Nutrition and You (2nd Edition)

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Nutrition and You (2nd Edition)

Dietary Reference Intakes: RDA, AI* Sel eni um (μg /d) Iod ine (μg /d) Cop per (μg /d) Ma nga nes e (m g/d Flu ) orid e

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Dietary Reference Intakes: RDA, AI*

Sel eni um (μg /d) Iod ine (μg /d) Cop per (μg /d) Ma nga nes e (m g/d Flu ) orid e (m g/d ) Chr om ium (μg /d) Mo lyb den um (μg /d)

Infants 0–6 mo 6–12 mo

Cal cium (mg /d) Pho sph oru s (m g/d ) Ma gne sium (mg /d) Iron (mg /d) Z in c (m g/d )

Life -Sta ge Gro up

Elements

200* 260*

0.27* 11

2* 3

15* 20*

110* 130*

200* 220*

0.003* 0.6*

0.01* 0.5*

100* 275*

30* 75*

0.2* 5.5*

2* 3*

Children 1–3 y 4–8 y

700 1,000

460 500

80 130

7 10

3 5

20 30

90 90

340 440

1.2* 1.5*

0.7* 1*

11* 15*

17 22

Males 9–13 y 14–18 y 19–30 y 31–50 y 51–70 y >70 y

1,300 1,300 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,200

1,250 1,250 700 700 700 700

240 410 400 420 420 420

8 11 8 8 8 8

8 11 11 11 11 11

40 55 55 55 55 55

120 150 150 150 150 150

700 890 900 900 900 900

1.9* 2.2* 2.3* 2.3* 2.3* 2.3*

2* 3* 4* 4* 4* 4*

25* 35* 35* 35* 30* 30*

34 43 45 45 45 45

Females 9–13 y 14–18 y 19–30 y 31–50 y 51–70 y >70 y

1,300 1,300 1,000 1,000 1,200 1,200

1,250 1,250 700 700 700 700

240 360 310 320 320 320

8 15 18 18 8 8

8 9 8 8 8 8

40 55 55 55 55 55

120 150 150 150 150 150

700 890 900 900 900 900

1.6* 1.6* 1.8* 1.8* 1.8* 1.8*

2* 3* 3* 3* 3* 3*

21* 24* 25* 25* 20* 20*

34 43 45 45 45 45

Pregnancy ≤18 y 19–30 y 31–50 y

1,300 1,000 1,000

1,250 700 700

400 350 360

27 27 27

12 11 11

60 60 60

220 220 220

1,000 1,000 1,000

2.0* 2.0* 2.0*

3* 3* 3*

29* 30* 30*

50 50 50

Lactation ≤18 y 19–30 y 31–50 y

1,300 1,000 1,000

1,250 700 700

360 310 320

10 9 9

13 12 12

70 70 70

290 290 290

1,300 1,300 1,300

2.6* 2.6* 2.6*

3* 3* 3*

44* 45* 45*

50 50 50

Sources: Reprinted with permission from the Dietary Reference Intakes series,National Academies Press.Copyright 1997,1998,2000,2001,by the National Academy of Sciences.These reports may be accessed via www.nap.edu.Courtesy of the National Academies Press,Washington,DC.

both be used as goals for individual intake.RDAs are set to meet the needs of almost all (97 percent to 98 percent) individuals in a group.For healthy breastfed infants,the AI is the mean intake. The AI for other life stage and gender groups is believed to cover the needs of all individuals in the group,but lack of data prevent being able to specify with confidence the percentage of individuNote: This table is adapted from the DRI reports; see www.nap.edu.It lists Recommended Dietary als covered by this intake. Allowances (RDAs),with Adequate Intakes (AIs) indicated by an asterisk (*). RDAs and AIs may

Dietary Reference Intakes: RDA, AI*

Life -Sta ge Gro up Vita min A (μ g/d a ) Vita min D (I U/d )b Vita min E (m g/d c ) Vita min K (μ g/d ) Thi am in ( mg /d) Rib ofla vin (mg /d) Nia cin (mg /d) d Pan tot hen ic A cid (mg Bio tin /d) (μg /d) Vita min B6 ( mg /d) Fola te ( μg/ d) e Vita min B1 2 (μ g/d ) Vita min C (m g/d ) Cho line (mg /d)

Vitamins

Infants 0–6 mo 6–12 mo

400* 500*

400* 400*

4* 5*

Children 1–3 y 4–8 y

300 400

600 600

6 7

Males 9–13 y 14–18 y 19–30 y 31–50 y 51–70 y >70 y

600 900 900 900 900 900

600 600 600 600 600 800

Females 9–13 y 14–18 y 19–30 y 31–50 y 51–70 y >70 y

600 700 700 700 700 700

Pregnancy ≤18 y 19–30 y 31–50 y Lactation ≤18 y 19–30 y 31–50 y

2.0* 2.5*

0.2* 0.3*

0.3* 0.4*

2* 4*

1.7* 1.8*

5* 6*

0.1* 0.3*

30* 55*

0.5 0.6

0.5 0.6

6 8

2* 3*

8* 12*

0.5 0.6

11 15 15 15 15 15

60* 75* 120* 120* 120* 120*

0.9 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2

0.9 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.3

12 16 16 16 16 16

4* 5* 5* 5* 5* 5*

20* 25* 30* 30* 30* 30*

600 600 600 600 600 800

11 15 15 15 15 15

60* 75* 90* 90* 90* 90*

0.9 1.0 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1

0.9 1.0 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1

12 14 14 14 14 14

4* 5* 5* 5* 5* 5*

750 770 770

600 600 600

15 15 15

75* 90* 90*

1.4 1.4 1.4

1.4 1.4 1.4

18 18 18

1,200 1,300 1,300

600 600 600

19 19 19

75* 90* 90*

1.4 1.4 1.4

1.4 1.4 1.4

17 17 17

Sources: Reprinted with permission from the Dietary Reference Intakes series,National Academies Press.Copyright 1997,1998,2000,2001,by the National Academy of Sciences.These reports may be accessed via www.nap.edu.Courtesy of the National Academies Press,Washington,DC. Note: This table is adapted from the DRI reports; see www.nap.edu.It lists Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs),with Adequate Intakes (AIs) indicated by an asterisk (*).RDAs and AIs may both be used as goals for individual intake.RDAs are set to meet the needs of almost all (97 percent to 98 percent) individuals in a group.For healthy breastfed infants,the AI is the mean intake.The AI for other life stage and gender groups is believed to cover the needs of all individuals in the group,but lack of data prevent being able to specify with confidence the percentage of individuals covered by this intake.

a

65* 80*

0.4* 0.5*

40* 50*

125* 150*

150 200

0.9 1.2

15 25

200* 250*

1.0 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.7 1.7

300 400 400 400 400 400

1.8 2.4 2.4 2.4 2.4 2.4

45 75 90 90 90 90

375* 550* 550* 550* 550* 550*

20* 25* 30* 30* 30* 30*

1.0 1.2 1.3 1.3 1.5 1.5

300 400 400 400 400 400

1.8 2.4 2.4 2.4 2.4 2.4

45 65 75 75 75 75

375* 400* 425* 425* 425* 425*

6* 6* 6*

30* 30* 30*

1.9 1.9 1.9

600 600 600

2.6 2.6 2.6

80 85 85

450* 450* 450*

7* 7* 7*

35* 35* 35*

2.0 2.0 2.0

500 500 500

2.8 2.8 2.8

115 120 120

550* 550* 550*

Given as retinal activity equivalents (RAE). Also known as calciferol.The DRI values are based on the absence of adequate exposure to sunlight. c Also known as ␣-tocopherol. d Given as niacin equivalents (NE),except for infants 0–6 months,which are expressed as preformed niacin. e Given as dietary folate equivalents (DFE). b

Help students become

nutrition savvy Nutrition and You, Second Edition helps students to make healthy nutrition choices and encourages them

12

True or False?

1. Food advertising probably has no effect on you. 2. Food comes from the grocery

to become informed

3. Most farms in the United States are small 4. Coffee and bananas are major

consumers of nutrition

store.

5.

family farms.

p. 449

crops grown in the United States.

p. 453

Locally grown foods usually require fewer natural resources to produce.

p. 456

6. Eating in season can help reduce the “food

information.

p. 446

p. 447

of a particular food.

miles”

p. 457

7. Food policy is not tightly regulated in the United States.

p. 469

8. The food industry has little influence on the regulation of food policy.

p. 472

9. Organic foods are never produced with the use of pesticides. 10.

Organic foods are always preferable to nonorganic foods.

p. 474

p. 475

See page 479 for answers to these Myths and Misperceptions.

Consumerism: From Farm to Table NEW! Consumerism: From Farm to Table The new Chapter 12 adds and enhances coverage of topics such as organic foods, biotechnology, food marketing, food policy, and more. This chapter helps students learn how to make good decisions after they get to the grocery store, conveying how to effectively analyze options and determine a better path for their nutritional health.

Help your students make

better choices

NEW! “Made Over, Made Better” Made Over, Made Better appears at the end of Chapters 4-10, helping students make more nutritious decisions. • In a rich, visual style, this feature illustrates some typical foods students may choose accompanied by an improved, similar food choice. • The choices presented reinforce chapter

Made Over, Made Better! Snacks can be a great way to give your diet a mineral boost. Bananas, for example, are packed with potassium, raisins are naturally high in iron, peanuts are rich in magnesium, and cheese is a ringer for calcium. However, depending upon how these foods are processed, they may be higher in calories, fat, and saturated fat than you bargained for.

If you like this. . .

Try this healthy alternative!

Banana Chips

Banana

Serving size: 1/2 cup

1 small

Calories: 300 Fat: 14 grams Saturated Fat: 12 grams

Calories: 90 Fat: