462 Triphenylphosphite 460 Trimethylphosphite 143 Tri-n-propylamine (Tripropylamine) 223 Tripropylene glycol diacrylate 462 Tris(1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (Tritolyl phosphate) see Tricresyl phosphate

CAS #

Risk Code

Special Notes

75-89-8 75-46-7

X

1493-13-6

Cx

Caution

75-50-3 95-63-6

CX Xi

Caution

15625-89-5 121-45-9

X

101-02-0 Xi 121-45-9 T C Genetic 102-69-2 CX Caution 42978-66-5 126-72-7

51

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

360

Tungsten hexafluoride (Tungsten fluoride) Turpentine

294 431 222 263 263

294 263 470 263 263

Valeronitrile (1-Pentanonitrile) Vinyl acetate (Vinylbenzene) see Styrene Vinyl bromide Vinyl chloride (Chloroethene) (Vinyl cyanide) see Acrylonitrile (VCN) see Acrylonitrile 4-Vinyl-1-cyclohexane Vinyl fluoride Vinylmagnesium chloride, ⬍30% Vinylidene chloride (1,1-Dichloroethylene) Vinylidene fluoride (1,1-Difluoroethylene)

CAS # 7783-82-6

Risk Code

Special Notes

T Cancer Caution

8006-64-2 X Sensitization 110-59-8 T 108-05-4 V Caution

Class #

Chemical Names (and Synonyms)

132

N-Vinylpyrrolidone (1-Vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) (Vinylstyrene) see Divinyl benzene Vinyltrichlorosilane (Trichlorovinylsilane) VX (CW Agent VX) Water Witch hazel (Tobacco wood) (Wood creosote) see Creosote Xylene (Dimethyl benzene) Xylenesulphonic acid sodium salt, 30–70% (Sodium dimethylbenzene sulfonate) Xylenol (Dimethyl phenol) (Xylol) see Xylene

480

593-60-2 75-01-4

T Cancer Caution T Cancer Caution

600 590 590

100-40-3 75-02-5 3536-96-7 75-35-4

T Cancer

292 550

75-38-7

X

C X 316

CAS #

Risk Code

Special Notes

88-12-0

X

75-94-5

C

50782-69-9 7732-18-5 68916-39-2

Tx

Caution

1330-20-7 1300-72-7

X Xi

Caution

1300-71-6

TC

52

SECTION IV

Selection Recommendations Barriers This section contains the color-coded recommendations for protective barriers. Sixteen protective barriers are contained in the data tables. They represent materials that are used in the construction of gloves, boots, suits, and other items of protective clothing. The table below shows their principal uses as chemically resistant barriers (listed in the same order as in the colorcoded recommendations). See also Section VII—Manufacturers of Chemical Protective Clothing for contact information and description of barrier material.

Barrier Butyl rubber Natural rubber Neoprene rubber Nitrile rubber Polyethylene—PE Polyvinyl alcohol—PVAL Polyvinyl chloride—PVC Viton® 3 Viton®/Butyl rubber Barrier (PE/PA/PE)5

Common Uses1 Gloves, boots, suits Gloves Gloves, boots, suits Gloves and boots Coveralls, gloves2 Gloves Gloves, boots, suits Gloves and suits Suits4 Gloves

53

Silver Shield®/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)5 Responder® Trellchem® HPS Tychem® BR/LV Tychem® SL6 Tychem® TK

Gloves, aprons, booties, sleeves, Suits Suits Suits Coveralls and suits Suits

Viton® is registered trademark of DuPont Dow Elastomers. Responder®, Tychem® and Tyvek® are registered trademarks of E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company. Silver Shield®/4H® are registered trademarks of the North Company. Trellchem® is registered trademark of the Trelleborg AB. Saranex® is registered trademark of the Dow Chemical Company. 1 Most common applications in protective clothing. In some cases, this may represent a film or coating over another substrate, such as coated polyester, polyamide, or spun-bonded olefin fabrics. 2 Limited availability in gloves and aprons. Most of the PE recommendations are based on DuPont Tychem® QC test reports. 3 Some clothing manufacturers call this barrier material fluoroelastomer or FKM. 4 Viton/Butyl recommendations are from tests of a Viton/Butyl–laminate coated on polyester or polyamide fabrics. Draeger, Respirex, and Trelleborg manufacture Viton/Butyl suits.

5 Ansell Barrier and North Silver Shield®/4Hglove® are laminates of low polar/high polar/low polar plastics films, where PA ⫽ Polyamide, EVAL ⫽ Ethylene Vinyl Alcohol, and PE ⫽ Polyethylene. 6 Saranex® coated on Tyvek®.

Color Codes The tables contain fields with one of four color codes. These color codes are green, yellow, red, and white. The tables also contain three symbols. The greater than eight (>8) symbol means a greater than 8-hour resistance to breakthrough was reported. Some green fields have the letter E in them. This indicates a material that has been estimated to provide at least 4 four hours of protection. Finally, greater than 3 (>3) hours and greater than 12 (>12) hours are from CW Agents test reports based on MIL-STD-282 and greater than 1 (>1) hour based on NFPA 1991 standards. An explanation of what each specific color code means follows: Green fields in the data tables represent reported resistance to breakthrough of greater than 4 hours under conditions of continuous 54

contact. A >8 symbol represents greater than 8 hours of resistance to breakthrough reported under continuous contact. The letter E means the material has been estimated (but not tested) to provide at least 4 hours of protection. This symbol has been used for suit materials with expected long-term protection, but only tested for 3.3 hours to meet a specific government testing requirement. Yellow fields in the data tables represent barriers with reported breakthrough detection times of between 1 and 4 hours. The permeation rates after breakthrough may vary from low to high. Yellow fields may also represent breakthrough resistance tests that have been conducted for less than the full 4 (or 8) hours. The performance of protective clothing barriers in this classification may be unsuitable for use, except for those situations where only short periods of use are needed and the chemicals represent minimal dermal hazards. For some of the CW Agents, a >1 symbol represents greater than 1 hour breakthrough resistance according to the NFPA CRDC-SP-84010, method 2.2. Red fields in the data tables represent barriers with reported breakthrough detection times of less than 1 hour. In some cases, the rapid breakthrough may be accompanied or caused by

degradation of the barrier. After rapid breakthrough, permeation rates are usually high. Barriers listed with red fields for resistance are not recommended. White fields in the data tables represent those materials for which test data were not available. No recommendations are made for these barriers. These barriers should be tested against the challenge chemical before considering them for use.

Important Notes and Warnings These data tables are based on published and unpublished results of permeation testing completed by other researchers using ASTM, ISO, or other standard methods. At least 90% of these tests are generated in accordance to the ASTM standards. Most of the data shown for generic barriers are a summary of the results from more than one test report. Not all of the commercially available materials or barriers used for protective clothing are included in this guide. For performance data on products not listed in this guide or for the most recent data, the vendors of the products should be consulted. In addition, 55

specific products or newer formulations of the reported products or barriers may perform differently than reported in this guide. Always check with the manufacturer for the latest test results. Most of the data are from the manufacturer. Finally, it is important to remember that breakthrough resistance is only one of many factors to consider in the selection of protective clothing. See Section II on selection and use for some of the other important factors.

The Chemical Protective Clothing Performance Index by Krister Forsberg & Lawrence H. Keith, 2nd edition (1999); John Wiley & Sons, Inc. includes more than 10,500 reported chemical permeation test with more than 350 models of chemical protective clothing. In addition, there are more than 3,000 chemical degradation test reported. The selection recommendations are based on these data plus many new data compiled since the Index Book was published.

56

>8 >8

>8

Tychem® TK

>8

>8

>8

>8

8

>8

>8

>8

>8

Tychem® SL

>8

Tychem® BR/LV

>8

Trellchem® HPS

>8

>8

>8

>8

Responder®

>8

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

>8

>8

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Viton®

>8

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Acids Carboxylic, Aliphathic and Alicyclic, Unsubstituted Acetic acid Acrylic acid Butyric acid Caprylic acid 2-Ethylhexanoic acid Formic acid Formic acid, >70% Lauric acid, 30–70% Methacrylic acid Oleic acid Palmitic acid Propionic acid

Natural Rubber

102

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

57

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Acids Carboxylic, Aliphathic and Alicyclic, Substituted 3-Bromopropionic acid Chloroacetic acid 2-(4-Chloro-2-methylphenoxy)propionicacid 4-Chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid 2-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy)propionic acid Glycolic acid, sat. Lactic acid Mercaptoacetic acid Trichloroacetic acid Trifluoroacetic acid 104 Acids Carboxylic, Aliphathic and Alicyclic, Polybasic Citric acid, 30–70%

Natural Rubber

103

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

58

Maleic acid Oxalic acid Oxalic acid, 8

>8

>8

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

8 >8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

>8

59

>8

>8

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Viton®/Butyl Rubber Barrier (PE/ PA/PE) Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

121 Aldehydes, Aliphathic and Alicyclic Acetaldehyde Acrolein Butyraldehyde Crotonaldehyde Decanal Formaldehyde, 30–70% Glutaraldehyde, 30–70% Glutaraldehyde, 8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8

>8

E

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8 >8

>8 >8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

>8

60

>8

>8

>8

>8

Tychem® SL

Tychem® TK

>8 >8

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

>8

Polyvinylchloride

>8

Polyvinylalcohol

>8

>8

Polyethylene (PE)

>8

>8

Nitrile Rubber

>8

Neoprene Rubber

132 Amides, Aliphatic and Alicyclic Diethylacetamide Dimethylacetamide Dimethylformamide N-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone N-Vinylpyrrolidone 133 Amides, Aromatic, Others Propyzamide, 4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

R

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

61

Tychem® BR/LV

Tychem® SL

Tychem® TK

>8

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Amines, Aliphatic and Alicyclic, Primary Allylamine 2-(2-Amino ethoxy)ethanol Benzylamine n-Butylamine sec-Butylamine tert-Butylamine Cyclohexylamine 1,3-Dimethylbutylamine Ethanolamine Ethylamine Ethylamine, 30–70% Isobutylamine Isopropanolamine Isopropylamine

Natural Rubber

141

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8 >8

>8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

62

>8

>8

Tychem® TK >8

>8

Tychem® SL

>8

>8

Tychem® BR/LV

>8

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

>8

Viton®/Butyl Rubber Barrier (PE/ PA/PE) Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Methylamine Methylamine, 30–70% Methylpentamethylenediamine Nonylamine n-Pentylamine n-Propylamine 142 Amines, Aliphatic and Alicyclic, Secondary Diallylamine Di-n-amylamine Di-n-butylamine Diethanolamine Diethylamine Diisobutylamine Diisopropylamine Dimethylamine

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8 >8 >8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

>8

63

>8

>8

>8

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

>8

Tychem® BR/LV

>8

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Viton®/Butyl Rubber Barrier (PE/PA/ PE) Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

2,6-Dimethylmorpholine Di-n-propylamine Ethyl-n-butylamine Ethyleneimine 1,1,1,3,3,3-Hexamethyldisilazane N-Methylethanolamine Morpholine Piperidine 143 Amines, Aliphatic and Alicyclic, Tertiary n-Benzyl dimethylamine 2-(Diethylamino)ethanol 2-(Dimethylamino)ethanol N,N-Dimethylcyclohexylamine N,N-Dimethylethylamine Promethazine hydrochloroide

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

64

Tychem® TK

>8

Tychem® SL

>8

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Viton®/Butyl Rubber Barrier (PE/PA/ PE) Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

>8

Responder®

Triallylamine Triethanolamine Triethanolamine, >70% Triethylamine Triethylenediamine Trimethylamine Tri-n-propylamine 145 Amines, Aromatic, Primary Aniline 4-Chloroaniline 3,4-Dichloroaniline N,N-Diethyl-m-toluidene, crude 4,4⬘-Methylene bis(2-chloroaniline) 4,4⬘-Methylenedianiline 4,4⬘-Oxidianiline

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8 >8

>8 >8

>8 >8

>8 >8

>8 >8 >8

>8

>8 >8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8 >8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

>8 >8

65

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

>8

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

>8

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Viton®

m-Toluidine o-Toluidine 146 Amines, Aromatic, Secondary and Tertiary N,N-Diethylaniline, crude N,N-Dimethylaniline 4-Nitrodiphenylamine Treflan EC 148 Amines, Aliphatic and Alicyclic, Polyamines 1-(2-Aminoethyl)piperazine Diethylenetriamine 3-(Dimethylamino)propylamine N,N-Dimethylpiperazine Ethylenediamine 1,6-Hexanediamine

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8 >8

>8 >8

>8 >8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

66

>8

>8

>8

Tychem® TK

>8

Tychem® SL

>8

Tychem® BR/LV

>8

>8

Trellchem® HPS

>8

>8

Responder®

>8

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

>8

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

>8

>8

Viton®

>8

>8

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Polyvinylchloride

>8

Polyvinylalcohol

Nitrile Rubber

Polyethylene (PE)

Neoprene Rubber

1,6-Hexanediamine, 30–70% 3,3⬘-Iminobis(propylamine) 3-Methylaminopropylamine Piperazine 1,3-Propanediamine Propylenediamine Tetraethylenepentamine N,N,N⬘,N⬘-Tetramethylethylenediamine Triethylenetetraamine 149 Amines, Aromatic Polyamines 4,4⬘-Methylene bis(2-chloroaniline) 4,4⬘-Methylenedianiline 150 Amines, Hydroxy and Ketoximes Methyl ethyl ketomix

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

>8

>8

67

Tychem® SL

Tychem® TK

>8

Tychem® BR/LV

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

>8

Trellchem® HPS

>8

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Anhydrides, Aliphatic and Alicyclic Acetic anhydride Maleic anhydride Methylnadic anhydride Phthalic acid anhydride 162 Anhydrides, Aromatic 3,3⬘,4,4⬘-Benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride 170 Azo/Azoxy Compounds C I Pigment Yellow 74 211 Isocyanates, Aliphatic and Alicyclic Hexamethylene-1,6-diisocyanate Isophorone diisocyanate Methyl isocyanate

Natural Rubber

161

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8 >8

>8 >8

>8

>8 >8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

>8

68

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

Tychem® BR/LV

Responder®

>8

Trellchem® HPS

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

>8

Tychem® TK

>8

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

>8

>8

Tychem® SL

>8

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

212 Isocyanates, Aromatic Methylene bisphenyl-4,4⬘-diisocyanate Polymethylene polyphenylisocyanate Toluenediisocyanate, mixed isomers Toluene-2,4-diisocyanate 222 Ester Carboxylic, Acetates Benzyl acetate n-Butyl acetate Butyl glycol acetate Ethyl acetate Ethyldiglycol acetate Ethyl glycol acetate Isopentyl acetate Isopropyl acetate Methyl acetate 1-Methoxy-2-propylacetate

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

69

Metyl glycol acetate n-Penyl acetate Propyl acetate Vinyl acetate 223 Ester Carboxylic, Acrylates and Methacrylates Allyl acrylate Butyl acrylate Ethyl acrylate 2-Ethylhexyl acrylate Ethyl methacrylate Glycerol propoxytriacrylate Glycidyl methacrylate 1,6-Hexanediol diacrylate 2-Hydroxyethyl acrylate

>8

>8 >8

>8

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

70

>8

>8

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

>8

Trellchem® HPS

>8

Responder®

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

>8 >8

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

>8 >8

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate Isobutyl acrylate Isopropyl methacrylate Methyl acrylate Methyl methacrylate Propyl methacrylate Trimethylolpropane triacrylate Tripropylene glycol diacrylate 224 Ester Carboxylic, Aliphatic, Others Ambush Benzyl neocaprate Cypermethrin Fusilade 250EC Glycerol monothioglycolate, >70% Methyl chloroacetate

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

>8

71

>8

>8

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

225 Ester Carboxylic, Lactones beta-Butyrolactone gamma-Butyrolactone beta-Propiolactone 226 Ester Carboxylic, Benzoates and Phthalates Butyl benzyl phthalate Di-n-butyl phthalate Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate Diethyl phthalate Diisooctyl phthalate Di-n-octyl phthalate Methyl salicylate 232 Esters Non-Carboxylic,Carbonates 1-Bromoethylethyl carbonate Diethyl carbonate

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

>8

72

>8 >8

>8

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Esters Non-Carboxylic, Carbamates and Others Methomyl®, 8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8 >8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8 >8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

73

>8 >8 >8

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

243 Ethers, Alkyl-Aryl 2-(4-Chloro-2-methylphenoxy) propionic acid 4-Chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid 2-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy)propionic acid 245 Ethers, Glycol Ethers 1-Butoxy-2-propanol Butyldiglycol Butyl glycol Butyl glycol acetate Butyltriglycol 1-Bromopropane 1-Ethoxy-2-propanol 2-Ethoxy-1-propanol 1-Ethoxy-2-propylacetate Ethylene glycol dimethyl ether

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8 >8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

74

Ethyldiglycol Ethyldiglycol acetate Ethyl glycol Ethyl glycol acetate Ethyltriglycol Hexyldiglycol Hexyl glycol 1-Methoxy-2-propanol 1-Methoxy-2-propylacetate Methyldiglycol Methyl glycol Metyl glycol acetate Methyltriglycol 1-Propoxy-2-propanol

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8 >8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

75

Propyldiglycol Propyl glycol 246 Ethers, Vinylic Ethyl vinyl ether Methyl vinyl ether 261 Halogen Compounds, Aliphatic and Alicyclic Bromoacetonitrile Bromochloromethane Bromodichloromethane 2-Bromoethanol 1-Bromopropane 1-Bromo-2-propanol 3-Bromo-1-propanol 3-Bromopropionic acid

>8

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8 >8 E

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

76

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

>8

Tychem® BR/LV

>8

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

n-Butylchloride Carbon tetrachloride Chlordane, >70% Chloroacetone Chloroacetonitrile 2-Chloroacrylenitrile Chloroethane 2-Chloroethanol Chloroform Chloromethyl methyl ether 2-chloro-2-nitropropane 1-Chloropropane 1-Chloro-2-propanol 3-Chloro-1-propanol Dibromochloromethane

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8 >8 >8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

77

1,3-Dichloroacetone Dichloroacetyl chloride 1,1-Dichloroethane 1,2-Dichloropropane 1,1-Dichlorotetrafluoroethane Epichlorohydrin Ethylbromide Ethylene dibromide Ethylene dichloride Freon 12 Freon 113 TF Freon TMC Halothane Hexafluoroethane Hexafluoroisobutylene

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8 >8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

78

Tychem® TK

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Tychem® SL

Methyl bromide Methyl chloroacetate Methyl chloride Methylene bromide Methylene chloride Methyl fluoride Methyl iodide 1,1,2,2-Tetrabromoethane 1,1,1,2-Tetrachloroethane 1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane 2,2,2-Trichloroethanol Tribromomethane Trichloroacetaldehyde Trichloroacetic acid Trichloroacetonitrile

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

79

>8

>8

>8

>8

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

>8

>8

Tychem® BR/LV

>8

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

>8

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

1,1,1-Trichloroethane 1,1,2-Trichloroethane 1,2,3-Trichloropropane Trifluoroacetic acid 2,2,2-Trifluoroethanol Trifluoromethane 263 Halogen Compounds, Vinylic Chloroprene cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene cis,trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene Dimethylvinyl chloroide Hexachloro-1,3-butadiene Perchloroethylene Tetrafluoroethylene

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

E >8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

80

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

Tychem® TK

>8

Tychem® SL

>8

Tychem® BR/LV

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

>8

Trellchem® HPS

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

>8

Responder®

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

>8

Viton®

Trichloroethylene Vinylbromide Vinyl chloroide Vinyl fluoride Vinylidene chloroide Vinylidene fluoride 264 Halogen Compounds, Aromatic Bromobenzene 1-Bromo-4-fluorobenzene Chlorobenzene 4-Chlorobenzotrichloride 4-Chlorobenzotrifluoride 1-Chloronaphthalene 2-Chloronitrobenzene 4-Chloronitrobenzene

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8 >8

>8

>8

E

>8

E

>8 >8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

81

p-Chlorophenol o-Chlorotoluene p-Chlorotoluene 3,4-Dichloroaniline 1,2-Dichlorobenzene 1,3-Dichlorobenzene 1,4-Dichlorobenzene Fluorobenzene Polychlorinated biphenyls 1,2,4,5-Tetrachlorobenzene 1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene 265 Halogen Compounds, Allylic Allyl bromide Allyl chloride 3-Chloro-2-methylpropene

>8

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8 >8 >8 >8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

E

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

82

1,3-Dichloro-2-butene 1,4-Dichloro-2-butene 2,3-Dichloro-1-propene 1,3-Dichloropropene Hexachlorocyclopentadiene 266 Halogen Compounds, Benzylic Benzotrichloride Benzyl bromide Benzyl chloride 271 Heterocyclic Compounds, Nitrogen, Pyridines Nicotine alpha-Picoline beta-Picoline Pyridine

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

>8

83

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Heterocyclic Compounds, Nitrogen, Others 1-(2-Aminoethyl)piperazine Benlate® N,N-Dimethylpiperazine Diquat dibromide Ethyleneimine Piperazine Piperidine Pyrrolidine Quinoline 275 Heterocyclic Compounds, Oxygen, Epoxides Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether 1,4-Butanediol diglycidyl ether Epibromohydrin

Natural Rubber

274

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

84

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

Tychem® TK

Tychem® BR/LV

E

Tychem® SL

Trellchem® HPS

>8

Responder®

>8

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

>8

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Epichlorohydrin 1,2-Epoxybutane Epoxytrichloropropane Ethylene oxide 1,2-Propylene oxide 277 Heterocyclic Compounds, Oxygen, Furans Furan Furfural Tetrahydrofuran 278 Heterocyclic Compounds, Oxygen, Others Dimethoxane 1,3-Dioxane 1,4-Dioxane

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

85

Tychem® BR/LV

>8

>8

Tychem® TK

Trellchem® HPS

>8

Tychem® SL

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

279 Heterocyclic Compounds, Sulfur Thiophene 280 Hydrazines 1,1-Dimethylhydrazine Hydrazine Hydrazine hydrate, >70% Methylhydrazine 291 Hydrocarbons, Aliphatic and Alicyclic, Saturated n-Butane Cyclohexane Cyclopentane Cyclopropane Diesel fuel Dodecane Ethane

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8 >8 >8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

86

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

Tychem® TK

>8

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

>8

Trellchem® HPS

>8

Responder®

>8

>8 >8

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Viton®

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

>8

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Neoprene Rubber

Nitrile Rubber >8

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Heptane n-Hexane Isobutane Isooctane Jet fuel, 8

>8 >8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

87

>8 >8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

Tychem® TK

>8

Tychem® SL

Responder®

>8

Tychem® BR/LV

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

>8 >8

Trellchem® HPS

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

>8

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

292 Hydrocarbons, Aromatic Benzene p-tert-Butyltoluene m-Cresol p-Cresol Cresols, isomeric mixture Cumene Diethylbenzene Divinylbenzene Ethylbenzene Gasoline, 40–55% aromatics Gasoline, unleaded Isobutylbenzene alpha-Methylstyrene Styrene Toluene

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8 >8 >8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8 >8 >8

>8 >8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

88

Tychem® TK

>8

Tychem® SL

>8

Tychem® BR/LV

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

>8

Trellchem® HPS

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

>8

Responder®

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Viton®

Triethylbenzene 1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene Xylene 293 Hydrocarbons, Aromatic Polynuclear Benzo(a)pyrene Naphthalene 294 Hydrocarbons, Aliphatic and Alicyclic, Unsaturated 1,3-Butadiene 2-Butene Crude oil 2,6-Dimethylmorpholine Ethylene 1-Hexene

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

89

Isoprene d,l-Limonene n-Pentene Turpentine 4-Vinyl-1-cyclohexane 300 Peroxides 2-Butanone peroxide tert-Butyl hydroperoxide tert-Butyl peroxybenzoate Cumene hydroperoxide Hydrogene peroxide, 30–70% Peroxyacetic acid 311 Hydroxyl Compounds, Aliphatic and Alicyclic, Primary Allyl alcohol

>8 >8

>8

>8

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

90

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

Tychem® TK

>8

Tychem® SL

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

Tychem® BR/LV

>8

Trellchem® HPS

>8

>8

Responder®

>8

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

>8 >8

Viton®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

>8

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

>8

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Benzyl alcohol n-Butanol 2-(2-Amino ethoxy)ethanol 2-(Diethylamino)ethanol 2-(Dimethylamino)ethanol Ethanol Ethanolamine 2-Ethyl-1-hexanol Furfuryl alcohol Isobutanol Isopentyl alcohol Mercaptoacetic acid Methanol N-Methylethanolamine n-Octanol

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8 >8

>8

>8 >8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8 >8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

91

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

>8

Responder®

>8

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

>8

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

>8

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

n-Pentanol n-Propanol Triethanolamine Triethanolamine, >70% 312 Hydroxyl Compounds, Aliphatic and Alicyclic, Secondary sec-Butanol Cyclohexanol Isopropanol Isopropanolamine 313 Hydroxyl Compounds, Aliphatic and Alicyclic, Tertiary tert-Butanol

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

92

Tychem® SL

Tychem® TK

>8

Tychem® BR/LV

>8

Trellchem® HPS

>8

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

>8

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Hydroxyl Compounds, Aliphatic and Alicyclic, Polyols 1,4-Butylene glycol Diethylene glycol Dipropylene glycol Ethylene glycol Glycerol Polyethylene glycol Propylene glycol 315 Hydroxyl Compounds, Aliphatic and Alicyclic, Substituted 2-Bromoethanol 1-Bromo-2-propanol 3-Bromo-1-propanol 2-Chloroethanol 1-Chloro-2-propanol

Natural Rubber

314

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

>8

93

3-Chloro-1-propanol 1-Phenyl ethyl alcohol 2,2,2-Trichloroethanol 2,2,2-Trifluoroethanol 316 Hydroxyl Compounds, Aromatic (Phenols) p-Chlorophenol Creosote m-Cresol p-Cresol Cresols, isomeric mixture Hydroquinone Nonylphenol Pentachlorophenol Phenol, >70%

>8

Tychem® TK

>8 >8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

94

>8

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

>8

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

>8

Viton®/Butyl Rubber Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber >8

Viton®

>8

Polyvinylchloride

Phenolphthalein Picric acid Tannic acid 2,4,6-Tribromophenol Wood creosote Xylenol 318 Hydroxyl Compounds, Aromatic, Others Ambush 330 Elements Bromine Chlorine, liquid Iodine, solid Mercury

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

>8

>8

95

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

>8

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

>8

>8

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

>8

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

>8

Viton®

>8

Polyvinylchloride

>8

Polyvinylalcohol

Nitrile Rubber

>8

Polyethylene (PE)

Neoprene Rubber

340 Inorganic Salts and Solutions Aluminium sulfate hydrate Ammonium acetate, sat. Ammonium carbonate, sat. Ammonium fluoride, 30–70% Ammonium nitrate Cadmium oxide, solid Calcium chloride, 30–70% Cobolt sulfate heptahydrate Ferric chloride Ferrous chloride Litium chloride, >30% Mercuric chloride, sat. Potassium acetate, sat. Potassium chromate, sat. Potassium iodide

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8 >8 >8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

96

Potassium fluoride, 30–70% Potassium permanganate Sodium carbonate Sodium chloride, sat. Sodium dichromate, 4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8 >8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

>8

97

Potassium cyanide, 8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

E >8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

>8 >8

>8

98

Hydrogen fluoride Hydrogen selenide Hydrogen sulfide Nitric oxide Nitrogen dioxide Nitrogen tetroxide Nitrogen trifluoride Nitrious oxide Phosgene Phosphine Sulfur dioxide Sulfur hexafluoride Tungsten hexafluoride 360 Inorganic Halides Antimony pentachloride

>8 E

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8 >8 >8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

>8 >8

>8

>8

99

Boron trichloride Boron trifluoride Boron trifluoride etherate Bromine trifluoride Chlorine trifluoride Phosphorus oxychloride Phosphorus tribromide Phosphorus trichloride Silicon tetrachloride Sulfur dichloride Sulfuryl chloride Titanium tetrachloride Tungsten hexafluoride 365 Inorganic Acid Oxides Sulfur trioxide

>8

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

100

>8

Tychem® TK

>8

Tychem® SL

>8

Tychem® BR/LV

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Trellchem® HPS

>8

>8

Responder®

>8

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

370 Inorganic Acids Aqua regia Boric acid Chlorosulfonic acid Chromic acid, 30–70% Chromium trioxide Fluorosilic acid Fluorosulfonic acid Hydriodic acid, 30–70% Hydrobromic acid Hydrochloric acid 37% Hydrochloric acid 70%

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8 >8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8 >8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

E

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

101

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

Tychem® TK

>8

Tychem® SL

>8

Tychem® BR/LV

>8

Trellchem® HPS

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

Responder®

>8

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

>8

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

>8

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

>8

>8

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

>8

Polyvinylalcohol

Nitrile Rubber

Polyethylene (PE)

Neoprene Rubber

Nitric acid, 30–70% Nitric acid, 70% Sulfuric acid fuming Sulfuric acid, >70% Sulfuric acid, 30–70% Sulfuric acid, 8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8 >8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

102

>8

Tychem® TK

Tychem® BR/LV

>8

Tychem® SL

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

>8

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

>8

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

>8

Neoprene Rubber

>8

Polyvinylchloride

Nickel subsulfide Potassium hydroxide, 30–70% Sodium hydroxide, sat. Sodium hydroxide, >70% Sodium hydroxide, 30–70% 391 Ketones, Aliphatic and Alicyclic Acetone Chloroacetone Cyclohexanone Cyclopentanone 1,3-Dichloroacetone Diisobutyl ketone Ethyl vinyl ketone 4-Hydroxy-4-methyl-2-pentanone beta-Ionone

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8 >8

>8 >8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8 >8

>8 >8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

103

>8

Tychem® TK

>8

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Trellchem® HPS

Isophorone Mesityloxide 4-Methoxy-4-methyl-2-pentanone Methylethyl ketone 5-Methyl-2-hexanone N-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone Methylisobutyl ketone Methyl pentyl ketone Metyl vinyl ketone 2,4-Pentanedione 2-Pentanone beta-Tetralone 392 Ketones, Aromatic Acetophenone

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8 >8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8 >8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8 >8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

104

Chloroacetophenone Propiophenone 410 Quinones p-Benzoquinone 431 Nitriles, Aliphatic and Alicyclic Acetone cyanohydrin Acetonitrile Acrylonitrile Adiponitrile Bromoacetonitrile Chloroacetonitrile 2-Chloroacrylenitrile Isobutyronitrile Methacrylonitrile 2-Methylglutaronitrilr, >70%

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

105

2-Pentenenitril, >70% 3-Pentenenitril Phenylacetonitrile Propionitrile Trichloroacetonitrile Valeronitrile 432 Nitriles, Aromatic Benzonitrile 441 Nitro Compounds, Unsubstituted 1-Bromo-2-propanol 3-Bromo-1-propanol 2,4-Dinitrotoluene Nitrobenzene Nitroethane Nitromethane

>8

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

106

1-Nitropropane 2-Nitropropane 2-Nitrotoluene 4-Nitrotoluene 442 Nitro Compounds, Substituted 2-Chloro-2-nitropropane Chloropicrin 4-Nitrodiphenylamine Nitroglycerol Nitroglycol Picric acid Treflan EC 450 Nitro Compounds N-Nitrosodiethylamine N-Nitrosodimethylamine

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

107

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

462 Organo-phosphorus Compounds, Derivates of Phosphorus-based Acids Diphenyl phosphite Ethyl parathion Guthion Hexamethylphosphoramide Malathion Methyl parathion, 30–70% Naled Round Up® Trisbutyl phosphate Tricresyl phosphate Trimethyl phosphate Trimethyl phosphite Triphenylphosphite Tris(1,3-dichloroisopropyl)phosphate

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8 >8

>8

>4

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

108

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

470 Organo-Metallic Compounds Nickel carbonyl Tetraethyl lead Vinylmagnesium chloride,8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8 >8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

109

Tetraethoxysilane Trichlorosilane Triethoxysilane Vinyl trichlorosilane 501 Sulfur Compounds, Thiols Ethyl mercaptan Glycerol monothioglycolate, >70% Mercaptoacetic acid 2-Mercaptoethanol Methyl mercaptan Orthocid 83® Phenyl mercaptan Thionyl chloride

>8

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

110

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Responder®

Trellchem® HPS

Tychem® BR/LV

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

Tychem® TK

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

>8

Tychem® SL

Viton®

>8

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Sulfur Compounds, Sulfides and Disulfides Carbon disulfide Dimethyl disulfide Dimethyl sulfide Sufur Mustard Sulfur dichloride Sulfur dichloride, >70% Sulfur monochloride Thiophene 503 Sulfur Compounds, Sulfones and Sulfoxides Dimethyl sulfoxide Dimethyl-d6-sulfoxide 504 Sulfur Compounds, Sulfonic Acids Chlorosulfonic acid

Natural Rubber

502

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8 >8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

>8

111

Fluorosulfonic acid Methanesulfonic acid Methanesulfonyl chloride Phenolsulfonic acid p-Toluenesulfonic acid Trifluoromethanesulfonic acid 505 Sulfur Compounds, Sulfonyl Chlorides Benzenesulfonyl chloride 507 Sulfur Compounds, Sulfonates, Suphates, and Sulfites Diethyl sulphate Dimethyl sulphate 508 Sulfur Compounds, Thiones Carbon disulfide

>8

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8 >8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

112

>8

>8

Tychem® TK

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

509 Sulfur Compounds, Halides Sulfur hexafluoride 510 Nitrates and Nitrites Dynamite Isobutyl nitrite Isopentyl nitrite Isopropyl nitrite Nitroglycerol Nitroglycol 530 Zwitterions Borane pyridine complex 550 Organic Salts and Solutions 9-Aminoacridine hydrochloroide Benzethonium chloride 2,4-D, dimethylamine ammonium salt

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8 >8

>8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

113

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

Tychem® TK

>8 >8

>8

Tychem® SL

Tychem® BR/LV

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

>8

Polyvinylalcohol

>8

Polyethylene (PE)

>8

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

2-Hydroxyethyl-N,N,N-trimethyl ammonium hydroxide Promethazine hydrochloroide Sodium methylate, 30–70% Tetramethyl amonium hydroxide Xylenesulphonic acid sodium salt 590 Miscellaneous AFFF Aqua regia AZT® Battery acid Blood, human Carmustin Castor oil Coal tar extract

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8 >8

>8

>8 >8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

114

Tychem® SL

Tychem® TK

Trellchem® HPS

Responder®

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

Neoprene Rubber

Tychem® BR/LV

Corn oil Crude oil Cutting fluids Cypermethrin Epoxy (base) Epoxy (accelerator) Epoxy (base & accelerator) Gasohol Hydraulic oil Lubricating oil Pramitol® Shale oil Silicon etch Skydrol hydraulic fluid Stoddard solvent

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8 >8 >8 >8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8

>8 >8

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

>8

115

Tychem® SL

Tychem® TK

Silver Shield/4H® (PE/EVAL/PE)

Tychem® BR/LV

>8

Barrier (PE/PA/PE)

Viton®/Butyl Rubber

Viton®

Polyvinylchloride

Polyvinylalcohol

>8

Polyethylene (PE)

Nitrile Rubber

>8

Trellchem® HPS

>8

Responder®

Chemical Warfare Agents NOTE: According to NFPA 1991 CRDC-SP-84010, method 2.2 when >1 is indicated. All others according to Test Protocols MIL-STD-282 Lewisite (Agent L) Sarin (Agent GB) Soman (Agent GD) Sulfur Mustard (Agent HD) Tabun (Agent GA) VX (Agent VX)

>8

Neoprene Rubber

Water Witch hazel

Natural Rubber

Recommended >8 h. Recommended >4 h. Caution 1–4 h. Not recommended 8

>8

>1

>12

>6

>12

>8

>1

>12

>6

>12

>8

>8

600

>8 >12

>8

>8

>12 >12

>12

>12 >3

>12 >8

>12

CAUTIONS: Recommendations are NOT valid for very thin Natural Rubber, Neoprene, Nitrile, and PVC gloves (0.3 mm or less).

>12 >12

>12

>12

116

SECTION V

Glossary This section contains the glossary of terms related to the sections and use of chemical protective clothing. The terms are in alphabetic order followed by a brief definition in lay language wherever possible. ABSORB: To suck in or “pick-up” a liquid by capillary, osmotic, or chemical action. ABSORBENT: A material that picks up and retains a liquid distributed throughout its molecular structure causing the solid to swell (50% or more). The absorbent is at least 70% insoluble in excess fluid (ASTM F726-99).

ACGIH: The American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH®) is a member-based organization and community of professionals (representing government, academia, and private industry) that advances worker health and safety through education and the development and dissemination of scientific and technical knowledge. (http://www.acgih.org/About/) ACID: A compound that, in solution, furnishes hydrogen ions. Acids are compounds that have a pH less than 7.0. Very acidic compounds have low pHs. ACTION LEVEL: The exposure level (air concentration) at which OSHA regulations take effect. Usually one-half of the PEL.

117

ACUTE EFFECT: Health effects that show up a short length of time after exposure (Fundamentals of Industrial Hygiene, 3rd Edition, National Safety Council, 1988, p. 850). AEROSOL: A fine suspension of a liquid or solid in air with particles small enough to stay suspended for a period of time. ALKALI: A term usually applied to strong soluble bases, e.g., sodium hydroxide, NAOH. Compounds that have a pH above 7.0 when dissolved in water are considered alkaline. Highly alkaline compounds have high pHs. ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUE: A procedure whereby the concentration of the test chemical in a collection medium is quantitatively determined when conducting permeation testing (ASTM F 739). ANHYDROUS:

Without water.

AQUEOUS: Describes a water-based solution or suspension. ASTM: American Society for Testing and Materials. An organization founded in 1898 that develops and publishes technical information with an emphasis on consensus test methods. Within ASTM, Committee F23 on Protective Clothing is responsible for

the permeation test method and related test methods. ASTM is headquartered in Philadelphia, PA. BASE: A compound that, in solution furnishes hydroxyl ions. Substances that have a pH above 7.0 when dissolved in water are basic. The opposite of an acid on the pH scale. See ALKALI. BOILING POINT: The temperature at which a liquid boils or turns into a gas (vapor pressure equals atmospheric pressure). BREAKTHROUGH: The movement of a chemical through a protective barrier to the other side. BREAKTHROUGH DETECTION TIME: The elapsed time measured from the start of the test to the sampling time that immediately precedes the sampling time at which the test chemical is first detected (ASTM F23.30, F 739, F 1383). BREAKTHROUGH TIME: TECTION TIME.

See BREAKTHROUGH DE-

BUTYL RUBBER: A type of synthetic rubber formed from butylenes and isoprene as copolymers used in gloves and other protective clothing because of its chemical resistance. 118

BWA:

Biological War Agents (e.g., Anthrax).

CARCINOGEN:

A substance capable of causing cancer.

CAS NUMBER: The Chemical Abstracts Service registry number. A unique chemical designator or identifier. CAUSTIC:

See ALKALI.

CEILING EXPOSURE LIMIT: An airborne concentration that is not to be exceeded at any time during the working day. CHALLENGE 5000 AND 6400: Trade-name materials of the Chemfab Company that are of Teflon construction and used for chemical protective suits. The products are no longer available for civilian responders. CHEMICAL: of elements.

Any element, chemical compound, or mixture

CHEMICAL PROTECTIVE CLOTHING (CPC): Any material or combination of materials used in an item of clothing for the purpose of isolating parts of the body from direct contact with a potentially hazardous chemical (ASTM F23.70).

CHLORINATED POLYETHYLENE: Polyethylene (a selfextinguishing plastic) that contains chlorine atoms and is used for protective clothing by ILC Dover Company and DuPont Company. Also called CPE. CHLOROBUTYL RUBBER: A type of butyl rubber that contains chlorine atoms and is used in protective clothing. CHLOROPRENE:

See NEOPRENE

CHRONIC EFFECT: An effect usually occurring from repeated exposures received over a period of time. CLOROPELTM: A trademark for ILC Dover, Inc., chlorinated for polyethylene-coated fabrics used in protective clothing. COMBUSTIBLE LIQUID: higher than 100°F.

A material with a flash point of

CONTAMINATION: The presence of any unwanted material or substance on or in PPE, equipment, structures, or the environment. CORROSIVE: A material that causes visible destruction or irreversible alterations in living tissue by chemical action at the site of contact (or that will severely corrode steel). 119

CPC:

Chemical protective clothing.

CPE: Chlorinated polyethylene. CPF I, II, III, and IV: A trade-name material of the DuPont Company used in chemical protective clothing. CRYOGENIC GASES: Gases that are cooled to extremely cold temperatures to change them into liquids. CUMULATIVE PERMEATION: The total amount of chemical that permeates during a specified time from when the material is first contacted (ASTM F23.30, F 1383, F 1407). CW AGENT: Chemical Warfare Agents. A United Nation report from 1969 defines chemical warfare agents as chemical substances, whether gaseous, liquid, or solid, that might be used because of their toxic effects on humans, animals, and plants (e.g., Mustard agents, Sarin). DECONTAMINATION: The removal of a contaminant or contaminants from the surface or matrix, or both, of chemical protective clothing (CPC) to the extent necessary for its next intended action (e.g., reuse and disposal) (ASTM F23.70, F 1461).

DEGRADATION: A deleterious change in one or more physical properties of protective clothing or equipment as a result of contact with a chemical. DERMAL: Affecting the skin (or permeation through the skin). DETECTION LIMIT: A minimum limit of detection for the challenge chemical and the analytical technique used, when doing permeation testing. For the ASTM F739-91 permeation test, the detection limit is 0.1 ␮g/cm2/min and for EN 374 1.0 ␮g/cm2/min. DIFFUSION: The mixing of one substance into another when separated by barrier (i.e., movement of substance on a molecular level across the barrier to the other side). DIFFUSION RATE: A measure of the tendency of one gas or vapor to disperse into or mix with another gas or vapor. This rate depends on the density of the vapor or gas as compared with that of air (Fundamentals of Industrial Hygiene, 3rd Edition, National Safety Council, 1988, p. 861). Can be expressed mathematically. Fick’s first law of diffusion is sometimes used to quantitate the rate of permeation across the skin (Modern Industrial Hygiene, Recognition and Evaluation of Chemical Agents, Vol. 1, J. L. Perkins, 1997, p. 140). 120

DIPPED: Application of a liquid polymer coating to a substrate thereby forming a layer (e.g., elastomer-coated cotton gloves) or a method used to form a glove (e.g., latex coated gloves). DOT:

The United States Department of Transportation.

ELASTOMER: A rubber or plastic with elastic characteristics; also called FKM. ENSEMBLE (CHEMICAL PROTECTIVE SUIT ENSEMBLE): A combination of chemical protective clothing (e.g., suits, boots, gloves) and other protective equipment such as respirators, communication devices, cooling devices, and other equipment. EPA:

The United States Environmental Protection Agency.

ETHYLENE VINYL ALCOHOL: A plastic-like film with excellent resistance to chemicals used in protective clothing; also called EVAL. ETIOLOGIC AGENT: Microscopic organisms (e.g., virus, bacteria) that can cause disease. Refers to organisms, substances, or objects associated with the cause of disease or injury (Funda-

mentals of Industrial Hygiene, 3rd Edition, National Safety Council, 1988, p. 864). EXTREMELY HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE: Designation used by the EPA to describe materials that would be highly hazardous to a community in the event of an uncontrolled release. EVAL:

See ETHYLENE VINYL ALCOHOL

EVAPORATION RATE: The rate at which a material vaporizes (evaporates) from the liquid or solid state. Butyl acetate is the normal standard (rate ⫽ 1.0). Fast evaporating rates are higher than 3.0, whereas slow rates are below 1.0. EXTREMELY HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE: Designation use by the EPA to describe materials that would be highly hazardous to a community in the event of an uncontrolled release. FEP: Copolymer of tetrafluoroethylenene and hexafluorpropen that is a plastic-like material used in protective clothing because of its excellent chemical resistance; also called TeflonFEPTM. FIBERGLASS: Fibers of glass usually coated and woven into cloth and used in protective clothing as a base material. 121

FLAMMABLE LIQUID: A material with a flash point of lower than 100°F (new DOT standard is lower than 140°F).

HAZARDOUS ASSESSMENT: The process whereby the degree of risk to the wearer of the CPC is determined.

FLASH POINT: The lowest temperature at which a material generates enough vapor to ignite when an ignition source is present.

HAZARDOUS WASTE: Any discarded or spilled material that is listed as a hazardous waste under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Hazardous Waste Section.

GAS: A state of matter in which the material has very low density and viscosity; can expand and contract greatly in response to changes in temperature and pressure; easily diffuses into other gases; readily and uniformly distributes itself throughout any container (Fundamentals of Industrial Hygiene, 3rd Edition, National Safety Council, 1988, p. 867). For example, nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide are normally gases. GAS-TIGHT: the suit.

The ability to hold a gas under pressure within

GORE-TEXTM: A trademark of the W.L. Gore Company for a material that has water vapor transmission properties (allows some water vapor transmission for cooling) and is used in protective clothing. 4HTM: A trademark of the North Company for a film laminate of polyethylene and ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer used in protective clothing. Also called PE/EVAL.

HAZWOPER: Acronym for the OSHA standard entitled “Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response.” Codified as 29 CFR 1910.120. Designed to protect the health and safety of individuals treating hazardous wastes or performing environmental cleanups or emergency response actions. HEALTH HAZARD: effect on humans.

Any substance that can have a harmful

HEAT STRESS: The stress on the body from an inability to adequately dissipate heat from environmental conditions (such as protective clothing) and/or work. HEMATOPOIETIC TOXINS: forming organs. HEPATOTOXIN:

Toxic to the blood and blood-

Toxic to the liver. 122

HIGHLY FLAMMABLE LIQUID: A liquid material with a flash point of less than 73°F or 25°C.

(Fundamentals of Industrial Hygiene, 3rd Edition, National Safety Council, 1988, p. 873).

IARC:

LEVEL A: An EPA designation for the highest level of PPE for emergency response. For protective clothing, this usually includes the use of a gas-tight, totally encapsulating ensemble.

International Agency for Research on Cancer.

IDLH: Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health. An atmosphere or condition that poses an immediate threat to life or could produce irreversible, debilitating effects on health. Usually defined based on a 30: minute exposure. IMPERMEABLE (OR IMPERVIOUS): Not permeable. This is not a term that is technically correct for protective clothing except in rare circumstances. INGESTION:

Swallowing or eating.

IRRITANT: A substance that produces incipient inflammation, soreness, roughness, or irritability when it contacts skin, eyes, nose, or respiratory system. LAMINATED: A protective material made up of the same or differing barrier layers. LATEX: Originally, extract from the rubber tree. Currently also applied to water emulsions of synthetic rubbers or resins

LEVEL B: An EPA designation for the next to highest level of PPE for emergency response. For protective clothing, this usually includes the use of a chemically resistant splash suit. LEVEL C: An EPA designation for the next to lowest level of PPE for emergency response. For protective clothing, this usually includes the use of a chemically resistant splash suit. LEVEL D: An EPA designation for the lowest level of protection for emergency response. Typically a work uniform and safety glasses and gloves. May not be worn where respiratory or skin hazards exist. LOCALIZED: Restricted to one spot or are in/on the body and not spread all through it. (Fundamentals of Industrial Hygiene, 3rd Edition, National Safety Council, 1988, p. 874.) 123

MELTING POINT: The transition point between the solid and liquid state. Expressed as temperature at which this change occurs. The temperature at which a solid turns into a liquid.

NEPHROTOXINS:

MSDS: Material Safety Data Sheet. A document that describes the health and safety hazards associated with a product. It should also provide information on the selection of protective equipment, spill response, disposal, and other environmental information.

NEUTRALIZATION: Chemically, neutralization is the union of the hydrogen (H⫹) and the hydroxyl ion (OH) to form water. Neutralization is the reaction between an acid and a base. For example, weak bases can neutralize strong acids.

NARCOTICS AND ANESTHETICS: Agents that cause central nervous system depression with possible unconsciousness and death from respiratory arrest. Initial symptoms are often a euphoria rather than depression.

NFPA: tion.

NATURAL RUBBER: Name for the rubber that is derived naturally from trees (gutta percha). A distilled version is called isoprene. Natural rubbers are used in protective clothing, but if untreated, offer minimal chemical resistance.

NOMEX: A trademark of the DuPont Company for an aramid fiber used as a base material in protective clothing most notably because of the fire resistance of the fibers.

NEAT:

A solution or product that is undiluted.

NEOPRENE: A trade name of the DuPont Company for a rubber-like product used in protective clothing. Also called chloroprene.

NEUROTOXINS:

Toxic to the kidneys. Toxic to the nervous system.

The United States National Fire Protection Associa-

NITRILE: A type of synthetic rubber used in protective clothing.

NUISANCE MATERIALS: Agents, which produce transient irritation of eyes, skin, mucous membranes, or respiratory tract. No long term or systemic effects. ORGANIC CHEMICALS: from carbon or petroleum.

Any chemical containing derived 124

OSHA: The United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

PERMEABILITY: The ability of a chemical to pass or move into or through a substance or material.

OXIDATION: The loss of electrons from an atom, compound, or molecule. In general use, the term is generally applied to a chemical reaction of a substance with oxygen (O2) or an oxygen-containing material that adds oxygen atom(s) to the compound being oxidized. Whenever something is oxidized, something else must undergo the opposite reaction, reduction.

PERMEATION: The process by which a chemical moves through chemical protective clothing on a molecular (nonvisible) level.

OXIDIZER: A material, that yields oxygen or may initiate or promote combustion. OXYGEN DEFICIENT ATMOSPHERE: Any atmosphere that contains less than 19.5% oxygen by volume. PE: Polyethylene PEL: Permissible Exposure Limit. Legally enforceable exposure limit established by OSHA. PENETRATION: The flow of a chemical through zippers, stitched seams, pinholes, or other imperfections in chemical protective clothing on a nonmolecular level.

PERMEATION RATE: The rate or mass flow of the chemical across the barrier, expressed as mass per unit area per time interval. PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE): The equipment used to shield or protect an individual from chemical, physical, or thermal hazards that may be encountered during a response action or work activity. POLYETHYLENE: A common and relatively inexpensive plastic material (made of repeating units of ethylene) used in protective clothing or as a coating for protective clothing. Also referred to as PE. POLYMER: A high molecular weight material formed by the joining together of many simple molecules (monomers). Natural rubber and cellulose are naturally occurring polymers. Most resins are chemically produced polymers. (Fundamentals 125

of Industrial Hygiene, 3rd Edition, National Safety Council, 1988, p. 881). POLYVINYL ALCOHOL: A type of plastic (made of repeating units of vinyl alcohol) that has some solubility in water, but very good organic solvent resistance, and is used in protective clothing. Also called PVA, a trade name of the Ansell Company. POLYVINYL CHLORIDE: A common type of plastic (made of repeating units of vinyl chloride), which is used in protective clothing. This is the product that is commonly thought of when someone refers to a “plastic.” pH: A logarithmic scale from 0 to 14 that represents the acidity or alkalinity of an aqueous solution. Pure water has a neutral pH of 7.0. A low pH is acidic, whereas a high pH is alkaline or basic. PPE:

Personal Protective Equipment.

PPM: Parts per million parts of air by volume of vapor or gas or other contaminant. (Fundamentals of Industrial Hygiene, 3rd Edition, National Safety Council, 1988, p. 882). Usually describes the amount of a vapor or gas in contaminated air.

PROTECTIVE CLOTHING MATERIAL: Any material or combination of materials used in an item of clothing for the purpose of isolating parts of the body from a potential hazard. PSI:

Pounds per square inch. A unit of pressure.

PTFE: An abbreviation for the polymer polytetrafluoroethylene. Teflon is a trademark for tetrafluoroethylene (TFE). PYROPHORIC: A material that ignites spontaneously in air at or below 130°F. RADIOACTIVE: The property of an isotope or element that is characterized by spontaneous decay to emit radiation. (Fundamentals of Industrial Hygiene, 3rd Edition, National Safety Council, 1988, p. 884). RCRA: Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976. EPA regulation that governs hazardous wastes. REACTIVE MATERIALS: Substances capable of or tending to react chemically with other substances. These reactions could produce heat or new substances that are dangerous. REDUCTION: The gain of electrons or the loss of oxygen. The opposite of oxidation. 126

REPRODUCTIVE TOXIN: Toxic material that effects male or female reproductive systems or the developing fetus.

SBR: Styrene butadiene rubber. A synthetic rubber sometimes used in protective clothing.

RESPIRATORY PROTECTION: Equipment designed to protect the user from the inhalation of harmful or toxic materials.

SCBA: Self Contained Breathing Apparatus. A respiratory protection device usually consisting of a tank of compressed air, a pressure regulator, hosing, and a face piece.

RESPONDER: A trade name of the DuPont Company for material used in protective clothing. RESPONSE ACTION: The control, containment, confinement, and cleanup of a release to the environment of a toxic or hazardous substance. ROUTES OF ENTRY: The ways that a toxic material can enter the body. The four major routes of entry are inhalation, absorption (skin contact), ingestion, and injection. SARANEX: A trademark of the Dow Chemical Company for a film laminate (23-P) of polyethylene, polyvinylidene chloride, and ethene–vinyl acetate (EVA). Used as a coating for protective clothing. SATURATED (SAT): The point at which the maximum amount of matter can be held dissolved at a given temperature in a solution.

SENSITIZER: A material that can cause an allergic skin or respiratory reaction. SILVER SHIELD: A trademark of the North Company for a film laminate of a same composition to the 4H product and also used in protective clothing. SOLUBILITY: A term that normally expresses the amount of material (as a percentage by weight) that dissolves in a liquid, such as water at normal temperatures (producing a solution). SPECIFIC GRAVITY: The weight of a substance compared to the weight of an equal volume of water (water ⫽ 1). SPLASH PROTECTIVE SUIT: A one-piece or multiplepiece garment constructed of protective clothing materials and designed to protect the wearer against chemical contact by splash. 127

StaSafeTM: A trademark of the DuPont Company for chlorinated polyethylene fabric. STEADY STATE PERMEATION RATE: A constant rate of permeation that occurs after breakthrough when all forces affecting permeation have reached equilibrium (ASTM F 23.30, F739). STEL: Short Term Exposure Limit. A level above the 8 hour TWA, TLV, or PEL that should not be exceeded for more than 15 minutes four times a shift.

TLV: Threshold Limit Value. An airborne concentration of a substance and conditions under which it is believed that nearly all workers may be repeatedly exposed day after day without adverse effects. Recommended exposure limits are revised periodically by the American Conference of Governmental Hygienists based on the latest toxicologic information. TLV-SKIN: A substance that may also have a dermal route of entry that can affect the overall exposure.

SUBLIME: To change from a solid to a vapor and condenses to form solid crystals without becoming a liquid. (Fundamentals of Industrial Hygiene, 3rd Edition, National Safety Council, 1988, p. 889).

TOTALLY ENCAPSULATING CHEMICAL PROTECTIVE SUIT: A full-body garment that is constructed of protective clothing materials and covers all portions of the wearer’s body as well as the respiratory protection equipment. Gas tight refers to the ability to be pressurized with minimal leakage.

SYSTEMIC: Effect occurs at a site that is remote to the site of contact with or entry into the body.

TOXICITY: the body.

TEFLONTM: A trademark of the DuPont Company for a plasticlike material (tetrafluoroethylene) that has excellent chemical and thermal resistance properties, but poor physical properties, and is used in combination with other materials in protective clothing (see PTFE).

The inherent ability of a material to do harm to

TOXICOLOGY: The science that deals with the poisonous or hazardous properties of materials. TRELLCHEM® HPS, TLU, and VPS: A trademark of the Trelleborg Company for material used in protective clothing. 128

TOXIC SUBSTANCE: A substance capable of producing adverse (harmful) effects on contact with, or entry into, the body or the environment. TYCHEM® BR, F, LV, QC, SL, and TK: A trademark of the DuPont Company for a plastic-like material that is used in protective clothing. ®

TYVEK : A trademark of the DuPont Company for nonwoven polyethylene used in protective clothing.

VAPOR DENSITY: The weight of a given volume of pure vapor compared to that of dry air (air ⫽ 1). A vapor density of less than 1 means that a substance is lighter than air and will float upward, whereas a density greater than 1 means it will sink downward. VAPOR PRESSURE: The pressure exerted by vapor above its own liquid in a closed container.

TWA: Time Weighted Average. The average exposure over a given time period. Normally an 8-hour shift.

VITONTM: A trademark of the DuPont Company for a rubberlike copolymer of hexafluoropropylene and vinylidene fluoride used in protective clothing.

VAPOR: The gaseous state of a liquid or solid. For example, water gives off water vapor through evaporation.

WATER SOLUBILITY: The ability of a liquid or solid to mix with or dissolve in water.

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SECTION VI

Standards for Chemical Protective Clothing This section contains information on testing and performance standards for chemicals protective clothing including resistance to chemicals and physicals as well as human factors.

ASTM Standards (http://www.astm.org) Committee F23 on Protective Clothing Staff Manager: Stephen Mawn [email protected] (610) 832-9726 The American Society for Testing and Materials, ASTM Committee F23 on Protective Clothing was formed in 1977. F23 meets twice a year. Currently has jurisdiction of more than 35 standards, published in the Annual Book of ASTM Standards, Vol. 11.03. These standards have and continue to play a preeminent role in the protective clothing industry and address issues relating to particulates, physical, chemical, biological, end items, human factors, use, and flame and thermal. 131

Published standards under the jurisdiction of F23.30—Chemicals F739-99a Standard Test Method for Resistance of Protective Clothing Materials to Permeation by Liquids or Gases Under Conditions of Continuous Contact F903-99a Standard Test Method for Resistance of Materials Used in Protective Clothing to Penetration by Liquids F1001-99a Standard Guide for Selection of Chemicals to Evaluate Protective Clothing Materials F1186-99 Standard Classification System for Chemicals According to Functional Groups F1194-99 Standard Guide for Documenting the Results of Chemical Permeation Testing of Materials Used in Protective Clothing F1301-90(2001) Standard Practice for Labeling Chemical Protective Clothing F1383-99a Standard Test Method for Resistance of Protective Clothing Materials to Permeation by Liquids or Gases Under Conditions of Intermittent Contact F1407-99a Standard Test Method for Resistance of Chemical Protective Clothing Materials to Liquid Permeation-Permeation Cup Method F2130-01 Standard Test Method for Measuring Repellency, Retention, and Penetration of Liquid Pesticide Formulation Through Protective Clothing Materials

Published standards under the jurisdiction of F23.60—Human Factors F1154-99a Standard Practices for Qualitatively Evaluating the Comfort, Fit, Function, and Integrity of Chemical-Protective Suit Ensembles F1291-99 Standard Test Method for Measuring the Thermal Insulation of Clothing Using a Heated Manikin 132

F1731-96(2002) Standard Practice for Body Measurements and Sizing of Fire and Rescue Services Uniforms and Other Thermal Hazard Protective Clothing F1868-98 Standard Test Method for Thermal and Evaporative Resistance of Clothing Materials Using a Sweating Hot Plate F2010-00 Standard Test Method for Evaluation of Glove Effects on Wearer Hand Dexterity Using a Modified Pegboard Test

Published standards under the jurisdiction of F23.20—Physicals F1342-91(1996) Standard Test Method for Protective Clothing Material Resistance to Puncture F1790-97 Standard Test Method for Measuring Cut Resistance of Materials Used in Protective Clothing

Published standards under the jurisdiction of F23.91—Editorial F1494-01 Standard Terminology Relating to Protective Clothing

NFPA Standards (http://www.nfpa.org) A worldwide leader in providing fire, electrical, and life safety to the public since 1896. 133

NFPA (National Fire Protection Association), 1 Batterymarch Park Quincy, MA 02269-9101 USA Telephone: (617) 770-3000. NFPA has established performance standards for chemical protective clothing for use in support areas, for splash protection, and for “Level A” related spill cleanup work. These standards are: NFPA 1991 Standard on Vapor-Protective Ensembles for Hazardous Materials Emergencies NFPA 1992 Standard on Liquid Splash-Protective Ensembles and Clothing for Hazardous Materials Emergencies NFPA 1993 Standard on Single Use Splash Protective Suits for Non-Flammable Hazardous Chemical Situations NFPA 1994 Standard on Protective Ensembles for Chemical/Biological Terrorism Incidents NFPA 1999 Standard on Protective Clothing for Emergency Medical Operations Note: Safety Equipment Institute (SEI) maintain a list of products completed certification testing based on NFPA requirements (http://www.seinet.org/CPL/content.htm)

EN Standards (http://www.cenorm.be/) The European Committee for Standardization (CEN) has published for chemical protective clothing. Conformance to EN Standards (“harmonized standards”) is required for CE-marking, showing conformity with the European Directive on personal protective equipment 89/686/EEC. EN 943-1:2002 Protective clothing against liquid and gaseous chemicals, including liquid aerosols and solid particles—Part 1: Performance requirements 134

EN 943-2:2002 Protective clothing against liquid and gaseous chemicals, including liquid aerosols and solid particles—Part 2: Performance requirements for “gastight” (type 1) chemical protective suits for emergency teams (ET) EN 465:1995* Protective Clothing—Protection against liquid chemicals—Performance requirements for chemical protective clothing with spray-tight connections between different parts of the clothing (type 3 equipment) EN 466:1995* Protective Clothing—Protection against liquid chemicals—Performance requirements for chemical protective clothing with liquid tight connections between different parts of the clothing (type 4 equipment) EN 467:1995* Protective Clothing—Protection against liquid chemicals—Performance requirements for garments providing protection to parts of the body EN 374-3:1994 Protective gloves against chemicals and micro-organism—Part 3: Determination of resistance to permeation by chemicals EN ISO 6529 Protective clothing—Protection against chemicals—Determination of resistance of protective clothing materials to permeation by liquids and gases *These standards are currently being revised into a single document (WI162201).

ISO Standards (http://www.iso.org) International Organization for Standardization has published for chemical protective clothing. ISO 6529:2001 Protective clothing—Protection against chemicals—Determination of resistance of protective clothing materials to permeation by liquids and gases 135

ISO 6530:1990 Protective clothing—Protection against liquid chemicals—Determination of resistance of materials to penetration by liquids ISO 13994:1998 Clothing for protection against liquid chemicals—Determination of the resistance of protective clothing materials to penetration by liquids under pressure ISO 13995:2000 Protective clothing—Mechanical properties—Test method for the determination of the resistance to puncture and dynamic tearing of materials ISO 1741:2002 Protective clothing—Protection against gaseous and liquid chemicals—Determination of resistence of protective clothing to penetration by liquids and gases

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SECTION VII

Manufactures of Chemical Protective Clothing This section contains a partial listing of manufacturers publishing tests results of the resistance of their barrier material by any standard test method. The manufacturers are listed in alphabetic order. The list also contains contact information (technical contact names are given where available) and the specific type of barrier material used and registered trade names. Glove manufacturers often laminate or blend barrier materials. This is indicated by a “/” for laminates and a “⫹” for blends. The reader is encouraged to contact the manufactures for further information. Since the third edition was published, several manufacturers no longer provide any products for the market or other manufacturers have purchased the products. Bata Shoe Company (purchased by ONGUARD Industries L.L.C.)

Chemical Fabrics Corporation—Chemfab (products not available for civilian responders) Edmont (purchased by Ansell) Fariprene Industrial Products Co, Inc (no products available on the market) Huser (purchased by North Safety Products) Kappler Safety Group (CPC products purchased by DuPont) Mine Safety Applications Co.—MSA (no products available for the market) Pioneer Industrial Products Co. (purchased by MAPA) Playtex Products, Inc. Industrial Gloves (no products available for the market) Safety 4 A/S (4H® products purchased by North Safety Products) Standard Safety Equipment Co.—(StaSafe® products purchased by DuPont) 137

ANSELL Contacts: Mr. Nelson Schlatter E-mail: [email protected] Ansell Protective Product Tel:888-HAND-ONE, opt. 3 Tel:888-426-3663, opt. 3 1300 Walnut Street Coshocton, Ohio 43812, USA Tel: 740-622-4311 or Tel: 800-800-0444 Fax: 800-800-0445 Web: http://www.ansellpro.com Ansell Canada Inc. 105 Lauder Cowansville, Quebec J2K 2K8, Canada Tel: 450-266-1850 Ansell Europe Ann van den Borre E-mail: [email protected] Tel:⫹32-2-528 74 94 Fax:⫹32-2-528 74 03 Internationale Laan 55

Anderlecht 1070, Belgium Tel: ⫹32-2-528 74 00 Fax: ⫹32-2-528 74 02 Web: http://www.ansell.be

Products: Aprons, gloves

Barriers: Natural Rubber Neoprene Neoprene/Natural Rubber Nitrile PE/PA/PE (Barrier) PVAL (PVA®) PVC

BEST Contacts: Mr. Donald F. Groce E-mail: [email protected]

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Best Manufacturing Co. P.O. Box 8 Menlo, GA 30731-0008, USA Tel: 706-862-2302 or Tel: 800-241-0323 Fax: 706-862-6000 or 706-862-2660 E-mail: [email protected] Web: http://www.bestglove.com or http://www.chemrest.com

Barriers:

Best Manufacturing Ltd 253 Michaud Street Coaticook, Quebec J1A 1A9 Canada Tel: 800-565-2378 Fax: 819-849-6120

COMASEC

Best Manufacturing Europe, N.V. Kontichsesteenweg 67/1 2630 Aartselaar, Belgium Phone: ⫹32.3.458-33 33 Fax: ⫹32.3.458-34 57 E-mail: [email protected]

Products: Gloves

Butyl Natural Rubber Neoprene Nitrile PVC, Viton®

Contacts: Mr. Joseph Krocheski E-mail: [email protected] Comasec Safety, Inc P.O. Box 1219 Enfield, CT 06082, USA Tel: 800-333-0219 Fax: 860-741-0881 E-mail: [email protected] Web: http://www.comasecsafety.com Mr. Claude Piat E-mail: [email protected] Comasec S.A.

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49 avenue du Géneral Marceau BP 133 Route de Nuisement 28103 Dreux cédex, France Tel: ⫹33-1-49338542 Fax: ⫹33-1-49338585 Web: http://www.comasec.com/webcomasec/ english/sommaireframe.html Mr. Michael W. Reid Comasec Yate, Ltd. Great Western Business Park Yate Avon, BS17 5RF, England Tel: ⫹44-045-432-3633 Fax: ⫹44-045-432-4366

Products: Gloves

Barriers: Butyl, Butyl/Neoprene Natural Rubber Neoprene/Natural Rubber Nitrile PVC

DRAEGER Contacts: Drager Aktiegesellschaft Moislinger Allee 53/55 2400 Lubeck 1, Germany Tel: ⫹49-451-882-2658 Fax: ⫹49-451-882-3955 Web: http://www.draeger.com/de/ST/Produkte/ Schuetzen/Schutzanzuege/Schutzanzuege.jsp National Draeger Inc. 101, Technology Drive Pittsburgh, PA 15230, USA Tel: 412-787-8383 Fax: 412-787-2207 Web: http://www.draeger.com/us/ST/productsnservices/ protection/ProtCloth/protcloth.jsp

Products: Level A totally encapsulated suits

Barriers: Butyl/Viton®

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HimexTM UmexTM

Products:

DUPONT

Barriers:

Contacts:

CPF® 1 CPF® 2 CPF® 3 CPF® 4 StaSafe® Tychem® BR Tychem® TK Tychem® QS (PE on Tyvek®) Tychem® SL (Saranex® on Tyvek®)

Mr. James P. Zeigler [email protected] E.I. DuPont de Nemours and Company Customer Inquiry Center P.O. Box 27001 Richmond, VA 23261, USA Tel: 1-877-797-5907 Fax-on-Demand: 1-800-558-9329 E-mail: [email protected] Web: http://protectiveapparel.dupont.com/index.html European hotline: ⫹352-21-164 043 Other contact number: ⫹352-3666 5664 Fax: ⫹35-2-3666 5021 Mailing address: DuPont Nonwovens L-2984 Luxembourg E-mail: [email protected] Web: http://www.tyvekprotech.com

Coveralls to level A totally encapsulated suits

GUARDIAN Contacts: Ms. Susan Leak E-mail: [email protected] Guardian Manufacturing Co. 302 Conwell Ave.

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Willard, OH 44890-9525, USA Tel: 419-933-2711 Fax: 419-935-8961 Web: http://www.guardian-mfg.com/ guardianmfg.html

Products: Gloves

Products: Level A totally encapsulated suits

Barriers: CPE Cloropet® (Chlorinated Polyethylene coated on fabrics)

Barriers: Butyl Neoprene

MARIGOLD Contacts:

ILC Contacts: Ms. Rhonda Haller E-mail: [email protected] ILC Dover, Inc. One Moonwalker Road Frederica, DE 19946-2080, USA Tel: 302-335-3911 Fax: 302-335-1320 Web: http://www.ilcdover.com

Mr. Daren.Chambers E-mail: [email protected] Marigold Industrial Turnford Place, Great Cambridge Road Broxborne Hertfordshire EN10 6NQ, England Tel: ⫹44-1992-456700 Fax: ⫹44-1992-471536 E-mail: [email protected] Web: http://www.marigoldindustrial.com

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(Marigold Industrial US Distributor) Protective Industrial Products P.O. Box 19 Guilderland Center, NY 12085, USA Tel: 518-262-5755 Fax: 518-861-0144 E-mail: [email protected] Web: http://www.pipusa.com

Products: Gloves

Barriers: Natural Rubber Nitrile Nitrile/Natural Rubber PVC

MAPA 57, rue de Villiers-BP 190 F-92205 NEUILLY sur Seine Cedex France Tel: ⫹33-1-49 64 23 85 Fax: ⫹33-1-49 64 24 29 Web: http://www.mapaglove.com Mr. Rick Mallernee E-mail: [email protected] MAPA Professional Brunswick Business Center III 1126 Industrial Parkway North Brunswick, OH 44212, USA Tel: 330-220-3600 Fax: 330-220-2700

Products: Gloves

MAPA Contacts: Ms. Marianne Rodot E-mail: [email protected]

Barriers: Fluoroelastomer (FKM) Fluoroelastomer (FKM)/Nitrile Natural Rubber

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Neoprene Natural Rubber+Neoprene Natural Rubber+Nitrile Neopren+Nitirle+Natural Rubber Nitrile PVC

NORTH

Tel: 888-212-7233 Fax: 514-355-7233 North Safety Products Noordmonsterweg 1 4332 SC Middelburg The Netherlands Tel: ⫹31-118-656400 Fax: ⫹31-118-627535

Products:

Contacts:

Gloves, Dry-box gloves, booties, sleeves, aprons, and coat aprons

Mr. Fred Seebode E-mail: [email protected] North Safety Products 2000 Plainfield Pike Cranston, RI 02921, USA Tel: 800-430-4110 Fax: 800-572-6346 Web: http://www.northsafety.com

Barriers:

North Safety Products 10550 Parkway Blvd. Anjou, Quebec H1J 2K4, Canada

Butyl Shield®/4H®) PE/EVAL/PE (Silve Hypalon Natural Rubber Neoprene Neoprene/Butyl Neoprene/ Hypalon Nitrile PE PVC Viton®

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ONGUARD

RESPIREX

Contacts:

Contacts:

Ms. Mary Steinebrunner, Marketing Manager E-mail: [email protected] Ms. Natalie Crocket, Customer Development Manager E-mail: [email protected] ONGUARD Industries L.L.C. 4501 Pulaski Highway Belcamp, MD 21017-0479, USA Tel: 800-365-2282 Fax: 800-304-2282 Web: http://www.onguardindustries.com

Ms. Kathleen Hoskins E-mail: [email protected] Respirex Ltd. Kingsfield Business Centre, Unit F Philantrophic Road Redhill, Surrey, RH1 4DP England Tel: ⫹44-1737-778600 Fax:⫹44-1-737-779441 Web: http://www.respirex.co.uk

Products:

Coveralls, Level A totally encapsulated suits

Boots

Barriers:

Barriers:

Bromobutyl Hypalon/Neoprene/Butyl Neoprene

Nitrile, PVC

Products:

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Polyurethane PVC Viton®/Buyl Viton®/Buyl/ Viton®/

TRELLEBORG Contacts: Ms. Katarina Filipsson E-mail: katarina.fi[email protected] Product Manager PPE Trelleborg Protective Products AB Box 1521 271 00 Ystad, Sweden Tel: ⫹46 411 679 76 Mobile: ⫹46 708 77 64 04 Fax: ⫹46 411 152 85 Mr. Ulf Nyström E-mail: [email protected] Product Manager PPE Trelleborg Protective Products AB Box 1521

271 00 Ystad, Sweden Tel: ⫹46 411 679 56 Mobile: ⫹46 733 1679 56 Fax: ⫹46 411 152 85 Mr. Lars Persson E-mail: [email protected] Sales & Marketing Manager Trelleborg Protective Products AB Box 1521 271 00 Ystad, Sweden Tel: ⫹46 411 679 88 Mobile: ⫹46 708 62 71 26 Fax: ⫹46 411 152 85 Mr. Magnus Andersson E-mail: [email protected] Marketing Manager Trelleborg Viking, Inc. 170 West Rd. Suite 1 Portsmouth, NH 03801, USA Tel: 603 436 1236 Fax: 603 436 1392 Web: http://www.trelleborg.com/protective

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Products: Level A totally encapsulated Suits Level B splash protective garment

Barriers: Butyl, PVC Trellchem® HPS (Viton®/Butyl/Unknown material) Trellchem® Super (Viton®/Butyl) Trellchem® VPI Trellchem® VPS (Chloroprene/Unknown material) Trellchem® TLU (Two layers of unknown materials)

147