Obituaries In The Performing Arts, 2005: Film, Television, Radio, Theatre, Dance, Music, Cartoons and Pop Culture (Obituaries in the Performing Arts)

  • 18 365 8
  • Like this paper and download? You can publish your own PDF file online for free in a few minutes! Sign Up

Obituaries In The Performing Arts, 2005: Film, Television, Radio, Theatre, Dance, Music, Cartoons and Pop Culture (Obituaries in the Performing Arts)

Obituaries in the Performing Arts, 2005 This page intentionally left blank Obituaries in the Performing Arts, 2005 F

6,400 2,606 10MB

Pages 421 Page size 512 x 720 pts Year 2010

Report DMCA / Copyright

DOWNLOAD FILE

Recommend Papers

File loading please wait...
Citation preview

Obituaries in the Performing Arts, 2005

This page intentionally left blank

Obituaries in the Performing Arts, 2005 Film, Television, Radio, Theatre, Dance, Music, Cartoons and Pop Culture by

HARRIS M. LENTZ III

McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers Jefferson, North Carolina, and London

Front cover, clockwise from top left: Johnny Carson, Barbara Bel Geddes, John Paul II, James “Scotty” Doohan

ISSN 1087-9617

/

ISBN 0-7864-2489-3

(softcover : 50# alkaline paper)

©2006 Harris M. Lentz, III. All rights reserved No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying or recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Manufactured in the United States of America

McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers Box 611, Jefferson, North Carolina 28640 www.mcfarlandpub.com

To the memory of those friends and family lost during 2005 — Watson “Sivad” Davis, Horace Pierotti, Frank White, Josephine Cerritto, Sen. Eugene McCarthy, Terry Keeter, Betty Dean Lunamand, Robert Fleming, Marjorie Miller, Hazel McKenzie, Louise Byrd, Anne Clifton Dwyer and Keith Andes, Jack Mathis, Tommy Bond, James Doohan, Shelby Foote, Kelly Freas, Michael Sheard

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Celebrity Obits, Joy Martin, Denise Tansil, Blaine Lester, Louis and Carol Baird, Carlin and Renee Stuart, Greg Bridges, Michael and Maggie Hernandez, “Doc,” Dave Ramsey, Ray and Judy Herring, Don and Elaine Kerley, Mark Webb, Wally Traylor, Letsie Axmaker, Jerry Van Hausen, Steve Tines, Ronnie McAfee, Mark Ledbetter, Dennis Traylor, Gwen Beatley, John Anglin, Brian Theros, Jimmy Sowell, Kira Christensen, Shannon Carrico, Keith Prince, Laura Crofcheck, Jerry Warloh, April Buescher, Kat Cunningham, Hayden Brown, the fine folks at J. Alexanders, Willy Moffitt’s, Bob’s Sports Bar, the Memphis Film Festival, Glinda Kelley and Ray Grier of the Ellendale Post Office, the gang at AOL’s Classic Horror Film Board, Tommy Gattas, James Gattas, the University of Memphis Library and the Memphis, Shelby County, and Bartlett Public Libraries.

I greatly appreciate the assistance of my mother, Helene Lentz, and my good friend, Carla Clark. Special thanks also go to my sister, Nikki Walker, and to Bob King at Classic Images, for granting permission to use information from my columns. Also, thanks to Rosa Burnett and the staff at State Technical Institute library, Tom Weaver, Fred Davis, Forrest J Ackerman, Mike Fitzgerald, John Beifuss, Ray Neilson, John Whyborn, Boyd Magers, Larry Tauber, Andrew “Captain Comics” Smith, Jimmy Walker, Tony Pruitt, Greg Bridges, Bobby Mathews, Kent Nelson, Dale Warren, Andrew Clark, Aarin Prichard, Dr. Mark Heffington, Anne Taylor, Andy Branham, John Nelson, Richard Allynwood, Frank de Azpillaga, Irv Jacobs, Bill Warren, Bob Cuneo, Alun Jones, Marty Baumann, Joe Caviolo, Rusty White of Entertainment Insiders, Russ Blatt of Life in Legacy, Barbara and the folks at VoyForums:

vi

TABLE OF CONTENTS Acknowledgments vi Introduction viii Reference Bibliography xi The 2005 Obituaries

vii

1

INTRODUCTION The year 2005 set a new record for the passings of prominent people in the world of the performing arts since I prepared the first volume of this series eleven years ago. The obituaries of nearly 1500 individuals are included in the current book, along with pictures of the vast majority. Among the numerous notables are legendary late-night talk show host Johnny Carson, veteran newscaster Peter Jennings, taboo-breaking comedian Richard Pryor, Pulitzer Prize–winning playwright (and Marilyn Monroe ex) Arthur Miller, filmdom’s first Gidget: Sandra Dee, screen icon Ossie Davis, Wuthering Heights star Geraldine Fitzgerald, Oscar-winning star of The Miracle Worker Anne Bancroft, The Karate Kid’s Mr. Miyagi: Pat Morita, Star Trek’s Scotty, actor James Doohan, and Robert Wise, director of Star Trek: The Motion Picture. The world of television was particularly hard hit in 2005, with Gilligan’s Island’s Gilligan (Bob Denver), Get Smart’s Maxwell Smart (Don Adams), Green Acres’ Oliver Wendell Douglas (Eddie Albert), and Dallas’ Miss Ellie (Barbara Bel Geddes) among the stars who departed. The Hollywood firmament was also depleted with the loss of such stars as Sir John Mills (Best Supporting Actor Academy Award winner for Ryan’s Daughter), Teresa Wright (Best Supporting Actress Academy Award winner for Mrs. Miniver), Virginia Mayo, June Haver, Ruth Hussey, Jean Parker, Sheree North, Margaretta Scott, Maria Schell, and Simone Simon, the exotic star of The Cat People. Paul Henning, who created the hit television sit-com The Beverly Hillbillies, and William J. Bell, who created the soap opera The

Young and the Restless also died, as did Ralph Edwards, the long-time host of This Is Your Life, and Flipper patriarch Brian Kelly. Television supporting actors featured in this work include Batman villain the Riddler (Frank Gorshin), The Incredible Hulk’s nemesis, reporter Jack McGee ( Jack Colvin), western hero Johnny Ringo (Don Durant), the West Wing’s Chief of Staff Leo McGarry ( John Spencer), Seinfeld ’s Dad (Barney Martin), Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman neighbor (Debralee Scott), and The Andy Griffith Show recurring characters Howard Morris (Ernest T. Bass) and Jean Carson (Daphne, one of the Fun Girls). Several television bosses also departed including McGyver’s (Dana Elcar), McCloud ’s ( J.D. Cannon), Lou Grant’s (Mason Adams), Hogan’s Heroes’ Col. Klinck’s, General Burkhalter (Leon Askin), and Clark Kent’s, Perry White from Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman (Lane Smith). Skitch Henderson, the longtime bandleader for The Tonight Show, comedian Louis Nye, who was a comic foil for Tonight’s Steve Allen, and Charles Rocket, who parodied the news on Saturday Night Live, also died in 2005. Other passings include Merchant-Ivory film producer Ismail Merchant, Rambo director George Pan Cosmatos, R&B singer Luther Vandross, caberet star Hildegarde, entertainer Bobby Short, singer Frances Langford, opera sensation Birgit Nilsson, ballet star Fernando Bujones, ice skating sensation Belita, Broadway leading man John Raitt, comedian Nipsey Russell, and serial stars George D. Wallace (Commando Cody from Radar Men from the Moon) and Constance Moore (Wilma Deering from Buck Rogers). Pooh Corner

viii

ix is also a lonelier place with the back to back deaths of the voices of Tigger (ventriloquist Paul Winchell) and Piglet ( John Fielder). Henry Corden, the voice of Fred Flintstone, Thurl Ravenscroft, the voice of Kellogg’s Tony the Tiger, and Len Dresslar, the voice of the Jolly Green Giant, were also silenced. The many film and television character performers whose deaths are noted also include John Vernon (Dean Wormser from Animal House), Jocelyn Brando (the sister of Marlon), Amrish Puri (the villain from Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom), Geoffrey Keen ( James Bond’s M), David Kossoff (The Mouse That Roared scientist), Brock Peters (the innocent defendant from To Kill a Mockingbird ), Patrick Cranshaw (the over-the-hill frat brother Blue from Old School), Matthew McGrory (the giant from Big Fish), Daniel O’Herlihy (the corporate boss from RoboCop), Argentina Brunetti (Mr. Martini’s wife from It’s a Wonderful Life), Mary Jackson (one of the Baldwin Sisters from The Waltons), James Booth (Hook from Zulu), Vincent Schiavelli (the subway ghost from Ghost), Alex McAvoy (the fearsome teacher from Pink Floyd’s The Wall ), Wendie Jo Sperber (Amy from Bosom Buddies), Roy Stuart (Corporal Boyle from Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C ), Ileen Getz ( Judith from 3rd Rock from the Sun), Edward Bunker (Reservoir Dogs’ Mr. Blue), and such familiar faces as Harold J. Stone, Lloyd Bochner, Eva Renzi, Ford Rainey, Sandy Ward, Keith Andes, Lorna Thayer, Stephen Elliott, Carolyn Kearney, Kevin Hagen, John Larch, Harrie White Medin, Macon McCalman, Kay Walsh, Richard Eastham, Warren J. Kemmerling, and Marc Lawrence. The music world lost synthesizer inventor Robert Moog, “Ring of Fire” songwriter Merle Kilgore, blues artist Little Milton, Mike Gibbins of Badfinger, Obie Benson of the Four Tops, Mike Botts of Bread, and Spencer Dryden of Traffic. A member of the musical family the Cowsills, Barry, also perished, found dead following the devastation on the Gulf Coast caused by Hurricane Katrina. Robert Clarke, who starred in the cult scifi films The Hideous Sun Demon and The Man from Planet X, and Jason Evers and Adele Lamont, who co-starred in the schlock classic The Brain that Wouldn’t Die, died. Other cult film stars who passed include Pamela Duncan (lead-

2005 • Obituaries ing lady from Attack of the Crab Monsters), Paul Partain (a victim of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre), Cal Bolder (the monster from Jesse James Meets Frankenstein Daughter), Gregg Martell (the Caveman from Dinosaurus! ), Luce Potter (the bizarre Martian Intelligence from Invaders from Mars), Mel Welles (florist Gravis Muchnick from Little Shop of Horrors), Ron Randell (The She Creature leading man), and Fred Borges (star of Weasels Rip My Flesh). Death also claimed directors and producers Richard Cunha (Frankenstein’s Daughter), Herbert L. Strock (I Was a Teenage Werewolf ), Wolf Rilla (Village of the Damned ), Alfred Shaughnessy (Cat Girl ), and Wyott Ordung (Monster from the Ocean Floor). Also included within is Watson Davis, who as the caped and fanged Sivad, hosted many of these films on television’s Fantastic Features. Contemporary horror films lost three producers from the Halloween franchise, Debra Hill, Joseph Wolf and Moustapha Akkad (who perished in a terrorist bombing in Lebanon), and Saw and Saw II producer Greg Hoffman. The two stars of the 1970s British cult science fiction series U.F.O., Ed Bishop and Michael Billington, died days apart, and Blake’s 7 actor David Jackson followed. From the world of Star Wars, Michael Sheard (Admiral Ozzel) and John Hollis (Lobot) from The Empire Strikes Back, and William Hootkins (Porkins) from Star Wars also passed, as did several producers and directors from the long-running Star Trek franchise, Michael Piller and Herbert J. Wright. Literary losses from 2005 include authors John Fowles (The French Lieutenant’s Woman), Judith Rossner (Looking for Mr. Goodbar), and Rona Jaffe (The Best of Everything), Neil Simon’s brother Danny, Pulitzer Prize–winning playwright August Wilson, and Nobel laureates Saul Bellow and Claude Simon. Evan Hunter, who scripted Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds and wrote detective novels as Ed McBain, and Ernest Lehman who wrote Hitchcock’s North by Northwest are also found within these pages, along with science fiction legends Andre Norton, Jack L. Chalker, and Robert Sheckley. Legendary comic writer and artist Will Eisner, who created The Spirit, and Dale Messick, creator of the long-running comic strip Brenda Starr, were joined by Mad magazine artist and

Obituaries • 2005 science fiction illustrator Kelly Freas, Dick Tracy writer Michael Killian, Finding Nemo animator Dan Lee, Superman artist Paul H. Cassidy, Muppets co-creator Jerry Juhl, and Berenstain Bears creator Stan Berenstain. Rainier III, the Prince of Monaco whose marriage to Hollywood star Grace Kelly transformed her into a real-life Princess, and Karol Wojtyla, an actor and playwright who became the first Pole to lead the Roman Catholic Church as Pope John Paul II, are also included in this year’s volume. Also listed are automotive innovator John DeLorean, O.J. attorney Johnnie Cochrane, Nazi hunter Simon Wiesenthal, chicken magnate Frank Perdue, quirky tele-evangelist Dr. Gene Scott, Shirely Temple’s husband Charles Black and Judy Garland’s ex, Sid Luft, stripper Candy Barr, Oscar-winning art director Alexander Golitzen, Royal photographer the Earl of Lichfield, model-turned-bounty hunter Domino Harvey, poet and presidential candidate Eugene McCarthy, Star Trek theme soprano Loulie Jean Norman, Oscar-winning songwriter Joel Hirschhorn, Italian scripter Agenore “Age” Incrocci, Valley of the Cliff hangers creator Jack Mathis, Oscar Meyer’s Little Oscar George Molchan, surfing legends Dale Velzy and Wayne Miyata, and Gunsmoke fast-draw artist Arvo Ojala. Other passings include Civil War historian Shelby Foote and Civil War reenactor Brian Pohanka, along with Lucy Richardson, who inspired the Beatles’ tune “Lucy in the Sky (With Diamonds)” and John Fred, who parodied the song with “Judy in Disguise” (With Glasses). Also among the deceased are Little Rascal stars Tommy “Butch” Bond and and Gordon “Porky” Lee, and Sig Frohlich, who was Mickey Rooney’s stunt double and perhaps the last of the Flying Monkey’s from The Wizard of Oz. Lon McCallister, a juvenile star from Hollywood’s Golden Age, passed on, and Tara Correa-McMullen, a young teen actress, was gunned down in a drive-by gang shooting. The world of professional wrestling lost young superstars Eddie Guerrero and Chris Candido, and veteran mat legends Reggie “the Crusher” Lisowski, Pistol Pez Whatley, and Lord Alfred Hayes. German boxing champion Max Schmelling and Vikki LaMotta, wife of Jake “The Raging Bull” LaMotta, also passed.

x The animal kingdom also had several losses including race horse I Two Step Too, who appeared in the film Seabiscuit, Gordy, the seal star of German television, and Sam, who three times earned the moniker of World’s Ugliest Dog. This book provides a single source that notes the deaths of all major, and many minor, figures in the fields of film, television, cartoons, theatre, music and popular literature. The obituaries within this volume contain pertinent details of deaths including date, place and cause, of roughly 1500 persons. Biographical information and career highlights and achievements are also provided. I have also included a complete-as-possible filmography for film and television performers. Most obituaries are followed by citations to major newspapers and periodical stories reporting the death. A photograph has been included for many of the individuals. I have been writing obituaries of film personalities for nearly thirty years, beginning with a column in Forry Ackerman’s Famous Monsters of Filmland in the late 1970s. Many of the film obituaries in the work are taken from my monthly column in Classic Images (P.O. Box 809, Muscatine, IA 52761), a newspaper devoted to classic films and their performers. Information on the passing of the individuals found in this volume has been gathered from a myriad of sources. Primary sources, as previously noted, are listed in the individual bibliographies, including The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, Times (of London), The Washington Post, Variety, Time, People, TV Guide and Newsweek. Other sources include Boyd Mager’s Western Clippings, The Memphis Commercial Appeal, The Hollywood Reporter, The (Manchester) Guardian, The Comics Buyer’s Guide, Locus, Pro Wrestling Torch, Psychotronic Video, The Comics Journal and Facts on File. Several sources on the internet have also been helpful, including Celebrity Obits (http://www/voy.com/60649/), Life in Legacy (formerly Famous Deaths — Week in Review) (http://www.lifeinlegacy.com/), Entertainment Insiders (http://www.einsiders.com/features/ columns/2005obituaries), and the Internet Movie Database, Ltd. (http://us.imdb.com/).

REFERENCE BIBLIOGRAPHY The Academy Players Directory. Beverly Hills, Calif.: Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Science, 1978–2003. The American Film Institute Catalog: Feature Films, 1911–20. Patricia King Hansen, ed. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988. American Film Institute Catalog: Feature Films, 1921–30. Kenneth W. Munden, ed. New York: R.R. Bowker, 1971. The American Film Institute Catalog: Feature Films, 1931–40. Patricia King Hansen, ed. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993. American Film Institute Catalog: Feature Films, 1961–70. Richard P. Krafsur, ed. New York: R.R. Bowker, 1976. Brooks, Tim. The Complete Directory of Prime Time TV Stars. New York: Ballantine Books, 1987. Brown, Les. The New York Times Encyclopedia of Television. New York: Times Books, 1977. Bushnell, Brooks. Directors and Their Films. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1993. Chilton, John. Who’s Who of Jazz. Philadelphia, PA: Chilton Book, 1972. Contemporary Authors. Detroit: Gale Research, various editions. DeLong, Thomas A. Radio Stars. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1996. Dimmitt, Richard Bertrand. An Actors Guide to the Talkies. Metuchen, NJ: Scarecrow, 1967. Two Volumes.

Erickson, Hal. Television Cartoon Shows. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1995. Fetrow, Alan G. Feature Films, 1940–1949. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1994. _____. Feature Films, 1950–1959. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1999. _____. Sound Films, 1927–1939. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1992. Finch, Yolande. Finchy. New York : Wyndham Books, 1981. Fisher, Dennis. Horror Films Directors, 1931–1990. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1991. Hunter, Allan, ed. Chambers Concise Encyclopedia of Film and Television. New York: W & R. Chambers Ltd., 1991. Katz, Ephraim. The Film Encyclopedia, 2d ed. New York: HarperPerennial, 1994. Malloy, Alex G., ed. Comic Book Artists. Radnor, Penn.: Wallace-Homestead, 1993. Maltin, Leonard, ed. Movie and Video Guide 1995. New York: Signet Books, 1994. Marill, Alvin H. Movies Made for Television. Westport, CT: Arlington House, 1980. Mathis, Jack. Republican Confidential, Vol. 2: The Players. Barrington, IL: Jack Mathis Advertising, 1992. McNeil, Alex. Total Television. New York: Penguin Books, 1996. Monaco, James. Who’s Who in American Film Now. New York: Zoetrobe, 1988. Nash, Jay Robert, and Stanley Ralph Ross. The Motion Picture Guide. 10 vols. Chicago; Cinebooks, 1985.

xi

Obituaries • 2005 Nowlan, Robert A., and Gwendolyn Wright Nowlan. The Films of the Eighties. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1991. Oliviero, Jeffrey. Motion Picture Players’ Credits. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1991. Parrish, James Robert. Actors’ Television Credits 1950–1972. Metuchen, NJ: Scarecrow, 1973. _____. Film Actors Guide: Western Europe. Metuchen, NJ: Scarecrow, 1977. Ragan, David. Who’s Who in Hollywood, 1900– 1976. New Rochelle, NY: Arlington House, 1976. Rovin, Jeff. The Fabulous Fantasy Films. South Bunswick, NJ: A.S. Barnes, 1977. Terrace, Vincent. Encyclopedia of Television Series, Pilots and Specials, 1937–1973. New York: Zoetrobe, 1986. _____. Encyclopedia of Television Series, Pilots and Specials, 1974–1984. New York: Zoetrobe, 1986. Walker, John, ed. Halliwell’s Filmgoer’s and Video Viewer’s Companion, 10th Edition. New York: HarperPerennial, 1993. Watson, Elena M. Television Horror Movie Hosts. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1991. Weaver, Tom. Attack of the Monster Movie Makers: Interviews with 20 Genre Giants. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1994.

xii _____. Eye on Science Fiction. Jefferson, NC : McFarland, 2003. _____. I Was a Monster Movie Maker. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2001. _____. Interviews with B Science Fiction and Horror Movie Makers. Jefferson, NC : McFarland, 1988. _____. It Came from Weaver Five: Interviews with 20 Zany, Glib and Earnest Moviemakers in the SF and Horror Traditions of the Thirties, Forties, Fifties and Sixties. Jefferson, NC : McFarland, 1994. _____. Monsters, Mutants and Heavenly Creatures. Baltimore, MD: Midnight Marquee Press, 1996. _____. Science Fiction and Fantasy Film Flashbacks. Jefferson, NC.: McFarland, 1998. _____. Science Fiction Stars and Horror Heroes. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1991. _____. They Fought in the Creature Features: Interviews with 23 Classic Horror, Science Fiction and Serial Stars. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1994. Who’s Who in the World. Chicago: Marquis Who’s Who, various editions. Willis, John, ed. Screen World. New York: Crown Publishers, 1958–2001.

OBITUARIES IN THE PERFORMING ARTS, 2005 ABRAHAM, GEORGE “DOC” & KATY George “Doc” Abraham and his wife, Katy Abraham, who co-hosted the popular radio gardening program The Green Thumb from 1952 until their retirement in December of 2002, both died in Troy, New York, in 2005, Doc from a heart ailment on January 27, 2005, at age 89, and Katy from complications from Alzheimer’s disease on May 24, 2005, at age 83. The couple were childhood sweethearts in Wayland, New York, and both graduated from Cornell University, where they earned degrees in horticulture and journalism. They were married in 1942 and began writing a syndicated gardening column after Doc was discharged from the U.S. Army after World War II. They soon were addressing a large radio audience, hosting a half-hour radio call-in program out of Rochester, New York’s WHAM, dispensing gardening wisdom along with poetry and platitudes over a fifty year span. They also wrote 16 popular books on gardening including The Green Thumb Garden Handbook, Growing Plants from Seeds, Green Thumb Wisdom: Garden Myths Revealed!, and the autobiographical A Bathtub Built for Two. • Los Angeles Times, May 25, 2005, B15.

Don Adams (as Maxwell Smart)

Talent Scouts in 1954, which led to appearances on various television programs including The Steve Allen Show, The Rosemary Clooney Show, The Dinah Shore Chevy Show, Startime, and Toast of the Town, and was a regular performer on Kraft Music Hall in the early 1960s. Adams often teamed with fellow comic Bill Dana from the 1950s, and was cast as incompetent detective Byron Glick when Dana got his own television series, The Bill Dana Show, in 1963. He also played the voice of the animated penguin Tennessee Tuxedo in the cartoon series Tennessee Tuxedo and His Tales in the early 1960s, and was the voice of Comet in the 1964 animated version of Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer. Adams remained with The Bill Dana Show for two seasons until being cast as Maxwell Smart in 1965. He was ably supported by Barbara Feldon as the lovely Agent 99 and Edward Platt as the bald and frustrated Chief of the spy organization CONTROL. Adams earned three Emmy Awards while battling the forces of evil, KAOS, for five seasons. The show spawned such popular catch phrases as “Sorry about that, Chief ” when he bumbled a mission, and “Would you believe...?” when a previous exaggeration went challenged. He subsequently starred as Detective Lennie Crooke in the short-lived comedy series The Partners from 1971 to 1972, and was host of the syndicated program Don Adams’ Screen Test in 1975. He starred as Howard Bannister in the sit-com Check It Out in 1985. He also guest starred in episodes of Hulabaloo, The Andy Williams Show, The Dean Martin Show, Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre, The Danny Thomas Hour, Rowan & Martin’s LaughIn, It’s Happening, Playboy After Dark, The Sonny and Cher Comedy Hour, The Love Boat, Fantasy Island, The Fall Guy, Empty Nest, and Nick Freno: Licensed Teacher. Adams also was the voice of Inspector Gadget on several cartoon series from the 1980s. He was also seen in the films Jimmy the Kid (1982) and Back to the Beach (1987). Adams reprised the role of Maxwell Smart in the 1980 feature film The Nude Bomb, and the 1989 tele-film Get

George “Doc” and Katy Abraham

ACHS, ROBERT Filmmaker Robert Achs died of cancer in New York City on June 21, 2005. He was 54. Achs was born on August 19, 1950. He worked as a cinematographer for the HBO television series Taxi Cab Confessions. He also photographed the documentaries and films No Maps on My Taps (1979), Death of a Prophet (1981), In Our Hands (1984), Kaddish (1985), Damned in the U.S.A. (1991), and Maya Lin: A Strong Clear Vision (1994). ADAMS, DON Comic actor Don Adams, who starred as bumbling secret agent Maxwell Smart in the 1960s comedy spy spoof Get Smart, died of a lung infection in a Los Angeles hospital on September 25, 2005. He was 82. Adams was born Donald James Yarmy in New York City on April 13, 1923. He served in the U.S. Marines during World War II and was wounded at Guadalcanal. After the war he began working as a standup comic. He won a competition for Arthur Godfrey’s

1

Obituaries • 2005 Smart, Again!. Fox aired a new Get Smart series for 7 episodes in 1995, with Adams again as Maxwell Smart, now Chief of CONTROL, overseeing his son, Zach Smart, played by Andy Dick. Adams also appeared in numerous commercials and was a voice actor in such cartoon programs as Wait Till Your Father Gets Home, The New Scooby-Doo Movies, Gadget Boy’s Adventures in History, and Pepper Ann as Principal Hickey. Adams brother, Dick Yarmy, was also an actor who often gueststarred on Get Smart. He died in 1992. Adams was married three times and had seven children. His daughter, Cecily, was also an actress, and died in 2004. • Los Angeles Times, Sept. 27, 2005, B10; New York Times, Sept. 27, 2005, B7; People, Oct. 10, 2005, 73; Times (of London), Sept. 28, 2005, 67; Variety, Oct. 3, 2005, 76.

2 Miss Marple: Nemesis (1987), Danny, the Champion of the World (1989), The Bride in Black (1990), and The Count of Solar (1991). Adams starred as Alexander Krivenko in the 1987 science fiction series Star Cop, and guest starred in episodes of The Man in Room 17, Z Cars, The Troubleshooters, Rogues’ Gallery, The Rivals of Sherlock Holmes, Dixon of Dock Green, Hunter’s Walk, The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, Howard’s Way, Forever Green, The Piglet Files, Maigret, and Kavanagh QC.

ADAMS, JONATHAN British actor Jonathan Adams, who was an original cast member of The Rocky Horror Show, died in London on June 13, 2005. He was 75. Adams was born in Northampton, England, on February 14, 1931. He began his career in regional theater in 1959 and moved to London in the mid–1960s. He performed with various repertory companies before being cast in Richard O’Brien’s off-beat musical The Rocky Horror Show. He was featured as the Narrator in the London stage production at the Royal court’s Theatre Upstairs. A film version was made two years later and Adams took the part of Dr. Everett Von Scott, a Rival Scientist, in that production. The play and film developed a major cult following in England and the United States. Adams appeared in various other theatrical productions including a series of one man shows. He also performed in the musical Tomfoolery (1980), Master Class (1984), Metropolis (1989), and Valentine’s Day (1991). His other film credits include Three for All (1974), It Could Happen to You (1975), Eskimo Nell (1975), Adventures of a Private Eye (1977), Adventures of a Plumber’s Mate (1978), Revolution (1985), and the 1990 horror film Two Evil Eyes. He also appeared often on British television in such productions as The Donati Conspiracy (1973), Jesus of Nazareth (1977), King Richard the Second (1978), Anton & Cleopatra (1981), Bergerac (1981) as Dr. Lejeune, The Barchester Chronicles (1982), Squaring the Circle (1984), The Invisible Man (1984), Exploits at West Poley (1985), London Embassy (1987), The Day After the Fair (1987),

ADAMS, MASON Character actor Mason Adams, who as managing editor Charlie Hume in the 1970s television series Lou Grant, died at his home in Manhattan on April 26, 2005. He was 86. Adams was born in New York City on February 26, 1919. He was a leading performer on radio in the 1940s and 1950s, starring as Pepper Young in the radio soap opera Pepper Young’s Family. He also voiced the Kryptonite-powered Atom Man on the Superman radio serial. Adams was also seen as Thomas Watson in the 1947 film Mr. Bell. He also appeared in episodes of the television series The Man Behind the Badge and Robert Montgomery Presents. Adams was a popular character actor in films and television from the 1970s, appearing in the features The Happy Hooker (1975), God Told Me To (1976), The Final Conflict (1981), F/X (1986), Toy Soldiers (1991), Son in Law (1993), Not of This Earth (1995), Houseguest (1995), Life Among the Cannibals (1996), Touch (1997), Hudson River Blues (1997), and The Lesser Evil (1998). He also appeared in the tele-films The Deadliest Season (1977), And Baby Makes Six (1979), Shining Season (1979), Flamingo Road (1980), Murder Can Hurt You (1980), Revenge of the Stepford Wives (1980), Peking Encounter (1981), The Kid with the Broken Halo (1982), The Grinch Grinches the Cat in the Hat (1982) as the voice of the Cat in the Hat, Adam (1983), Solomon Northup’s Odyssey (1984), Passions (1984), The Night They Saved Christmas (1984), Under Siege (1986), Northstar (1986), Who Is Julia? (1986), Rage of Angels: The Story Continues (1986), A Quiet Conspiracy (1989), Perry Mason: The Case of the Maligned Mobster (1991), Jonathan: The Boy Nobody Wanted (1992), Assault at West Point: The Court-Martial of Johnson Whittaker (1994), Murder One: Diary of a Serial Killer (1997), and From the Earth to the Moon (1998). He starred as Dr. Frank Prescott in the television soap opera Another World

Jonathan Adams

Mason Adams

3

2005 • Obituaries

from 1976 to 1977, and co-starred with Ed Asner in Lou Grant from 1977 to 1982. He appeared as Gordon Blair in the 1986 series Morningstar/Eveningstar and was Everett Daye in the 1989 series Knight & Daye. His other television credits include episodes of The Love Boat, Family Ties, Matlock, Murder, She Wrote, Monsters, Family Matters, Civil Wars, Class of ’96, Murder One, The West Wing, and Oz. From the 1970s Adams was the commercial spokesman for Smucker’s Jam, whose familiar intonation of the line “With a name like Smucker’s, it has to be good,” became the company’s catchphrase. • Los Angeles Times, Apr. 29, 2005, B11; New York Times, Apr. 28, 2005, C18; Time, May 9, 2005, 28; Variety, May 9, 2005, 68.

ADAMS, TONY Film producer Tony Adams, who produced many of Blake Edwards films, died of a stroke on October 22, 2005. He was 52. Adams was born in Dublin, Ireland, on February 15, 1953. He began working in films as an assistant to director John Boorman on Deliverance in 1972. He subsequently served as associate producer on Blake Edwards’ The Return of the Pink Panther (1975) and The Pink Panther Strikes Again (1976). Adams continued to work with Edwards, producing most of his films. He produced Revenge of the Pink Panther (1978), 10 (1979), S.O.B. (1981), Victor/Victoria (1982), Trail of the Pink Panther (1982), The Man Who Loved Women (1983), Micki + Maude (1984), A Fine Mess (1986), That’s Life! (1986), Blind Date (1987), Sunset (1988), Skin Deep (1989), Switch (1991), and Son of the Pink Panther (1993). He also produced the tele-films Justin Case (1988) and Peter Gunn (1989), and coproduced the stage version of Victor/Victoria on Broadway in 1995. • Los Angeles Times, Oct. 26, 2005, B11; New York Times, Oct. 25, 2005, C19; Times (of London), Nov. 23, 2005, 65; Variety, Oct. 31, 2005, 73.

Hasil Adkins

songs, often featuring Adkin’s macabre humor, garnered him a cult following and some of his early works were collected for the 1986 album Out to Hunch. He also released recordings of “The Wild Man” and “Peanut Butter Rock and Roll.” Adkins was also seen in several films in recent years including The Wild World of Hasil Adkins (1993), R.I.P., Rest in Pieces (1997), Let Me Be Your Band (2003), The Heart Is Deceitful Above All Things (2004), and Die You Zombie Bastards! (2005). • Los Angeles Times, Apr. 29, 2005, B10; New York Times, Apr. 30, 2005, B9.

ADLER, GERALD Film and television distributor Gerald Adler died of respiratory failure following a brain hemorrhage in a Los Angeles hospital on October 11, 2005. He was 81. Adler was born in New York City on March 9, 1924. He worked in radio before joining NBC in 1953, becoming director of international enterprises for the network. Adler also served as president of NBC Enterprises from 1968 to 1973. He was instrumental in pioneering the distribution of films and television programs throughout the world. Adler served as managing director of Viacom International in the 1980s, and was vice president of the Motion Picture Export Association of America from 1988 to 1990. • Los Angeles Times, Oct. 20, 2005, B9; Variety, Oct. 31, 2005, 73. AH-YUE LOU German actor Ah-Yue Lou died in Hamburg, Germany, on April 17, 2005. He was 81.

Tony Adams

ADKINS, HASIL Rockabilly singer Hasil Adkins was found dead at his home near Madison, West Virginia, on April 26, 2005. He was 67. Adkins was born in Boone County, West Virginia, on April 29, 1937. He began performing in rural West Virginia in the 1950s. He performed as a one-man band, recording hundreds of songs including “She Said” and “We Got a Date.” His

Ah-Yue Lou

Obituaries • 2005 Ah-Yue Lou was born in Hamburg on October 7, 1923. He starred in numerous films and television productions in the 1950s and 1960s including Freddy und das Lied der Sudsee (1962), A Mission for Mr. Dodd (1964), and The Corrupt Ones (1967). AILLAUD, GILLES French painter and scenic designer Gilles Aillaud died in Paris on March 24, 2005. He was 76. Aillaud was born in Paris on June 5, 1928, the son of architect Emile Aillaud. He began his career as an artist in the late 1940s. He was also a production designer on numerous theatrical works, as well as the French television productions of Don Carlos (1996), Le Couronnement de Poppee (2000), and Il Ritorno d’Ulisse in Patria (2002).

Gilles Aillaud

AITKEN, LAUREL Jamaican musician Laurel Aitken died on July 17, 2005. He was 78. Aitken was born in Cuba on April 22, 1927, and emigrated to Jamaica at the age of 11. He began singing calypso in his early teens, and was soon performing in Kingston nightclubs. He recorded the song “Roll Jordan Roll” in 1957, and had a hit with “Little Sheila” and “Boogie in My Bones” the following year. Aitken was regarded as one of the earliest innovators of the Jamaican ska sound, with such songs as “Bartender, More Whiskey” and “Judgement Day.” He moved to London in the early 1960s,

4 where he continued to record and perform. He went into semi-retirement in the 1970s, when a new generation of reggae performers came to prominence. Aitken returned to the forefront the following decade during the 2Tone ska revival. He performed with such groups as the Toasters, the Busters, and the New York Ska Jazz Ensemble. He also appeared in the 1986 film Absolute Beginners with David Bowie. • Times (of London), July 26, 2005, 52. AJETI, MELIHATE Kosovar actress Melihate Ajeti died of a heart attack in Prishtina, Kosova, on March 28, 2005. She was 69. Ajeti was born in Prishtina, then Yugoslavia, on October 9, 1935. She began her career on stage while in her teens and appeared in nearly 200 roles during her career. She starred in productions of Hamlet, Othello, Antigone, Macbeth, and many others. Ajeti was also featured in numerous films including Wolf of Prokletija (1968), Zedj (1971), Treni (1976), Gjurmet e Baredha (1980), and Dorotej (1981).

AKKAD, MOUSTAPHA Moustapha Akkad, the Syrian-born filmmaker who served as executive producer of the Halloween horror film series, died of injuries received in a terrorist bombing of a hotel in Amman, Jordan, on November 11, 2005. He was 75. His daughter, Rima Akkad Monia, who was with him attending a wedding in Jordan, was also killed in the bombing. Akkad was born in Aleppo, Syria, in July of 1930. He came to the United States in 1950 to studying filmmaking. He was best known as the executive producer of John Carpenter’s landmark horror film Halloween in 1978. Akkad was also executive producer for the sequels Halloween II (1981), Halloween III: Season of the Witch (1982), Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers (1988), Halloween 5: The Revenge of Michael Myers (1989), Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers (1995), Halloween H2O: 20 Years Later (1998), and Halloween: Resurrection (2002). Akkad also produced and directed the 1976 film Mohammed, Messenger of God (aka The Message) and 1981’s Omar Mukhtar: Lion of the Desert, about a Muslim rebel who battled Italian troops in Libya during World War II. • Los Angeles Times, Nov. 12, 2005, B1; New York Times, Nov. 12, 2005, A13; Times (of London), Dec. 6, 2005, 64; Variety, Nov. 21, 2005, 73.

Moustapha Akkad Laurel Aitken

5 ALBERT, EDDIE Leading film and television actor Eddie Albert, who earned two Academy Award nominations for best supporting actor and starred in the popular television sit-com Green Acres, died of pneumonia at his home near Pacific Palisades, California, on May 26, 2005. He was 99. He was born Edward Albert Heimberger in Rock Island, Illinois, on April 22, 1906. He began his career on the local stage in the early 1930s, and was soon performing on radio as a singer and comic. He made his debut on the Broadway stage in the 1936 comedy O Evening Star, and subsequently starred in Garson Kanin’s production of Brother Rat. He also appeared in Broadway productions of Room Service (1937) and The Boys from Syracuse (1938). He made his film debut in 1937 reprising his role as Bing Edwards in the film version of Brother Rat, and also starred in the 1940 sequel Brother Rat and the Baby. He also appeared in the films On Your Toes (1939), Four Wives (1939), An Angel from Texas (1940), My Love Came Back (1940), A Dispatch from Reuters (1940), The Great Mr. Nobody (1941), Four Mothers (1941), The Wagons Roll at Night (1941), Thieves Fall Out (1941), Out of the Fog (1941), Treat ’Em Rough (1942), Eagle Squadron (1942), Lady Bodyguard (1943), Ladies’ Day (1943), and Bombardier (1943). Albert served in the U.S. Navy during World War II, and was awarded the Bronze Star while serving in the Pacific. He returned to the screen after the war in such films as Strange Voyage (1946), Rendezvous with Annie (1946), The Perfect Marriage (1947), Hit Parade of 1947 (1947), Smash-Up: The Story of a Woman (1947), Time Out of Mind (1947), Unconquered (1947), The Dude Goes West (1948), You Gotta Stay Happy (1948), and Every Girl Should Be Married (1948). He also began Eddie Albert Productions, which produced such educational 16-millimeter films as the pioneer sex education films Human Growth and Human Beginnings. Albert continued his career in films, usually playing a light leading man in such features as The Fuller Brush Girl (1950), You’re in the Navy Now (1951), Meet Me After the Show (1951), Actor’s and Sin (1952), Carrie (1952), Roman Holiday (1953) which earned him an Oscar nomination for his role as Gregory Peck’s pal, The Girl Rush (1955), Oklahoma! (1955), I’ll Cry Tomorrow (1955), Attack (1956), The Teahouse of the August Moon (1956), The Sun Also Rises (1957), The Joker Is Wild (1957), Orders to Kill (1958), The Roots of Heaven (1958), The Gun Runners (1958), Beloved Infidel (1959), The Young Doctors (1961), Madison Avenue (1962), The Longest Day (1962), Who’s Got the Action? (1962), The Two Little Bears (1963), Miracle of the White Stallions (1963), Captain Newman, M.D. (1963), The Party’s Over (1965), and 7 Women (1966). Albert also began appearing frequently on television from the late 1940s, starring in episodes of such series as The Ford Theatre Hour, The Chevrolet Tele-Theatre, Suspense, Lights Out, Somerset Maugham TV Theatre, Schlitz Playhouse of Stars, Studio One, Danger, The Revlon Mirror Theater, the science documentary Our Mr. Sun, and Studio One starring as Winston Smith in an acclaimed adaptation of George Orwell’s 1984. He starred as Larry Tucker in the 1952 comedy series Leave It to Larry with Ed Begley, and hosted the summer variety shows Nothing But the Best in 1953 and Saturday Night Revue in 1954. He also guest

2005 • Obituaries

Eddie Albert

starred in The Philip Morris Playhouse, The Philco Television Playhouse, You Show of Shows, The Motorola Television Hour, The United States Steel Hour, Goodyear Television Playhouse, Letter to Loretta, Medallion Theatre, Toast of the Town, General Electric Theater, TV Reader’s Digest, Front Row Center, Robert Montgomery Presents, The Alcoa Hour, Climax!, Zane Grey Theater, Wagon Train, Studio 57, Frontier Justice, Goodyear Theatre, Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse, Playhouse 90, The David Niven Show, Frontier Justice, Laramie, Riverboat, Sunday Showcase, Startime, Tales of Wells Fargo, Ben Casey, The Virginian, Naked City, The DuPont Show of the Week, The Wide Country, Sam Benedict, The Eleventh Hour, The Greatest Show on Earth, Combat!, Dr. Kildare, The Lieutenant, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, Mr. Novak, The Outer Limits, The Reporter, Rawhide, Kraft Suspense Theatre, The Rogues, Burke’s Law, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., The Dean Martin Show, The Carol Burnett Show, and The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour. Albert starred as city lawyer Oliver Wendell Douglas, who takes his wife, played by Eva Gabor, to start a new life on a small country farm in popular comedy series Green Acres from 1965 to 1971. He also guest starred in the same role on the sister programs The Beverly Hillbillies and Petticoat Junction. Albert was also seen in the tele-films Columbo: Dead Weight (1971), See the Man Run (1971), Fireball Forward (1972), The Borrowers (1973), Benjamin Franklin (1974), and Promise Him Anything (1975). He was the narrator of the 1972 animated version of Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax and earned a second Oscar nomination for his role in the 1972 film The Heartbreak Kid. He made a rare screen appearance as a villain, playing the evil Warden Hazen in the 1974 prison football film The Longest Yard starring Burt Reynolds. He also appeared in the films McQ (1974), The Take (1974), Escape to Witch Mountain (1975), the 1975 horror film The Devil’s Rain, Whiffs (1975), Hustle (1975), Moving Violation (1976), Birch Interval (1977), The Border (1979), The Concorde: Airport ’79 (1979), How to Beat the High Co$t of Living (1980), Foolin’ Around (1980), Yesterday (1981), Take This Job and Shove It (1981), The Act (1982), Yes, Giorgio (1982), Dreamscape (1984), Stitches (1985), Head Office (1985), Turnaround (1987), Brenda Starr (1989), The Big Picture (1989), and Headless! (1994). Albert starred as Frank McBride in the light detective series Switch with Robert

Obituaries • 2005 Wagner from 1975 to 1978, and was Carlton Travis in the prime-time soap opera Falcon Crest in the early 1980s. He was also seen in the tele-films Evening in Byzantium (1978), The Word (1978), Trouble in High Timber Country (1980), Beulah Land (1980), The Oklahoma City Dolls (1981), Peter and Paul (1981), Goliath Awaits (1981), Beyond Witch Mountain (1982), Rooster (1982), The Demon Murder Case (1983), Burning Rage (1984), In Like Flynn (1985), Mercy or Murder? (1987), War and Remembrance (1988), The Girl from Mars (1991), and The Barefoot Executive (1995). He also guest starred in episodes of McCloud, Here’s Lucy, Kung Fu, The Fall Guy, Simon & Simon, The Love Boat, Hotel, Highway to Heaven, Murder, She Wrote, The Twilight Zone, thirtysomething, The Ray Bradbury Theater, The Golden Palace, The Jackie Thomas Show, and Time Trax. He was the voice on the villainous Vulture in several episodes of the Spider-Man cartoon series, and reprised his role as Oliver Wendell Douglas in the 1990 reunion tele-film Return to Green Acres. Albert was married to actress Margo, who starred in the 1937 fantasy classic Lost Horizon, from 1945 until her death in 1985. He is survived by his son, actor Edward Albert, Jr., and a daughter, Maria Albert Zucht. • Los Angeles Times, May 28, 2005, B20; New York Times, May 28, 2005, C14; People, June 13, 2005, 150; Time, June 6, 2005, 25; Times (of London), May 31, 2005, 49.

ALESSANDRI, LUISA Luisa Alessandri, the long-time assistant director to Vittorio De Sica, died in Rome on March 18, 2005. She was 91. Alessandri was De Sica’s assistant from his first film, Red Roses, in 1940, through his final picture, The Voyage in 1974. Her film credits also include Piccolo Alpino (1940), The Dream of Everything (1940), The Children Are Watching Us (1944), The Bicycle Thief (1948), Hello Elephant (1952), Umberto D (1952), Frisky (1954), The Gold of Naples (1954), It Happens in Roma (1955), Scandal in Sorrento (1955), The Sign of Venus (1955), Two Women (1960), The Last Judgment (1961), Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow (1963), Marriage Italian-Style (1964), After the Fox (1966), and The Garden of the Finzi-Continis (1970). In recent years Alessandri collaborated with De Sica’s son, Manuel, on a television documentary of the director, Long Live De Sica. • Variety, Apr. 18, 2005, 44. ALEXANDER, MICHAEL Actor Michael Anderson died in England in October of 2005. He was 78. Alexander was born in the British Bahamas in 1927. He began his career on stage while in his teens and served in British army’s theatrical unit during World War II. He performed on television and radio in New York after the war. He made his debut on the London stage in 1952’s production of The Troublemakers. He also appeared in productions of The Day Nursery (1955) and The Beaux Stratagem (1957). Alexander also appeared in several films including The Love Lottery (1954) and The Gilded Cage (1954). He starred as Spike Stranahan in the BBC science fiction television mini-series Return to the Lost Planet in 1955. His other television credits include episodes of Colonel March of Scotland Yard, The Count of Monte Cristo, Storyboard, Jacks and Knaves, and Suspense. Alexander’s acting career was ended when he contracted polio in 1961. After a year of hospitalization he began

6

Michael Alexander

working as a newsreader at Southern Television, and became head of television programs with Gibraltar Broadcasting in 1964. He continued to work as a television executive over the next three decades and, in the 1990s, wrote profiles on various film stars for British radio. Alexander was married to actress Rosemary Rogers from 1958 until his death.

ALEXANDER, SHANA Journalist Shana Alexander, who was best known as the liberal half of the debating duo with James J. Kilpatrick on the Point/Counterpoint segment of the landmark CBS television news magazine show 60 Minutes in the 1970s, died of cancer in an assisted-living home in Hermosa Beach, New York, on June 23, 2005. She was 79. Alexander was born in New York City on October 6, 1925, the daughter of Tin Pan Alley composer Milton Ager and show-business columnist Cecilia Ager. She attended Vassar, where she majored in anthropology before embarking on her career in journalism. Her mother was instrumental in securing her first job at the New York tabloid PM, where she rose from copy clerk to reporter. She was a freelance writer for such magazines as Junior Bazaar and Mademoiselle in the 1940s before joining the staff of Life as a researcher in 1951. During the 1960s Alexander wrote the groundbreaking column “The Feminine Eye” for Life. She became editor of McCall’s in 1969, where she remained for two years. She subsequently worked a columnist for

Shana Alexander

7 Newsweek when she was teamed with conservative columnist James J. Kilpatrick for the weekly 60 Minutes debate sessions. Their sometimes contentious sessions became the fodder for a regular Saturday Night Live skit, featuring Dan Aykroyd and Jane Curtin. The comic duo spoofed their debates in diatribes that often included Aykroyd’s disdainful retort, “Jane, you ignorant slut.” Alexander left 60 Minutes in 1979, continuing to work as a journalist and author. She wrote 10 books including Anyone’s Daughter about Patty Hearst, Very Much a Lady about Scarsdale diet doctor Herman Tarnower’s killer, Jean Harris, and When She Was Bad about former Miss America Bess Myerson. Alexander’s book, Nutcracker: Money, Madness & Murder was adapted for a television mini-series in 1987. She also wrote a memoir, Happy Days: My Mother, My Father, My Sister & Me, in 1995. • Los Angeles Times, June 24, 2005, B8; New York Times, June 25, 2005, A16; Time, July 4, 2005, 21; Variety, July 11, 2005, 44.

ALEXANDRAKIS, ALEKOS Leading Greek stage and film actor Alekos Alexandrakis died of cancer in an Athens hospital on November 8, 2005. He was 76. Alexandrakis was born in Athens in 1928. He studied at the National Theater’s Drama School, and appeared frequently in films and plays from the late 1940s. His numerous film credits include Lily of the Harbor (1952), Eva (1953), Madame X (1954), Michael Cacoyannis’ Stella (1955) with Melina Mercouri, Katrakylisma (1956), The Hurdy-Gurdy (1957), Agorokoritso, To (1959), I Soferina (1964), Return (1965), A Brief Intermission (1966), Xypna Vassili (1969), Beautiful Days (1970), Papaflessas (1971), Boom (1972), The Man with the Carnation (1980), The Children of the Swallow (1987), Fading Light (2001), and Athens Blues (2001). He also starred in such Greek television productions as Oi Mistikoi Arravones (1979), O Hartopehtis (1990), O Fovos (1991), Passion (1993), Taxim (1999), and Watch Over Me (2000).

2005 • Obituaries

Tony Alizzi

(MSR) in 1999, which produced adult films designated for the gay community. Alizzi directed many of the MSR titles including Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell! (1999), Manhattan Sex Party (2001), White Trash (2002), The List (2003), Sex Pigs (2003), and Studs ’N Pps (2004).

ALLBEURY, TED Novelist Ted Allbeury died in England on December 4, 2005. He was 88. Allbeury was born in Stockport, England, on October 24, 1917. He served in the Army Intelligence Corps during World War II, and worked in advertising after the war. He also operated a farm and a pirate radio station before embarking on a career writing espionage thrillers in the early 1970s. Allbeury wrote over 40 popular novels during his career, some under the pen names Richard Butler and Patrick Kelly. His works include A Choice of Enemies (1973), Palomino Blonde (1975), The Only Good German (1976), The Man with the President’s Mind (1977), The Lantern Network (1978), The Alpha List (1979), The Twentieth of January (1980), The Reaper (1980), The Secret Whispers (1981), Codeword Cromwell (1981), Shadow of Shadows (1982), The Girl from Addis (1984), The Judas Factor (1984), Children of Tender Years (1985), The Seeds of Treason (1986), A Wilderness of Mirrors (1988), Deep Purple (1989), The Stalking Angel (1989), Show Me a Hero (1992), Beyond the Silence (1995), The Reckoning (1999), Berlin Exchange (2000), Cold Tactics (2001), Rules of the Game (2001), The Networks (2002), Due Process (2003), and Hostage (2004). • Times (of London), Dec. 5, 2005, 54.

Alekos Alexandrakis

ALIZZI, TONY Adult filmmaker Tony Alizzi died of a heart attack in Hollywood, California, on January 3, 2005. He was 42. Alizzi, whose real name was Robert Allen, was born on July 27, 1962, and was raised in New Jersey. He began working in films and television as a set designer. He founded Male Sexual Research

Ted Allbeury

Obituaries • 2005 ALLEN, DAVE Irish comedian Dave Allen died in his sleep at his London home on March 10, 2005. He was 68. Allen was born in Tallaght, Dublin, Ireland, on July 6, 1936. He was a popular guest performer on television in BBC One’s The Val Doonican Show, and was soon given his own series with ITV’S Tonight 2ith Dave Allen in 1967. He subsequently starred in the BBC series Dave Allen at Large in 1971. He was often seen on camera sitting on a stool and sipping a glass of whiskey. He created a stage show, An Evening with Dave Allen, in 1991, and another ITV series followed in 1993. He also appeared in the 1970 film Squeeze a Flower, and in a 1979 television production of One Fine Day. Allen retired from performing in 1999. • Times (of London), Mar. 12, 2005, 80.

8 & Allie. He was also seen in the tele-film A Place to Call Home (1987), and the feature Born on the Fourth of July (1989), before retiring from acting to become a high school teacher.

AMES, CHRISTINE GOSSETT Actress Christine Gossett Ames, the widow of actor Leon Ames, died in Corona del Mar, California, on October 27, 2005. She was 91. She was born Christine Mae Gossett in Chickasha, Oklahoma, on December 25, 1913. She moved to Hollywood in the 1930s where she signed a contract with 20th Century–Fox. She appeared in small roles in several films including High Tension (1936) and Ramona (1936). She married Ames in 1938, and abandoned films to raise a family. She and Ames remained together until his death in 1993. AMONGO, MAR Philippine comic artist Mar Amongo died in Los Banos, Laguna, the Philippines, on August 10, 2005. Amongo studied under comic artist Nestor Redondo, and was artist for numerous publications in the Philippines. He also drew stories for such DC Comics as Weird War Tales, All Out War, G.I. Combat, and Ghosts in the 1980s. He left comics to work as an artist in the Middle East, before returning to the Philippines to draw religious comics.

Dave Allen

AMELIO, PHILIP Child actor Philip J. Amelio, who starred as Lucille Ball’s grandson on the shortlived Life with Lucy television series in 1986, died in Schenectady, New York, of an internal infection on April 1, 2005. He was 27. Amelio was born on November 3, 1977. He performed in numerous television commercials as a child. He starred as young Kevin McGibbon on Life with Lucy, which was cancelled in 1986 after only several episodes. Amelio also appeared as Scott Parker Chandler on the daytime soap opera All My Children from 1988 to 1991, and guest starred in a episode of Kate

Philip Amelio

Mar Amongo

ANTALOSKY, CHARLES Stage actor Charles Antalosky died of cancer in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania,

Charles Antalosky

9

2005 • Obituaries

on March 23, 2005. He was 67. Antalosky was born in St. Clair, Pennsylvania, on December 8, 1937. He was a popular performer on the Philadelphia stage and also appeared on Broadway in productions of Fortune’s Fool, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Measure for Measure, and Sly Fox. He also appeared on television in the soap opera All My Children and the comedy series Remember WENN.

ANCONA, EDWARD P., JR. Edward P. Ancona, Jr., who worked as a color consultant at NBC from the 1960s, died of a heart attack in Los Angeles on November 8, 2005. He was 84. Ancona was born on June 11, 1921. He served as color consultant for the television western series Bonanza during most of its 14 season run, earning an Emmy Award in 1965 for his contributions to the series. His work was also instrumental in standardizing colors on national television. He also worked on the western series The High Chaparral in the late 1960s, and again worked with Michael Landon as a color consultant for his 1970s series Little House on the Prairie and several of the subsequent tele-films. Ancona later served as director of tape and film post-production at NBC before his retirement in 1988. • Los Angeles Times, Nov. 20, 2005, B12. ANDERSSON, KENT Swedish actor Kent Andersson died in Gothenburg, Sweden, on November 3, 2005. He was 71. Andersson was born on Gothenburg on December 2, 1933. He was a leading actor on the Swedish stage, screen, and television from the early 1960s. His numerous film credits include My Love Is Like a Rose (1963), Love 65 (1965), Vindingevals (1968), A Simple Melody (1974), Elvis! Elvis (1976), Battle of Sweden (1980), Who Pulled the Plug? (1981), The Painter (1982), King of Smugglers (1985), Pease and Whiskers (1986), The Return of the Jonsson Gang (1986), Rat Winter (1988), Kurt Olsson —The Film About My Life as Myself (1990), The Pill-Roller (1994), Hitler and We in Clamping Street (1997), and Jacobs Fretelse (2001).

Kent Andersson

ANDES, KEITH Leading actor Keith Andes was found dead at his home in Canyon Country, California, of suicide by asphyxiation on November 11, 2005. He had been suffering from numerous physical ailments including bladder cancer and lung problems in recent

Keith Andes

years. He was 85. He was born John Charles Andes in Ocean City, New Jersey, on July 12, 1920. He began performing on radio at the age of 12. He studied voice at the Philadelphia Conservatory of Music, and served in the United States Air Force for three years during World War II, often performing in USO shows. He began his film career after the war, appearing in such features as The Farmer’s Daughter (1947), Project X (1949), Clash by Night (1952) as Marilyn Monroe’s leading man, Blackbeard the Pirate (1952), Split Second (1953), A Life at Stake (1954), The Second Greatest Sex (1955), Away All Boats (1956), Back from Eternity (1956), Pillars of the Sky (1956), Interlude (1957), The Girl Most Likely (1957), Model for Murder (1958), the 1958 crime drama Damn Citizen as Col. Francis C. Grevemberg, Surrender — Hell! (1959), Hell’s Bloody Devils (1970), Tora! Tora! Tora! (1970) as General George Marshall, and ...And Justice for All (1979). He also appeared in the tele-films The Ultimate Impostor (1979) and Blinded by the Light (1980). Andes starred as Police Chief Frank Dawson in the 1959 police drama This Man Dawson, and starred as Keith Granville, husband of Glynis Johns, in the comedy mystery series Glynis in 1963. He was featured as Jeff Morgan in the soap opera Paradise Bay from 1965 to 1966. Andes was the voice of Ray Randall and Birdman in the cartoon series Birdman and the Galaxy Trio in 1967, and was Dr. Barnett in the science fiction adventure series Search in 1973. His other television credits include guest roles in such series as Ford Television Theatre, Celebrity Playhouse, Letter to Loretta, Producers’ Showcase, Conflict, Playhouse 90, Jane Wyman Presents the Fireside Theatre, Goodyear Theatre, The Gale Storm Show, Alcoa Theatre, The Bell Telephone Hour, Sea Hunt, Have Gun—Will Travel, Follow the Sun, The Rifleman, G.E. True, Perry Mason, Vacation Playhouse, The Lucy Show, 77 Sunset Strip, The Outer Limits, Death Valley Days, Branded, Run for Your Life, Daniel Boone, I Spy, The Andy Griffith Show, Star Trek as Akuta in the episode “The Apple,” Petticoat Junction, The Bold Ones: The New Doctors, Cannon, The Streets of San Francisco, Gunsmoke, Caribe, and Buck Rogers in the 25th Century. Andes retired from the screen in the early 1980s. • Los Angeles Times, Nov. 27, 2005, B12; New York Times, Nov. 30, 2005, C19.

Obituaries • 2005 ANDREASI, FELICE Italian actor Felice Andreasi died in Italy on December 25, 2005. He was 77. Andreasi was born in Turin, Italy, on January 8, 1928. He appeared in numerous films from the early 1970s including Fiorina la Vacca (1972), Clareta and Ben (1974), Il Sospetto (1975), Goodnight, Ladies and Gentlemen (1976), Stormtroopers (1977), Man in a Hurry (1977), How to Lose a Wife and Find a Lover (1978), Saxophone (1979), Bingo Bongo (1982), The Story of Boys and Girls (1989), The Latest from Paris (1992), A Soul Split in Two (1993), Muzungu (1999), The Invisible Collection (2000), Bread and Tulips (2000), Johnny the Partisan (2000), Check and Mate (2001), and Two Friends (2002).

Felice Andreasi

ANDRES, VALERIANO Spanish actor Valeriano Andres died in Madrid, Spain, on April 21, 2005. He was 82. Andres was born in Madrid on July 1, 1922. He appeared in numerous film and theatrical productions from the 1940s. His many film credits include Maria de los Reyes (1948), The Duchess of Benameji (1949), Trifles (1950), The Siege (1950), Lola, the Coalgirl (1952), El Seductor de Granada (1953), The Generous Bandit (1954), La Lupa (1955), Torment of Love (1956), Whom God Forgives (1957), Poison at 2:30 (1959), Vampiresas 1930 (1962), The Daughters of Helena (1963), Old Man Made in Spain (1969), Secret Intentions (1970), Crimen Imperfecto (1970), Don Quixote Rides Again (1973), Los Auto-

10 nomicos (1982), The Heifer (1985), The Lame Pigeon (1995), and Story of a Kiss (2002). Andres also worked often in Spanish television.

ANGERS, AVRIL British comedienne Avril Angers died of pneumonia in a London hospital on November 9, 2005. She was 83. Angers was born in Liverpool, England, on April 18, 1922. She began her career on stage while in her teens. She also appeared frequently in films from the late 1940s, appearing in Brass Monkey (1948), Skimpy in the Navy (1949), The Six Men (1950), Miss Pilgrim’s Progress (1950), Don’t Blame the Stork (1954), Women Without Men (1956), The Green Man (1956), Bond of Fear (1956), Blonde Bait (1956), Light Fingers (1957), Devils of Darkness (1965), Be My Guest (1965), The Family Way (1966), Two a Penny (1967), Three Bites of the Apple (1967), The Best House in London (1969), Staircase (1969). There’s a Girl in My Soup (1970), Mr. Forbush and the Penguins (1971), Gollocks! There’s Plenty of Room in New Zealand (1973), Confessions of a Driving Instructor (1976), and Dangerous Davies —The Last Detective (1981). Angers also starred in such British television series as How Do You View? in the early 1950s, All Aboard (1958), Coronation Street as Norah Dawson in 1961, The More We Are Together (1971), No Appointment Necessary (1977) as Beryl Armitage, Odd Man Out (1977) as Ma, Just Liz (1980) as Jessie Worth, and Common as Muck (1994) as Diane Parry. Her other television credits include episodes of such series as Dad’s Army, The Liver Birds, Dawson’s Weekly, All Creatures Great and Small, Are You Being Served?, Smuggler, Minder, Cat’s Eyes, and Victoria Wood. • Times (of London), Nov. 11, 2005, 79.

Avril Angers

Valeriano Andres

ANSELL, LORRAINE Actress Lorraine Ansell died suddenly in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, on November 28, 2005. She was 49. Ansell worked in film and television in Canada from the 1980s. She was featured in the films Two’s a Mob (1998), Undercover Angel (1999), The Kiss of Debt (2000), House of Luk (2001), and Parkwood Hills (2002). She starred as Victoria Mann in the 2004 television series Mann to Mann, and was also seen in the tele-films The Body Electric (1985), Saving Emily (2004), H2O (2004), A Killer Upstairs (2005), and The Perfect Neighbor (2005).

11

2005 • Obituaries

Lorraine Ansell

Adriano Arie

APARO, JIM Veteran comic artist Jim Aparo died at his home in Southington, Connecticut, after a brief illness on July 19, 2005. He was 72. Aparo was born on August 24, 1932. He worked as a commercial artist in the fashion industry in the early 1960s, and was creator of the short-lived newspaper comic strip Stern Wheeler with Ralph Kanna in 1963. He was hired by Dick Giordano at Charlton Comics in 1966, where he drew comics in numerous genres, often pencilling, inking and lettering his work. Giordano was instrumental in bringing Aparo to DC Comics in the late 1960s. He worked at DC for the next three decades, drawing in the adventures the super-heroes the Phantom Stranger, Batman, Green Arrow, and Aquaman. He also did illustrations for the DC comics Brave and the Bold for nearly 100 issues, which showcased Batman in team-ups with various other DC heroes on a monthly basis. Aparo was the cocreator of the Batman and the Outsiders book in the 1980s and was penciller on the Death in the Family storyline in the Batman comic that resulted in the murder of Jason Todd, the second Robin. During the 1990s Aparo contributed occasional artwork through the end of the decade, until his retirement.

L’Altra Cara de la Lluna (2000), and Horse Fever: The Mandrake Sting (2002). He also produced Fratelli (1988), Greener Fields (1998), Pepe Carvalho (1999), Francesca and Nunziata (2001), La Tassinara (2004), and Il Veterinario (2005) for television.

ARIKAWA, SADAMASA Japanese special effects director Sadamasa Arikawa, who worked on the original Godzilla film, died of lung cancer at a hospital in Izu, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan, on September 22, 2005. He was 79. Arikawa was born in Tokyo in June of 1926. He began his career assisting director Inoshiro Honda on Godzilla (1954) as director of special effects photography. Arikawa designed and directed special effects for numerous Japanese films including The Invisible Man (1954), Gigantis, the Fire Monster (1955), Rodan (1956), The Mysterians (1957), The H-Man (1958), Battle in Outer Space (1959), Submarine 1–57 Will Not Surrender (1959), The Birth of Japan (1959), Magic Monkey Sky (1959), I Bombed Pearl Harbor (1960), The Secret of the Telegian (1960), The Human Vapor (1960), Blood on the Sea (1961), Daredevil in the Castle (1961), Mothra (1961), The Last War (1961), Gen and Acala (1961), Gorath (1962), Scarlet Sky (1962), King Kong vs. Godzilla (1962), Varan the Unbelievable (1962), Attack Squadron! (1963), Attack of the Mushroom People (1963), The Lost World of Sinbad (1963), Atragon (1963), Siege of Fort Bismarck (1963), Dagora, the Space Monster (1964), Ghidrah, the

Jim Aparo (self portrait)

ARIE, ADRIANO Italian film producer Adriano Arie died in Rome on October 3, 2005. He produced numerous film and television productions from the late 1980s. Arie produced the films Electric Blue (1988),

Sadamasa Arikawa

Obituaries • 2005 Three-Headed Monster (1964), Shikonmado: Big Tornado (1964), Godzilla vs. the Thing (1964), Frankenstein Conquers the World (1965), Monster Zero (1965), Retreat from Kiska (1965), Crazy Adventure (1965), War of the Gargantuas (1966), Zero Fighters: Great Air Battle (1966), Godzilla vs. the Sea Monster (1966), King Kong Escapes (1967), Son of Godzilla (1967), Mighty Jack (1968), Destroy All Monsters (1968), Admiral Yamamoto (1968), Latitude Zero (1969), Yog, Monster from Space (1970), Rainbowman (1972), and The Mighty Peking Man (1977). Arikawa also directed special effects for the Ultraman television series in the 1960s, and was director of the 1983 films The Phoenix (aka War of the Wizards). • Times (of London), Sept. 26, 2005, 50.

ARMSTRONG, DARRYL Canadian actor Darryl Armstrong committed suicide by jumping from a bridge in Toronto on January 29, 2005. He was 23. Armstrong was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, in 1982. He appeared on television in episodes of the series Queer as Folk and Degrassi Junior High.

Darryl Armstrong

ARRELIA Waldemar Seyssel, who performed as the clown Arrelia from the 1920s, died of pneumonia in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on May 23, 2005. He was 99. Seyssel was born to a circus family in Jaguariaiva, Brazil, on December 31, 1905. He worked in the family circus as a juggler and acrobat before becoming a clown in 1922.

Arrelia

12 He created the character of Arrelia several years later in 1927. Seyssel continued to perform with the circus through the 1950s, and subsequently appeared in Brazilian films and television. Seyssel’s film credits include O Palhaco Atormentado (1948), Suzana e o Presidente (1951), Modelo 19 (1952), O Homem Dos Papagaios (1953), A Sogra (1954), Destiny in Trouble (1954), Carnaval em La Maior (1955), Na Corda Bamba (1958), O Barbeiro Que Se Vira (1958), and Pluft, o Fantasminha (1965). He performed regularly on Brazilian television from the 1950s through the 1970s.

ASKIN, LEON Hefty Austrian character actor Leon Askin, who was best known for his recurring role as General Burkhalter, bumbling Colonel Klinck’s commanding officer, in the 1960s sit-com Hogan’s Heroes, died in a Vienna, Austria, hospital on June 3, 2005. He was 97. Askin was born Leo Aschkenasy in Vienna on September 18, 1907. He performed in cabarets in the 1930s before fleeing persecution by the Nazi regime. He went to France before settling in the United States. He worked often with theatrical director Erwin Piscator, and appeared on Broadway in productions of Faust and Shylock. He was an imposing screen presence from the early 1950s, often portraying villains in numerous film and television productions. His numerous film credits include Assignment: Paris (1952), Road to Bali (1952), Desert Legion (1953), South Sea Woman (1953), China Venture (1953), The Robe (1953), The Veils of Bagdad (1953), Knock on Wood (1954), Secret of the Incas (1954), Valley of the Kings (1954), Carolina Cannonball (1955), Son of Sinbad (1955), Spy Chasers (1955), Duel in the Forest (1958), The Last Blitzkrieg (1959), Rebel Flight to Cuba (1959), Mistress of the World (1960), Until Money Departs You (1960), The Whole Truth (1961), Billy Wilder’s One, Two, Three (1961), Lulu (1962), The Testament of Dr. Mabuse (1962), Sherlock Holmes and the Deadly Necklace (1962), John Goldfarb, Please Come Home (1965), Do Not Disturb (1965), What Did You Do in the War, Daddy? (1966), Double Trouble (1967), The Caper of the Golden Bulls (1967), The Perils of Pauline (1967), Lucrezia Borgia (1968), God’s Police Patrol (1968), The Wicked Dreams of Paula Schultz (1968), Guns for San Sebastian (1968), The Blonde Connection (1969), A Fine Pair (1969), The Maltese Bippy (1969), Hammersmith Is Out (1972) with

Leon Askin

13 Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor, Dr. Death: Seeker of Souls (1973), The World’s Greatest (1973), Karl May (1974), Going Ape! (1981), Frightmare (1982), Airplane II: The Sequel (1982), A Stroke of Genius (1984), Odd Jobs (1984), Stiffs (1985), Savage Island (1985), First Strike (1985), Deshima (1987), Occhio Pinocchio (1994), Fear of Heights (1994), Deadly Love (1995), and Smoking Cuban Style (1999). Askin starred as General Albert Burkhalter on Hogan’s Heroes from 1965. He also appeared in the Gene Roddenberry science fiction tele-film Genesis II (1973), and appeared in European television productions of Bliss by Installments (1995) and A Styrian Television Story (1995). Askin was a familiar face on television from the 1950s, guest starring in episodes of such series as Biff Baker, U.S.A., The Charles Farrell Show, Schiltz Playhouse of Stars, Lux Video Theatre, Superman, Studio 57, The Lineup, Soldiers of Fortune, Crusade, TV Reader’s Digest, Front Row Center, Telephone Time, The 20th Century–Fox Hour, Tales of the 77th Bengal Lancers, The Restless Gun, Matinee Theater, Disneyland, The Dick Powell Show, Saints and Sinners, G.E. True, The Outer Limits, The Rogues, My Favorite Martian, Honey West, Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre, The Double Life of Henry Phyfe, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., I Spy, It’s About Time, Vacation Playhouse, Felony Squad, The Monkees, It Takes a Thief, Daniel Boone, Mission: Impossible, The F.B.I., McMillan and Wife, Friends and Lovers, Switch, Meeting of Minds, The Hardy Boys Nancy Drew Mysteries, Happy Days, Three’s Company, Insight, and Diff ’rent Strokes. Askin had returned to Austria in the 1980s, where he continued to perform on stage, film and television into the 2000s. • Los Angeles Times, June 5, 2005, B12; Variety, June 27, 2005, 80.

ASTELL, BETTY British actress Betty Astell died in St. Peter Port, Guernsey, Channel Islands, on July 27, 2005. She was 93. Astell was born in Brondesbury, London, England, on May 23, 1912. She began her career on stage as the age of two, appearing as an egg at the London Coliseum. She performed on stage as a dancer and actress, appearing in such productions as For the Love of Mike in the early 1930s. She also began performing on BBC television in some of its earliest broadcasts in 1931. Astell also appeared in numerous comedy films and thrillers in England during the 1930s includ-

2005 • Obituaries ing A Tight Corner (1932), Double Dealing (1932), This Is the Life (1933), Strike It Rich (1933), That’s My Wife (1933), The Stickpin (1933), The Medicine Man (1933), I’ll Stick to You (1933), Great Stuff (1933), Cleaning Up (1933), A Wife or Two (1934), That’s My Uncle (1934), On the Air (1934), The Man I Want (1934), The Lost Chord (1934), The Life of the Party (1934), Josser on the Farm (1934), Flat Number Three (1934), Strictly Illegal (1935), Sunshine Ahead (1936), Jack of All Trades (1936), Behind Your Back (1937), and The Mind of Mr. Reeder (1939). She married comedian Cyril Fletcher in 1941. They remained wed for over sixty years until Fletcher’s death on January 1, 2005. The often performed together, with Astell writing much of their material. They wrote and starred in the 1948 comedy film A Piece of Cake, and were featured in such television series as Cyril’s Saga (1957) and The Cyril Fletcher Show (1959). They also toured on stage in pantomime and variety shows from the 1950s through the late 1970s. Astell subsequently retired from performing, though she did continue to write pantomime scripts. • Times (of London), July 30, 2005, 71.

ATKINSON, GEORGE George Atkinson, a former stuntman-actor who was a pioneer in the video rental business in California, died of emphysema in Los Angeles on March 3, 2005. He was 69. Atkinson was born in Shanghai, China, on June 2, 1935. He worked as an actor and stuntman in films and television in the 1960s. He was seen in the 1969 film Childish Things, and appeared in television in episodes of Burke’s Law, Honey West, and Mannix. Atkinson began Video Station in Los Angeles 1979, renting films in the emerging format of video. Within several years over 500 video stores were affiliated with Video Station. Atkinson left the business in the mid–1980s. • Los Angeles Times, Mar. 12, 2005, B17; New York Times, Mar. 9, 2005, A23.

George Atkinson

Betty Astell

AUSTIN, MIKE Mike Austin, a record holding golfer and occasional actor, died at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital in Woodland Hills, California, on November 22, 2005. He was 95. Austin was born in Guernsey, on Great Britain’s Channel Islands, in 1910. A golfer and teacher, he was noted for his long drives and stunt shots which earned him the title of “The Golfing Bandit.” He held the world record for the longest

Obituaries • 2005

Mike Austin

14 BA, INDAY Actress Inday Ba (N’Deaye Ba) died of complications from lupus in Bristol, England, on April 26, 2005. She was 32. Ba was born in Gothenburg, Sweden, on August 10, 1972. She was featured in several films from the 1990s including The Perfect Blue (1997), The Man Who Knew Too Little (1997), The Man with Rain in His Shoes (1998), Four Dogs Playing Poker (2000), and Tom & Thomas (2002). She also appeared in numerous television productions including Into the Blue (1997), Out of Hours (1998), The Ruth Rendell Mysteries: Going Wrong (1998), Y2K (1999), Thin Ice (2000), Arabian Nights (2000), Trial & Retribution V (2001), The Lost Empire (2001), The Reunion (2002), Lie with Me (2004), Ahead of the Class (2005), and Empire (2005). Her other television credits include episodes of Holding the Baby, The Pretender, Ultimate Force, The Brief, and Sea of Souls.

drive in a professional golf tournament at the U.S. National Seniors Open in Las Vegas in 1974, driving the ball 515 yards. Austin also performed on stage in a production of The Desert Song at the Los Angeles Civic Opera in 1947. He appeared as Judge Lang in the 1983 film thriller The Star Chamber with Michael Douglas.

AYLWARD, DEREK British character actor Derek Aylward died in Sussex, England, on July 10, 2005. He was 82. Aylward was born in Maidenhead, England, on October 29, 1922. He appeared frequently in films and television from the early 1950s. Aylward’s film credits include Operation Diplomat (1953), Malta Story (1953), The Strange Case of Blondie (1954), John Wesley (1954), The Devil’s Jest (1954), Handcuffs, London (1955), The House in Marsh Road (aka The Invisible Creature) (1960), The Trials of Oscar Wilde (aka The Green Carnation) (1960), Very Important Person (1961), School for Sex (1968), For Men Only (1968), The Big Switch (1969), Cool It Carol! (1970), Man of Violence (1971), Come Play with Me (1977), and The Playbirds (1978). He also appeared in television productions of Quatermass II (1955), Bellweather Nine (1959), and The Moonstone (1959). Aylward’s other television credits include episodes of The Adventures of Sir Lancelot as King Marhaus, The New Adventures of Charlie Chan, The New Adventures of Martin Kane, Ivanhoe, William Tell, Dixon of Dock Green, and The Prisoner.

Inday Ba

BABB, SANORA Novelist and poet Sanora Babb died at her home in Hollywood, California, on December 31, 2005. She was 98. Babb was born Oklahoma in an Otoe Indian community in 1907. While working for the Farm Security Administration during the Great Depression, she authored a novel about migrant workers in the Kansas dust bowl. The book was considered an excellent account of the times, but the similarity of her story to John Steinbeck’s 1939 novel The Grapes of Wrath delayed its publication for over sixty years, until

Derek Aylward Sanora Babb

15 it was published as Whose Names Are Unknown by the University of Oklahoma Press in 2004. Babb went on to write several other works including the 1958 novel The Lost Traveler, the short story collection Cry of the Tinamou, the collection of poems Told in the Seed, and the memoir An Owl on Every Post. Babb was married to Oscar-winning cinematographer James Wong Howe from 1948 until his death in 1976. • Los Angeles Times, Jan. 8, 2006, B12; New York Times, Jan. 10, 2006, C17.

BABI, PARVEEN Indian actress Parveen Babi was found dead at her home in Bombay, India, on January 22, 2005. She was believed to have died of natural causes two days earlier. She was 55. Babi was born in Junagad, India, on April 4, 1949. She began her film career in B.R. Ishara’s 1973 film Charitra. She remained a leading film star for the next fifteen years, starring in such movies as Majboor (1974), Kala Sona (1975), I’ll Die for Mama (1975), Bullet (1976), The Husband, Wife and Mistress (1978), Sign of Marriage (1979), Black Stone (1979), Abdullah (1980), Strength (1982), Ashanti (1982), Chor Police (1983), Sitamgar (1985), and Avinash (1986). Babi retired from the screen after appearing in 1988’s Akarshan, and spent a largely reclusive life. • Times (of London), Jan. 26, 2005, 63; Variety, Jan. 31, 2005, 69.

2005 • Obituaries France, on February 15, 2005. He was 60. Bachelet was born in Paris on May 25, 1944. He composed the score for the 1974 erotic film Emmanuelle. He also composed music for the sequels Emmanuelle 2: The Joys of a Woman (1975), Emmanuelle V (1987), Emmanuelle’s Secret (1992), Emmanuelle’s Love (1993), and Emmanuelle Forever (1993). His other film score credits include Some Too Quiet Gentlemen (1973), The Story of O (1975), Black and White in Color (1976), The Last Romantic Lover (1978), Hothead (1979), Private Collections (1979), Confessions of the Naughty Nymphos (1980), The Perils of Gwendoline in the Land of the Yik Yak (1984), The Children of the Marshland (1999), and A Crime in Paradise (2001).

BACKHAUSEN, BIRTHE Danish actress Birthe Backhausen died in Copenhagen, Denmark, on November 18, 2005. She was 78. Backhausen was born in Denmark on January 20, 1927. She performed frequently on stage, film, and television from the 1950s. Her film credits include I Gabestokken (1950), Charly & Steffen (1979), Kvindesind (1980), Ved Vejen (1988), Tifanfayaz (1997), and Facing the Truth (2002). She also appeared on television in productions of Rullegardinet (1971), Matador (1978), and Lange leve Friheden (1993).

Parveen Babi

Birthe Backhausen

BACHELET, PIERRE French composer Pierre Bachelet died of cancer in Suresnes, Hauts-de-Seine,

BAILEY, BENNY Jazz trumpeter Benny Bailey died at his home in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, on

Pierre Bachelet

Benny Bailey

Obituaries • 2005 April 14, 2005. He was 79. He was born Ernest Harold Bailey in Cleveland, Ohio, on August 13, 1925. He attended the Cleveland Conservatory of Music and began his career performing with bands led by Bull Moose Jackson and Scatman Crothers. In the late 1940s he toured Europe with Dizzy Gillespie’s band, and spent several years with Lionel Hampton’s band. Bailey largely remained in Europe for the rest of his life, settling in Sweden and, later, the Netherlands. Bailey performed in Europe with the Kenny Clarke–Francy Boland Big Band and the George Gruntz Concert Jazz Band. He also recorded the hit jazz single “Compared to What” with Sax player Eddie Harris and singer Les McCann at the Montreaux Jazz Festival in Switzerland in 1969. Bailey also returned to the U.S. to make occasional performances in New York in the 1990s. • Los Angeles Times, May 11, 2005, B12; New York Times, May 9, 2005, B8; Times (of London), May 18, 2005, 62.

BAIRD, HARRY British Black actor Harry Baird died in London on February 13, 2005. Baird was born in Georgetown, Guyana (then British Guinea), on May 12, 1931. He began his acting career on stage in a British West End production of Kismet, and made his film debut as a wrestler in 1955’s A Kid for Two Farthings. He starred as Atimbu in the African adventure series White Hunter in 1957, and was featured in the films Sapphire (1959), Killers of Kilimanjaro (1959), Tarzan the Magnificent (1960), Taur the Mighty (1960), The Mark (1961), The Devil Inside (1961), Flame in the Streets (1961), The Road to Hong Kong (1962), Station Six-Sahara (1962), The Small World of Sammy Lee (1963), Traitor’s Gate (1964), He Who Rides a Tiger (1965), The Whisperers (1967), Melvin Van Peebles’ The Story of a Three-Day Pass (1968), The Touchables (1968), The Italian Job (1969), Edgar Allan Poe’s The Oblong Box (1969), Castle Keep (1969), Cool It Carol! (1970), and 1000 Convicts and a Woman (1971). He also appeared in several episodes of the British television spy series Danger Man with Patrick McGoohan, and starred as Lt. Mark Bradley in the cult science fiction series UFO in 1970. He was featured in several Italian spaghetti westerns including Trinity and Sartana Are Coming (1972), Colt in the Hand of the Devil (1972), and Those Dirty Dogs (1973). He appeared in a 1975 television production of The Count of Monte Cristo

16 and an Italian version of Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse (1975) before largely retiring from the screen.

BA JIN Chinese writer Ba Jin died of cancer in Shanghai, China, on October 17, 2005. He was 100. Ba Jin was born Li Yaotang in Chengdu, Sichuan, China on November 25, 1904. He was best known for his novel Family, published in 1931 about a household in feudal China. The saga of the Torrents trilogy continued with Spring (1938) and Autumn (1940). He wrote numerous novels, essays and short stories, becoming one of the leading authors in the Communist era. His other works include the Love Trilogy Fog (1931), Rain (1933) and Lightning (1935), the short novels A Garden of Repose (1944), Ward No. 4 (1946), and Cold Nights (1947), the novellas Autumn in Spring and A Dream of the Sea, and the short story collection Germination. Several of his works were adapted for film including Spring (1953), Family (1953), Autumn (1954), Cold Nights (1955), Ming Feng (1957), and Garden of Repose (1964). Persecuted as a counterrevolutionary during the Chinese Cultural Revolution of the 1960s, he was rehabilitated in 1977, becoming chairman of the Chinese Writers’ Association in 1983. Ba Jin continued to write throughout his life until poor health curtailed his activities in later years. • Los Angeles Times, Oct. 18, 2005, B8; New York Times, Oct. 18, 2005, A25; Time, Oct. 31, 2005, 27; Times (of London), Oct. 25, 2005, 66.

Ba Jin

BAKER, ROBERT Psychologist and author Robert Baker, who spent most of his career debunking

Harry Baird

Robert Baker

17 ghostly sightings and supernatural occurrences, died on August 8, 2005. He was 84. Baker was born in Blackford, Kentucky, on June 27, 1921. He served in the Army Air Force as a cryptographer during World War II, and studied psychology at the University of Kentucky and Stanford, where he earned a doctorate in 1951. He wrote numerous books on the paranormal, attempting to explain ghostly visitations as waking dreams or hallucinations. His works include Hidden Memories: Voices and Visions from Within (1992) and Mind Games (1996).

BAKER, TUNGIA Maori stage and film actress Tungia Baker died of cancer at her family home in Otaki, Manawatu, New Zealand, on July 27, 2005. She was 64. Baker was featured as Hira in the 1993 film The Piano with Holly Hunter and Anna Paquin. She also appeared in several short films and television dramas in New Zealand including the mini-series A Difficult Woman (1998) and Greenstone (1999), and the children’s series Mirror, Mirror. She was also seen in the 2002 television drama Mataku, and the 2003 film The Legend of Johnny Lingo.

2005 • Obituaries language films including 1967’s Agniputhri. He usually appeared in supporting roles and was featured as the wise man Narada in a series of mythological films. He also produced 18 films under his production company, TKB Films.

BALDRY, LONG JOHN British blues musician Long John Baldry died of complications from a chest infection in a Vancouver, British Columbia, hospital on July 21, 2005. He was 64. Baldry was born in Derbyshire, England, on January 12, 1941. He became a leading recording artist in the 1960s, releasing his first hit, “Let the Heartaches Begin,” in 1967. Baldry recorded over 40 albums that included such popular songs as “Don’t Try to Lay No Boogie-Woogie on the King of Rock and Roll,” “You’ve Lost That Loving Feeling,” “A Thrill’s a Thrill,” and “Come and Get Your Love.” He was also instrumental in launching the careers of such rock artists as Rod Stewart, Ginger Baker, Jimmy Page, and Mick Jagger, who were featured in Baldry’s stage act in the 1960s. The 6'7" musician also appeared in the 1971 British comedy film Up the Chastity Belt as Little John. Baldry lived in New York and Los Angeles for several years before moving to Vancouver in 1980, and became a Canadian citizen soon after. He became a popular voice-over artist, working on numerous commercials and such animated programs as Ewoks, Dragon Quest, Captain N: The Game Master, Madeline, Bucky O’Hare and the Toad Wars, Conan: The Adventurer, The Adventures of Sonic the Hedgehog as Dr. Ivo Robotnik, Hurricanes, Nilus the Sandman, ReBoot, Sabrina the Animated Series, and Toad Patrol, and the animated tele-films Snow Queen (2002) and Ben Hur (2003). • Los Angeles Times, July 23, 2005, B17; New York Times, July 25, 2005, B7; Times (of London), July 25, 2005, 47.

Tungia Baker

BALACHANDRAN, T.K. Indian actor and producer Thiruvananthapuram K. Balachandran died at his home in India on December 15, 2005. He was 78. Balachandran began his career on stage before moving to films in the late 1950s. He appeared in over 400 Tamil

Long John Baldry

T.K. Balachandran

BALLING, ERIK Danish film and television director Erik Balling died of a heart attack in Gentoffe, Denmark, on November 19, 2005. He was 80. Balling was born in Nyborg, Denmark, on November 29, 1924. He began working in films as the Danish production company Nordisk Films Kompagni in 1946, and made his directoral debut with the 1953 feature Adam and Eve. He went on to direct such films as Kispus (1956), The Poet and the Little Mother (1959), Faith, Hope and Witch-

Obituaries • 2005

Erik Balling

craft (1960), Birkus Buster (1961), Death Comes at High Noon (1964), Summer in Tyrol (1964), Two Times Two in the Fourposter (1965), Operation Lovebirds (1965), Relax Freddie (1956), I Belong to Me (1967), and Martha (1967). Balling’s best known films were the popular comic detective series The Olsen Gang, which included The Olsen Gang (1968), The Olsen Gang in a Fix (1969), The Olsen Gang in Jutland (1971), The Olsen Gang’s Big Score (1972), The Olsen Gang Runs Amok (1973), The Last Exploits of the Olsen Gang (1974), The Olsen Gang on the Track (1975), The Olsen Gang Sees Red (1976), The Olsen Gang Outta Sight (1977), The Olsen Gang Goes to War (1978), and The Olsen Gang Never Surrenders (1979). His other credits include the films Revolution My A... (1970), One of Those Things (1971), and Midt om Natten (1984), and the television series Matador (1978) and Anthonsen (1984).

BALSAN, HUMBERT French film producer Humbert Balsan committed suicide in Paris on February 10, 2005. He was 50. Balsan was born in Arcachon, Gironde, France, on August 21, 1954. He began his career as an actor, appearing as Sir Gawain in 1974’s Lancelot of the Lake. He was also featured in the films The Conquistadores (1976), Northwest Wind (1976), Loulou (1980), Quartet (1981), Merry-Go-Round (1981), Strange Affair (1981), Chanel Solitaire (1981), All Fired Out (1982), I Married a Shadow (1983), Liberty Belle (1983), Swann in Love (1984), Thieves After Dark (1984), The Aspern Papers (1985), Listening in the Dark (1988), Jefferson in Paris (1995), The Proprietor (1996), The Ad-

Humbert Balsan

18 versary (2002), and Le Divorce (2003). Balsan also produced over sixty films from the late 1970s including Face to the Sun (1980), Quartet (1981), The Veiled Man (1987), Alexandria Again and Forever (1990), Walking a Tightrope (1992), Great Happiness (1993), Angels in Paradise (1993), The Light from Dead Stars (1994), The Emigrant (1994), Jefferson in Paris (1995), Muriel’s Parents Have Had It Up to Here (1995), Lumiere and Company (1995), Surviving Picasso (1996), Will It Snow for Christmas? (1996), The Proprietor (1996), Destiny (1997), After Sex (1997), Terminale (1998), Rembrandt (1999), The City (2000), Samia (2000), Martha ... Martha (2001), Silence ... We’re Rolling (2001), Chronicle of Love and Pain (2002), Total Kheops (2002), The Bathers (2003), Process (2004), The Gate of Sun (2004), Youssef Chahine’s Alexandria ... New York (2004), Le Grand Voyage (2004), The Intruder (2004), Travaux (2005), and The Man from London (2005). • Variety, Feb. 14, 2005, 55.

BANCROFT, ANNE Leading actress Anne Bancroft, who received the 1962 Academy Award for Best Actress for her role as Annie Sullivan, young Helen Keller’s teacher, in The Miracle Worker, and starred as the “older woman,” Mrs. Robinson, who seduced her daughter’s boyfriend, Dustin Hoffman, in the 1967 film The Graduate, died of uterine cancer in a New York City hospital on June 6, 2006. She was 73. She was born Anna Maria Italiano in The Bronx, New York, on September 17, 1931. She began her career in New York in the early 1950s, working in television under the name Anne Marno in such series as Suspense, Danger, The Adventures of Ellery Queen, and Lights Out. She was signed to a contract by 20th Century–Fox in 1952 and chose the screen name Anne Bancroft. She starred in over a dozen B-films over the next six years including Don’t Bother to Knock (1952), Tonight We Sing (1953), Treasure of the Golden Condor (1953), The Kid from Left Field (1953), Gorilla at Large (1954), Demetrius and the Gladiators (1954), The Raid (1954), New York Confidential (1955), A Life in the Balance (1955), The Naked Street (1955), The Last Frontier (1955), Walk the Proud Land (1956), Nightfall (1957), The Restless Breed (1957), and The Girl in Black Stockings (1957). She was also seen on television in such series as Omnibus, Kraft Television Theatre, Lux Video Theatre, Climax!, The Alcoa Hour, Playhouse 90,

Ann Bancroft

19 Zane Grey Theater, Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre, and ABC Stage 67. Bancroft returned to New York in 1958 to star with Henry Fonda in Arthur Penn’s Broadway production of Two for the Seesaw. She earned a Tony Award for her performance, which she followed with another Tony-winning role in Broadway’s The Miracle Worker. She reprised her role as teacher to Patty Duke’s Helen Keller in the 1962 film version, winning the Oscar. She married comedian and director Mel Brooks in 1964. She also starred in the films The Pumpkin Eater (1964) with Peter Finch, The Slender Thread (1965), and 7 Women (1966), before joining Dustin Hoffman in the 1967 landmark film The Graduate. Bancroft earned an Academy Award nomination for her role as Mrs. Robinson. She continued to appear in such films as Young Winston (1972) as Jenny Churchill, Mel Brooks’ Blazing Saddles (1974) in the role of an extra in her husband’s comedy classic, The Prisoner of Second Avenue (1975), The Hindenburg (1975), and Lipstick (1976). She starred as Mary Magdalene in the television mini-series Jesus of Nazareth in 1977 and received another Oscar nomination for her role as ballerina Emma Jacklin in the 1977 The Turning Point. She earned another Tony nomination for her performance as Golda Meir in the 1977 Broadway production of Golda. Bancroft wrote, directed and starred in the 1980 comedy Fatso and appeared as Mrs. Kendal in David Lynch’s The Elephant Man in 1980. She starred in the 1982 television mini-series Marco Polo and co-starred with her husband in the 1983 comedy To Be or Not to Be. She also appeared in the films Garbo Talks (1984), Agnes of God (1985) which earned her another Academy Award nomination, ’Night, Mother (1986), 84 Charing Cross Road (1987) with Anthony Hopkins, Torch Song Trilogy (1988), Bert Rigby, You’re a Fool (1989), Honeymoon in Vegas (1992), Love Potion No. 9 (1992), Point of No Return (1993), Malice (1993), Mr. Jones (1993), How to Make an American Quilt (1995), Home for the Holidays (1995), Mel Brooks’ Dracula: Dead and Loving It (1995), The Sunchaser (1996), G.I. Jane (1997), Critical Care (1997), the animated Antz (1998) as the voice of the Queen, Great Expectations (1998), Keeping the Faith (2000), Up at the Villa (2000), and Heartbreakers (2001). Bancroft also starred in Max Chandler in the 1990 comedy series Freddie and Max, and appeared in television productions of Neil Simon’s Broadway Bound (1992), Mrs. Cage (1992), Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All (1994), Paddy Chayefsky’s The Mother (1994), Homecoming (1996), Deep in My Heart (1999) which garnered her an Emmy Award for Best Supporting Actress, Haven (2001), and The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone (2003). Bancroft is survived by her husband and their son, Max. • Los Angeles Times, June 8, 2005, A1; New York Times, June 8, 2005, A17; People, June 20, 2005, 137; Time, June 20, 2005, 23; Variety, June 13, 2005, 56.

BAQUET, MAURICE French actor and musician Maurice Baquet died in Noisy-le-grand, France, on July 8, 2005. He was 94. Baquet was born in Villefranche-sur-Saone, Rhone, France, on May 26, 1911. He studied the cello in Paris as a young man, but soon turned to acting. He was featured in numerous films from the early 1930s including Le Taxi de Minuit (1934),

2005 • Obituaries Sacrifice of Honor (1935), The Crime of Monsieur Lange (1936), Helene (1936), The Lower Depths (1936), Lady Killer (1937), L’Alibi (1937), Youth in Revolt (1938), Final Accord (1938), Hatred (1938), Twisted Mistress (1942), Frederica (1942), Adieu Leonard (1943), Coup de Tete (1944), The Last Metro (1945), My Treasure (1947), Sextette (1948), The Sad Sack (1950), Andalousie (1951), Bibi Fricotin (1951), Innocents in Paris (1952), The Impossible Mr. Pipelet (1955), Stowaway in the Sky (1960), Mandrin (1962), Scarf of Mist Thigh of Satin (1966), Costa-Gavras’ Z (1969), Special Section (1975), Let’s Make a Dirty Movie (1976), Mr. Klein (1976), Bobby Deerfield (1977), The Adolescent (1979), Le Divorcement (1979), The King of Jerks (1981), Intimate Moments (1981), L’Ange (1982), Salut, j’Arrive (1982), Viva le Sociale! (1983), Paulette (1986), The Debutante (1986), Only God Sees Me (1998). Baquet also appeared often on French television, making his last performance in 2002’s L’Ami de Patagonie.

BARBERO, LUIS Spanish character actor Luis Barbero died of a heart attack in Madrid, Spain, on August 3, 2005. He was 88. Barbero was born in Madrid on August 8, 1916. He began his career on the Spanish stage in the late 1930s. He was also featured in over 100 films during his career including Stories from Madrid (1958), Valentine’s Day (1959), The Big Family (1962), The Sinner and the Witch (1964), Find That Girl (1965), Every Day Is a Holiday (1965), Snakes and Ladders (1966), Sangre en el Ruedo (1969), El Sobre Verde (1971), My Dearest Senorita (1972), Las Colocadas (1972), Senora Doctor (1973), La Curiosa (1973), Watch Out, We’re Mad (1974), Timid Bachelor (1974), Silk Worms (1977), Historia de S (1979), ...And the Third Year, He Resuscitated (1981), La Tia de Carlos (1981), Los Chulos (1981), The Beehive (1982), They Call Him J.R. (1982), Shake Before Use (1983), Our Father (1985), Silver-Beet Face (1987), Madrid (1987), Lute: Forge on or Die (1987), SSS (1988), The Things of Love (1989, I’m the One (1990), The Dumbfounded King (1991), On the Far Side of the Tunnel (1994), and Corazon Loco (1997). Barbero also appeared frequently on Spanish television, starring in the series Ay, Senor, Senor! (1994), La Banda de Perez (1997), and Medico de Familia as Matias from 1997 to 1999.

Luis Barbero

BARBOUR, PETER British entertainer Peter Barbour died in Northampton, England, on September 12,

Obituaries • 2005

20 BARCLAY, EDDIE French jazz musician and music producer Eddie Barclay died of pulmonary and urinary infections in Paris on May 12, 2005. He was 84. Barclay was born in Paris on January 26, 1921. He began his career as a pianist and composer, working on the scores for several films in the 1950s. His credits include Fever Heat (1955), Every Day Has Its Secret (1958), Temptation (1959), FX 18, Secret Agent (1964), and The Dictator’s Guns (1965). Barclay was also a successful music producer in France from the 1950s, working with such artists as Jacques Brel, Quincy Jones, and Charles Aznavour. • Los Angeles Times, May 14, 2005, B19; New York Times, May 22, 2005, 31; Times (of London), May 17, 2005, 54.

Peter Barbour

2005. He was 82. Barbour was born in Skegness, Lincolnshire, England, on November 5, 1922, the son of comedian Roy Barbour. He made his stage debut in variety shows in the late 1930s. He joined with his brother, Roy Jr., in the 1940s as part of a comedy stilt-walking act. They performed on stage and television and appeared in musical production of Barnum! on the London stage in 1981. They were also seen in the 1986 television production of Barnum!.

BARBOUR, THOMAS Character actor Thomas Barbour died in New York City on December 29, 2005. He was 84. Barbour was born in New York City on July 25, 1921. He was featured in several Broadway plays including The Great White Hope and Kingdoms. He was also seen in a handful of films including The Taking of Pelham One Two Three (1974), Arthur (1981) and the 1988 sequel Arthur 2: On the Rocks as Stanford Bach, Woody Allen’s A Midsummer Night’s Sex Comedy (1982), Whatever It Takes (1986), Legal Eagles (1986), Hotshot (1987), Suspect (1987), The Age of Innocence (1993), Girlfight (2000), and York Street, 1929 (2004). Barbour also appeared in the tele-films Dr. Cook’s Garden (1971), The Mating Season (1980), The Haunted Mansion Mystery (1983), and Will There Really Be a Morning? (1983). His other television credits include episodes of The DuPont Show of the Week and The Nurses.

Eddie Barclay

BARDINET, MICHEL French actor Michel Bardinet died in Apt, Vaucluse, France, on February 22, 2005. He was 73. Bardinet was born in Toulon, Var, France, on November 15, 1931. He was popular film star in France from the late 1950s, appearing in The Nude Set (1957), Three Murderesses (1959), The Green Mare (1959), Heat of the Summer (1959), The Bread Peddler (1963), Les Baisers (1964), Hired Killer (1966), I Married You for Fun (1967), The Black Sheep (1968), The Sweet Body of Deborah (1968), Naked Violence (1969), A Woman on Fire (1969), The Lady of Monza (1969), That Little Difference (1970), Oasis of Fear (1971), Without Apparent

Thomas Barbour Michel Bardinet

21

2005 • Obituaries

Motive (1971), Shadows Unseen (1972), Slap the Monster on Page One (1972), Blood in the Streets (1973), The Porcelain Anniversary (1974), Maxim’s Porter (1976), A Little Romance (1979), American Dreamer (1984), and L’Invite Surprise (1989). Bardinet was also seen frequently on television, guest starring in an episode of It Takes a Thief in 1969 and appearing in such productions as The Age of the Medici (1973), Gil Blas de Santillane (1974), Adios (1976), Alistair MacLean’s The Hostage Tower (1980), Vivement Lundi (1988), and Victoire, ou la Douleur des Femmes (2000).

BARKER, FRANCINE HURD Singer Francine Hurd Barker, who was half of the original Peaches and Herb duo in the 1960s, died in Maryland after a lengthy illness on August 13, 2005. She was 58. She was born in Washington, D.C., on April 28, 1947. She began singing while in her teens, performing with such groups as the Keynotes, the Darlettes, and the Sweet Things. She teamed with Herb Feemster, later known as Herb Fame, in 1965 to form the duo Peaches and Herb. The two recorded such hits as “Let’s Fall in Love” and “We’re in This Together.” The duo remained together until 1970, when Herb left show business. When he resumed his career in 1976, it was with a new Peaches, singer Linda Greene. Barker suffered a brain aneurysm and stroke and was in a coma for over a decade. She remained in very poor health for the remainder of her life.

Francine Barker

BARKER, RONNIE English comedian Ronnie Barker, who starred in the popular BBC television series The Two Ronnies from the early 1970s, died of a heart ailment at his home in Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire, England, on October 3, 2005. He was 76. Corbett was born in Bedford, England, on September 25, 1929. He began his career on stage in the late 1940s, and was also performing on British radio in the 1950s. He was noted for his role in the BBC radio program The Navy Lark in 1959. He began performing in British films and television in the 1950s, appearing in the features Wonderful Things! (1958), Kill or Cure (1962), Father Came Too! (1963), The Cracksman (1963), Doctor in Distress (1963), A Home of Your Own (1964), The Bargee (1964), Runaway Railway (1965), The Man Outside (1967), A Ghost of Chance (1968), Futtocks End (1970), and The Magnif-

Ronnie Barker

icent Seven Deadly Sins (1971). He also performed on television in It’s a Square World, The Seven Faces of Jim, Six More Faces of Jim, More Faces of Jim, How to Be an Alien, Bold as Brass, The Keys of the Cafe, A Tale of Two Cities, Benny Hill, The Frost Report, Foreign Affairs, The Saint, Sykes and A..., The Avengers, and Before the Fringe. He starred in the series The Ronnie Barker Playhouse (1968), Hark at Barker (1969) as Lord Rustless, and 6 Dates with Barker (1971) as Fred. He also appeared as Bottom in a 1971 television production of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Barker had worked with fellow comic Ronnie Corbett in the 1960s satirical series That Was the Week That Was, and they teamed for the popular British comedy series The Two Ronnies in 1971. The series ran on the BBC for over 15 years, with Barker writing many of the skits, often under the pseudonym Gerald Wiley. He also starred as Norman Stanley Fletcher in the comedy series Porridge from 1973 to 1977. He reprised his role as Fletcher in the 1978 series Going Straight, and the 1979 feature film Porridge. Barker also starred as George Idle in the 1972 television production of Idle at Work, and was Lord Rustless in 1972’s His Lordship Entertains. He was Arkwright in Open All Hours from 1973 to 1985, and was Johnnie Wetherby in 1974’s Franklyn and Johnnie. He also appeared in productions of The Picnic (1975) and When We Are Married (1975), and was featured as Friar Tuck in the 1976 film Robin and Marian with Sean Connery and Audrey Hepburn. Barker appeared in the film By the Sea (1982), and a television production of The Magnificent Evans (1984). He also reunited with Ronnie Corbett for several specials including The Two Ronnies in Australia (1987) and Christmas Night with the Two Ronnies (1987). He starred as Clarence Sale in the 1988 comedy series Clarence, and was featured in the 1999 television production of The Nearly Complete and Utter History of Everything. He returned to the screen as David Inches, Winston’s Churchill’s butler, in the television production of The Gathering Storm in 2002, and was featured in My House in Umbria the following year. • Times (of London), Oct. 5, 2005, 69; Variety, Oct. 10, 2005, 93.

BARNES, ANN Dixie Cheney, who, as Ann Barnes, starred as Cookie Bumstead on the Blondie television series in the late 1950s, died in Lansing, Michi-

Obituaries • 2005

22

Ann Barnes

Candy Barr

gan, on September 13, 2005. She was 60. She was born in Lansing on June 17, 1945. As a child actress, she was featured as Dagwood and Blondie’s daughter, Cookie in the short-lived sit-com based on the popular comic strip, Blondie. She also guest-starred as Frances Hobbs in two episodes of Leave It to Beaver in 1960.

for possession of less than an ounce of marijuana. She served several years in prison before being paroled. She subsequently moved to Brownwood, and later, Edna, Texas, where she lived in seclusion. • Los Angeles Times, Jan. 3, 2006, B9; New York Times, Jan. 4, 2006, C15.

BARONE, JOE

Actor Joe Barone died of a lung infection in Amarillo, Texas, on April 12, 2005. He was 65. Barone was born on November 15, 1939. He left his career as a New York City fireman to move to Los Angeles in the 1980s to act. He appeared in episodes of several television series including The Fall Guy and Designing Women. He also appeared in the 1979 science fiction film The Day It Came to Earth. He subsequently moved to Amarillo, where he performed on stage and hosted a local radio program.

BARRETT, TOMI Actress and stuntwoman Tomi Barrett died of lung cancer in Austin, Texas, on September 8, 2005. Barrett was born Shirley Willford in Austin on December 19, 1950. Barrett worked on the choreography for Brian DePalma’s 1974 film The Phantom of the Paradise, and appeared in the films The Pyramid (1975) and Terror in the Forest. She and her husband, Gary Kent, produced the 1985 film Rainy Day Friends (aka L.A. Bad). She also did stunts for the 1996 film Street Corner Justice.

Tomi Barrett Joe Barone

BARR, CANDY Exotic dancer Candy Barr died of pneumonia in a Victoria, Texas, hospital on December 30, 2005. She was 70. She was born Juanita Dale Slusher in Edna, Texas, on July 6, 1935. She went to Dallas and, at the age of 16, appeared in the landmark stag film Smart Alec in 1951. She became one of the best known strippers in Texas, often outfitted in a skimpy cowgirl outfit. She was a choreographer and technical advisor to Joan Collins for the 1960 film Seven Thieves. Barr’s career was halted after her arrest in the late 1950s

BARRON, BLUE Band leader Blue Barron died in his sleep in Baltimore, Maryland, on July 16, 2005. He was 91. Barron was born Harry Friedman in Cleveland, Ohio, on November 19, 1913. He formed a swing band in 1936 and originally featured Russ Carlyle as the lead vocalist. The band recorded several hit songs including “At a Perfume Counter,” “Sometimes I’m Happy,” and “Cruisin’ Down the River.” They also starred in several movie shorts including Melody Master: Blue Barron and His Orchestra (1939), Paramount Headliner: Blue Barron and His Orchestra (1940), and Blue

23

2005 • Obituaries in California on November 28, 2005. She was 76. She was born Joan Hamilton Killian in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on October 11, 1929. She went to Hollywood in the mid–1950s and appeared in the 1956 film A Kiss Before Dying as a stunt rider for actress Virginia Leith. She met actor Jeffrey Hunter on the set of the film and the two were married the following year. She and Hunter were together for ten years until their divorce in 1967.

Blue Barron

Barron and His Orchestra (1952). The group continued to perform until 1956 and Barron subsequently moved to Baltimore to manage real estate. • Los Angeles Times, July 23, 2005, B17; New York Times, July 23, 2005, B20.

BARRY, ALAN Irish actor Alan Barry died in Dublin, Ireland, on July 13, 2005. He was 72. Barry was born in Dublin in 1933. He began his career on the stage in Ireland in the 1960s. He also performed in BBC radio dramas and was seen in small roles in the films The Night of the Prowler (1962), Dead Man’s Evidence (1962), The Limbo Line (1968), Captain Nemo and the Underwater City (1969), and Hennessy (1975). He remained a popular performer on the Dublin stage and also appeared on television in episodes of Softly Softly, Z Cars, Gazette, and Bergerac. Barry also performed in the films In the Name of the Father (1993), Some Mother’s Sons (1996), Bloodlines: Legacy of a Lord (1997), The Brylcreem Boys (1998), The General (1998), A Love Divided (1999), and Evelyn (2002), and in television productions of The Old Curiosity Shop (1995), The Tale of Sweeney Todd (1998), and The Return (2003). He was featured as Superintendent Foley in the television series Ballykissangel from 1997 to 1999, and guest-starred in episodes of The New Adventures of Robin Hood and Baddiel’s Syndrome.

Alan Barry

BARTLETT, JOAN Joan “Dusty” Bartlett, the former wife of actor Jeffrey Hunter, died of lung cancer

BARTMAN, WILLIAM Stage and film director William Bartman died of multiple organ failure and complications from HIV infections at a New York hospital on September 15, 2005. He was 58. Bartman was born in Chicago on October 14, 1946. He began producing and directing stage productions for the West Coast Theater Co. in Lost Angeles in the 1970s. He also served as second-unit director on several films, and directed and co-scripted the 1982 film O’Hara’s Wife. He was founder of the nonprofit Art Resources Transfer, which published contemporary artist interview books and distributed them to underprivileged area.

William Bartman

BARTON, FRANKLIN Television writer and producer Franklin Barton died in Beverly Hills, California, on May 31, 2005. He was 87. Barton was born in Chicago on September 30, 1917. He began his career as a reporter and became head of the CBS New Bureau’s Chicago desk. He began writing for television in New York in the 1950s, scripting episodes of such series as Robert Montgomery Presents, Matinee Theatre, and The Kaiser Aluminum Hour. Barton went to California in the 1960s where he continued writing for television. He scripted episodes of such series as The Nurses, Arrest and Trial, Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre, Peyton Place, The Law and Mr. Jones, The Virginian, Felony Squad, The Invaders, and Judd for the Defense. He also was a story consultant and supervising producer for the series Hawaii Five-O. Barton became CBS’s vice president for program development in the late 1970s and was a producer at Universal Studios. He produced the 1977 television mini-series Seventh Avenue, and the tele-films Off the Wall (1977) and Ransom for Alice! (1977). He subsequently served as a senior vice president for television at Warner Bros. until his retirement. • Variety, June 13, 2005, 56.

Obituaries • 2005 BATCHELOR, DAVID Film sound mixer David “Dickie” Batchelor died of liver cancer in England on May 3, 2005. He was 64. Batchelor was born in England on March 7, 1941. He began working at the BBC as an aide while in his teens before joining Anglia Television’s camera department. He remained with Anglia until 1977, working on numerous television productions and commercials. He subsequently worked freelance in films and television, serving as a production sound assistant on the 1981 fantasy Dragonslayer. He was a boom operator for the 1983 science fiction classic Star Wars: Episode VI — Return of the Jedi. He also worked as a sound mixer on Alex Cox’s 1987 film Walker. • Times (of London), May 28, 2005, 70. BATTEN, TOM Stage and screen actor Tom Batten died on June 6, 2005. He was 77. Batten was born on October 29, 1927. Batten appeared in several films from the late 1930s including The Star Maker (1939) and Rationing (1941). He was also featured as Smiley in Sweet Genevieve with Jean Porter in 1947. He appeared on Broadway in the 1970s in the musicals Gantry, Mack & Mabel (1974), On the Twentieth Century (1978), the revival of Can-Can (1981), and Into the Light (1986). He also appeared in the 1981 television production of Pippin: His Life and Times, and the films Just Tell Me What You Want (1980) and Crocodile Dundee II (1988). Batten was also seen on television in an episode of The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd. BAUER, BILLY Jazz guitarist Billy Bauer died in Melville, New York, of complications from pneumonia on June 17, 2005. He was 89. Bauer was born in the Bronx, New York, on November 14, 1915. He began performing with the banjo and guitar on radio while in his teens and was playing electric guitar in danced bands by the 1940s. He performed with Woody Herman’s First Herd band during the decade, and later played with bands led by Benny Goodman, Jack Teagarden, Tommy Dorsey, and many others. He released an album, Plectrist, in 1956. He also played with the NBC staff orchestra during the 1950s. He continued to perform and taught at the Billy Bauer Guitar School in New York until shortly before his death. An autobiography, Sideman, was published in 1997. • Los Angeles Times, June 25, 2005, B19; New York Times, June 23, 2005, C20.

Billy Bauer

24 BAY, FRANCIS Belgian band leader Francis Bay died in Bonheiden, Belgium, on April 25, 2005. He was 90. He was born Frans Bayetz in Rijkevorsel, Belgium, in 1914. He began playing the clarinet at an early age, and soon became proficient on the trombone and saxophone as well. He performed with several swing and dance bands in Europe in the 1930s and during World War II. After the war he as a founder of the European big band The Skymasters. He also worked often in the postwar film industry composing and conduction scores for numerous film and television productions including Ontdek de Ster (1955), TV-Cirkus, Het (1955), CorsariShow (1959), Anita, My Love (1960), Canzonissima (1963), Pro of Contra (1963), De Vorstinnen van Brugge (1972), and Anna, Child of the Daffodils (1975). Bay formed his own band in the mid–1950s and, in 1956, became the director of popular music at the Flemish radio and television network in Belgium. His music became international popular soon due to the 1958 World’s Fair in Brussels, bringing him to the attention of an international audience. He recorded numerous popular albums over the next decade, before jazz recordings receded in popularity in the 1960s. He continued to work in television in Belgium until his retirement in 1979.

Francis Bay

BAYLOS, GENE Comedian Gene Baylos died in a Manhattan, New York, hospital on January 10, 2005.

Gene Baylos

25

2005 • Obituaries

He was 89. Baylos was born in New York City on November 16, 1906. He began his career as a stand-up comic in the Catskills in the 1930s and became a successful entertainer on the nightclub circuit. In the early 1960s Baylos appeared as Backdoor Benny Harper, the bookie, in several episodes of the television comedy Car 54, Where Are You? He was also seen in episodes of The Dick Van Dyke Show, Burke’s Law, and Kojak, and appeared in the films The Family Jewels (1965) with Jerry Lewis and The Love Machine (1971). He continued to perform in nightclubs, including the New York Friars Club, until he was forced to retire after breaking his hip in 1999. • Los Angeles Times, Jan. 16, 2005, B15; New York Times, Jan. 15, 2005, C11.

BEAUMONT, ANDY British actor Andy Beaumont died in England of a brain tumor on November 11, 2005. He was 53. Beaumont was born in Heckmondwike, West Yorkshire, England, on September 28, 1952. He began his career as an entertainer in the early 1970s, forming a song and dance team as The Stewart Brothers with Billy Pearce. He also appeared in BBC productions of Kisses at Fifty and Speech Day in 1973. Beaumont was featured as Robin Smethurst, a recurring character on the television series Coronation Street in 1977. Later in the decade he joined with Paula Smyczok and Chris Beaumont to form the singing trio Young Love, which was later known as Neon. They recorded and performed in venues throughout the world.

Wolfgang Becker

BEDFORD, LOU Character actor Lou Bedford died on January 18, 2005. He was 74. Bedford was born on December 16, 1930. He starred as Inspector Sam in the tele-film series Extralarge with Bud Spencer. He was also seen in the films The Happy Hooker (1975), Death Journey (1976), The Killing Hour (1982), and Passenger 57 (1992) with Wesley Snipes. He also appeared on television in episodes of B.L. Stryker, The 100 Lives of Black Jack Savage, and SeaQuest DSV.

Lou Bedford (left, with Bud Spencer and Michael Winslow from Extralarge)

Andy Beaumont

BECKER, WOLFGANG German film and television director Wolfgang Becker died in Munich, Germany, on January 30, 2005. He was 94. Becker was born in Berlin on May 15, 1910. He began working in films as an editor and assistant director, and was involved in documentary filmmaking until 1950. He subsequently directed numerous feature films in Germany from the 1950s including I Was All His (1957), Voyage to Italy, Complete with Love (1958), Everybody Loves Peter (1959), Riviera-Story (1961), and Dead Sexy (1970). He worked primarily in television from the 1960, helming episodes of Kriminalmuseum, Babeck, Der Kommissar, The Little Doctor, Tatort, Derrick, and Der Alte. • Variety, Feb. 21, 2005, 41.

BEI, LEO Austrian costume designer Leo Bei died in Austria on September 24, 2005. He was 86. Bei was born in Vienna, Austria, in 1918, the son of costume designers Albert and Ella Bei. He joined the family business, creating costumes for numerous theatrical productions and films. Bei’s film credits include Vienna Waltzes (1951), Helle Dienstmann (1952), Adventures in Vienna (1952), April 1, 2000 (1952), The Story of Vickie (1954), Sissi (1955), Congress Dances (1956), The House of the Three Girls (1958), Embezzled Heaven (1958), Forever My Love (1962), Born to Sing (1962), Miracle of the White Stallions (1963), The Waltz King (1963), and Emil and the Detectives (1964). BEL GEDDES, BARBARA Veteran actress Barbara Bel Geddes, who was best known for her role as Ewing matriarch Miss Ellie in the popular television series Dallas, died of lung cancer at her home in Northeast Harbor, Maine, on August 8, 2005. She was 82. She was born in New York City on October 31, 1922, the daugh-

Obituaries • 2005

26

Barbara Bel Geddes

Belita

ter of famed stage designer Norman Bel Geddes. She began her career on stage in 1940, and made her film debut opposite Henry Fonda in The Long Night in 1947. Bel Geddes was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her role as Katrin Hanson in I Remember Mama in 1948. She was also seen in the films Blood on the Moon (1948), Caught (1949), Panic in the Streets (1950), Fourteen Hours (1951), Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo (1958) with James Stewart and Kim Novak, The Five Pennies (1959), Five Branded Women (1960), and By Love Possessed (1961). She also continued to perform on stage, earning Tony Award nominations for her roles in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof in 1956 and Mary, Mary in 1961. Bel Geddes was also seen frequently on television in the 1950s, guest-starring in episodes of Robert Montgomery Presents, Pulitzer Prize Playhouse, Nash Airflyte Theatre, Campbell Playhouse, Toast of the Town, On Trial, Schlitz Playhouse of Stars, Studio One, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Playhouse 90, The United States Steel Hour, The DuPont Show of the Month, Riverboat, Death Valley Days, Dr. Kildare, Daniel Boone, Journey to the Unknown, and Spencer’s Pilots. She returned to the screen in 1971’s Summertree and The Todd Killings, and was featured in the 1977 television production of Our Town. Bel Geddes was cast as Miss Ellie Ewing, wife of Jock and mother of J.R. and Bobby, in the prime-time soap opera Dallas in 1978. She remained the backbone of the Ewing clan for six seasons before leaving the series for health reasons in 1984. She was briefly replaced by Donna Reed for season before returning to the role in 1985 and remaining until the series end in 1990. • Los Angeles Times, Aug. 11, 2005, B10; New York Times, Aug. 11, 2005, C17; Time, Aug. 22, 2005, 21; Times (of London), Aug. 17, 2005, 48.

Man on the Eiffel Tower (1950), Never Let Me Go (1953), Invitation to the Dance (1956), and Silk Stockings (1957). She also performed in numerous ice shows in the United States and England. Belita retired from ice skating in 1956 and made her final film, The Terrace, in 1963. She spent most of her later years in France. • Los Angeles Times, Dec. 23, 2005, B11; Times (of London), Jan. 4, 2006, 54.

BELITA Ice skating film star Belita died in France on December 18, 2005. She was 82. She was born Belita Gladys Olive Lyne Jepson-Turner in Nether Wallop, Hampshire, England, on October 25, 1923. She skated on the British Olympic team at the age of 13 in 1936. She toured the United States two years later and made her film debut in 1941’s Ice-Capades. She continued to appear in films, most of which were designed to highlight her skating skills. Her film credits include Silver Skates (1943), Lady, Let’s Dance (1944), Suspense (1946), The Gangster (1947), The Hunted (1948), The

BELKIN, GARY Emmy Award–winning comedy writer Gary Belkin died of emphysema in New York City on July 28, 2005. He was 78. Belkin was born on April 24, 1927. He wrote material for such stars as Frank Sinatra, Johnny Carson, Danny Kaye, and Anne Bancroft. He wrote for Sid Caesar’s variety show Caesar’s Hour from 1954 to 1957, and earned two Emmy Awards for his work on The Carol Burnett Show in the 1960s. He also received an Emmy for writing the 1970 television special Annie, the Woman in the Life of a Man. Belkin also scripted episodes of such comedy series as The Danny Kaye Show, Get Smart, The Doris Day Show, Chico and the Man, and Newhart. He also scripted the PBS sex education show VD Blues, and was ghostwriter for much of Mohammed Ali’s poetry. He also shared an Emmy nomination in 1987 for his work on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson. • Los Angeles Times, Aug. 3, 2005, B11; New York Times, Aug. 4, 2005, A17; Variety, Aug. 8, 2005, 37.

Gary Belkin

27

2005 • Obituaries

BELL, ESTELITA Brazilian actress Estelita Bell died of heart failure in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on April 12, 2005. She was 93. She began her career on stage in 1938, and appeared in such films as Massagista de Madame (1958), Mulheres Chequei (1959), Memoirs of a Gigolo (1970), O Mau Carater (1974), O Cacador de Fantasma (1975), Quem Matou Pacifico (1977), Odio (1977), The Kiss (1981), and Tropclip (1985). She also performed in such Brazilian television series as O Fim do Mundo (1996) and Salsa e Merenque (1996). BELL, MARY HAYLEY Actress and author Mary Hayley Bell died in England after a long illness on December 1, 2005. She was 91. Bell was born in Shanghai, China, on January 22, 1914. She began her career as an actress in the early 1930s, making her stage debut in a production of The Barretts of Wimpole Street in 1932. She made her London debut two years later. She met actor John Mills in the 1930s and the two were married in 1941. The couple had a son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Juliet and Hayley, both of whom became film and television stars. Bell largely quit acting in the 1940s to concentrate on writing. She wrote numerous plays including Men in Shadow (1942), Duet for Two Hands (1945), Angel (1947), and The Uninvited Guest (1953). She was best known for writing the 1958 novel Whistle Down the Wind which was adapted for a 1961 film starring her daughter Hayley. Bell also wrote the 1966 film Sky West and Crooked (1966), which was directed by her husband and also starred Hayley. Bell appeared in small roles in several films including The Shrike (1955) and The Big Freeze (1993). He autobiography, What Shall We Do Tomorrow?, was published in 1968. She and Mills remained married until his death in April of 2005. • New York Times, Nov. 6, 2005, C19; Times (of London), Dec. 3, 2005, 75.

William J. Bell

World Turns in 1957 and was co-creator, with Irna Phillips, of the prime time soap spin-off Our Private World in 1965. He became head writer for the soap Days of Our Lives in 1966, transforming it into a popular hit before leaving the series in 1972. Bell teamed with his wife, Lee Phillip Bell, to create The Young and the Restless in 1973, which became television’s top rated soap. They also created The Bold and the Beautiful in 1987. His survivors include his wife, sons Bill Jr. and Bradley, who is executive producer and head writer for The Bold and the Beautiful, and daughter, actress Lauralee Bell, who stars as Cricket on The Young and the Restless. • Los Angeles Times, May 2, 2005, B9; New York Times, May 3, 2005, B8; Times (of London), May 9, 2005, 49; Variety, May 9, 2005, 68.

BELLOW, SAUL Nobel Prize–winning author Saul Bellow died at his home in Brookline, Massachusetts, on April 5, 2005. He was 89. Bellow was born Solomon Bellows in Lachine, Quebec, Canada, on June 10, 1915, and was raised in Chicago, Illinois. He was educated at the University of Chicago, Northwestern University, and the University of Wisconsin, and served in the Merchant Marine during World War II. He wrote several novels in the 1940s including Dangling Man (1944) and The Victim (1947). He received acclaim for his 1953 novel The Adventures of Augie March, and expanded on his growing reputation as a leading literary figure

Mary Hayley Bell

BELL, WILLIAM J. William J. Bell, the writer, producer and co-creator of the popular daytime soap operas The Young and the Restless and The Bold and the Beautiful, died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease in Los Angeles on April 29, 2005. He was 78. Bell was born in Chicago on March 6, 1927. He began working in television in the mid–1950s as a writer on the Guiding Light soap opera. He started writing for As the

Saul Bellow

Obituaries • 2005 with Seize the Day (1956), Henderson the Rain King (1959), Herzog (1964), and Mr. Sammler’s Planet (1970). He received the Pulitzer Prize for fiction for the 1975 novel Humboldt’s Gift, and was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1976. He also wrote the memoir To Jerusalem and Back: A Personal Account (1976), the short story collection Him with His Foot in His Mouth (1984), and the novel Die of Heartbreak (1987). His later works include the novellas A Theft (1989) and The Bellarosa Connection (1989), the essay collection It All Adds Up (1994), and the books The Actual (1997), Ravelstein (2000), and Collected Stories (2001). He was reportedly working on another manuscript, All Marbles Still Accounted For, at the time of his death. Seize the Day was adapted for a film starring Robin Williams in 1986, and Bellow appeared as himself in Woody Allen’s 1983 film Zelig. Bellow taught at the University of Chicago for many years, before moving to Boston University in 1993. He served as a mentor and advisor to numerous younger writers. • Los Angeles Times, Apr. 6, 2005, A1; New York Times, Apr. 6, 2005, A1; People, Apr. 18, 2005, 105; Time, Apr. 18, 2005, 146; Times (of London), Apr. 7, 2005, 57.

BENEDICT, HOWARD Space reporter Howard Benedict died at his home in Cocoa, Florida, on April 25, 2005. He was 77. Benedict was born in Sioux City, Iowa, on April 23, 1928. He worked for the Associated Press wire service, where he became the senior aerospace writer during his 37 years there. He covered numerous space missions from Alan Shepard’s 1961 Mercury flight, until his retirement in 1990. Benedict also wrote three books about the space program, NASA: A Quarter Century of Space Achievement (1984), NASA: The Journey Continues (1989), and Moon Shot: The Inside Story of America’s Race to the Moon (1994) which he co-authored with reporter Jay Barbee and astronauts Alan Shepard and Deke Slayton. Moon Shot was adapted as a tele-film in 1994. • Los Angeles Times, Apr. 28, 2005, B13.

28 body Likes a Smart Ass, which was featured on New Orleans’ Bourbon Street throughout the 1960s and 1970s. He also appeared in numerous local plays and was featured in several films including Crypt of Dark Secrets (1976) and Mardi Gras Massacre (1978).

BENNETT, JOHN British character actor John Bennett died in London on April 11, 2005. He was 76. Bennett was born in Beckenham, Kent, England, on May 8, 1928. He trained as an actor and made his stage debut in a performance of The Man from the Ministry in 1949. He spent the next decade acting in repertory theater and made his film debut in 1960s The Challenge (aka It Takes a Thief) with Jayne Mansfield. He appeared in numerous films over the next 40 years including The Trials of Oscar Wilde (1960), the 1961 Hammer horror film The Curse of the Werewolf (1961), Victim (1961), Postman’s Knock (1962), The Barber of Stamford Hill (1962), The Pirates of Blood River (1962), Crooks Anonymous (1962), Lawrence of Arabia (1962), Kaleidoscope (1966), A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum (1966), The Syndicate (1968), The House That Dripped Blood (1970), Henry VIII and His Six Wives (1972), The House in Nightmare Park (1973), Hitler: The Last Ten Days (1973) as Josef Goebbels, Mohammed, Messenger of God (1976), The Shadow Line (1976), Face of Darkness (1976), Watership Down (1978) as the voice of Holly, The Greek Tycoon (1978), The Mirror Crack’d (1980), Eye of the Needle (1981), Strangers Kiss (1983), Give My Regards to Broad Street (1984), Tai-Pan (1986), Night Angel (1990), Antonia and Jane (1991), Split Second (1992), Priest (1994), Last Fair Deal (1995), The Fifth Element (1997), Bridge of Dragons (1999), Breathtaking (2000), Beginner’s Luck (2001), Charlotte Gray (2001), Roman Polanski’s The Pianist (2002), Minority Report (2002), and Chaos and Cadavers (2003). He also appeared in television productions of The Horse Without a Head (1963), Lorna Doone (1963), Esther Waters (1964), Market in Honey Lane (1967), The Forsyte Saga (1967), Daniel Deronda (1970), Hope (1970), Ross (1970), Fathers and Sons (1971), I, Claudius (1976) as Xenophon, Anna Karenina (1977), The House on Garibaldi Street (1979), Maybury (1981), Return to Treasury Island (1986), The Bretts (1987), Miss Marple: Sleeping Murder (1987), The Tenth Man (1988),

Howard Benedict

BENIT, BUTCH Actor and comedian Dudley “Butch” Benit, Jr., died in Louisiana on July 27, 2005. He was 68. Benit was born on November 11, 1936. He wrote and performed in the popular comedy revue No-

John Bennett (as Goebbels from Hitler: The Last Ten Days)

29 Saracen (1989), Needle (1990), The War That Never Ends (1991), Prisoner of Honor (1991), Merlin of the Crystal Cave (1991), Mulberry (1992), Sherlock Holmes and the Leading Lady (1992) as Sigmund Freud, Jason and the Argonauts (2000), The Infinite Worlds of H.G. Wells (2001), and Armadillo (2001). Bennett starred as Injun Joe in the 1960 television series The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, and was Jackman in the 1962 series The River Flows East. He was Zaliv in the 1964 series The Midnight Men, and was the editor in 1965’s The Front Page. His numerous television appearances also include roles in episodes of The Cheaters, Top Secret, Silent Evidence, The Avengers, Z Cars, Crane, Dixon of Dock Green, The Saint, Detective, Danger Man, Softly Softly, The Baron, Thirty-Minute Theatre, The Mind of Mr. J.G. Reeder, Strange Report, Ryan International, Hadleigh, Paul Temple, The Troubleshooters, Doctor Who, Porridge, Survivors, 1990, Return of the Saint, Blakes 7, The Professionals, Boon, Bergerac, Hunter, Alleyn Mysteries, Cadfael, Murder Most Horrid, Heartbeat, Jonathan Creek, Holby City, Casualty, Doctors, Seven Wonders of the Industrial World, New Tricks, and Rosemary & Thyne. • Times (of London), May 6, 2005, 70

BENOIT, JACQUES Canadian assistant director Jacques Benoit died of lung cancer in Canada in April of 2005. He was 63. Benoit was born in St-Jean, Quebec, Canada, in 1941. He worked as an assistant director on numerous Canadian films including Murder in the Family (1984), Night Magic (1985), Elvis Gratton (1985), The Decline of the American Empire (1986), Brother Andre (1987), The Revolving Doors (1988), Leolo (1992), Shadow of the Wolf (1992), Legends of the North (1995), Rainbow (1996), Poverty and Other Delights (1996), Out of Control (1998), Possible Worlds (2000), and The Barbarian Invasions (2003). Benoit was also assistant director on the television productions Warrior Spirit (1994), Nuremberg (2000), and Largo Winch (2002).

2005 • Obituaries

Obie Benson

inally known as the Four Aims, the performed in New York jazz clubs for nearly a decade before achieving popular success after an appearance on the Tonight show in 1963 singing “In the Still of the Night.” They were then signed to a recording contract by Berry Gordy of Motown Records and produced numerous hits including “Baby, I Need Your Lovin’,” “Standing in the Shadows of Love,” “Bernadette,” and “Can’t Help Myself (Sugar Pie, Honey Bunch).” Benson also wrote the anti-war song “What’s Goin’ On,” which was a hit for singer Marvin Gaye. Though the Four Tops left Motown in 1972, they continued to perform and record together and were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1990. The group remained together until Payton’s death in 1997. Stubbs left the group because of illness in 2000, but Benson and Fakir continued with the Tops, joined by newcomers Ronnie McNair and Theo Peoples. The remained popular performer, particularly in Las Vegas venues. • Los Angeles Times, July 2, 2005, B18; New York Times, July 2, 2005, C16; People, July 18, 2005, 73; Times (of London), July 6, 2005, 59; Variety, July 11, 2005, 45.

BENTLEY, LAMONT Lamont Bentley, who starred as Hakeem Campbell in the Moesha television series in the 1990s, was killed when his car plunged from the embankment of the San Diego Freeway on January 18, 2005. He was 31. Bentley was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on October 25, 1973. He starred as Rashad

Jacques Benoit

BENSON, OBIE Singer Renaldo “Obie” Benson, who was a founding member of the popular Motown singing group the Four Tops, died in Detroit, Michigan, of lung cancer on July 1, 2005. He was 69. Benson was born in Detroit on June 14, 1936. He joined with fellow high schoolers Levi Stubbs, Abdul Fakir and Lawrence Payton to form the Four Tops in 1954. Orig-

Lamont Bentley

Obituaries • 2005 in the 1994 television series South Central, and guest starred in such series as Gabriel’s Fire, Family Matters, The Parent ’Hood, Courthouse, The Client, The Sentinel, NYPD Blue, Clueless, The Parkers, and Soul Food. He also appeared in the films Tales from the Hood (1995), A Day in the Life of Mia (1997), The Breaks (1999), Gabriela (2001), The Wash (2001), and Shards (2004), and the tele-films Buffalo Soldiers (1997) and Too Legit: The MC Hammer Story (2001) as Tupac Shakur. • Los Angeles Times, Jan. 21, 2005, B9; People, Feb. 7, 2005, 83; Variety, Jan. 31, 2005, 69.

BERBERIAN, ARA Opera singer Ara Berberian died of heart failure in Boynton Beach, Florida, on February 21, 2005. He was 74. Berberian was born in Detroit, Michigan, on May 14, 1930. He trained as a singer and began performing with the Robert Shaw Chorale and the New York City Opera in the late 1950s. He made his debut with the Metropolitan Opera in 1979, appearing in over 100 roles in such productions as Orphete, Boris Godunov, and The Barber of Seville. He sang with the Met for twenty years before his retirement in 1997. Berberian also performed in television productions of the operas Carmen in 1987 and The Ghosts of Versailles (1992). • Los Angeles Times, Feb. 24, 2005, B11; New York Times, Feb. 24, 2005, B11.

30 Janeiro, Brazil, on May 17, 2005. She was 51. Berditchevsky was born in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on July 1, 1953. She appeared in several films during her career including Ajuriicaba (1977), Colonel Delmire Gouveia (1978), Os Sete Gatinhos (1980), Noites do Sertao (1984), O Cavalinho Azul (1984), and O Vestido (2003). She was best known for her numerous television performances from the late 1970s, starring in such series as Dancin’ Days (1978), Marrom-Glace (1979), Plumes & Paetes (1980), Terras do Sem-Fim (1981), Selva de Pedra (1986), Barriga de Aluguel (1990), Fera Ferida (1993), Vera Uma Vez... (1998), and Senhora do Destino (2004).

BERENSTAIN, STAN Stan Berenstain, who created the popular children’s book series the Berenstain Bears with his wife, Jan, died in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on November 26, 2005. He was 82. Berenstain was born on September 19, 1923. He and his wife began drawing together after meeting at the Philadelphia Museum School of Industrial Art in 1941. The married after Stan served in the army during World War II. They collaborated on numerous cartoons for such magazines as The Saturday Evening Post, Collier’s, and McCalls. They also created the All in the Family cartoon series, which appeared in several magazines. The Berenstain’s became associated with Theodore “Dr. Seuss” Geisel in 1962, who helped them develop the first Berenstain Bears book, The Big Honey Hunt, at Random House in 1962. The couple produced over 200 books in the series over the next four decades, working with their sons Leo and Michael on more recent volumes. The Berenstain Bears also became an animated television series in 2003. • Los Angeles Times, Nov. 30, 2005, B10; New York Times, Nov. 30, 2005, C19; Time, Dec. 12, 2005, 29; Times (of London), Dec. 7, 2005, 56.

Ara Berberian

BERDITCHEVSKY, SURA Brazilian television actress Sura Berditchevsky died of a suicide in Rio de

Stan Berenstain

Sura Berditchevsky

BERGER, TONI German actor Toni Berger died in Munich, Germany, on January 29, 2005. He was 83. Berger was born in Munich on March 27, 1921. A leading stage actor, he was also featured in numerous films including The Cry of the Black Wolves (1972), The Serpent’s Egg (1977), It Can Only Get Worse (1979), From the Life of the Marionettes (1980), Doctor Faustus (1983), Sugarbaby (1985), and Madame Baurin (1993). He appeared frequently on German television from the 1970s,

31

2005 • Obituaries

Toni Berger

Giovanni Bertolucci

appearing the series Der Alte, Derrick, Tatort, Franz Xaver Brunnmeyr, and Kir Royal, and numerous tele-films.

the Night (1985), Miranda (1985), Capri Remembered (1987), Goodbye and Thank You (1988), Snack Bar Budapest (1988), Dial Help (1988), the 1989 mini-series Ocean, The Belt (1989), Mom I Can Do It (1992), All Women Do It (1992), Where Are You? I’m Here (1993), Poor but Beautiful (1996), Frivolous Lola (1998), and Fallo! (2003).

BERNTZEN, ROLF Norwegian stage and screen actor Rolf Berntzen died in Bergen, Norway, on September 22, 2005. He was 87. Berntzen was born in Norway on June 4, 1918. He appeared in numerous theatrical productions and many Shakespearean plays during his career. He was also featured in several films including Marenco (1964), Song of Norway (1970), and Vilde, the Wild One (1986).

BETTIS, PAUL Canadian actor Paul Bettis died of lung cancer in Toronto, Canada, on August 4, 2005. He was 65. Bettis was born in England in 1940 and came to Canada in 1970. He began his career on stage in the 1970s as artistic director of the Theatre Second Floor. He also founded his own experimental theater and performed at leading theaters throughout Canada. Bettis was also a director at his Civilized Theatre. He was featured in several experimental films including Pissoir (1988), Termini Station (1989), The Adjuster (1991), Uncut (1997), The Five Senses (1999), Touch (2001), The Messiah: Prophecy Fulfilled (2004), and Looking for Angelina (2005). He was also seen on television in episodes of War of the Worlds, The Twilight Zone, Friday the 13th, and Queer as Folk.

Rolf Berntzen

BERTOLUCCI, GIOVANNI Italian film producer Giovanni Bertolucci died in Rome on February 17, 2005. He was 64. Bertolucci was born in Parma, Italy, on June 24, 1940. He began working in films as a producer in the late 1960s, producing the 1968 feature Partner, written and directed by his cousin Bernardo Bertolucci. He produced several more of Bernardo Bertolucci’s films and also worked with the directors Luchino Visconti and Tinto Brass. His numerous credits include The Spider’s Stratagem (1970), The Conformist (1970), Teresa the Thief (1972), The Perfume of the Lady in Black (1974), Conversation Piece (1974), Burnt by a Scalding Passion (1976), The Innocent (1976), The Bishop’s Bedroom (1977), Stay as You Are (1978), Luna (1979), Lost and Found (1980), Tragedy of a Ridiculous Man (1981), the 1982 television mini-series Marco Polo, The Key (1983), Lady of

Paul Bettis

BETTS, KETER Jazz bassist Keter Betts died at his home in Silver Springs, Maryland, on August 6, 2005. He was 77. Betts was born in Port Chester, New York, on July 22, 1928. He began playing the bass while

Obituaries • 2005

32 Telugu language film Vara Vikrayan. She made her debut in Tamil films in 1948, and appeared in nearly 100 films opposite such stars as N. T. Rama Rao, Nageswara Rao, and Sivaji Ganesan. Her numerous film credits include Maya Rambha (1950), Chakrapani (1954), Rangoon Radha (1956), Varudu Kavali (1957), Penchina Prema (1963), Bobbili Yudham (1964), Palnati Yudham (1966), Vichitra Vivaham (1973), Gadasari Attaha Sosagara Kodalu (1981), Mangamma Gari Manavadu (1984), Bamma Maata Bangaru Baata (1990), Peddarikam (1992), and Pelli Kanuka (1998). She also produced and directed many of her films from the 1950s.

Keter Betts

in his teens and performed with Earl Bostic’s band in the late 1940s. He teamed with guitarist Charlie Byrd and saxophonist Stan Getz in the early 1960s to record the album Jazz Samba, which was largely responsible to inaugurating the bossa nova sound in the United States. Betts began a lengthy association with singer Ella Fitzgerald in the mid–1960s, accompanying her performances until her retirement in 1993. Betts also performed and recorded frequently with pianist Tommy Flanagan. • Los Angeles Times, Aug. 10, 2005, B10; New York Times, Aug. 22, 2005, B7; Times (of London), Aug. 13, 2005, 66.

BIANCHI, GIAMPIERO Italian actor Giampiero Bianchi died in Rome on July 16, 2005. He was 60. Bianchi was born in Varese, Italy, in 1945. He was featured in numerous Italian television productions from the 1960s including La Freccia Nera (1968), La Donna di Picche (1972), E.S.P. (1973), L’Homme de Suez (1984), Olimpo Lupo (1995), Turbo (1999), La Piovra 10 (1999), One Last Dream (2000), Incantesimo 5 (2002), and Chiaroscuro (2003). Bianchi also appeared in several films including Da Grande (1987), Love and Fear (1988), Wolf! Wolf! (1992), Italia Village (1994), State Secret (1995), Ardena (1997), and Scandalous Crimes (1999).

BEYERS, CHARLOTTE Educational filmmaker Charlotte Kempner Beyers died of complications from lymphoma at her home in Palo Alto, California, on March 10, 2005. She was 73. Beyers was born in New York City on December 8, 1931. She worked as a journalist for various magazines and newspapers from the 1950s. She made her first film AIDS In your School following the death of her husband’s brother from the disease in 1985. She made two other documentaries about the disease including A Is for AIDS (1989) and AIDS and Women: The Greatest Gamble (1993). • Los Angeles Times, Mar. 17, 2005, B11. BHANUMATHI, PALUVAYI Indian film actress and director Paluvayi Bhanumathi died at her home in India on December 25, 2005. She was 80. Bhanumathi was born in Madras, India, on September 7, 1925. She began her career in films in 1939, appearing in the

BICH, KAREN French adult film star Karen Bich committed suicide in Paris on January 28, 2005. She was 32. Bich was born in Lyon, Francis, on January

Paluvayi Bhanumathi

Karen Bich

Giampiero Bianchi

33

2005 • Obituaries

19, 1973. Sometimes billed under such names as Karen Lancaume, Carene Lancome, and Angel Paris, Bich appeared in such adult films as Black Widow (1997), Private Gold 25: When the Night Falls (1997), Mad Sex (1997), The Panty Thief (1997), Cindy (1997), The Nurse’s Diary (1998), Exhibition 99 (1998), Masquerade (1998), American Girl in Paris (1998), The Marionette (1999), Hotdorix (1999), and the 2000 feature Baise-Moi (aka Kiss Me).

BIDDLE, ADRIAN British cinematographer Adrian Biddle died of a heart attack in London on December 7, 2005. He was 53. Biddle was born in England on July 20, 1952. He began his career directing television commercials. He worked in films as a camera operator on such films as On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (1969), Captain Nemo and the Underwater City (1969), Murphy’s War (1971), When Eight Bells Toll (1971), The Duellists (1977), and Alien (1979). He made his debut as director of photography for James Cameron’s Aliens in 1986. He continued to serve as cinematographer on such films as The Princess Bride (1987), The Dawning (1988), Willow (1988), The Tall Guy (1989), Thelma and Louise (1991) which earned him an Academy Award nomination, 1492: Conquest of Paradise (1992), City Slickers II: The Legend of Curly’s Gold (1994), Judge Dredd (1995), 101 Dalmatians (1996), Fierce Creatures (1997), The Butcher Boy (1997), Event Horizon (1997), Holy Man (1998), The Mummy (1999), The World Is Not Enough (1999), The Weight of Water (2000), 102 Dalmatians (2000), The Mummy Returns (2001), Reign of Fire (2002), Shanghai Knights (2003), Laws of Attraction (2004), Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason (2004), An American Haunting (2005), and the forthcoming V for Vendetta (2006). • Times (of London), Dec. 17, 2005, 65.

Annamirl Bierbichler

BILBOE, GORDON British actor Gordon Bilboe died of lung cancer in Shropshire, England, on February 26, 2005. He was 60. Bilboe was born on May 5, 1944. He appeared on British television in episodes of Softly Softly, Dixon of Dock Green, and Last of the Summer Wine, and the 1975 Play for Today production of Gangsters. BILLINGTON, MICHAEL British actor Michael Billington, who starred as Colonel Paul Foster in the 1970 science fiction television series U.F.O., died of cancer in England on June 6, 2005. He was 63. Billington was born in Blackburn, Lancashire, England, on December 24, 1941. He appeared in several films during his career including Alfred the Great (1969), the 1977 James Bond film The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) as Sergei Barsov, KGB: The Secret War (1986), and Flicks (1987). He was best known for his roles on television, starring as Neil Hall in the 1965 British series United!, and as Freddie Hepton in Hadleigh in 1971. He also starred as Daniel Fogarty on The Onedin Line from 1971 to 1974, and was featured in the mini-series War and Peace (1972) and Edward the King (1975), playing Czar Nicholas II. Billington starred as Count Louis Dardinay in the short-lived U.S. television series The Quest in 1982, and appeared in television productions of Antony and Cleopatra (1983) and The Collectors (1986). His other television credits include episodes of The Prisoner, Z Cars, The Profession-

Adrian Biddle

BIERBICHLER, ANNAMIRL German actress Annamirl Bierbichler died in Germany on May 27, 2005. She was 55. Bierbichler was born on December 7, 1949. She appeared in over a dozen films from the late 1970s including Bye-Bye Bavaria! (1977), Beer Chase (1977), The Last Hole (1981), The Ghost (1983), Wanderkrebs (1984), Rita Ritter (1984), Triumph der Gerechten (1987), Punch Drunk (1987), Bride of the Orient (1989), Mix Wix (1989), and Ab Nach Tibet! (1994).

Michael Billington

Obituaries • 2005 als, The Greatest American Hero, Hart to Hart, Fantasy Island, Philip Marlowe, Private Eye, Magnum, P.I., and Maigret. • Variety, June 27, 2005, 80.

34 ries in 1979. He also appeared regularly in the 1986 series Buddy as Mr. Normington, and was Roy in Kinsey in 1990. His other television credits include episodes of such series as Ghost Squad, Z Cars, The Saint, The Protectors, Gideon’s Way, The Avengers, The Baron, Sanctuary, Dixon of Dock Green, My Partner, the Ghost, Department X, Steptoe and Son, Hadleigh, Budgie, Paul Temple, The Guardians, Softly Softly, Jason King, Shirley’s World, Till Death Us Do Part, The Adventure, The Rivals of Sherlock Holmes, Bless This House, Public Eye, Rising Damp, Angels, Raffles, Coronation Street, All Creatures Great and Small, Fawlty Towers, Yes, Minister, Hammer House of Horror, Julie Bravo, The Fourth Arm, One by One, Ever Decreasing Circles, Stay Lucky, Second Thoughts, and Boon.

BIRD, NORMAN Leading British character actor Norman Bird died of cancer in Wolverhampton, West Midlands, England, on April 22, 2005. He was 80. Bird was born in Coalville, Leicestershire, England, on October 30, 1924. He appeared in numerous films from the 1950s including An Inspector Calls (1954), The League of Gentlemen (1959), Man in the Moon (1960), The Angry Silence (1960), Cash on Demand (1961), Whistle Down the Wind (1961), Victim (1961), Very Important Person (1961), The Secret Partner (1961), Term of Trial (1962), Burn, Witch, Burn! (1962), In Search of the Castaways (1962), The Punch and Judy Man (1963), The Cracksman (1963), Bitter Harvest (1963), 80,000 Suspects (1963), The Mind Benders (1963), Maniac (1963), The Black Torment (1964), The Beauty Jungle (1964), The Bargee (1964), Agent 8∫ (1964), H.G. Wells’ First Men in the Moon (1964), The Hill (1965), Sky West and Crooked (1966), The Wrong Box (1966), The Limbo Line (1968), A Dandy in the Aspic (1968), Oh! What a Lovely War (1969), The Virgin and the Gypsy (1970), The Rise and Rise of Michael Rimmer (1970), Please Sir! (1971), The Raging Moon (1971), Hands of the Ripper (1971), Get Charlie Tully (1972), Doomwatch (1972), Young Winston (1972), The Slipper and the Rose (1976), the 1978 animated version of J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings as the voice of Bilbo Baggins, The Medusa Touch, The Final Conflict (1981), If You Go Down in the Woods Today (1981), and Shadowlands (1993). Bird also appeared frequently on British television, performing in productions of The Pub Fighter (1968), W. Somerset Maugham: A Casual Affair (1969), Run a Crooked Mile (1969), Elementary My Dear Watson (1973), Margie and Me (1978), To Serve Them All My Days (1980), A Voyage Round My Father (1982), The Ghost Downstairs (1982), Break Point (1982), the Hammer House of Mystery and Suspense production of Black Carrion (1984), Born Kicking (1992), and Crossing the Floor (1996). Bird also appeared as Sid Stubbins in the 1973 television series Up the Workers, and was Leonard Chambers in the series Yanks Go Home in 1976. He was featured as Gilbert in Thomas and Sarah in 1979 and was Mr. Braithwaite in the Worzel Gummidge children’s se-

BISHOP, ED Leading actor Ed Bishop, who starred as Commander Ed Straker in the British science fiction television series U.F.O. in 1970, died in a hospital in England on June 8, 2005. He was 72. Bishop was born George Bishop in Brooklyn, New York, on June 11, 1932. He served in the U.S. Army in the early 1950s and was a disc jockey on Armed Forces Radio. After his discharge he studied drama at Boston University before attending the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art. He began his professional career on the English stage in 1961. Bishop was featured in numerous films during his career including The Cool Mikado (1962), Lolita (1962), The War Lover (1962), The Mouse on the Moon (1963), Man in the Middle (1964), The Bedford Incident (1965), You Must Be Joking! (1965), Battle Beneath the Earth (1967), the 1967 James Bond film You Only Live Twice, Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), Journey to the Far Side of the Sun (1969), the 1971 James Bond film Diamonds Are Forever, Pets (1974), Sex Play (1974), Twilight’s Last Gleaming (1977), The French Woman (1977), Running Blind (1979), Brass Target (1979), Silver Dream Racer (1980), Saturn 3 (1980), Nutcracker (1982), The Lonely Lady (1983), The Lords of Discipline (1983), Restless Natives (1985), Turnaround (1987), Testimony (1988), The Serpent of Death (1989), Born to Ride (1991), Funny Man (1994), and 500! (2001). He also appeared in television productions of The Portrait of a Lady (1968), W. Somerset Maugham’s The Fall of Edward Barnard, Marked Personal (1973), Nurse Will Make It Better (aka The Devil’s Web) (1975), The Day After To-

Norman Bird

Ed Bishop

35 morrow (1976), S.O.S. Titanic (1979), Breakaway (1980), Whoops Apocalypse (1982), The Mad Death (1983), The Master of Ballantrae (1984), Master of the Game (1984), The First Olympics: Athens 1896 (1984), Threads (1984), Chocky’s Children (1985), Going for the Gold: The Bill Johnson Story (1985), The Fifth Missile (1986), Broken Glass (1996), The Unexpected Mrs. Pollifax (1999), and The American (2001). Bishop was the voice of Captain Blue in the marionette television series Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons in the late 1960s, and was a voice actor in the 1973 animated Star Trek series. Bishop’s other television credits include episodes of such series as The Saint, The Troubleshooters, Man in a Suitcase, Sherlock Holmes, Out of the Unknown, Strange Report, The Adventurer, The Protectors, Colditz, Warship, Quiller, Great Mysteries, Two’s Company, 1990, The Wilde Alliance, The Professionals, It Ain’t Half Hot Mum, Dick Turpin, Phillip Marlowe, Private Eye, Worlds Beyond, Just Good Friends, French and Saunders, The South Bank Show, 2point4 Children, Space Cadets, Highlander, and Waking the Dead. • Variety, July 18, 2005, 48.

2005 • Obituaries Workers (1979), Krypskyttere (1982), and The Bluck (1991). He also appeared often on Norwegian television in such productions as Ungen (1960), Nederlaget (1966), Twigs (1978), Blind Goddess (1997), and Nini (2001).

BLACK, CHARLES Charles A. Black, the husband of former child star Shirley Temple, died of a bone marrow disease at his home in Woodside, California, on August 4, 2005. He was 86. Black was born on March 6, 1919. He attended Stanford University, where he earned a master’s degree in business. He served with distinction in naval intelligence during World War II. Black met Temple in Honolulu, Hawaii, in 1950 and the two were married later the same year. He later founded a fishing and hatchery company and was a leading expert on maritime issues. He is survived by his wife and children, Charles Jr. and Lori, and another daughter, Susan, from Temple’s first marriage to actor John Agar. • Los Angeles Times, Aug. 7, 2005, B17; New York Times, Aug. 6, 2005, C16.

BITHIKOTSIS, GRIGORIS Leading Greek singer Grigoris Bithikotsis, who was regarded as the “voice of Greece,” died in an Athens, Greece, hospital after a long illness on April 7, 2005. He was 82. Bithikotsis was born in Athens on December 11, 1922. He began his musical career as a bouzouki player and became well known for his renditions of songs by leftist political composer Mikis Theodorakis. He also performed in several films in the early 1960s including Synoikia to Oneiro (1961), The Red Lanterns (1963), and Moderna Stahtopouta (1965). • Times (of London), Apr. 15, 2005, 75.

Charles Black (with wife Shirley Temple and their children)

BLACK, IAN Canadian actor Ian Black died in Canada on December 19, 2005. He was 55. Black was featured in the films The Journey of Natty Gann (1985) and Mystery Date (1991). He also appeared in the telefilms Sky High (1990), Always Remember I Love You (1990), Morning Glory (1993), Johnny’s Girl (1995), and

Grigoris Bithikotsis

BJORNSTAD, ROY Norwegian character actor Roy Bjornstad died in Oslo, Norway, of cancer on November 25, 2005. He was 80. Bjornstad was born in Norway on September 29, 1925. He appeared frequently on stage and film from the 1940s. His numerous film credits include Englandsfarere (1946), Dei Svarte Hestane (1951), About Tilla (1963), Marenco (1964), Hunger (1966), An-Magritt (1969), One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich (1970), Call of the Wild (1972), Lina’s Wedding (1973), Bobby’s War (1974), The Seed (1974), Karjolsteinen (1977), Operation Cobra (1978), Blood of the Railroad

Ian Black

Obituaries • 2005 Mary Higgins Clark’s Try to Remember (2004). His other television credits include episodes of The Beachcombers, Airwolf, Stingray, MacGyver, Hawkeye, Moccasin Flats, and Corner Gas.

BLAKE, BUD Bud Blake, the creator of the popular “Tiger” cartoon strip, died in a Portland, Maine, hospital on December 26, 2005. He was 87. Blake was born in Nutley, New Jersey, on February 13, 1918. He began working as an artist at an advertising agency in the late 1930s, and rose to become executive art director for the Kudner Agency in New York City. He left the agency in 1965 to embark on a career as a cartoonist. His panel cartoon “Ever Happen to You?” was distributed by King Features Syndicate, as was the comic strip he created later in 1965, “Tiger.” The gently humorous strip depicted the childhood antics of Tiger and his younger brother, Punkinhead. The comic was awarded the National Cartoonists Society’s best humor strip award in 1970, 1978 and 2000. Blake continued the strip for the next forty years, with “Tiger” appearing in over 400 newspapers at the time of his death. • Los Angeles Times, Dec. 31, 2005, B14.

36 cover of such magazines as Mademoiselle. She also appeared as Miss Pringle, the girl in the cap and gown, in Woody Allen’s 1965 film What’s New Pussycat. She authored an amusing autobiography, Made in Heaven, in 1971. She continued to write and also taught English in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

BLAKE, TERESA Teresa Blake, the widow of character actor Larry J. Blake and mother of child actor turned make-up artist Michael Blake, died on January 2, 2005. She was 91. She was born on October 9, 1913, and was married to Larry Blake until his death in 1982. She appeared with her son in the 2000 documentary Lon Chaney: A Thousand Faces.

Teresa Blake

BLAKE, ROSIE Actress and model Rosemary (Rosie) Blake Johnson died of cancer on February 6, 2005. She was 63. She was born on October 6, 1941. She worked as a model in the early 1960s, appearing on the

BLAND, STEVEN “DOOKY” Rodeo star and actor Steven “Dooky” Bland died after a brief illness in Noodle, Texas, on August 21, 2005. He was 48. Bland was born in Abilene, Texas, on November 17, 1956. He joined the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association in 1977 and was a leading competitor over the next decade. Bland also worked as a wrangler and occasional actor on films in the Texas area including the 1995 tele-film The Good Old Boys, and the features Blood Trail (1997), The Postman (1997), Dancer, Texas Pop. 81 (1998), All the Pretty Horses (2000), American Outlaws (2001), Grand Champion (2002), Secondhand Lions (2003), and The Alamo (2004).

Rosie Blake

Steven “Dooky” Bland

Bud Blake

37

2005 • Obituaries

BLOCK, HOWARD Cameraman Howard Block died in Tarzana, California, on February 5, 2005. He was 79. Block was born in New York City on June 29, 1925. He worked as an assistant cameraman on the Naked City television series in the late 1950s. He was also a cameraman on the films Godspell (1973), Crazy Joe (1974), The Prisoner of Zenda (1979), and The Nude Bomb (1980). Block was cinematographer for the 1973 film Girls Are for Love, and for the television series Crazy Like a Fox and She-Wolf of London. BLUMENFELD, SIMON Novelist Simon Blumenfeld died on April 3, 2005. He was 97. Blumenfeld was born on November 25, 1907. He began his career writing plays in the 1920s and was best known for his 1932 novel Jew Boy (aka The Iron Garden). He also penned the novel Phineas Kahn in 1937, and wrote several western novels under the pen name Huck Messer in the 1930s. Blumenfeld served in the Royal Army Ordnance Corps during World War II, and also became involved with the army talent show, Stars in Battledress. After the war Blumenfeld wrote for the entertainment magazine Band Wagon. He subsequently began a publishing business himself, putting out the Weekly Sporting Review newspaper. He began writing for The Stage in the early 1960s, and continued to contribute a column for the publication until shortly before his death. • Times (of London), Apr. 16, 2005, 72.

Simon Blumenfeld

BOCHNER, LLOYD Actor Lloyd Bochner, who made a career out of playing suave leading men and villains, died of cancer at his home in Santa Monica, California, on October 29, 2005. He was 81. Bochner was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, on July 29, 1924. He began his career on radio in Ontario at the age of 11. He was soon performing on stage in Canada and moved to New York in the early 1950s to continue his career. He starred as Captain Nicholas Lacey in the television drama series On Man’s Family in 1952 and was host of the series On the Spot in 1953. Bochner also appeared in episodes of Kraft Television Theatre, Star Tonight, and the Hallmark Hall of Fame production of Twelfth Night. He moved to Los Angeles in 1960 to co-star as Chief of Police Neil Campbell in the adventure series Hong Kong with Rod Taylor. He also appeared as government cryp-

Lloyd Bochner

tographer Chambers in the classic Twilight Zone episode “To Serve Man,” who learns that the alien book of that title is a cookbook. He also appeared in episodes of Hudson’s Bay, The Americans, Boris Karloff ’s Thriller, The United States Steel Hour, Cain’s Hundred, Dr. Kildare, Sam Benedict, The Eleventh Hour, Alcoa Premiere, G.E. True, The Dick Powell Show, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre, Perry Mason, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Kraft Suspense Theatre, numerous episodes of The Richard Boone Show, Twelve O’Clock High, The Legend of Jesse James, Honey West, Combat!, Branded, A Man Called Shenandoah, Wild Wild West, The Wackiest Ship in the Army, Daniel Boone, The Green Hornet, The Girl from U.N.C.L.E., Occasional Wife, Hallmark Hall of Fame, T.H.E. Cat, Death Valley Days, Tarzan, Bonanza, The Big Valley, Hogan’s Heroes, The Virginian, Custer, Daniel Boone, Judd for the Defense, The Name of the Game, Mannix, Mission: Impossible, It Takes a Thief, Bewitched, The Outsider, Medical Center, The F.B.I., Insight, The Silent Force, Storefront Lawyers, and Hawaii Five-O. He also had a successful film career in such features as Drums of Africa (1963), The Night Walker (1964), Sylvia (1965), Harlow (1965), Point Blank (1967), Tony Rome (1967), Tiger by the Tail (1968), The Detective (1968), The Young Runaways (1968), The Horse in the Gray Flannel Suit (1968), the 1970 film adaptation of H.P. Lovecraft’s horror classic The Dunwich Horror, Ulzana’s Raid (1972), The Man in the Glass Booth (1975), It Seemed Like a Good Idea at the Time (1975), Mr. No Legs (1981), The Hot Touch (1982), The Lonely Lady (1983), Crystal Heart (1985), Fine Gold (1989), Millennium (1989), Deadly Deception (1991), The Naked Gun 2∂: The Smell of Fear (1991), Landslide (1992), Bram Stoker’s Legend of the Mummy (1997), and The Commission (2003). He also appeared in numerous television productions including Scalplock (1966), Barefoot in Athens (1966), Stranger on the Run (1967), Braddock (1968), Crowhaven Farm (1970), They Call It Murder (1971), Columbo: The Most Dangerous Match (1973), Satan’s School for Girls (1973), Rex Harrison Presents Stories of Love (1975), The Nurse Killer (1975), Collision Course: Truman vs. MacArthur (1976) as W. Averell Harriman, Richie Brockelman: The Missing 24 Hours (1976), Terraces (1977), Greatest Heroes of the Bible (1978) as Imhotep, The Immigrants (1978), A Fire in the Sky (1978),

Obituaries • 2005 The Best Place to Be (1979), Riel (1979), The Golden Gate Murders (1979), Mary and Joseph: A Story of Faith (1979), Rona Jaffe’s Mazes and Monsters (1982), Hotel (1983), Manimal (1983), Louisiana (1984), Double Agent (1987), Race for the Bomb (1987) as Gen. Curtis LeMay, Dick Francis: Blood Sport (1989), Berlin Lady (1991), Morning Glory (1993), Loyal Opposition: Terror in the White House (1998), and Mary Higgins Clark’s Before I Say Goodbye (2003). Bochner also starred as Cecil Baldwin Colby in the prime time soap opera Dynasty from 1981 to 1982, who died of cardiac arrest while making love to Joan Collins. He also guest-starred in episodes of The Bold Ones: The New Doctors, The Doris Day Show, Emergency!, Cannon, Ironside, McCloud, Barnaby Jones, The Starlost, Hec Ramsey, Gunsmoke, Police Story, Medical Center, The Magician, The Rookies, Barbary Coast, Ellery Queen, The Bionic Woman, McMillan and Wife, The Amazing SpiderMan, Vega$, Charlie’s Angels, Fantasy Island, The Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew Mysteries, Battlestar Galactica, The Littlest Hobo, Trapper John, M.D., B.J. and the Bear, Hart to Hart, Fantasy Island, Darkroom, The Love Boat, Matt Houston, Hotel, Manimal, The Highwayman, Masquerade, The A-Team, Crazy Like a Fox, The Fall Guy, Murder, She Wrote, The Golden Girls, 1st & Ten, Highway to Heaven, Superboy, Designing Women, Who’s the Boss?, Road to Avonlea, The Young Riders, and Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman. He was also the voice of Mayor Hamilton Hill cartoon series Batman: The Animated Adventures in the early 1990s. He was the father of actor Hart Bochner. • Los Angeles Times, Nov. 3, 2005, B11; New York Times, Nov. 2, 2005, C18; Times (of London), Dec. 14, 2005, 61.

BOLAND, FRANCY Jazz pianist and composer Francy Boland died of cancer in Geneva, Switzerland, on August 12, 2005. He was 75. Boland was born in Namur, Belgium, on November 6, 1929. He began playing the piano at an early age and joined Bob Shots’ band in 1949. He began performing with Chet Baker’s quintet in Paris in the mid–1950s, and recorded and toured Europe with the group. He subsequently came to the United States where he worked as an arranger for such musicians as Benny Goodman and County Basie. He formed the Kenny Clarke/Francy Boland Big Band in 1961, which recorded over thirty albums during the next

Francy Boland

38 decade. Boland also composed the jazz composition “Sax No End,” which was later recorded by the Oscar Peterson trio. • Los Angeles Times, Aug. 16, 2005, B11; New York Times, Aug. 22, 2005, B7; Times (of London), Sept. 15, 2005, 65.

BOLCHI, SANDRO Italian film director Sandro Bolchi died of complications from heart disease and diabetes in Rome on August 2, 2005. He was 81. Bolchi was born in Vogheri, Italy, in 1924. Bolchi worked primarily in television, helming numerous Italian miniseries and tele-films. His credits include Un Marito Ideale (1959), Il Mulino del Po (1962), I Miserabili (1964), I Fratelli Karamazov (1969), I Corvi (1969), Il Cappello del Prete (1970), Puccini (1973), Anna Karenina (1974), Manon Lescaut (1975), Camilla (1976), Bel Ami (1979), Chimica (1980), Melodramma (1984), Lulu (1986), Una Donna a Venezia (1986), Assunta Spina (1992), and Servo d’Amore (1995).

Sandro Bolchi

BOLDER, CAL Bodybuilder and actor Cal Bolder, who was best known for his role as the hulking monster in the 1966 horror western Jesse James Meets Frankenstein’s Daughter, died of cancer on January 19, 2005. He was 74. He was born Earl Craver in Kansas on June 14, 1931. He was also seen in the films Heller in Pink Tights (1960) and One Spy Too Many (1966). Bolder appeared on television in episodes of such series as Ad-

Cal Bolder

39 ventures in Paradise, Bonanza, Outlaws, Gunsmoke, Destry, Honey West, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Daniel Boone, Cimarron Strip, and Star Trek. He was also the author of the novel Last Reunion under his birth name E.C. Craver.

BOLESCH, OTTO Austrian actor Otto Bolesch died in Vienna after a long illness on April 7, 2005. He was 86. Bolesch appeared in numerous films from the 1950s including Night to Mont-Blanc (1951), A Devil of a Woman (1951), 8/15 Part 2 (1955), Sebastian Kneipp (1958), and Das Fliegende Klassenzimmer (1973). He also appeared in German television in episodes of Derrick, Der Kommissar, and Tatort. He was a member of the Castle Theatre ensemble from 1978 until his retirement in 2000. BOLLEN, PAUL Actor Paul Bollen died in Los Angeles, California, on October 19, 2005. He was 65. Bollen was born on February 1, 1940. He was featured in such films as Die Hard 2 (1990), American Me (1992), Unlawful Entry (1992), Love Is Like That (1993), Demolition Man (1993), Executive Decision (1996), Total Force (1997), Absolute Force (1997), Lethal Weapon 4 (1998), and Trapped (1999). He also guest starred in an episode of television’s Mike Hammer, Private Eye. BOLTON, BETTY British actress and singer Betty Bolton died in London on April 2, 2005. She was 99. She was born in Nottingham, England, on January 26, 1906. She began her career as a child performer on the stage at the age of 10. She appeared in numerous musical revues and plays. She appeared in productions of Fifinella (1919), The Dybbuk (1927), and Appearances (1930). She also appeared in several films including Balaclava (1928), Wolves (1930), and Long Live the King (1933). She also performed on British radio in the 1930s and appeared in an experimental television transmission in August of 1932. She retired from the theater later in the decade after the birth of her daughter.

2005 • Obituaries his film career at the age of five when he was discovered by a Hal Roach talent scout while leaving a movie theater with his mother. Bond appeared in numerous Our Gang and Little Rascals shorts, originally as a character named Tommy, and later as Spanky and Alfalfa’s nemesis, Butch. His Our Gang credits include Spanky (1932), Forgotten Babies (1933), The Kid from Borneo (1933), Mush and Milk (1933), Bedtime Worries (1933), Wild Poses (1933), Hi’-Neighbor! (1934), For Pete’s Sake! (1934), The First Round-Up (1934), Honky Donkey (1934), Mike Fright (1934), and Washee Ironee (1934). Bond’s other credits include Beauty and the Bus (1933) with Thelma Todd and Patsy Kelly, the 1933 serial The Mystery Squadron, and several shorts with comedian Charley Chase including The Cracked Iceman (1934), I’ll Take Vanilla (1934), and You Said a Hatful! (1934). He was also seen in Kid Millions (1934), Alimony Aches (1935), Gobs of Trouble (1935), Oh, My Nerves (1935), Unrelated Relations (1936), The Return of Jimmy Valentine (1936), Silly Billies (1936) with Wheeler and Woolsey, Counterfeit (1936), Page Miss Glory (1936), The Final Hour (1936), Mister Smarty (1936), Libeled Lady (1936), the Tex Avery Warner cartoon I Love to Singa (1936) as the voice of Owl Jolson, Knee Action (1937), Married Before Breakfast (1937), Rosalie (1937), and Hideaway (1937). After a three year absence Bond returned to Our Gang as the bully Butch in Glove Taps (1937), Rushin’ Ballet (1937), Fishy Tales (1937), Framing Youth (1937), Came the Brawn (1938), The Little Ranger (1938), Party Fever (1938), Football Romeo (1938), Practical Jokers (1938), Duel Personalities (1939), Cousin Wilbur (1939), Dog Daze (1939), Auto Antics (1939), Captain Spanky’s Show Boat (1939), and Bubbling Troubles (1940) before leaving the series. He also appeared in The Magician’s Daughter (1938), City Streets (1938), Block-Heads (1938) with Laurel and Hardy, Happily Buried (1939), Now It Can Be Sold (1939), and Static in the Attic (1939). Bond also starred as Joey Pepper in the films Five Little Peppers and How They Grew (1939), Five Little Peppers at Home (1940), Out West with the Peppers (1940), and Five Little Peppers in Trouble (1940). His other films include A Little Bit of Heaven (1940), Adventures in Washington (1941), New York Town (1941), A Quiet Fourth (1941), This Land Is Mine (1943), Man from Frisco (1944), Twice Blessed (1945), The Beautiful Cheat (1945), Gas House Kids Go

Betty Bolton

BOND, TOMMY Tommy Bond, who starred as the bully Butch in the Little Rascals comedy shorts, died of complications from heart disease in a Los Angeles hospital on September 24, 2005. He was 79. Bond was born in Dallas, Texas, on September 16, 1926. He began

Tommy Bond (as Butch from Our Gang)

Obituaries • 2005

Tommy Bond (as Jimmy Olsen with Kirk Alyn as Superman)

West (1947) and Gas House Kids in Hollywood (1947) as Chimp, Big Town Scandal (1948), The Lucky Stiff (1949), Any Number Can Play (1949), Tokyo Joe (1949), Battleground (1949), Hot Rod (1950), Call Me Mister (1951), and Bedtime for Bonzo (1951). Bond was also featured as Jimmy Olsen in the serials Superman (1948) and Atom Man vs. Superman (1950) with Kirk Alyn as the Man of Steel. He left acting in 1951 to work in television production. He retired in 1991 from a television station in Fresno, California. • Los Angeles Times, Sept. 26, 2005, B9; New York Times, Sept. 26, 2005, B7; Variety, Oct. 3, 2005, 76.

BOOTH, JAMES British supporting actor James Booth died in Hadleigh, Essex, England, on August 11, 2005. He was 77. Booth was born David Geeves-Booth in Croydon, Surrey, England, on December 19, 1927. He began his career on the amateur stage in London after serving in the British army. He attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts in the mid–1950s and performed in several plays at the Old Vic later in the decade. He made his film debut in the 1959 musical Jazz Boat and continued to perform on stage with Joan Littlewood’s London Theatre Workshop. He appeared on British television in episodes of William Tell, The Invisible Man, Them, and The Sweeney, and was seen in the films Let’s Get Married (1960), In the Nick (1960), The Trials of Oscar Wilde (1960), In the Doghouse (1961), The Hellions

James Booth

40 (1961), Sparrows Can’t Sing (1963), Zulu (1964) as Private Henry Hook, French Dressing (1964), Ninety Degrees in the Shade (1965), The Secret of My Success (1965), Robbery (1967), The Bliss of Mrs. Blossom (1968), Fraulein Doktor (1969), the 1970 television production of W. Somerset Maugham’s The Vessel of Wrath, Adam’s Woman (1970), Darker Than Amber (1970), Macho Callahan (1970), The Man Who Had Power Over Women (1970), Revenge (1971), Rentadick (1972), Penny Gold (1973), That’ll Be the Day (1973), Percy’s Progress (1974), Brannigan (1975), and I’m Not Feeling Myself Tonight (1976). Booth came to United States in the mid–1970s, where he appeared on television in episodes of Bonanza, Lassie, Shirley’s World, Baretta, Mission: Impossible, The Hardy Boys Mysteries, Charlie’s Angels, Hart to Hart, and The Fall Guy. He also appeared in the film Airport ’77 (1977), and the tele-films Murder in Peyton Place (1977), Arthur Hailey’s Wheels (1978), Evening in Byzantium (1978), Jennifer: A Woman’s Story (1979), Hotline (1982), and The Cowboy and the Ballerina (1984). Booth also began writing films in the late 1970s, scripting the 1979 feature Sunburn and the 1985 tele-film Stormin’ Home. He also wrote and appeared in the action films Pray for Death (1985), Avenging Force (1986), and American Ninja 2: The Confrontation (1987). Dividing his time between the United States and England, he also appeared in the films Caboblanco (1980), The Jazz Singer (1980), Zorro, the Gay Blade (1981), Bad Guys (1986), Moon in Scorpio (1987), Deep Space (1987), Programmed to Kill (1987), American Ninja 4: The Annihilation (1991), Inner Sanctum II (1994), The Breed (2001), and Keeping Mum (2005). Booth was also featured in the tele-films The Lady and the Highwayman (1989), Have a Nice Night (1990), Gunsmoke: To the Last Man (1992), and The Red Phone: Manhunt (2001). His other television credits include episodes of the series Minder, Auf Wiedersehen, Pet in the recurring role of Kenny Ames, Bergerac, Lovejoy, The Bill, David Lynch’s Twin Peaks as Ernie Niles and Acapulco H.E.A.T. • Los Angeles Times, Aug. 22, 2005, B9; Times (of London), Aug. 17, 2004, 48.

BORBA, EMILINHA Singer Emilinha Borba, who was a leading star of Brazilian radio from the late 1930s, died of a heart attack on October 3, 2005, several months after suffering a severe fall at her home in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. She was 82. She was born Emilia Savana

Emilinha Borba

41 da Silva Borba in a poor district of Rio de Janeiro on August 31, 1923. She began performing professionally in the late 1930s after performer Carmen Miranda arranged her audition for a popular casino. Borba recorded her first record, “Pirulito” (“Lollipop”) in 1939, and was soon signed by Radio Nacional where she spent the next three decades as their leading singer. She also recorded over 200 songs during her career, including the popular “Chiquita Bacana,” “Tomara que Chova,” and “Com Jeito Vai.” She also performed in several dozen films from the late 1930s through the 1960s including Bananada-Terra (1939), Astros em Desfile (1942), Segura Esta Mulher (1946), Estou Ai (1949), Tudo Azul (1952), Rei do Movimento (1954), Carnaval em Marte (1955), Eva no Brasil (1956), Garotas e Samba (1957), Mulheres a Vista (1959), Virou Bagunca (1960), 007 1/2 no Carnaval (1996), and Carnaval Barra Limpa (1967). She was largely retired by the early 1980s, but returned to record her final CD, Emilinha Pinta e Borda, in 2003. • Times (of London), Oct. 25 2005, 67.

BORGES, FRED Actor Fred Borges died on January 31, 2005 in Balwin, New York, of a heart attack. He was 43. Borges was born on June 12, 1961 in Queens, New York. He was featured in several independent horror films including Weasels Rip My Flesh (1979) and Long Island Cannibal Massacre (1980).

2005 • Obituaries

Clovis Bornay

1930s, appearing in over a dozen features. Her film credits include A Shot at Dawn (1932), Love in Uniform (1932), Crown of Thorns (1932), I Will Teach You to Love (1933), Story of a Night (1933), The Song of Happiness (1933), and Every Woman Has a Secret (1934). She subsequently retired from films and came to the United States.

Ery Bos

Fred Borges (from Weasels Rip My Flesh)

BOTTS, MIKE Mike Botts, who was drummer for the rock band Bread in the 1970s, died of cancer in

BORNAY, CLOVIS Brazilian Carnival designer Clovis Bornay died of cardiac arrest in a Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, hospital on October 9, 2005. He was 89. Bornay was instrumental in persuading the Rio Municipal Theater to promote costume parades during Carnival in 1937. He took part in numerous festivals, outfitted in outlandish costumes with plumes and sequins. He also designed costumes and appeared in the 1967 film Anguished Land, and was featured in the 1970 television series Assim na Terra Como no Ceu. Bornay also appeared in the films Independencia ou Morte (1972) and O Gigante de America (1978). • Times (of London), Oct. 15, 2005, 81. BOS, ERY German actress Ery Bos died in Chappaqua, New York, on March 10, 2005. She was 94. Bos was born in Berlin, Germany, on October 3, 1910. She had a brief career in films in Germany in the early

Mike Botts (left, with Larry Knechtal, James Griffin and David Gates from Bread)

Obituaries • 2005

42

a Burbank, California, hospital on December 9, 2005. He was 61. Botts was born on December 8, 1944. He joined Bread before their second album, On the Waters, and remained with the group until it broke up in 1973. Botts later worked as a session drummer and recorded and toured with such artists as Linda Ronstadt, Eddie Money, Tina Turner, Dan Fogelberg, and others. He briefly returned to Bread when the group reunited for a reunion and tour in 1977. • Los Angeles Times, Dec. 15, 2005, B11.

BOWDON, DORRIS Actress Dorris Bowdon died of complications from strokes and heart failure at the Motion Picture Country Home in Los Angeles on August 9, 2005. She was 89. Bowdon was born in Coldwater, Mississippi, on December 27, 1915. She was the winner of the Miss Memphis pageant in 1937 and was approached by a scout from 20th Century–Fox while appearing in a play at Louisiana State University. She signed a contract with Fox and headed to Hollywood. Bowdon met producer and writer Nunnally Johnson, and the two soon married. Bowdon was featured in a handful of films including Always Goodbye (1938), Down on the Farm (1938), Young Mr. Lincoln (1939), John Ford’s Drums Along the Mohawk (1939), The Grapes of Wrath (1940) as Rose-of-Sharon, Jennie (1940), and The Moon Is Down (1943). She retired from the screen after the birth of her first child. She and Johnson remained together until his death in 1977.

John Box

dra (1971). He received two further Oscar nominations for his work on the films Travels with My Aunt (1972) and A Passage to India (1984). Box also served as a production designer on the films The Wild Affair (1963), Of Human Bondage (1964), A Man for All Seasons (1966), The Great Gatsby (1974), Rollerball (1975), Sorcerer (1977), The Keep (1983), the 1986 tele-film Murder by the Book, Just Like a Woman (1992), Black Beauty (1994), and First Knight (1995). • Los Angeles Times, Mar. 23, 2005, B10; Times (of London), Mar. 11, 2005, 69.

BRABOURNE, LORD British film producer John Ulick Knatchbull, the seventh Baron Brabourne, died at his home in Kent, England, on September 22, 2005. He was 80. He was born in Bombay, India, on November 9, 1924. Lord Brabourne began working in films as a production manager in the early 1950s on such features as The Stranger’s Hand (1952), Trouble in the Glen (1953), and Pursuit of the Graf Spee (1956). He produced numerous acclaimed films including Harry Black and the Tiger (1958), Sink the Bismarck! (1960), Damn the Defiant! (1962), Othello (1965), The Mikado (1967), Up the Junction (1968), Franco Zeffirelli’s 1968 production of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, which garnered an Academy Award nomination for Best Picture, The Dance of Death (1969), Tales of Beatrix Potter (1971), Murder on the Orient Express (1974), The Copter Kids (1976), Agatha Christie’s Death on the Nile (1978), Stories from

Dorris Bowdon

BOX, JOHN British film production designer John Box died in Leatherhead, Surrey, England, on March 7, 2005. He was 85. Box was born in London on January 27, 1920. He attended the London School of Architecture and began working in films in England in 1947. He worked as an art director on numerous films in the 1960s including Man with a Million (1953), The Cockleshell Heroes (1955), High Flight (1956), Zarak (1956), The Gamma People (1956), Tank Force (1958), The Inn of the Sixth Happiness (1958), Our Man in Havana (1959), Left Right and Centre (1959), The World of Suzie Wong (1960), and Two Way Stretch (1960). Box was co-recipient of four Academy Awards for Best Art Direction for the films Lawrence of Arabia (1962), Doctor Zhivago (1965), Oliver! (1968), and Nicholas and Alexan-

Lord Brabourne

43 a Flying Trunk (1979), The Mirror Crack’d (1980), Evil Under the Sun (1982), A Passage to India (1984) which also received a Best Picture Oscar nomination, and Little Dorrit (1988). Lord Brabourne married Patricia Mountbatten, daughter of Lord Mountbatten, in 1946. They were both aboard Lord Mountbatten’s boat in 1979 when an IRA bomb blast killed Mountbatten. Brabourne’s mother, Doreen, the Dowager Lady Brabourne, and the Brabourne’s 14-year-old son, Nicholas, were also killed in the explosion. Lord and Lady Brabourne and another son were all badly injured. • Los Angeles Times, Sept. 28, 2005, B10; Times (of London), Sept. 24, 2005, 76; Variety, Oct. 3, 2005, 76.

BRACARDI, FRANCO Italian musician and comic actor Franco Bracardi died in Rome on February 27, 2005. He was 67. Bracardi was born in Rome on May 16, 1937. He was a pianist with Maurizio Costanzo’s orchestra for many years. Bracardi also performed in several films in the 1970s and 1980s, usually in comic roles. His screen credits include Sex Diary (1976), Sex for Sale (1976), In the Pope’s Eye (1981), Snow White and the Seven Wise Men (1982), and Il Diavolo e l’Acquasanta (1983).

2005 • Obituaries the Swinging Blue Jeans in 1958. He played bass guitar and was lead singer of the group. They were popular in England, recording such hit songs as “Hippy Hippy Shake,” “Good Golly Miss Molly,” “You’re No Good,” and “Don’t Make Me Over” in the early 1960s. Braid continued to perform with a changing array of musicians in the group for nearly 45 years. • Times (of London), Sept. 23, 2005, 69.

BRAININ, NORBERT Classical violinist Norbert Brainin died of cancer in London on April 10, 2005. He was 82. Brainin was born in Vienna, Austria, on March 12, 1923. He studied at the Vienna Conservatory before coming to England with his family at the start of World War II. He joined with fellow refugees Siegmund Nissel and Peter Schidlof, and cellist Martin Lovett to form what became the Amadeus Quartet in 1947. The group gained an international reputation for their performances and recordings of the works of such composers as Mozart, Brahms, and Schubert. They continued to play together until Schidlof ’s death in 1987. Brainin also performed as a solo violinist, and taught music in England and Germany. • Los Angeles Times, May 11, 2005, B12; New York Times, Apr. 16, 2005, B6; Times (of London), Apr. 12, 2005, 55.

Franco Bracardi Norbert Brainin

BRAID, LES British musician Les Braid died of lung cancer on July 31, 2005. He was 67. Braid was born in Liverpool, England, on September 15, 1937. He began performing with the band that became known as

BRAMLEY, PETER Peter Bramley, who served as the first art director of the National Lampoon humor

Les Braid

Peter Bramley

Obituaries • 2005 magazine in the early 1970s, died of pneumonia in St. Petersburg, Florida, on April 12, 2005. He was 60. Bramley was born in Braintree, Massachusetts, in 1944. He began drawing cartoons while in his early teens and formed Cloud Studio in New York in 1967 with Bill Skurski and Gail Burwen. The studio was noted for its surreal photographic comic strips and produced illustrations for such publications as Fortune, Boys’ Life, Playgirl, and The New York Times. They also did work for the television series The Electric Company and Sesame Street. Bramley also appeared in several underground films in the early 1970s including a role as a trapeze artist in the adult film It Happened in Hollywood. He and Skurski were the first art directors for National Lampoon from 1970 to 1971. Bramley also was involved in producing several other short-lived humor magazines including Apple Pie, Harpoon, and International Insanity. He also created the underground comic books Vinny Shinblind, the Invisible Sex Maniac and Cahoot Cheroot. Los Angeles Times, May 10, 2005, B11; New York Times, May 5, 2005, A33.

BRANDO, JOCELYN Actress Jocelyn Brando, the older sister of the late Marlon Brando, died at her home in Santa Monica, California, on November 27, 2005. She was 86. Brando was born in San Francisco on November 18, 1919, and raised on a farm near Evanston, Illinois. She began her career on stage in the early 1940s, and made her Broadway debut in the short-lived 1942 production of The First Crocus. She was also featured on Broadway in productions of Desire Under the Elms, The Golden State, and Mister Roberts. She came to Hollywood in the early 1950s to work in films and television. She was featured in such films as China Venture (1953), The Big Heat (1953), Ten Wanted Men (1955), Nightfall (1957), Step Down to Terror (1958), The Explosive Generation (1961), The Ugly American (1963), Bus Riley’s Back in Town (1965), The Chase (1966), Movie Movie (1978), Good Luck, Miss Wyckoff (1979), Why Would I Lie? (1980), and Mommie Dearest (1981). She also appeared in the tele-films A Question of Love (1978), Dark Night of the Scarecrow (1981), and Starflight: The Plane That Couldn’t Land (1983). She was a frequent performer on television, guest starring in such series as Actor’s Studio, Kraft Television Theatre, Omnibus, The United States Steel

Jocelyn Brando (with brother, Marlon Brando)

44 Hour, General Electric Theater, Official Detective, Wagon Trail, Richard Diamond, Private Detective, State Trooper, One Step Beyond, Buckskin, M Squad, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Lux Playhouse, Riverboat, Laramie, Thriller, COronado 9, Checkmate, The Tall Man, Alcoa Premiere, Tales of Wells Fargo, Frontier Circus, 87th Precinct, The Virginian, Arrest and Trial, Dr. Kildare, The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, Ironside, Little House on the Prairie, Kojak, Darkroom, and Dallas in the recurring role of Mrs. Reeves. She was also featured as Anna Krakauer in the daytime soap opera Love of Life from 1966 to 1967. She remained close to her brother and was at his bedside when he died of lung failure in July of 2004. • Los Angeles Times, Nov. 29, 2005, B11; New York Times, Nov. 30, 2005, C19; Variety, Dec. 12, 2005, 67.

BRAUNGER, CARL Film and television art director Carl Braunger died of complications from Parkinson’s disease in Hollywood Hills, California, on December 6, 2005. He was 81. Braunger served as art director on such series as The Lucy Show, Get Smart, The Partridge Family, and The Waltons. He also worked on the films Paint Your Wagon (1969) and Viva Max! (1969), and the tele-films Banjo Hackett: Roamin’ Free (1976), Roger & Harry: The Mitera Target (1977), and Kill Me If You Can (1977). BREED, HELEN LLOYD Character actress Helen Lloyd Breed died in New York City after a long illness on April 16, 2005. She was 94. Breed was born in New York City on January 27, 1911. She appeared in numerous stage productions during her career. She was also featured in several films including Forever, Lulu (1987), The Witches of Eastwick (1987), Who’s That Girl? (1987), Funny Farm (1988), How I Got Into College (1989), Vampire’s Kiss (1989), Passed Away (1992), Rain Without Thunder (1992), Home Before Dark (1997), Big Daddy (1999), and Mickey Blue Eyes (1999). Breed also appeared in the 1989 tele-film Dream Breakers, and guest starred in episodes of Mathnet and Law & Order. BRENNER, MAURICE Actor Maurice Brenner died on August 25, 2005. He was 80. Brenner starred as Private Fleischman in the The Phil Silvers Show (aka Sergeant Bilko) from 1955 to 1959. He also appeared in episodes of Car 54, Where Are You? and The Dick Van Dyke Show. Brenner appeared in a small role in the 1964 film Lilith. He returned to the screen in 1985 to appear in Woody Allen’s The Purple Rose of Cairo. He was also featured in Sweet Lorraine (1987). BREWSTER, BARBARA Barbara Brewster LeMond, who performed with her twin sister, Gloria, as the Brewster Twins in films in the 1930s, died of pneumonia in an Oceanside, California, hospital on June 21, 2005. She was 87. She and her sister were born Naomi and Ruth Stevenson in Tucson, Arizona, on February 19, 1918. They were billed as “the Most Beautiful Twins in America,” when they were contracted to 20th Century–Fox in the late 1930s. They were seen in 1937 Buster Keaton comedy short Ditto, and the films Wake Up and Live (1937), Wife, Doctor and Nurse (1937), Happy Landing (1938), Little Miss Broadway (1938) with Shirley Temple, Hold That Co-Ed (1938) with John Bar-

45

Barbara Brewster (with twin sister Gloria)

rymore, Thanks for Everything (1938), Twincuplets (1940), and The Flame of New Orleans (1941). She also appeared on the New York stage with Montgomery Clift in the drama Foxhole in the Parlor. She entertained the troops in the South Pacific with the USO during World War II, where she met radio and television announcer Bob LeMond. She and Lemond subsequently wed and she retired from show business in 1946. Her sister, Gloria, predeceased her in 1996. • Los Angeles Times, June 25, 2005, B19.

BRIER, BARBARA Former actress Barbara Brier died in San Marino, California, on July 10, 2005. She was 79. Brier was born in Topeka, Kansas, on October 19, 1925. She moved to California in the 1930s to work as a fashion model. She was runner-up in the 1945 competition for Miss California, and soon began appearing in small roles in such films as I Surrender Dear (1948), An Old-Fashioned Girl (1949), Shamrock Hill (1949), Manhattan Angel (1949), and Hard, Fast, and Beautiful (1951). She retired from the screen after her marriage to attorney James C. Ford in 1957.

2005 • Obituaries II (1980), Night Train to Murder (1983), The Wicked Lady (1983), Young Sherlock Holmes (1985), A Fish Called Wanda (1988), Killing Dad or How to Love Your Mother (1989), The Law Lord (1991), A Business Affair (1994), Beaumarchais the Soundrel (1996), Jinnah (1998), Bodywork (1999), The Calling (2000), Ali G Indahouse (2002), and About a Boy (2002). Brierley was also featured in television productions of A Touch of the Casanovas (1975), Out of the Trees (1976), Pennies from Heaven (1978), Maybury (1981), Love Story: Mr. Right (1983), In the Secret State (1985), Inside Story (1986), When We Are Married (1987), East of Ipswich (1987), A Very British Coup (1988), Nineteen 96 (1989), All Creatures Great and Small: Brotherly Love (1990), Foreign Affairs (1993), Pat and Margaret (1994), The Buccaneers (1995), The Vanishing Man (1996), A Case of Coincidence (1996), Have Your Cake and Eat It (1997), Sex and Chocolate (1997), This Could Be the Last Time (1998), Tilly Trotter (1999), Innocents (2000), My Fragile Heart (2000), Evolution (2002), Ella and the Mothers (2002), Poirot: Five Little Pigs (2003), The Alan Clark Diaries (2004), and In Denial of Murder (2004). He starred as Ronnie Peabody in the 1974 series Not on Your Nellie. His television credits also include episodes of The Likely Lads, Doctor Who, Z Cars, Detective, The Howerd Confessions, The Sweeney, Rising Damp, The Wilde Alliance, Rumpole of the Bailey, The Goodies, To the Manor Born, Minder, Solo, Only Fools and Horses, Casualty, Call Me Mister, Victoria Wood, The Bill, Jeeves and Wooster, Bottom, Boon, Lovejoy, Mr. Bean, Goodnight Sweetheart, Surgical Spirit, Tales from the Crypt, Dangerfield, Spark, Kavanagh QC, Midsomer Murders, Spooks, and My Family. • Times (of London), Oct. 12, 2005, 65.

BRIERLEY, ROGER British actor Roger Brierley died of a heart attack at his home in England on September 23, 2005. He was 70. Brierley was born in Stockport, Cheshire, England, on June 2, 1935. He appeared frequently on stage, film, and television during his career. His numerous film credits include Superman

BRISTOW, DEEM Actor Deem Bristow died of a heart attack in San Diego, California, on January 15, 2005. He was 57. Bristow was born in Eaton, Ohio, on April 11, 1947. He appeared in small roles in such films as Terminal Exposure (1987), Freeway (1988), Flitch! (1988), and Problem Child (1990), and was featured in an episode of the sci-fi television series Quantum Leap. Bristow was best known as a voice actor and was the voice of the villainous Dr. Ivo “Eggman” Robotnik in the Sonic Adventure video games. He also voiced characters in such video games as Die Hard Trilog y 2: Viva Las Vegas, Di-

Roger Brierley

Deem Bristow

Obituaries • 2005 ablo II, Dungeon Lords, and Call of Cthulhu: Dark Corners of the Earth.

BRITO, PHIL Singer Phil Brito died in Newark, New Jersey, on October 28, 2005. He was 90. He was born Philip Colombrito in Boomer, West Virginia, to Italian immigrants on September 15, 1915. He began performing in his teens in clubs in New Jersey singing with numerous dance bands. He also appeared in several films in the 1940s including Sweetheart of Sigma Chi (1946), Music Man (1948), and Square Dance Katy (1950). He returned to New Jersey later in the decade where he remained a popular performer in the local venues until poor health forced his retirement.

Phil Brito

46 BROMFIELD, JOHN Actor John Bromfield, who starred as lawman Frank Morgan in the 1950s television series Sheriff of Cochise and U.S. Marshal, died of kidney failure in a Palm Desert, California, hospital on September 18, 2005. He was 83. Bromfield was born Farron Bromfield in South Bend, Indiana, on June 11, 1922. He began acting on stage at the La Jolla Playhouse in the 1940s, and made his film debut in the documentary Harpoon in 1948. He appeared with Burt Lancaster in the films Sorry, Wong Number (1948) and Rope of Sand (1949), which also featured French actress Corinne Calvet, whom Bromfield married soon after. They were together for five years before divorcing in 1954. Bromfield continued to appear in increasingly larger roles in such films as Paid in Full (1950), The Furies (1950), The Cimarron Kid (1952), Hold That Line (1952), Flat Top (1952), Easy to Love (1953), Ring of Fear (1954), The Black Daakotas (1954), Revenge of the Creature (1955), The Big Bluff (1955), Three Bad Sisters (1956), Manfish (1956), Crime Against Joe (1956), Quincannon — Frontier Scout (1956), Hot Cars (1956), and Curucu, Beast of the Amazon (1956). He also appeared on television in episodes of The Ford Television Theatre and Frontier. He began playing lawman Frank Morgan in the contemporary western The Sheriff of Cochise in 1956. The series became known as U.S. Marshal in 1958 and continued until 1960. Bromfield subsequently retired from acting. He spent his later years as an avid hunter and commercial fisherman. • Los Angeles Times, Sept. 19, 2005, B9; Variety, Sept. 26, 2005, 71.

BROGREN, LENA Swedish stage and film actress Lena Brogren died of complications from a heart attack in Gothenburg, Sweden, on September 21, 2005. She was 76. Brogren was born on April 18, 1929. She was featured in films from the early 1950s, appearing in Secrets of Women (1952), Lille Fridolf blir Morfar (1947), The Rooster (1981), Rasmus and the Vagabond (1981), The Best Intentions (1992), and Jacobs Frestelse (2001). Brogren also appeared often on Swedish television, starring in productions of Kallocain (1981), Glenn och Gloria (1989), Glappet (1997), Solbacken: Avd. E (2003), and Salton (2005). John Bromfield

Lena Brogren

BRONHILL, JUNE Australian operatic soprano June Bronhill died of breast cancer in Sydney, Australia, on January 24, 2005. She was 75. Bronhill was born in Broken Hill, New South Wales, Australia, on June 26, 1929. She began her career in the 1950s, performing with England’s Sadler’s Wells Opera Company. She also sang with the Australian Opera, the Victorian State Opera, and the State Opera of South Australia during her career. Bronhill performed in a television production of The Merry Widow in 1958. She also appeared as Mrs. Crawford in the television series Are You Being Served? in 1980 and was Annie Montagu in the 1987 mini-series Melba. She retired in 1993. • Times (of London), Feb. 16, 2005, 63.

47

2005 • Obituaries the Park (1963), Flora, the Red Menace (1965), On a Clear Day You Can See Forever (1965), Promises, Promises (1968), Last of the Red Hot Lovers (1969), Minnie’s Boys (1970), Holiday (1973), The Member of the Wedding (1975), Carmelina (1979), and Dance a Little Closer (1983). He was the recipient of the Coty Award, the fashion industry’s highest honor, on three occasions during his career. • Los Angeles Times, Aug. 6, 2005, B17; New York Times, Aug. 3, 2005, C17; Variety, Aug. 22, 2005, 43.

June Bronhill

BROOKS, EVELYN Actress and entertainer Evelyn Brooks Wagner died in a Florida hospital on September 16, 2005. She was 82. Brooks was born on October 23, 1922. She began her career as a singer on the Catskill circuit, and was featured in Off-Broadway productions of George M., Mr. President, and Gypsy. She came to Florida in 1984 where she continued to perform. Brooks was featured in small roles in several films including Folks! (1992), The Crew (2000), All About the Benjamins (2002), Out of Time (2003), and The Boynton Beach Bereavement Club (2005).

BROOKS, DONALD Costume designer Donald Brooks died of a heart attack in a Stony Brook, New York, hospital on August 2, 2005. He was 77. Brooks was born in New Haven, Connecticut, on January 10, 1928. He was a leading fashion designer, replacing Clare McCardle as Townley Manufacturing’s chief designer. He opened his own design house in 1963. He was also a leading stage, film, and television costume designer. He earned a Tony Award nomination for his work on Richard Rodgers’ 1962 Broadway production No Strings. He also received an Academy Award nomination for his work on Otto Preminger’s 1963 film The Oscar. He also received Oscar nominations for the Julie Andrews films Star! (1968) and Darling Lili (1970). He designed costumes for Ethel Merman for the 1961 television special Merman on Broadway, and designed First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy’s outfits for the 1962 televised Tour of the White House. His other celebrity clients include Princess Grace, Pamela Harriman, Barbra Streisand, Lady Bird Johnson and Faye Dunaway. Brooks was costume designer for the films The Third Day (1965), The Detective (1968), The Terminal Man (1974), and The Bell Jar (1979), and the tele-films Laura (1968), Scruples (1981), The Country Girl (1982), The Letter (1982) which earned him an Emmy Award, Murder Among Friends (1985), and The Two Mrs. Grenvilles (1987) which earned him another Emmy nomination. He also designed costumes for over forty Broadway productions including Barefoot in

BROSNAN, JOHN British film critic and writer John Brosnan was found dead of acute pancreatitis at his home in South Harrow, London, England, on April 11, 2005. He had died in his sleep, possibly several days earlier. He was 57. Brosnan was born in Perth, Western Australia, on October 7, 1947. He became active in science fiction fandom in the 1960s and moved to London later in the decade. He wrote several books on film including James Bond in the Cinema (1972), Movie Magic: The Story of Special Effects in the Cinema (1974), The Horror People (1976), Future Tense: The Cinema of Science Fiction (1978), Hollywood Babble On (1989), The Primal Screen: A History of Science Fiction Film (1991), Lights, Camera, Magic! (1998), Scream (2000), and The Hannibal Lecter Story (2001). He also wrote many of the film entries for the 1978 Encyclopedia of Science Fiction. He also wrote science fiction and horror novels, often under pseudonyms. His work appeared under the names James Blackstone (with John Baxter), Simon Ian Childer and Harry Adam Knight (with Leroy Kettle), and John Raymond. His novel Bedlam was filmed as Beyond Bedlam, starring Elizabeth Hurley, in 1993. His novel Carnosaur was filmed in 1993 and a film adaptation of Proteus was

Donald Brooks

John Brosnan

Obituaries • 2005

48

released in 1995. His other novels include Skyship (1981), Midas Deep (1983), Slimer (1983), The Fungus (1985), Torched (1986), Worm (1988), The Sky Lords (1989), War of the Sky Lords (1989), Death Spore (1990), The Fall of the Sky Lords (1991), The Opononax Invasion (1993), Damned and Fancy (1995), Have Demon, Will Travel (1996), and Mothership (2004). His most recent novel, Mothership Awakening, was scheduled for publication later in the year.

BROUGH, JOANNE Television producer Joanne Brough died of esophageal cancer in Joplin, Missouri, on February 24, 2005. She was 77. Brough was born on November 24, 1927. She began her career in Los Angeles with TV station KTLA in 1960. She moved to CBS several years later, where she was instrumental in the development of such series as Kojak, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Hawaii Five-O, All in the Family, and M*A*S*H. In the 1980s she was executive producer of the prime-time soap operas Dallas and Falcon Crest. She served as vice president of creative affairs at Lorimar Productions and was executive producer for several telefilms including Our Family Business (1981), Mistress of Paradise (1981), Washington Mistress (1982), and This Is Kate Bennett... (1982). She left Hollywood in 1993, developing soap operas in Indonesia and Singapore. She later returned to her native Missouri, where she taught courses on television drama production. • Los Angeles Times, Mar. 12, 2005, B17.

Bob Brown (left, with author Harris Lentz at the Memphis Film Festival)

BROWN,

CLARENCE

“GATEMOUTH”

Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown died of complications from cancer and heart disease on September 10, 2005, at his brother’s home in Orange, Texas, where he had gone when his home in Slidell, Louisiana, was devastated by Hurricane Katrina. He was 81. Brown was born in Vinton, Louisiana, on April 18, 1924, and raised in Orange, Texas. He began playing the guitar at an early age and performed with swing bands in the early 1940s. he acquired the nickname Gatemouth because of his deep singing voice. He made numerous recordings in the 1940s and 1950s including “Boogie Rambler,” “Okie Dokie Stomp,” and “Dirty Work at the Crossroads.” Brown also performed country and western numbers, and recorded with such artists as Roy Clark, Eric Clapton and Bonnie Raitt. • Los Angeles Times, Sept. 12, 2005, B9; New York Times, Sept. 12, 2005, A19; Time, Sept. 26, 2005, 21; Times (of London), Sept. 12, 2005, 59; Variety, Sept. 19, 2005, 84.

Joanne Brough

BROWN, BOB Bob Brown, leathersmith to the cowboy stars, died in his home in Big Bear City, California, on September 13, 2005. He was 95. Brown was born in Geneva, Illinois, on May 22, 1910, and moved to California in 1916. He studied art as a youth and won a contest to design the Columbia Pictures logo in the early 1930s. He was trained in leatherwork by Frankie Paul who he worked with until founding his own leather shop in 1937. Brown handcrafted saddles, holsters and other accoutrements for such western stars as Hopalong Cassidy, Lash LaRue, Buck Jones, Sunset Carson, and John Wayne. Brown also made the leather mask for the film Man in the Iron Mask (1939), and reputedly taught John Wayne his famous swagger. In recent years Brown was a popular guest for film festivals across the country.

Gatemouth Brown

BROWN, DANNY JOE Danny Joe Brown, who was the original lead singer for the Southern rock ’n’ roll group Molly Hatchet in 1970s, died of complications from diabetes and a stroke in Florida on March 10, 2005. He was 53. Brown was born on August 24, 1951. He was a founding member of the Jacksonville, Florida– based band and was lead singer on their debut album,

49

2005 • Obituaries series Brewster Place with Oprah Winfrey, and guest starred as jazz pianist Mile Taylor in the sit-com Roc in 1992. He also appeared in the films Up Against the Wall (1991) and Original Gangstas (1996), and the tele-film Sunday in Paris (1991). • Los Angeles Times, May 31, 2005, B9; New York Times, May 31, 2005, D8; Time, June 13, 2005, 15; Times (of London), June 2, 2005, 269.

Danny Joe Brown

Molly Hatchet, in 1978. He also performed on the band’s hit recording of “Flirtin’ with Disaster” in 1979. Brown left Molly Hatchet the following year and formed the Danny Joe Brown Band, which recorded the songs “Beatin the Odds” and “Take No Prisoners” in the early 1980s. He returned to Molly Hatchet in 1982, singing with the group on the albums No Guts ... No Glory (1983), The Deed Is Done (1984), and Double Trouble Live (1985). Brown continued to record and perform with Molly Hatchet until poor health forced him to leave the band in the mid–1990s. • Los Angeles Times, Mar. 15, 2005, B9.

BROWN, OSCAR, JR. Singer, songwriter and actor Oscar Brown, Jr., died of complications from a blood infection in a Chicago hospital on May 29, 2005. He was 78. Brown was born in Chicago on October 10, 1926. He began his career while in his teens, performing in radio dramas. He subsequently became host of the Chicago radio program Negro Newsfront. He attempted to start a career as a singer in 1960, earning acclaim for his album Sin and Soul. He also wrote the musical play Kicks & Co., and his musical adaptation Buck White played on Broadway starring Muhammad Ali in 1969. Brown also appeared frequently on television, hosting the syndicated series Jazz Scene U.S.A. in 1962 and the PBS 13-week history of black music, From Jumpstreet. Brown also appeared regularly as Jessie in the 1990 drama

Oscar Brown, Jr.

BROWN, TED Radio disc jockey Ted Brown died of complications from a stroke in The Bronx, New York, on March 20, 2005. He was 85. He was born Theodore David Brown in Collingwood, New Jersey on May 5, 1919. He worked in radio in New York City for over 40 years as a disc jockey and radio talk-show host for various stations including WMGM, WNEW and WNBC. Brown was also seen on television as Bison Bill, who sometimes substituted for Buffalo Bob Smith as the host of The Howdy Doody Show in the 1950s. He also hosted the television series Birthday Party in 1949, The Greatest Man on Earth from 1952 to 1953, and Across the Board in 1959. He was the announcer for The Paul Winchell and Jerry Mahoney Show from 1951 to 1954. He teamed with his first wife, Rhoda, on the radio program Ted Brown and the Redhead. He was subsequently married to actress Sylvia Miles, whom he divorced, and to Rene Lee Brody, who survives him. • New York Times, Mar. 22, 2005, C17.

Ted Brown

BRUCE, HONEY Nightclub entertainer Honey Bruce Friedman, who was the former wife of comedian Lenny Bruce, died of complications from colitis in a Honolulu, Hawaii, hospital on September 12, 2005. She was 78. She was born Harriett Jolliff in Mania, Arkansas, on August 15, 1927. She ran away from home in her teens and danced in carnivals and worked as a stripper before her marriage to Bruce in 1951. She appeared with Bruce in the 1953 film Dance Hall Racket, and was also featured in the film Princess of the Nile (1954). He marriage to Bruce ended in divorce in 1957, and Lenny Bruce died of a drug overdose in 1966. Honey Bruce overcame drug and alcohol addiction and became a clothing designer. She was an advisor on Bob Fosse’s 1974 film Lenny, starring Dustin Hoffman as Lenny and Valerie Perrine as Honey. She wrote the 1976 memoir, Honey: The Life and Loves of Lenny’s Shady Lady, and appeared in the 1998

Obituaries • 2005

Honey Bruce (with husband Lenny Bruce and daughter Kitty)

documentary Lenny Bruce: Swear to Tell the Truth. She was instrumental in winning a posthumous pardon for Lenny Bruce in 2003 from New York Governor George Pataki for Bruce’s 1964 conviction on obscenity charges during a comedy act. • Los Angeles Times, Sept 18, 2005, B12; New York Times, Sept. 20, 2005, A27; Time, Oct. 3, 2005, 27; Variety, Sept. 26, 2005, 71.

BRUNE, GABRIELLA British actress Gabriella Brune died in Chichester, Sussex, England, on January 18, 2005. She was 92. Brune was born in Bournermouth, Dorset, England, on February 12, 1912. She began her film career in the early 1930s, appearing in such features as Red Pearls (1930), The Wife of General Ling (1937), The Penny Pool (1937), Bad Boy (1938), Garrison Follies (1940), He Found a Star (1941), At Dawn We Die (1943), A Run for Your Money (1949), Crash of Silence (1952), Hot Ice (1952), The Titfield Thunderbolt (1953), The Wedding of Lilli Marlene (1953), White Fire (1954), Touch and Go (1955), True As a Turtle (1956), Stars in Your Eyes (1956), Fun at St. Fanny’s (1956), The Model Murder Case (1963), and Follow Me! (1972). Brune also appeared on British television in episodes of Z Cars, My Partner, the Ghost, and Raffles. BRUNETTI, ARGENTINA Character actress Argentina Brunetti, who was featured as Mrs. Martini in the holiday classic It’s a Wonderful Life, died in Rome, Italy, on December 20, 2005. She was 98. Brunetti was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on August 31, 1907, the daughter of Italian leading actress Mimi Aguglia. Brunetti made her debut on stage at the age of three in a small role in the opera Cavelaria Rusticana. She performed on stage throughout South America and Europe, and was signed by MGM to provide the Italian dubbing voices for such stars as Jeanette MacDonald and Norma Shearer in the late 1930s. She appeared frequently in films in the United States from the mid–1940s, usually cast in ethnic roles as Italian or Spanish housewives. Her films include Gilda (1946), The Return of Monte Cristo (1946), Frank Capra’s It’s a Wonderful Life (1946), California (1946), High Tide (1947), Tycoon (1947), ManEater of Kumaon (1948), Tenth Avenue Angel (1948), Mexican Hayride (1948), Knock on Any Door (1949), El Paso (1949), We Were Strangers (1949), House of Strangers

50 (1949), The Red Danube (1949), Holiday in Havana (1949), The Blonde Bandit (1950), The Lawless (1950), Broken Arrow (1950), Dial 1119 (1950), Southside 1–1000 (1950), The Great Caruso (1951), Ghost Chasers (1951), Sirocco (1951), Force of Arms (1951), The Fighter (1952), Rose of Cimarron (1952), When in Rome (1952), Apache War Smoke (1952), Woman in the Dark (1952), My Cousin Rachel (1952), Tropic Zone (1953), San Antone (1953), The Story of Three Loves (1953), The Caddy (1953), King of the Khyber Rifles (1953), Make Haste to Live (1954), Hell’s Island (1955), The Prodigal (1955), The Far Horizons (1955), The Last Command (1955), The Tall Men (1955), The Rains of Ranchipur (1955), Anything Goes (1956), Duel at Apache Wells (1956), Three Violent People (1957), The Unholy Wife (1957), The Midnight Story (1957), The Brothers Rico (1957) as Mrs. Rico, Showdown at Boot Hill (1958), Jet Over the Atlantic (1960), The George Raft Story (1961), as Mrs. Raft, The Horizontal Lieutenant (1962), The Pigeon That Took Rome (1962), George Pal’s 7 Faces of Dr. Lao (1964), Stage to Thunder Rock (1964), The Money Trap (1965), The Appaloosa (1966), The Venetian Affair (1967), The Shakiest Gun in the West (1968), Blue Sunshine (1976), Fatso (1980), and Lookin’ Italian (1998). She was also featured in the telefilms Flight to Holocaust (1977), Black Market Baby (1977), Tenspeed and Brown Shoe (1980), and Evita Peron (1981). Brunetti was featured as Filomena Soltini in the daytime soap opera General Hospital from 1985 to 1986. Her numerous television credits also include guest roles in such series as Hopalong Cassidy, Racket Squad, Waterfront, Letter to Loretta, The Public Defender, Lux Video Theatre, The Lone Ranger, Jane Wyman Presents the Fireside Theatre, TV Reader’s Digest, The 20th Century–Fox Hour, Matinee Theatre, Celebrity Playhouse, Telephone Time, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Navy Log, The Adventures of Jim Bowie, Panic!, The Veil, Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse, M Squad, The Detectives Starring Robert Taylor, The Untouchables, General Electric Theater, Bonanza, Rawhide, One Step Beyond, Thriller, The Deputy, Wanted: Dead or Alive, Checkmate, Wagon Train, Route 66, The Lawless Years, Miami Undercover, The Rifleman, The Gallant Men, Ben Casey, Gunsmoke, The Fugitive, The F.B.I., The Andy Griffith Show, The Invaders, Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C., The Big Valley, I Spy, Ironside, The High Chaparral, To Rome with Love, Temperatures Rising, Kojak,

Argentina Brunetti

51

2005 • Obituaries

Wonder Woman, Quincy, Fantasy Island, The Quest, Joanie Loves Chachi, 1st & Ten, Booker, Everybody Loves Raymond, and That’s Life. Throughout her long career Brunetti also worked as a journalist, writing numerous articles and books on Hollywood personalities. A member of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, she also interviewed film stars for Italian radio for Voice of America. • Los Angeles Times, Dec. 24, 2005, B15; New York Times, Dec. 26, 2005, B8; People, Jan. 9, 2006, 109; Variety, Dec. 26, 2005, 37.

BRUNETTI, GUY Wrestler Guy Brunetti died in Phoenix, Arizona, on June 5, 2005. He was 75. Brunetti was born in Bingham Canyon, Utah, on September 28, 1929. He began wrestling in the late 1940s, teaming with Joe Tangaro as his “brother,” Joe Brunetti. The duo wrestled as crowd favorites throughout the 1950s and 1960s, competing against such teams as the Kalmikoffs and the Smith Brothers. They held the NWA World Tag Team Title several times throughout the United States and Canada. After retiring from the ring in the early 1970s, Brunetti was a wrestling promoter in the Salt Lake City, Utah, area. He subsequently opened a restaurant in Sun City, Arizona.

Guy Brunetti

BRUNNER, VIVIAN Vivian Brunner, who cofounded the Popcorn Theater Marionettes with her husband, died in North Hollywood on September 24, 2005. She was 79. She was born Vivian Hypes in Downey, California, on August 22, 1926. She married advertising artist John Brunner in 1947 and worked as a fashion designer. She and her husband quit their jobs to form the touring marionette show in 1962, with John creating the puppets and Vivian outfitting them in costumes. They created over 100 marionettes for the increasingly elaborate productions over the next three decades. The Brunners also were involved in creating special effects for several films including 1985’s Lifeforce and the 1987 horror film Dolls. She was widowed when John Brunner died in 1993. • Los Angeles Times, Oct. 19, 2005, B10. BRUNO, NIKKI Actress Nikki Bruno died of breast cancer at her home in Westerly, Rhode Island, on October 30, 2005. She was 82. She was born Dorothy Stoppello in Providence, Rhode Island, on December 7,

Nikki Bruno

1922. She began her career on the local stage and moved to New York in the early 1940s. She performed on stage and appeared in numerous touring productions including Snow White and the Seven Dwarves. She met her future husband, Bucky Walsh, in the play, and they worked together often. Bruno also appeared on television in the daytime soap operas As The World Turns and The Guiding Light. She was featured often in television commercials and appeared in small roles in several films including Mystic Pizza (1988), True Lies (1994), and The Crucible (1996), and the television mini-series The Buccaneers (1995).

BRUNOY, BLANCHETTE French actress Blanchette Brunoy died in Paris on April 3, 2005. She was 89. She was born Blanche Bilhaud in Paris on October 5, 1915. She began her career in films in the 1930s and appeared in numerous features over the next sixty years. Her numerous film credits include The Woman Thief (1936), Counsel for Romance (1936), Confessions of a Newlywed (1937), Jeannette Bourgogne (1938), Altitude 3,200 (1938), The Human Beast (1938), Love Cavalcade (1940), The Duraton Family (1940), They Were Twelve Women (1940), Two Women (1940), The Big Fight (1942), The White Truck (1943), It Happened at the Inn (1943), Shop Girls of Paris (1943), The Eleventh Hour Guest (1945), Ladies of the Park (1945), Raboliot (1946), Clockface Cafe (1947), The Murdered Model (1948), Sextette (1948), La

Blanchette Brunoy

Obituaries • 2005

52

Maternelle (1949), Just Out (1949), Venom and Eternity (1950), French Touch (1952), Le Petit Jacques (1953), Agonies (1954), Le Circuit de Minuit (1956), Bernadette of Lourdes (1960), The Baron of the Locks (1960), People in Luck (1962), Anatomy of a Marriage: My Days with Francoise (1963), Careless Love (1963), The Holy Terror (1963), L’Enfer (1964), Love on the Quiet (1985), Roulez Jeunesse! (1993), and White Lies (1998). She also appeared frequently on French television from the 1960s, starring in such productions as La Berthe (1975), Le Theatre de Tristan Bernard (1975), Les Eygletiere (1978), Les Filles d’Adam (1980), Marcheloup (1982), Tantie (1989), La Stagiaire (1991), and La Corruptrice (1994).

BRYANT, BETTY Australian actress Betty Bryant died in Seattle, Washington, on October 3, 2005. She was 85. Bryant was born in Bristol, England, on June 27, 1920. She moved to Australia with her family in the early 1930s and began performing on Australian radio as a teenager. She was cast as the female lead, Juliette Rouget, in the 1941 film Forty Thousand Horsemen, which became the first Australian film to succeed in the United States and Europe. Bryant became a popular singer and leading stage and radio performer in Australia. She married MGM executive Maurice “Red” Silverstein in 1941. She was cast in the film Mrs. Miniver, but had to withdraw after becoming pregnant. She later appeared in a small role in the 1948 film Saigon. She and her husband were co-founders of the charity organization The Foundation for the People of the South Pacific in the early 1960s, and Bryant remained active with the group for the remainder of her life. She and Silverstein remained married until his death in 1999.

John Bryson

and The Osterman Weekend (1983). He was also featured in the 1988 television mini-series War and Remembrance. • Los Angeles Times, Aug. 12, 2005, B11; Variety, Aug. 22, 2005, 43.

BUISSON, PAUL Canadian television personality Paul Buisson died of respiratory arrest in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, on April 19, 2005. He was 41. Buisson worked with the Canadian sports network RDS from the station’s beginning in 1989. He also appeared in the films Les Boys II (1998) and Station Nord (2002). He also starred in the television series Reseaux (1998) and Lance et Compte — La Nouvelle Generation (2001) as Bouboule.

Paul Buisson Betty Bryant

BRYSON, JOHN Photojournalist John Bryson died in a Brookings, Oregon, retirement home on August 10, 2005. He was 81. He was born on October 12, 1923. He began his career as a photographer working at Life magazine as a picture editor. During his career he photographed numerous celebrities including Katharine Hepburn, Ernest Hemingway, Salvador Dali, Marilyn Monroe, Elizabeth Taylor, Frank Sinatra, and President John F. Kennedy. Bryson also appeared in several films including John Frankenheimer’s Grand Prix (1966), and Sam Peckinpah’s The Getaway (1972), Conwoy (1978),

BUJONES, FERNANDO Ballet dancer Fernando Bujones died of lung cancer in Miami, Florida, on November 9, 2005. He was 50. Bujones was born in Miami of Cuban parents on March 9, 1955. He studied ballet in his teens and earned the gold medal at the International Ballet Competition in 1974. He joined the American Ballet Theatre in 1974. During his thirty year career Bujones performed throughout the world, dancing with the Paris Opera, the Royal Ballet, the Tokyo Ballet, and as guest artist in over thirty other countries. Bujones also appeared the 1977 ballet film The Turning Point. He served as artistic director of the Orlando Ballet in Florida until shortly before his death. • Los Angeles Times, Nov. 12, 2005, B16; New York Times, Nov. 11,

53

2005 • Obituaries set in Anglo-Saxon England (Wolfshead as Arthur Frazier), and war dramas as Bruno Krauss. He also adapted the British television series The Professionals as Ken Blake. He also created the Dray Prescott series of science fiction novels under the pseudonym of Alan Burt Akers, beginning with 1972’s Transit to Scorpio. The series was published in the U.S. by DAW Books, and continued for nearly forty volumes through 1988’s Warlord of Antares. Bulmer continued the series with his German publisher for another decade. He began the Odan of the Half-God series with 1977’s Dream Chariots under the name Manning Norval, and Whetted Bronze (1978) and Crown of the Sword God (1980) followed. Bulmer continued to produce novels until suffering a stroke in 1993.

Fernando Bujones

2005, C16; Time, Nov. 21, 2005, 27; Times (of London), Nov. 17, 2005, 67.

BULMER, KENNETH Science fiction writer Kenneth Bulmer died after a long illness of complications from a stroke on December 16, 2005. He was 84. Bulmer was born in London on January 14, 1921. He began his writing career in the early 1950s, co-authoring the science fiction novel Space Treason in 1952. He wrote nearly 200 novels over the next fifty years, including Empire of Chaos (1953), The Stars Are Ours (1953), City Under the Sea (1957), The Earth Gods Are Coming (1960), Beyond the Silver Sky (1961), No Man’s World (1961), The Wizard of the Starship Poseidon (1963), Demon’s World (1964), The Million Year Hunt (1964), Behold the Stars (1965), The Doomsday Men (1968), The Ulcer Culture (1969), Kandar (1969), Quench the Burning Stars (1970), Sword of the Barbarians (1970), The Electric SwordSwallowers (1971), The Insane City (1971), On the SymbSocket Circuit (1972), Roller Coaster World (1972), To Outrun Doomsday (1975), and Where the Jungle Ends (1978). Bulmer also created the Keys to the Dimensions series, which included nine volumes including Land Beyond the Map (1961), The Key to Irunium (1967), The Key to Venudine (1968), The Wizards of Senchuria (1969), The Chariots of Ra (1972), and The Diamond Contessa (1983). During the 1970s Bulmer continued to write novels, utilizing over 20 pen names. He authored tales of ancient Rome (The Eagles as Andrew Quiller), historical novels

BUMATAI, RAY Hawaiian actor and entertainer Ray Bumatai died of brain cancer in Hawaii on October 6, 2005. He was 52. Bumatai was born in Offenbach, Germany, on December 20, 1952. He began working as a stand-up comic in the 1980s and was a member of the Booga Booga comedy troupe. Bumatai also appeared in supporting roles in numerous films and television productions set in Hawaii. He was James Kulani in the television series Island Son from 1989 to 1990, and was Danny Kinimaka in Big Wave Dave’s in 1993. He also appeared in the tele-films Blood & Orchids (1986), Miracle Landing (1990), Danger Island (1992), Miss America: Behind the Crown (1992), and Johnny Tsunami (1991). He was also featured in episodes of Magnum, P.I., Life Goes On, Raven, Time Trax, The Adventures of Brisco County Jr., One West Waikiki, Martial Law, Baywatch, and Hawaii. He also appeared in several feature films including Tis the Season (1994), Glacier (1995), Under the Hula Moon (1995), Lemon Tree Billiards House (1996), Lani Loa; The Passage (1998), Ho’olawe: Give and Take (2001), and 2005’s Pele O Ka Foodmart. Bumatai was also the voice of Tito Makani in the Rocket Power animated series in 1999, and was a voice actor in The Wild Thornberrys and 2005’s Aloha, Scooby-Doo.

Ray Bumatai (with Tina Shelton in a production of The King and I )

Kenneth Bulmer

BUNCE, BARRINGTON Animation artist Barrington Bunce died on June 14, 2005. He was 60. Bunce was born on January 12, 1945. He began working as an animator in the later 1960s, and was a storyboard and

Obituaries • 2005

54

layout artist for such cartoons as Spider-Woman, The Smurfs, The 13 Ghosts of Scooby-Doo, Dr. Seuss’ Pontoffel Pock, Where Are You, Baby Daze, CatDog, and Johnny Bravo.

BUNCH, CHRIS Science fiction novelist and television writer Chris Bunch died on July 4, 2005. He was 61. Bunch was born on December 22, 1943. He was a veteran of the Vietnam war and was a combat correspondent for Stars and Stripes. He later wrote for various publications including Look, Rolling Stone, and outlaw motorcycle magazines. He was best known as the coauthor of the Sten series with Allan Cole, which included the novels Sten (1982), The Wolf World (1984), The Court of a Thousand Suns (1986), Fleet of the Damned (1988), Revenge of the Damned (1989), The Return of the Emperor (1990), Vortex (1992), and Empire’s End (1993). He and Cole also worked together as television scriptwriters, penning episodes of such series as The Incredible Hulk, Mrs. Columbo, Magnum, P.I., The A-Team, The Master, Jessie, Hardball, and Walker, Texas Ranger. Bunch wrote numerous other science fiction novels including The Far Kingdoms (1985), A Reckoning for Kings: A Novel of the Tet Offensive (1987), A Daughter of Liberty (1992), The Warrior’s Tale (1994), Kingdoms of the Night (1995), The Wind After Time (1996), Hunt the Heavens (1996), The Darkness of God (1997), The Seer King (1997), The Demon King (1998), The Warrior King (1999), The Last Legion (1999), Firemask (2000), Storm Force (2000), The Empire Stone (2000), Corsair (2001), Homefall (2001), Storm of Wings (2002), Star Risk, Ltd. (2002), Scoundrel Worlds (2003), Knighthood of the Dragon (2003), The Last Battle (2004), The Doublecross Program (2004), and The Dog from Hell (2005). • Los Angeles Times, July 11, 2005, B9; Variety, July 25, 2005, 57.

Edward Bunker

and No Beast So Fierce. The latter work served as the basis for the 1978 film Straight Time starring Dustin Hoffman, which used Bunker as a technical adviser and also featured him the role of Mickey. Bunker worked often in films from the 1980s, appearing in small rolls, and often serving as a technical advisor, on such features as The Long Riders (1980), Runaway Train (1985) which he also scripted, Shy People (1987), The Running Man (1987) with Arnold Schwarzeneggar, Fear (1988), Miracle Mile (1988), Relentless (1988), Best of the Best (1989), and Tango & Cash (1989). Bunker appeared as a member of the color-coded criminal gang in Quentin Tarantino’s premiere film Reservoir Dogs in 1992 as Mr. Blue. He was also seen in the films Best of the Best 2 (1993), Distant Cousins (1993), Somebody to Love (1994), Chameleon (1996), and Shadrach (1998), and the tele-films Slow Burn (1986) and Love, Cheat & Steal (1993). He also appeared in an episode of Hunter on television, and was a technical advisor on the 1995 film Heat. Bunker wrote, scripted and starred as Buzzard in 2000’s Animal Factory, and was featured in Family Secrets (2002), 13 Moons (2002), and Adam Sandler’s The Longest Yard (2005) as Skitchy Rivers. • Los Angeles Times, July 24, 2005, B14; New York Times, July 27, 2005, C17.

BUNKER, LARRY Jazz drummer Larry Bunker died of complications from a stroke in a Los Angeles hospital on March 8, 2005. He was 76. Bunker was born

Chris Bunch

BUNKER, EDWARD Screenwriter and actor Edward Bunker died of complications from surgery while suffering from cancer and diabetes in a Burbank, California, hospital on July 19, 2005. He was 71. Bunker was born in Hollywood on December 31, 1933. He became San Quentin prison’s youngest inmate in 1940 when he was sentenced for bank robbery and car theft at the age of seventeen. He served over twenty years in prison, during which time he wrote the books Confession of a Felon

Larry Bunker

55

2005 • Obituaries

in Long Beach, California, on November 4, 1928. He began performing in the early 1950s with trombonists Howard Rumsey. He also played with such jazz legends as Stan Getz, Art Pepper and Gerry Mulligan. Bunker performed as a member of singer Peggy Lee’s band. He worked as a studio musician on numerous films including Stalag 17 (1953), A Boy and His Dog (1975), The Truth About Cats and Dogs (1996), and The Incredibles (2004). • Los Angeles Times, Mar. 17, 2005, B11; New York Times, Mar. 27, 2005.

BURCH, WILLIAM N. Radio and television producer and director William N. Burch died of complications from hip surgery in Sacramento, California, on October 1, 2005. He was 86. Burch was born in Evanston, Illinois, on October 30, 1918. He began his career working as a copywriter for the J. Walter Thompson advertising firm in Chicago in the 1930s. He served in the Army Air Force during World War II, and rejoined Thompson’s California office after the war. He joined Ralph Edwards’ production company in the late 1940s and produced Edwards’ game show Truth or Consequences for radio and, from 1950, for television. Burch was also involved in the production of Gene Autry’s radio and television programs, and worked with Tennessee Ernie Ford in the early 1960s. Burch married singer Yvonne King in 1966, and produced several of the King Family television specials. • Variety, Oct. 24, 2005, 40. BURGER, NEAL Writer and sound editor Neal Robinson Burger died in San Pedro, California, on July 28, 2005. He was 73. Burger was born in Brooklyn, New York, on September 4, 1931. He began working in films as a mailroom clerk at Republic Studios in the mid– 1950s. He became a member of the Motion Pictures Editors Guild in the early 1960s and worked in films as a sound editor. Burger also co-wrote the 1974 tele-film The Disappearance of Flight 412 with George Simpson. He and Simpson also co-wrote several novels including Ghostboat. Burger worked as sound editor on numerous films including Shoot to Kill (1988), Bull Durham (1988), License to Drive (1988), Talk Radio (1988), Renegades (1989), Turner and Hooch (1989), Steel Magnolias (1989), National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation (1989), Narrow Margin (1990), Backstreet Dreams (1990), L.A. Story (1991), Only the Lonely (1991), and Clifford (1994). • Variety, Sept. 26, 2005, 72. BURNSIDE, R.L.

Mississippi blues musician R.L. Burnside died after a long illness in a Memphis, Tennessee, hospital on September 1, 2005. He was 78. Burnside was born in Harmontown, Mississippi, on November 21, 1926. He learned to play guitar while in Chicago in the 1940s, and was first recorded in 1968 by folklorist George Mitchell. He continued to play the blues in Mississippi venues and signed with the newly formed Fat Possum record label in 1991. Burnside went on to record over a dozen albums including the live recording Bad Luck City (1992), Too Bad Jim (1994), and his final, 2004’s A Bothered Mind. • Los Angeles Times, Sept. 2, 2005, B11; New York Times, Sept. 2, 2005, B7; Time, Sept. 12, 2005, 26; Times (of London), Oct. 7, 2005, 78.

R.L. Burnside

BUSBY, F.M. Science fiction writer Francis Marion Busby died after a long illness in a Seattle, Washington, health facility on February 17, 2005. He was 83. Busby was born on March 11, 1921. He was a leading science fiction fan from the 1950s, writing and publishing fanzines including the Hugo Award winning Cry of the Nameless. He also wrote over 20 novels and collections, including the popular Rissa Kergulen series which he began in 1976. He also wrote The Demu Trilog y and the Dynas series. His other novels include Cage a Man (1973), All These Earths (1978), Getting Home (1987), The Breeds of Man (1988), The Singularity Project (1993), Arrow from Earth (1995), and The Triad Worlds (1996).

F.M. Busby

BYCE, JASON Actor and singer Jason Byce died of multiple myeloma in a Marietta, Georgia, hospital on February 13, 2005. He was 60. He was born Ervin Luther Buice in Roswell, Georgia, on June 17, 1944. He performed in numerous opera and theatrical productions, appearing in musicals on Broadway and stages throughout the country. He also appeared in the 1993 film The Program, and was seen in the daytime soap opera All My Children and the drama series In the Heat of the Night. Byce was best perhaps best known for his appearances in a Polaner All fruit television commercial in the mid–1980s, where drawled the phrase “Would ya please pass the jelly?” to a shocked tableful of fellow diners.

Obituaries • 2005

56 Hawaii Vice Reflections (1990), Voodoo Vixens (1991), Tempting Tianna (1992), Dyno-mite (1992), Dirty Dixie (1992), Beverly Hills Geisha (1992), Spanish Fly (1993), Beach Bunny (1994), and Wendy Has Whoppers (1996).

Jason Byce

BYRD, JERRY Musician Jerry Byrd died of complications from Parkinson’s disease in Honolulu, Hawaii, on April 11, 2005. He was 85. Byrd was born in Lima, Ohio, on March 9, 1920. He began playing the steel guitar while in his teens, and was a country music performer on the radio in Cincinnati and Detroit in the late 1930s and early 1940s. Byrd subsequently went to Nashville, where he performed with such country artists as Patsy Cline, Hank Williams, Red Foley, Chet Atkins, and Marty Robbins. He became a leading figure on the Hawaiian music scene in the 1970s, where he played steel guitar with such artists as Don Ho and Irmgard Aluli. He often performed at the Royal Hawaiian and Halekulani. • Variety, Apr. 25, 2005, 69.

CABRERA INFANTE, GUILLERMO Cuban writer Guillermo Cabrera Infante died in a London hospital on February 21, 2005, from an infection he developed while being treated from a broken hip following a fall in his bathroom. He was 75. Cabrera Infante was born in Gibara, Cuba, on April 22, 1929. He moved to Havana with his family in 1941, where he aspired to be a writer. He wrote for several magazines in the 1950s including a stint as film critic for Carteles from 1954 to 1960. He was an early supporter of Fidel Castro’s Communist revolution. Cabrera’s first collection of stories, In Peace As in War, was published in 1960. He served the Cuban government as a charge d’affaires in Belgium in the early 1960s before breaking with the Castro regime. Cabrera spent the next four decades in exile in London. He wrote the popular novel Three Trapped Tigers in 1967 and scripted the 1968 films Wonderwall. Under the pseudonym Guillermo Cain he scripted the 1971 cult film Vanishing Point, which was refilmed for television in 1997. He was also noted for his film criticisms, with a collection of his reviews published in 1968 as A TwentiethCentury Job. His other works include Infante’s Inferno (1984) and View of Dawn in the Tropics (1988). • Los Angeles Times, Feb. 23, 2005, B7; New York Times, Feb. 23, 2005, C19; Time, Mar. 7, 2005, 27; Times (of London), Jan. 23, 2005, 62.

Jerry Byrd

Guillermo Cabrera Infante

CABO, REX Adult film actor and director Rex Cabo died in a suicide plunge from the 11th floor of a Long Beach, California, apartment building, landing on a parked police car on April 28, 2005. He was 40. He was born Rex Hickok on June 26, 1964. Cabo began working in adult films with Leisure Time Entertainment in the early 1990s. Cabo also recruited such stars as Vivanna, Rikki Lee, and Savannah into the adult film world. Savannah, formerly known as Shannon Wilsey, was a leading superstar in the industry until her death by suicide in the 1990s. Cabo also directed over 100 adult films, often appearing under the name Lance Heywood. Some of his film credits include Slip of the Tongue (1990),

CALAME, CRAIG DEXTER Craig Dexter Calame, who starred as Mugsy on New Jersey’s The Uncle Floyd Show from 1974 to 1986, died of cancer at his home in Hackensack, New Jersey, on October 25, 2005. He was 56. Calame was born on February 25, 1949, in Newark, New Jersey. He worked with Floyd Vivino throughout the run of the Uncle Floyd Show, often performing comic song parodies. Calame was also the creator of the television programs The 11th Hour and After Hours in New Jersey. CALLE, TEOFILO Spanish actor Teofilo Calle died in Madrid, Spain, on February 13, 2005. He was

57

Mugsy Calame

2005 • Obituaries

Salvador “Tutti” Camarata (with Annette Funicello)

sion series including Startime, The Alcoa Hour, and The Vic Damone Show. • Los Angeles Times, Apr. 18, 2005, B11; New York Times, Apr. 19, 2005, C17.

Teofilo Calle

67. Calle attended the School of Dramatic Art and began his career as an actor on the Spanish stage in the mid–1950s. He was also seen in several films in Spain including Unmarried and Mother in Life (1969), El Mejor Regalo (1975), Memorias del General Escobar (1984), Dragon Rapide (1986), Men Always Lie (1995), Lycantropus: The Moonlight Murders (1996), and Barbaric Years (1998).

CAMARATA, SALVADOR “TUTTI” Musician and big band arranger Salvador ‘Tutti’ Camarata died in Burbank, California, after a brief illness on April 13, 2005. He was 91. Camarata was born in Glen Ridge, New Jersey, on May 11, 1913. He studied music at Juilliard in New York and was arranger and lead trumpeter in Jimmy Dorsey’s band in the 1930s and early 1940s. He was arranger on such popular songs as “Green Eyes,” “Yours,” and “Tangerine.” After leaving Dorsey’s band he worked as an arranger for such musicians as Glen Gray and the Casa Loma Orchestra, Benny Goodman, Ella Fitzerald, Billie Holiday, and Bing Crosby. He also was an arranger and orchestrator for several films including Sing, Helen, Sing (1943) and London Town (1946). He worked for London Records in England in the late 1940s, then returned to the United States to work with Disneyland Records. He was an arranger for such Disney performers as Hayley Mills and Annette Funicello. Camarata also served as musical director for several televi-

CAMP, HAMILTON Character actor and folk singer Hamilton Camp died after suffering a fall near his home in Hancock Park, California, on October 2, 2005. He was 70. Camp was born in London on October 30, 1934. He moved to Canada, and then to California with his mother and sister after World War II. He and his sister performed in USO shows and Camp made his film debut in the 1946 horror classic Bedlam with Boris Karloff. Sometimes billed as Robin Camp, he also appeared in the films The Happy Years (1950), Outrage (1950), Dark City (1950), Kim (1950), When I Grow Up (1951), The Son of Dr. Jekyll (1951), My Cousin Rachel (1952), Titanic (1953), Ride Clear of Diablo (1954), Executive Suite (1954), and The Black Shield of Falworth (1954). In the early 1960s he formed a folk singing duo with Bob Gibson. Gibson and Camp recorded the 1961 album Live at the Gate of Horn, and wrote such songs as “You Can Tell the World” and “Well, Well, Well.” The duo broke up after a year when Camp became an early member of the comedy troupe Second City in Chicago. He was also a founding member of the San Francisco troupe the Committee. The 5'2" Camp often played comedy roles in films and television. He was featured as Andrew Hummel in the television sit-com He & She from 1967 to 1968, and wrote and performed in the

Hamilton Camp

Obituaries • 2005 short-lived comedy variety series Turn-On. He also appeared in the films The Perils of Pauline (1967), Cockeyed Cowboys of Calico County (1970), Nickelodeon (1976), American Hot Wax (1978), Heaven Can Wait (1978), Starcrash (1979), Roadie (1980), All Night Long (1981), S.O.B. (1981), Evilspeak (1981), Eating Raoul (1982), Safari 3000 (1982), Young Doctors in Love (1982), Under Fire (1983), Meatballs Part II (1984), No Small Affair (1984), The Rosebud Beach Hotel (1984), City Heat (1984), Bird (1988), Megaville (1990), Dick Tracy (1990), Arena (1991), Let’s Kill All the Lawyers (1992), Gordy (1995), Doctor Dolittle (1998) as the voice of the Pig, Family Tree (1999), Joe Dirt (2001), Wishcraft (2002), The 4th Tenor (2002), and Hard Four (2005). He was also featured in the tele-films McGurk (1979), Portrait of a Showgirl (1982), I Take These Men (1983), The Hoboken Chicken Emergency (1984), It Came Upon the Midnight Clear (1984), Lots of Luck (1985), Attack of the 50 Ft. Woman (1993), and How to Marry a Billionaire: A Christmas Tale (2000) as Santa. He also starred as Mr. Peabody in the 1979 comedy series Co-Ed Fever, and was Arthur Wainwrigh in Two Close for Comfort in 1981. He performed regularly on the variety series The Nashville Palace from 1981 to 1982, and was Professor Bob in the comedy series Just Our Luck in 1983. His numerous television credits also include episodes of The Andy Griffith Show, The Rat Patrol, Hey, Landlord, The Monkees, Bewitched, Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C., Bonanza, The Good Guys, Love, American Style, Mary Tyler Moore, The Flip Wilson Show, Starsky and Hutch, Alice, M*A*S*H, WKRP in Cincinnati, Laverne & Shirley, Soap, Three’s Company, Trapper John, M.D., Mork & Mindy, Hill Street Blues, The Twilight Zone, Cheers, All Is Forgiven, Mama’s Family, Saved by the Bell, Murphy Brown, Morton & Hayes, The Jeff Foxworth Show, ER, Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman as H.G. Wells, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, Star Trek: Voyager, Titus, Grounded for Life, That Was Then, and Desperate Housewives. Camp also worked often as a voice actor for the animated films The 13 Ghosts of Scooby-Doo (1985), Scooby-Doo Meets the Boo Brothers (1987), The Jetsons Meet the Flintstones, Scooby-Doo and the Reluctant Werewolf (1988), Scooby-Doo and the Ghoul School (1988), Rockin with Judy Jetson (1988), The Little Mermaid (1989), The Pebble and the Penguin (1995), and All Dogs Go to Heaven 2 (1996), and on the cartoon series The Smurfs as Greedy Smurf and Harmony Smurf, The Kwicky Koala Show, The Incredible Hulk, The Secret World of Og, Sherlock Hound, the Detective, DuckTales, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, A Pup Named ScoobyDoo, Potsworth & Co., Tale Spin, The Wizard of Oz, Gravedale High, Pirates of Darkwater, Darkwing Duck, Spacecats, James Bond Jr., Bonkers, Aladdin, Tiny Toon Adventures, The Tick, Mighty Max, Duckman, Extreme Ghostbusters, and The Zeta Project. • Los Angeles Times, Oct. 5, 2005, B12; Times (of London), Oct. 6, 2005, 68.

CAMPBELL, BLACK ANGUS Professional wrestler Black Angus Campbell died in a hospital in Stranraer, Scotland, on April 21, 2005. Campbell was born Frances Patrick Hoy in England. He became a wrestler at an early age. With shoulder lengthy black

58

Black Angus Campbell

hair and a long black beard, the burly brawler wrestled under the names Rasputin, The Mad Monk and Black Angus Campbell. He later competed in Canada and the United States. Campbell held the Stampede North American Title in Calgary, Canada, several times in 1971. He also held several tag team championships, teaming with Roger Kirby and Harley Race. He competed in Florida, the Carolinas, and the Pacific Northwest before retiring from the ring in the mid–1970s. Campbell moved to New Zealand and later settled in Scotland.

CANDIDO, CHRIS Professional wrestler Chris Candido collapsed and died in Matawan, New Jersey, on April 28, 2005. He was 33. He had undergone surgery for a broken ankle earlier in the week. Candido was born in Spring Lake, New Jersey, on March 21, 1972. He was trained by Larry Sharpe and began wrestling professionally in 1986. He competed in the USWA in 1990, and wrestled in the WWA in New Jersey in the early 1990s, holding the Junior Heavyweight Title in 1990 and 1992. He entered Smoky Mountain in April of 1993, where he teamed with Brian Lee to capture the tag team belts. Candido captured the revived NWA title in a tournament in November of 1994. He and his wife, Tammy Fytch, joined the WWF in 1995 as the Body Donnas, with Candido as Skip and Fytch as Sunny. Candido teamed with Zip (Tom Prichard) to capture the WWF Tag Team Title in a tournament in March of 1996. They lost the belts the following May. Candido subsequently

Chris Candido (with Tammy “Sunny” Fytch)

59

2005 • Obituaries

left the WWF for ECW, where he teamed with Lance Storm to win the ECW World Tag Team. He and Tammy wrestled with the XPW in 2000, where he held the XPW championship in February. He moved to WCW soon afterwards and won a tournament to become the WCW Cruiserweight Champion in April of 2000. After leaving the WCW Candido and Tammy appeared in independent promotions, and Candido competed with New Japan in early 2002. He was competing with TNA wrestling when he suffered a broken ankle.

CANNON, DORAN WILLIAM Writer and filmmaker Doran William Cannon died on March 12, 2005. He was 68. Cannon was born in Toledo, Ohio, on February 11, 1937. He attended Columbia College before making his first film, Square Root of Zero, which he produced, directed, scripted and edited in 1963. He also wrote the 1968 film Skidoo and wrote Robert Altman’s black comedy Brewster McCloud in 1970. He also wrote the 1970 supernatural film Hex and the 1980 television adaptation of George Orwell’s Brave New World. Cannon was also a staff writer for the prime-time soap opera Knots Landing in the 1980s.

Doran William Cannon

CANNON, J.D. Actor J.D. Cannon, who was best known for his role as New York City Detective Chief Peter B. Clifford in the 1970s police drama McCloud with Dennis Weaver, died at his home in Hudson, New York, on May 20, 2005. He was 83. Cannon was born in Salmon Idaho, on April 24, 1922. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II. He attended the American Academy of Dramatic Arts and was a prolific actor in television and films from the 1960s. His film credits include An American Dream (1966), Cool Hand Luke (1967) with Paul Newman, Krakatoa, East of Java (1969), Heaven with a Gun (1969), The Thousand Plane Raid (1969), Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970), Lawman (1971), Serpico (1973), Raise the Titanic (1980), Death Wish II (1982), and Street Justice (1989). He also appeared in numerous tele-films including Memorandum for a Spy (1965), U.M.C. (1969), D.A.: Murder One (1969), Sam Hill: Who Killed the Mysterious Mr. Foster? (1971), Cannon (1971), Lady Luck (1973), A Memory of Two Mondays (1974), Testimony of Two Men (1977), Ike: The War Years (1978), A Double Life (1978), Killing Stone (1978), the

J.D. Cannon

1979 mini-series Ike as Gen. Walter Bedell Smith, Walking Through the Fire (1979), My Kidnapper, My Love (1980), Top of the Hill (1980), Pleasure Palace (1980), The Adventures of Nellie Bly (1981), Beyond Witch Mountain (1982), Rooster (1982), and The Road Raiders (1989). Cannon starred as Chief Clifford on McCloud from 1970 to 1977, and reprised the role in the 1989 tele-film The Return of Sam McCloud. He also starred as General Hampton in the 1984 series Call to Glory. His many television credits also include appearances in such series as The United States Steel Hour, Play of the Week, Naked City, The Catholic Hour, The Defenders, The Untouchables, The Nurses, Wagon Train, Combat!, Stoney Burke, The Great Adventure, Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre, East Side/West Side, Rawhide, Gunsmoke, The Rogues, Profiles in Courage, The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, Twelve O’Clock High, The Fugitive, Wild Wild West, The Trials of O’Brien, A Man Called Shenandoah, The F.B.I., Shane, The Invaders, Disneyland, The Guns of Will Sonnett, Cimarron Strip, The Iron Horse, The Invaders, Lancer, The Mod Squad, Bonanza, Hallmark Hall of Fame, The Name of the Game, The Virginian, Alias Smith and Jones in the recurring role of Harry Briscoe, The Hardy Boys Mysteries as Jason Fox, Sword of Justice, B.J. and the Bear, The Fall Guy, Fantasy Island, Remington Steele, Matt Houston, The Master, Murder, She Wrote, Blacke’s Magic, The Highwayman, and Law & Order. • Los Angeles Times, June 4, 2005, B19; New York Times, June 4, 2005, A13; Variety, June 13, 2005, 56.

CANNON, JEAN Model Jean Cannon, who was Playboy Playmate of the Month for October of 1961, died in Hollywood, Florida, on November 17, 2005. She was 64. Cannon was born on Long Island, New York, on October 4, 1941. The busty brunette was Playboy’s Miss October in 1961. CANTO E CASTRO, HENRIQUE Portuguese actor and singer Henrique Canto e Castro died in Almada, Portugal, on February 1, 2005. He was 74. Canto e Castro was born in Lisbon, Portugal, on April 24, 1930. He was a leading performer on the Portuguese stage for over fifty years. Canto e Castro was also seen in numerous films including Submersed Morning (1980), Life Is Beautiful (1982), The Blood (1989), The Man from Nowhere (1989), To the Bitter End (1991), Xavier (1992),

Obituaries • 2005

Jean Cannon

Henrique Canto e Castro (right, with Ruy de Carvalho in King Lear)

The Last Dive (1992), Light Trap (1993), Here on Earth (1993), See You Tomorrow, Mario (1994), Revenge of the Musketeers (1994), Three Palm Trees (1994), Lisbon Story (1994), Requiem (1998), In the Shadow of the Vultures (1998), Traffic (1998), Jaime (1999), April Captains (2000), Word and Utopia (2000), and Low-Flying Aircraft (2002).

60 Worcestershire, England, on April 24, 1944. He was a founding member of the legendary rock band Traffic with Steve Winwood, Dave Mason and Chris Wood in 1967. The band produced such hit songs as “John Barleycorn Must Die,” “40,000 Headmen,” “Paper Sun,” and “Mr. Fantasy” and recorded 11 albums before they broke up in 1974. They also scored music for the 1967 film Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush, and appeared in the 1972 concert film Traffic Life at Santa Monica. Capaldi subsequently performed with The Contenders and had a successful career as a solo artist with such hits as “Oh! How We Danced,” “It’s Alright,” and “Love Hurts.” Traffic reunited for a U.S. tour in 1994 and were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2004. • Los Angeles Times, Jan. 29, 2005, B17; New York Times, Jan. 29, 2005, B7; People, Feb. 14, 2005, 101; Time, Feb. 7, 2005, 23; Times (of London), Jan. 29, 2005, 76.

CAPPUCCILLI, PIERO Italian opera singer Piero Cappuccilli died in Trieste, Italy, on July 12, 2005. He was 75. Cappuccilli was born in Trieste on November 9, 1929. He performed in small roles in Trieste before making his official debut in a production of Pagliacci in Milan in 1957. He came to London at the end of the decade, where he performed in EMI recordings of Don Giovanni and Lucia di Lammermoor with Maria Callas. He also performed Lucia in his La Scala debut in 1964. He performed La Traviata at London’s Covent Garden, and was in Verdi’s Don Carlos at the Salzburg Festival in 1975. In the 1970s and 1980s he was also seen in television productions of Il Travatore (1978), Otello (1982), Andrea Chenier (1985), Don Carlo (1986), and Un Ballo in Maschera (1986). He continued to perform until he was seriously injured in an automobile accident in 1992. • New York Times, July 21, 2005, A26; Times (of London), Aug. 5, 2005, 62.

CAPALDI, JIM Rock drummer Jim Capaldi died of stomach cancer in a London hospital on January 28, 2005. He was 60. Capaldi was born in Evesham,

Piero Cappuccilli

Jim Capaldi

CARDOSO, REGIS Brazilian television director Regis Cardoso died of respiratory failure and pneumonia in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on April 3, 2005. He was 70. Cardoso worked in television from the 1960s, directing such series as O Direito de Nascer (1964), O Sheik de Agadir (1966), Anastacia, A Mulher Sem Destino (1967), Rosa Rebelde (1969), A Cabana do Pai Tomas (1969), A Proxima Atracao (1970), Os Ossos do Barao

61

2005 • Obituaries

Regis Cardoso

Al Carmines

(1973), Escalada (1975), Anjo Mau (1976), Locomotivas (1977), Te Contei (1978), Os Gigantes (1979), O BemAmado (1980), Verao Quente (1993), Cinzas (1993), and Tocaia Grande (1995).

CARNEIRO, KADU Brazilian actor Kadu Carneiro died of respiratory failure in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on May 20, 2005. Carneiro appeared in the films Lambada (1990), Cruz e Sousa — O Poeta do Desterro (1998), and Filhas do Vento (2004). He also appeared on television in the series A Hostoria de Ana Raio E Ze Trovao, Sangue do Meu Sangue, and Forca de Um Desejo.

CARISSE, TERRY Canadian country singer and songwriter Terry Carisse died of cancer in Ottawa, Canada, on May 22, 2005. He was 58. Carisse was born in Ottawa on July 11, 1946. He began performing while in his teens and recorded his debut album, The Story of the Year, in 1978. He recorded five further albums as well as such popular hit songs as “Sparkle in Her Eyes,” “All Her Letters,” and “We Could Make Beautiful Music Together.”

Kadu Carneiro (with Maria Ceica)

CAROSIO, MARGHERITA Italian lyric soprano Margherita Carosio died in Italy on January 10, Terry Carisse

CARMINES, AL Al Carmines, a leading figure of the New York avant-garde stage, died in New York city on August 11, 2005. He was 69. Carmines was born in New Hampton, Virginia on July 25, 1936. He earned a degree in divinity at the Union Theological Seminary in 1961, and was selected to serve as assistant minister at a Greenwich Village church. In the 1960s he formed the Judson Poet’s Theater where he staged numerous controversial production. He was considered a founder of the Off Off Broadway Theater, staging and often appearing in the off beat production. Carmines won five Obie Awards during his career, including one for lifetime achievement. He also appeared in the 1987 tele-film Kojak: The Price of Justice as a priest.

Margherita Carosio

Obituaries • 2005 2005. She was 96. Carosio was born in Genoa, Italy, on June 7, 1908. She began performing in her teens and sang at London’s Covent Garden in the late 1920s. She was also a popular performer at La Scala and at the Colon in Buenos Aires, Argentina. She performed the roles of Rosina in The Barber of Seville and Violetta in La Traviata. Carosio was also featured in several films including Queen of the Scala (1937), Sarasate (1941), and L’Elisir d’Amore (1941). She retired in the early 1960s, subsequently working in Genoa as a journalist and critic. • Times (of London), Jan. 24, 2005, 52.

CARPENTER, HUMPHREY

British author and biographer Humphrey Carpenter died in England after a long illness with Parkinson’s disease on January 5, 2005. He was 58. Carpenter was born in England on April 29, 1946. He began working as a trainee for the BBC in the late 1960s, launching BBC Radio Oxford in 1970. He also was a disc jockey, known as Humf, on the station. After leaving the BBC he began writing, with his first book, A Thames Companion, published in 1975. Carpenter was best known for his 1977 biography of Lord of the Rings creator J.R.R. Tolkien. He also wrote such literary biographies as The Angry Young Men, The Brideshead Generation, Geniuses Together, and That Was Satire That Was. Carpenter also created the Mr. Majeika series of children’s books, which were adapted for a television series in 1992. He subsequently returned to radio, where he often hosted the Night Waves series for Radio 3. • Los Angeles Times, Jan. 20, 2005, B11; New York Times, Jan. 19, 2005, C17; Times (of London), Jan. 6, 2005, 61.

62 and Orchestra Wives. Carr served in the U.S. Navy during World War II and was active in the Navy’s training film program. After the war he was a founder of Cascade Pictures. He was executive producer of the 1947 film The Fabulous Joe, and directed the comedy films Curley (1947) and Who Killed Doc Robbin? (1948). In the 1970s Carr founded Multi-Media, Inc., which was active in the distribution and storage of television and radio commercials. He worked with the company until his retirement in the 1990s.

CARR, TERRY MARTIN Film producer Terry Martin Carr and his nine-year-old daughter, Arieka, were found dead in a Jeep SUV outside of a convenience store in Clearlake Oaks, California, on August 1, 2005. Carr had driven off with his daughter after abandoning his wife at a grocery store in Ashland, Oregon, the day before. The bodies were lying in the back of the Jeep, showing no obvious cause of death. He was 62. Carr was born on February 22, 1943. He had been involved in films from the 1970s, serving as an assistant director on Woody Allen’s Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex * But Were Afraid to Ask, and as production manager for the 1976 remake of King Kong. He was also production supervisor for the films On Golden Pond (1981), The River (1984), and Jagged Edge (1985). Carr wrote and directed the 1986 film Welcome to 18 He was also a producer on the films An Almost Perfect Affair (1979), Coast to Coast (1980), Yes, Giorgio (1982), Six Against the Rock (1987), The Boost (1988), Predator 2 (1990), and Dark Summer (1999). CARREY, LEAH Actress Leah Carrey died in New York City on June 16, 2005. She was a longtime co-host of Ben Gailing’s Boston Yiddish radio program under the name Leahke Post. She also appeared as Grandma in Woody Allen’s 1987 comedy film Radio Days.

Humphrey Carpenter

CARR, BERNARD Actor turned director Bernard Carr died at his home in Pacific Palisades, California, on October 18, 2005. He was 94. Carr was born in Stockton, California, on March 23, 1911. He moved to Hollywood after graduation from the University of San Francisco where he acted in such films as Murder in the Fleet (1935), The Virginia Judge (1935), and Three Godfathers (1936). He soon turned to directing and producing at 20th Century–Fox and Hal Roach Studios. He served as assistant director on such films as One Million B.C. (1940), Turnabout (1940), Topper Returns (1941), Week-End in Havana (1941), Song of the Islands (1942),

Leah Carrey

CARROLL, GORDON Film producer Charles Gordon Carroll, III, died of pneumonia on September 20, 2005. He was 77. Carroll was born in Baltimore, Maryland, on February 2, 1928. He worked in advertising before moving to Los Angeles in the late 1950s. Carroll became involved with films, serving as a producer on such features as How to Murder Your Wife (1965), Cool

63

2005 • Obituaries

Hand Luke (1967), The April Fools (1969), Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid (1973), Alien (1979), Blue Thunder (1983), The Best of Times (1986), Aliens (1986), Red Heat (1998), Aliens 3 (1992), Alien: Resurrection (1997), and Alien Vs. Predator (2004).

CARSON, JEAN Actress Jean Carson, who was best known for her role as Daphne, one of the “fun girls” from Mt. Pilot in several episodes of The Andy Griffith Show, died in Palm Springs, California, on November 2, 2005. She was 82. Carson was born in Charleston, West Virginia, on February 28, 1923. She began her career on stage in the late 1940s, making her Broadway debut in a production of George S. Kaufman’s Bravo in 1958. Carson earned a Tony Award for her performance in Bird Cage in the 1950s. She also appeared in roles in several films including The Phenix City Story (1955), I Married a Monster from Outer Space (1958), The Sound and the Fury (1959), Here Come the Jets (1959), Sanctuary (1961), One Man’s Way (1964), Warning Shot (1967), Gunn (1967), and The Party. She was a frequent performer on television from the late 1940s, guest starring in episodes of such series as NBC Presents, Studio One, The Philco Television Playhouse, The Ford Theatre Hour, The Trap, Robert Montgomery Presents, The Adventures of Ellery Queen, Eye Witness, Inner Sanctum, The Man Behind the Badge, The 20th Century–Fox Hour, The Gale Storm Show, The Court of Last Resort, Sugarfoot, Death Valley Days, Peter Gunn, General Electric Theater, The Chevy Mystery Show, The Twilight Zone, Ripcord, The Tom Ewell Show, COronado 9, The Untouchables, The Joey Bishop Show, Stoney Burke, 77 Sunset Strip, Perry Mason, Burke’s Law, Wendy and Me, Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C. and The Outsider. Carson also starred as Rosemary in the 1959 comedy series The Betty Hutton Show. She was featured in three episodes of The Andy Griffith Show with Joyce Jameson as the “fun girls,” and was noted for her throaty rendition of the line “Hello Doll” as she flirted with Andy and Barney. She retired from the screen in the late 1970s shortly after appearing in the 1977 comedy film Fun with Dick and Jane. • Los Angeles Times, Nov. 12, 2005, B17; Variety, Nov. 14, 2005, 61.

Johnny Carson

Jean Carson (with Don Knotts)

thirty years, died of emphysema at his home in Malibu, California, on January 23, 2005. He was 79. Carson was born in Corning, Iowa, on October 23, 1925. He began performing as a magician and ventriloquist while in his teens. Carson served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. After the war he attended the University of Nebraska and worked as an announcer on an Omaha television station. He subsequently moved to Los Angeles where he was soon hosting the comedy talk show Carson’s Cellar. He also worked as a writer for Red Skelton and became host of The Johnny Carson Show on CBS from 1955 to 1956. Carson subsequently moved to ABC, where he hosted the quiz show Who Do You Trust? from 1957 to 1962. Carson also appeared as a panelist on the game shows What’s My Line, I’ve Got a Secret, and To Tell the Truth. Carson replaced Jack Paar as host of The Tonight Show on October 1, 1962. With Ed McMahon as his sidekick and bandleaders Skitch Henderson and, from 1967, Doc Severinsen, Carson ruled the late night airwaves for three decades. He also hosted the Academy Award shows in television several times in the late 1970s and 1980s. He appeared in cameo roles in several films including Looking for Love (1964), Cancel My Reservation (1972), and the Bob Hope tele-film Joys (1976). He was also seen in episodes of Playhouse 90, The Polly Bergen Show, The United States Steel Hour, The Jack Benny Program, Get Smart, Bob Hope Presents The Chrysler Theatre, Rowan and Martin’s Laugh-In, Here’s Lucy, The Dean Martin Show, Mary Tyler Moore, Night Court, Newhart, and Cheers, and voiced an episode of The Simpsons. Numerous comedians achieved fame as performers and guest hosts, including David Letterman, Bill Cosby, David Brenner, Garry Shandling, Joan Rivers, and Jerry Seinfeld. Carson made his final appearance on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson on May 22, 1992, with Jay Leno taking over duties as host. Carson was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1992 and was honored for career achievement at the Kennedy Center Honors in 1993. • Los Angeles Times, Jan. 24, 2005, A1; New York Times, Jan. 24, 2005, A1; People, Feb. 7, 2005, 84; Time, Feb. 7, 2005, 23; Variety, Jan. 31, 2005, 68.

CARSON, JOHNNY Johnny Carson, who hosted the late night talk show The Tonight Show for

CARSON, MICHAEL Australian television producer and director Michael Carson died of pancreatic

Obituaries • 2005

64 since the mid–1970s. • Los Angeles Times, Mar. 5, 2005, B17; New York Times, Mar. 5, 2005, A11.

CARTER, PAM Actress Pam Carter died of a heart aneurysm in an Omaha, Nebraska, hospital on February 28, 2005. She was 50. Carter was born on March 7, 1954. She was a leading performer in local theater in Omaha. She also had small roles in Alexander Payne’s films Citizen Ruth (1996) and Election (1999). Carter also had her own production company and directed several nationally syndicated cartoons including Warner Bros.’s Archie’s Weird Mysteries and Nickelodeon’s 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. She also directed segments of the PBS animated series Liberty’s Kids, and the 2003 tele-film Time Kid. Michael Carson

cancer in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, on May 14, 2005. Carson began working in television in the early 1970s. After several years as an assistant director he began directing television dramas. He helmed the mini-series Loss of Innocence (1978), A Place in the World (1979), The Timeless Land (1980), and The Petrov Affair (1987). He also helmed the tele-films Coralie Landsdowne Says No (1980), Intimate Strangers (1981), and Touch the Sun: Peter & Pompey (1988), and episodes of Spring & Fall. Carson also produced the television dramas Intimate Strangers (1981), Scales of Justice (1983), Mail Order Bride (1984), Crime of the Decade (1984), and Man of Letters (1984). He continued to direct such productions as Jackaroo (1990), Halifax f.p: Hard Corps (1994), Singapore Sling: Old Flames (1995), The Bite (1996), and The Devil Game (1997). His other credits include episodes of Police Rescue, Phoenix, The Damnation of Harvey McHugh, Janus, SeaChange, Driven Crazy, Something in the Air, Horace & Tina, Cybergirl, Corridors of Power, and Out There.

CARTER, JOE Country musician and comedian Joe Carter died of pancreatic cancer on March 2, 2005. He was 79. He was born on February 27, 1926, the youngest son of country music legends Sara and A.P. Carter. He performed with the Carter Family on many of their recordings from the 1950s. A singer and guitarist, he was also noted for his animal impersonations as part of the Carter Fold show in Hiltons, Virginia,

Joe Carter

Pam Carter

CASE, DAVID Actor David Case died of complications from throat cancer at his home in El Sobrante, California, on October 1, 2005. He was 73. Case was born in London on April 25, 1932. He made his acting debut on the British stage, and also appeared in small roles on television. He came to the United States in the mid–1970s where he continued to perform in local theater. He soon found his calling as a recording artist for Books on Tape, reading the works on numerous authors and performing over 700 books for audiotape. Case also worked for Blackstone Audio Books, where he recorded under the name Frederick Davidson. His works included

David Case

65 Don Quixote, Galsworthy’s Forsyte chronicles, and numerous novels by P.G. Wodehouse, Anthony Trollope, and Charles Dickens. He was forced to retire in 2000 after contracting throat cancer.

CASEY, AL Guitarist Al Casey died of colon cancer in a Manhattan hospital on September 11, 2005. He was 89. Casey was born in Louisville, Kentucky, on September 15, 1915. He was a leading musician with Fats Waller’s band in the 1930s and 1940s. He also performed with Teddy Wilson and Louis Armstrong, and recorded with Billie Holiday and Frankie Newton. During the 1950s he continued to perform in swing and blues settings, and played with King Curtis for several years later in the decade. Casey emerged from retirement to join Albert Vollmer’s Harlem Blues and Jazz Band in 1981. He continued to perform with the group until poor health forced his retirement in 2001. • Los Angeles Times, Sept. 15, 2005, B11; New York Times, Sept. 13, 2005, B9; Times (of London), Sept. 16, 2005, 76.

2005 • Obituaries for Joe Shuster’s studio in Cleveland in 1938. Shuster, with writer Jerry Siegel, created the character of Superman, which became a mainstay at DC Comics from its inception. Cassidy was ghost artist for Shuster until 1940, when he began teaching. He later worked as an artist for World Book Encyclopedia and art director for the Child Craft publications. He also worked at Grollier’s Books of Knowledge. He returned to Milwaukee in 1964 where he again worked as an art teacher. Cassidy also created his own comic, Fantasy, the Moon Boy, but was unable to find a publisher. • Los Angeles Times, July 5, 2005, B9.

CASTAGNO, NESTOR Chilean television writer Nestor Castagno died of lung cancer in Chicureo, Chile, on March 19, 2005. He was 63. Castagno was born in Santiago, Chile, in 1941. He began writing for Chilean television series in the late 1960s, scripting Los Dias Jovenes (Chile, the Young Days). He also wrote for the series La Gran Mentira (1982), La Torre 10 (1984), A la Sombra del Angel (1989), Rojo y Miel (1994), Santoladron (2000), and Mas Que Amigos (2002).

Al Casey Nestor Castagno

CASSIDY, PAUL H. Comic artist Paul H. Cassidy, who was one of the first artists to draw Superman for comic books, died at a seniors’ living facility in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on May 15, 2005. He was 94. Cassidy was born in Cherry Valley, Illinois, on June 11, 1910. He attended the University of Wisconsin in Madison, where he earned a degree in fine arts. He began working

CATARCIO, MAURICE Maurice Catarcio, who wrestled professionally as The Matador in the World Wrestling Federation in the late 1950s, died of prostate cancer at his home in Del Haven, New Jersey, on May 12, 2005. He was 76. Catarcio was born on March 21, 1929. He was a bodybuilder and weightlifter

Paul H. Cassidy

Maurice Catarcio

Obituaries • 2005 while serving in the Navy in the late 1940s and early 1950s in California, where he became a friend of fitness guru Jack LaLanne. After leaving the navy he worked in New York as the wrestler The Matador, complete with flowing cape. Catarcio continued to display feats of strength in the 1990s, dragging the 80-foot boat, Delta Lady, across Sunset Lake and hauling a 27,000 pound bus down a New York City street on The Late Show with David Letterman. Catarcio was also a prominent figure in the local Republican party in southern New Jersey, severing as a state committeeman and local party chairman.

CAVALCANTI, URSULA Italian adult actress Ursula Cavalcanti died of lung cancer in Italy on September 22, 2005. Cavalcanti appeared in such adult productions as Messalina: The Virgin Empress (1996), Lunch Party (1996), Mamma (1997), Year of Bullets (1999), La Polizia Ringrazia (2001), and Dangerously Alone (2004).

66 CHALKER, JACK L. Science fiction writer Jack L. Chalker died of congestive heart failure in a Baltimore, Maryland, hospital on February 11, 2005. He was 60. Chalker was born in Baltimore on December 17, 1944. He worked as a teacher and lecturer before becoming a full-time writer in the late 1970s. Chalker was best known for his Well World series of novels, which commenced with Midnight at the Well of Souls in 1977, and continued through Ghost of the Well of Souls in 2000. He also wrote several other science fiction series including The Four Lords of the Diamond, The Rings of the Master, G.O.D., Inc., Change Winds, The Quintara Marathon, The Soul Rider, The Dancing Gods, The Watchers of the Well, The Three Kings, and The Wonderland Gambit. • Los Angeles Times, Feb. 17, 2005, B10.

Jack L. Chalker Ursula Cavalcanti

CAYROL, JEAN French author and screenwriter Jean Cayrol died in Bordeaux, France, on February 10, 2005. He was 93. Cayrol was born in Bordeaux on June 6, 1911. He was best known for his work with director Alain Resnais, scripting his 1956’s documentary Night and Fog and the 1963 feature Muriel. Cayrol also wrote 25 novels and wrote and directed the films Madame se Meurt (1961), Le Coup de Grace (1965), and La Deesse (1966). • Times (of London), Jan. 28, 2005, 49.

CHEVIE, EDMOND Film producer and agent Edmond J. E’Chavarrie, who produced films under the name Edmond Chevie, died in Las Vegas, Nevada, on August 4, 2005. He was 83. E’Chavarrie was born in Tuscon, Arizona, on April 12, 1922. He represented such stars as Bette Davis and Sterling Hayden while an agent. He was producer on several films in the late 1950s including Rock, Pretty Baby (1956) and Eighteen and Anxious (1957). He also produced several independent films and was the founder of the telecommunications firm Space Time Systems in 1975.

Jean Cayrol

CHISHOLM, SHIRLEY Shirley Chisholm, the first Black woman elected to the United States House of Representatives and an unsuccessful candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination in 1972, died of complications from strokes in Ormond Beach, Florida, on January 1, 2005. She was 80. Chisholm was born in Brooklyn, New York, on November 30, 1924. She was elected to Congress from New York in 1969. She received 152 delegates and was winner of the New Jersey primary in the 1972 campaign. George McGovern ultimately became the party’s nominee that year. She remained in Congress for another decade before retiring in 1983. She was featured in a German made documentary about her presidential campaign, Shirley Chisholm for President, in 1972. Her landmark effort was also the subject of Shola Lynch’s 2004 documentary film Chisholm ’72: Unbought

67

2005 • Obituaries

Shirley Chisholm

Professeur Choron

& Unbossed. • Los Angeles Times, Jan. 4, 2005, B10; New York Times, Jan. 4, 2005, B9.

1929. He created several satirical newspapers in the 1950s was best known for his creation of the Mad magazine inspired Hara Kiri in 1960. The controversial publication remained on the newstands for twenty-five years. Bernier was also seen in several films in France including The Year 01 (1973), The King of Jerks (1982), and Paulette (1986), and performed in the television comedy series Les Raisins Verts (1963) and Merci Bernard (1982). • Times (of London), Mar. 7, 2005, 52.

CHO, SHINTA Japanese children’s author and illustrator Shinta Cho died of cancer in a Tokyo, Japan, hospital on June 25, 2005. He was 77. Cho was born Shuji Suzuki in Tokyo in 1928. He began illustrating cartoon strips in the late 1940s. He created the Talkative Fried Egg cartoon for a comic monthly in 1959. He also wrote illustrated children’s books, notably 1994’s The Gas We Pass: The Story of Farts. CHOICE, LIVIA German adult actress and fetish model Livia Chase was killed in an automobile accident in Germany on June 9, 2005. She was 26. She appeared in numerous bondage films including Black and Bad (2003) and Betty Bi: Six Days to Hell (2004).

CHORVINSKY, MARK Mark Chorvinsky, a filmmaker and debunker of cryptozoological hoaxes, died of cancer in Rockville, Maryland, on July 16, 2005. He was 51. Chorvinsky was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on March 4, 1954. He trained as a magician as a child and became interested in unusual phenomena. He was involved with the International Fortean Organization in the early 1980s before leaving the group to found Strange magazine in 1987. Chorvinsky was active in debunking sightings of Bigfoot, the Loch Ness Monster, and Owlman, among others. He was also producer of the short film Strange Tangents in the 1980s, and produced several video documentaries on his investigations, including Strange World, in the 1990s.

Livia Choice

CHON UN Veteran South Korean actor Chon Un died of colon cancer in Ilsan, South Korea, on March 26, 2005. He was 67. A leading voice actor, Chon Un also featured in numerous television dramas from the 1960s, usually playing kindly father figures. He was seen in Taewongun and Haeddugo Talddugo. CHORON, PROFESSEUR

George Bernier, who was known professionally as Professeur Choron, died in Paris on January 10, 2005. He was 75. Bernier was born in Laneuville-aux-Bois, France, in September of

Mark Chorvinsky

CHRISTENSEN, CAROL Actress and model Carol Christensen died on June 4, 2005. She was 68. Christensen was born in Detroit, Michigan, in 1937. She

Obituaries • 2005

68

began modeling in the late 1950s. She appeared in a handful of films in the early 1960s including Freckles (1960), Swingin’ Along (1961), The Big Show (1961), and The Three Stooges in Orbit (1962). She also appeared on television in an episode of Ensign O’Toole. Christensen was married to actor Dwayne Hickman from 1963 to 1972.

CITTI, SERGIO Italian film director and writer Sergio Citti died of a heart attack in a hospital near Rome on October 11, 2005. He was 72. Citti was born in Rome on May 30, 1933. He began working in films in the early 1960s, assisting director Pier Paolo Pasolini in writing the dialogue on his early films including Accattone (1961) and Mamma Roma (1962). Citti also scripted Bernardo Bertolucci’s 1962 film The Grim Reaper. He served as an assistant director on such films as The Hawks and the Sparrows (1966), The Witches (1967), Pigpen (1969), Medea (1969), The Decameron (1971), and The Canterbury Tales (1972). He also wrote Pasolini’s Salo, or The 120 Days of Sodom (1976). Citti made his own directoral debut with 1970’s Ostia. He also wrote and directed the films Bawdy Tales (1973), Beach House (1977), Happy Hobos (1978), Il Minestrone (1981), Death to You (1989), We Free Kings (1996), Viper (2001), and Fratella e Sorello (2002). • Times (of London), Oct. 21, 2005, 81; Variety, Oct. 24, 2005, 40.

Sergio Citti

CLAIRE, IMOGEN British character actress Imogen Claire died in London on June 24, 2005. She was 62. Claire was born in London in 1943. She trained at the Royal Ballet School, and danced principal roles with the London Dance Theatre. She also appeared in numerous films from the early 1970s including many from director Ken Russell. Claire’s screen credits include The Music Lovers (1970), Henry VIII and His Six Wives (1972), Savage Messiah (1972), The Who’s Tommy (1975), the cult musical The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975) as one of the Transylvanians, Lisztomania (1975), Hussy (1980), Flash Gordon (1980), Shock Treatment (1981), Caravaggio (1986), Salome’s Last Dance (1988), Hawks (1988), The Lair of the White Worm (1988), Wilt (1989), I Hired a Contract Killer (1990), Billy Elliot (2000), and The Man Who Cried (2000). She also appeared in television productions of Clouds of Glory: The Rime of the Ancient

Imogen Claire

Mariner (1978), Oedipus the King (1984), Prisoner of Honor (1991), and The Sin Eater (1997), and appeared in episodes of Dial M for Murder, Star Maidens, The Bill, Lovejoy, and Kavanagh QC.

CLARIN, HANS German actor Hans Clarin died of heart failure in Aschau im Chiemgau, Germany, on August 28, 2005. He was 75. Clarin was born in Wilhelmshaven, Germany, on September 14, 1929. He began his career on stage in Munich in 1950. Clarin appeared in numerous films in Germany from the early 1950s including Dwarf Nose (1952), Die Goldene Gans (1953), Music by Night (1953), Fireworks (1954), The Spessart Inn (1958), Arms and the Man (1958), Beautiful Adventure (1959), The Haunted Castle (1960), Crook and the Cross (1960), Brutality in Stone (1961), The Indian Scarf (1963), Chamber 13 (1964), Mark of the Tortoise (1964), 24 Hours to Kill (1965), 100 Horsemen (1965), Angel Baby (1968), Pippi Longstocking (1969) as Dunder-Karlsson, Pepe: His Teacher’s Fright (1969), Pippi Goes on Board (1973), Hannah (1996), An Almost Perfect Wedding (1999), and Pinky and the Million Dollar Pug (2001). He also appeared in numerous German television productions including Madame Pompadour (1976), Der Millionenbauer (1979), Mandara (1983), Der Kleine Riese (1985), La Paria (1985), Oliver Maass (1985), Tante Tilly (1986), Das Geheimnis von Lismore Castle (1986), Tatort— Die Macht des Schicksals (1987), Tatort— Die Bruder (1988), Der Bettler vom

Hans Clarin

69 Kurfurstendamm (1989), Die Schnelle Gerdi (1989), Heidi und Erni (1990), Lippels Traum (1991), Peter und Paul (1992), Heute Weder Hamlet (1994), Titus, der Satansbratten (1997), Waiting Means Death (1999), Der Bestseller (2001), and Der Bergpfarrer (2004).

2005 • Obituaries Minister Neville Chamberlain. Clarke also appeared on television in the horror anthology series Tales from the Darkside and Monsters.

CLARKE, RICHARD British character actor Richard Clarke died of colon cancer on January 7, 2005. He was 71. Clarke was born in England on January 31, 1933. He began his career on stage in England, and appeared in several British films from the late 1950s including Dangerous Exile (1957), A Night to Remember (1958), To Have and to Hold (1963), and Five to One (1964). Clarke made his Broadway debut in 1964’s Poor Richard. He appeared in numerous Broadway productions over the next forty years in such plays as Saint Joan, Tiger at the Gates, Cyrano de Bergerac, Hay Fever, The Devil’s Disciple, Arcadia, Six Degrees of Separation, The Judas Kiss, and Ring Round the Moon. He also created the role of Carr Gomm in the Broadway production of The Elephant Man, and reprised the role in a 1982 television adaptation of the play. Clarke also appeared in the films Midnight Cowboy (1969), John and Mary (1969), The Protector (1985), Identity Crisis (1989), The Last Resort (1997), and Meet Joe Black (1998). He also appeared in the tele-film Kojak: None So Blind (1990) and the 1990 mini-series The Kennedys of Massachusetts as British Prime

CLARKE, ROBERT Leading actor Robert Clarke, who was best known for his starring in such 1950s cult science fiction and horror films as The Hideous Sun Demon and The Man from Planet X, died of complications from diabetes at his home in Valley Village, California, on June 11, 2005. He was 85. Clarke was born in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, on June 1, 1920. He began his career in Hollywood at RKO in the early 1940s, appearing in small roles in numerous films including The Falcon in Hollywood (1944), A Game of Death (1945), The Enchanted Cottage (1945), Those Endearing Young Charms (1945), Zombies on Broadway (1945), Val Lewton’s adaptation of Robert Lewis Stevenson’s The Body Snatcher (1945) with Boris Karloff and Bela Lugosi, Back to Bataan (1945), Wanderer of the Wasteland (1945), Radio Stars on Parade (1945), First Yank into Tokyo (1945), Sing Your Way Home (1945), Man Alive (1945), Ding Dong Williams (1946), Bedlam (1946) as Dan the Dog, Sunset Pass (1946), The Bamboo Blonde (1946), Step by Step (1946), Genius at Work (1946), Lady Luck (1946), Criminal Court (1946), San Quentin (1946), Code of the West (1947), The Farmer’s Daughter (1947), In Room 303 (1947), Desperate (1947), Under the Tonto Rim (1947), Thunder Mountain (1947), Dick Tracy Meets Gruesome (1947), If You Knew Susie (1948), Fighting Father Dunne (1948), Return of the Bad Men (1948), Beyond Glory (1948), Ladies of the Chorus (1948), The Judge Steps Out (1949), Riders of the Range (1950), Champagne for Caesar (1950), A Modern Marriage (1950), Outrage (1950), The Valparaiso Story (1951), Drums in the Deep South (1951), Hard, Fast and Beautiful (1951), Edgar Ulmer’s science fiction classic The Man from Planet X (1951), Tales of Robin Hood (1951) as Robin Hood, Casa Manana (1951), Pistol Harvest (1951), Street Bandits (1951), The Fabulous Senorita (1952), Captive Women (1952), Body Beautiful (1953), Sword of Venus (1953), Captain John Smith and Pocahontas (1953), Her Twelve Men (1954), The Black Pirates (1954), King of the Carnival (1955), The Benny Goodman Story (1955), The Incredible Petrified World (1957), The Astounding She-Monster (1957), Outlaw Queen (1957), Band of Angels (1957), The Helen Mor-

Richard Clarke

Robert Clarke

CLARKE, JON Jon Clarke, an original member of the Loggins and Messina band in the 1970s, died of kidney cancer at his home in Kauai, Hawaii, on June 10, 2005. He was 54. Clarke was born on August 19, 1950. He began performing on saxophone and oboe while in his teens. He played with the rock band California Earthquake and Don Ellis’ jazz orchestra. He was a founding member of the five-piece band formed by Kenny Loggins and Jim Messina in 1970, and played and recorded with the group throughout the decade. He was noted for his baritone sax solo on the 1972 hit record “Your Momma Don’t Dance.” After the group split up, Clarke worked as a studio musician and often performed with the Academy Award orchestra. He also performed on numerous film and television soundtracks including Fried Green Tomatoes, Scent of a Woman, The Green Mile, The Road to Perdition, and My Big Fat Greek Wedding. • Variety, June 20, 2005, 44.

Obituaries • 2005 gan (1957), My Man Godfrey (1957), The Deep Six (1958), Girl with an Itch (1958), From the Earth to the Moon (1958) as the Narrator, Date with Death (1959), and Timbuktu (1959). Clarke produced, directed, and scripted the 1959 cult horror film The Hideous Sun Demon, also starring as ill-fated Dr. Gilbert McKenna, who turns into a bloodthirsty reptilian creature when exposed to the rays of the sun. He also produced and starred in the 1960 science fiction film Beyond the Time Barrier. He continued to appear in such films as Cash McCall (1960), The Last Time I Saw Archie (1961), Terror of the Bloodhunters (1962), Secret File: Hollywood (1962), The Lively Set (1964), Zebra in the Kitchen (1965), The Restless Ones (1965), the 1970 tele-film The Brotherhood of the Bell, Where’s Willie? (1978), the 1980 television mini-series Scruples, Frankenstein Island (1981), First Strike (1985), Midnight Movie Massacre (1988), Alienator (1989), and Haunting Fear (1991). Clarke also began appearing on television in the late 1940s, starring as Fred in a 1949 version of The Christmas Carol, and as D’Artagnan in 1950’s The Three Musketeers. He also appeared in episodes of The Ford Theatre Hour, The Lone Ranger, Dragnet, Cavalcade of America, The Cisco Kid, Science Fiction Theater, The Ford Television Theatre, The Gale Storm Show, Perry Mason, Sea Hunt, Adventures of Wild Bill Hickok, Harbor Command, Sky King, Wagon Train, The Man and the Challenge, Men into Space, Bronco, M Squad, Hawaiian Eye, Laramie, Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse, 77 Sunset Strip, Checkmate, Cheyenne, Ripcord, Kraft Suspense Theatre, Dragnet 1967, Adam-12, Marcus Welby, M.D., O’Hara, U.S. Treasury, Kolchak: The Night Stalker, Baa Baa Black Sheep, Fantasy Island, Dynasty, Simon & Simon, Knight Rider, Matt Houston, Murder, She Wrote, Finder of Lost Loves, Falcon Crest, and Hotel. Clarke married Alyce King, one of the singing King Sisters, in 1956 and toured and performed with the group. He was a regular on the television variety series The King Family Show on ABC from 1965 to 1969. He and Alyce were married until her death in August of 1996. Clarke is survived of a son, voice actor Cam Clarke. • Los Angeles Times, June 16, 2005, B10; Times (of London), Aug. 2, 2005, 43.

CLEEVE, DAVID British actor David Cleeve died of cancer in London on September 16, 2005. He was 63. He was born David Woolliscroft in Maccles-

70 field, Cheshire, England, on March 6, 1942. He began acting as a child, appearing in several segments of the radio program Out of School. He performed in various theatrical productions in the 1960s, and had small roles in such episodes of such television series as Z Cars, Upstairs, Downstairs, and Then Churchill Said to Me in the 1970s. Cleeve spent most of his career as a dress extra and background performer in numerous films and television productions.

CLEMENTS, VASSAR Legendary fiddle player Vassar Clements died of lung cancer at his home in Nashville, Tennessee, on August 16, 2005. He was 77. Clements was born in Kinards, South Carolina, on April 25, 1928, and raised in Kissimmee, Florida. He began playing the fiddle at an early age and performed in bluegrass, country, jazz, and rock groups during his career. He was heard on over 2000 albums, backing up such musicians as Paul McCartney, Johnny Cash, the Byrds, the Grateful Dead, Bonnie Raitt, and the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band. Clements also recorded over two dozen solo albums during his career. He also appeared onscreen in Robert Altman’s 1975 film Nashville. He continued to record and perform until early in 2005, when he was diagnosed with cancer. • Los Angeles Times, Aug. 17, 2005, B10; New York Times, Aug. 17, 2005, C16; Time, Aug. 29, 2005, 21; Times (of London), Aug. 25, 2005, 60; Variety, Aug. 22, 2005, 42.

Vassar Clements

CLERK, CLIVE Actor Clive Clerk died in Los Angeles on June 22, 2005. He was 59. Clerk appeared in several films in the 1960s including Send Me No Flowers (1964), Dear Brigitte (1965), and Billie (1965). He was also seen as David Martin in the daytime soap opera Days of Our Lives from 1966 to 1967, and was the recurring character Jack in the teen drama series The New People in 1969. He was also the lead male dancer in Happy Days in 1970, and appeared in episodes of Combat!, The Virginian, I Spy, The Rat Patrol, The High Chaparral, The Mod Squad, The Name of the Game, and Judd for the Defense. He performed in the original cast of the hit Broadway musical A Chorus Line in the 1970s. After leaving the production he changed his name to Clive Wilson to work as a professional artist. David Cleeve

71

2005 • Obituaries

Clive Clerk

Johnnie Cochran, Jr.

COATES, CAROLYN Actress Carolyn Coates died of cancer in a Branford, Connecticut, hospice on March 28, 2005. She was 77. Coates was born in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, on April 29, 1930. A leading stage actress, she performed in productions of such plays as Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf, The Cherry Orchard, The Trojan Women and The Balcony. She was also featured in several films including The Hustler (1961), The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds (1972), The Postman Always Rings Twice (1981), Mommie Dearest (1981), and The Buddy System (1984). Coates also appeared in the tele-films Starflight: The Plane That Couldn’t Land (1983) and Blood Feud (1983), and guest starred in episodes of Knots Landing, Lou Grant, Remington Steele, and St. Elsewhere. She was married to actor James Noble, who appeared as the Governor in the television sit-com Benson, from 1956 until her death. • Variety, Apr. 11, 2005, 59.

sented many of those arrested during the race riots there in 1965. He became a prominent attorney in the Los Angeles area. His defense of Simpson, the former football star and actor who was charged with murdering his exwife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and Ronald Goldman, brought Cochran to national attention. The proceedings, called “The Trial of the Century” by much of the media, resulted in Cochran winning an acquittal for Simpson. He subsequently handled numerous civil liberties cases around the country as head of the Cochran, Cherry, Givens & Smith legal firm. He appeared in cameo roles in the 1998 tele-film CHiPs ’99, and several films including Bamboozled (2000) and Showtime (2002). He also guest starred in episodes of such series as Family Matters, Arli$$, The Hughleys, JAG, and First Monday. Cochran’s autobiography, A Lawyer’s Life, was published in 2002. • Los Angeles Times, Mar. 30, 2005, A1; New York Times, Mar. 30, 2005, A15; People, Apr. 11, 2005, 81; Time, Apr. 11, 2005, 16; Times (of London), Mar. 31, 2005, 59; Variety, Apr. 4, 2005, 80.

COELHO, EDUARDO TEIXEIRA Portuguese comic artist Eduardo Teixeira Coelho died in Florence, Italy on May 31, 2005. He was 86. Coelho was born on Terchera Island, in the Azores, on January 4, 1919. He began illustrating comics in the early 1940s working for the magazine Mosquito. He moved to Brazil in the 1950s where he taught art in Son Paulo. He moved to France

Carolyn Coates

COCHRAN, JOHNNIE L., JR. Attorney Johnnie Cochran, Jr., who achieved fame as the lead defense attorney in the O.J. Simpson murder trial in 1995, died of a brain tumor at his home in Los Angeles on March 29, 2005. He was 67. Cochran was born in Shreveport, Louisiana on October 2, 1937. He attended the University of California at Los Angeles and earned a law degree from Loyola Law School in 1962. He returned to Los Angeles to practice law, where he repre-

Eduardo Teixeira Coelho

Obituaries • 2005 in 1955 where he worked for the magazine Vaillant for over twenty years. His best known work was the adventure series Ragner the Viking.

COLEMAN, BRYAN British character actor Bryan Coleman died in Dorset, England, on July 4, 2005. He was 94. Coleman was born in London on January 29, 1911. He was featured in numerous films from the early 1940s including Lady in Distress (1940), Jassy (1947), Landfall (1949), The Lost Hours (1952), The Planter’s Wife (1952), The Sword and the Rose (1953), You Know What Sailors Are (1954), Suspended Alibi (1956), Loser Takes All (1956), Blood of the Vampire (1958), The Hand (1960), The Longest Day (1962), Mr. Brown Comes Down the Hill (1965), Give a Dog a Bone (1965), Happy Deathday (1968), Zeppelin (1971), Mona Lisa (1986), Johann Strauss: The King Without a Crown (1987), and Chaplin (1992). He was also seen in television productions of Country (1981), A Dedicated Man (1982), The Road to 1984 (1984), and The Black Candle (1991). He starred as Geoffrey Windsor in the British television series My Friend Charles in 1958, and was Alistair Goodman in The Scarf in 1959. Coleman was also seen as Captain Digby in The Naked Lady in 1959, and was Mr. Brownlow in The Further Adventures of Oliver Twist in 1980. His other television credits include episodes of Sword of Freedom, The Adventures of Robin Hood, The New Adventures of Charlie Chan, Danger Man, Sir Francis Drake, Softly Softly, Adam Adamant Lives!, Upstairs, Downstairs, The Duchess of Duke Street in the recurring role of Lord Henry Norton, The Agatha Christie Hour, Sorry!, and This Is David Harper. COLLINS, LARRY Larry Collins, who was best known as the co-author of the best-selling book Is Paris Burning?, died of a cerebral hemorrhage in Frejus, France, on June 20, 2005. He was 75. He was born John Lawrence Collins, Jr., in West Hartford, Connecticut, on September 14, 1929. He worked as reporter in Europe for the news agency United Press International from the early 1950s. He met Paris-Match reporter Dominique Lapierre in the 1950s and collaborated on a project about the later days of the German occupation of Paris during World War II. Their work culminated in the publication of Is Paris Burning? in 1964, chronicling Hitler’s attempts to raze the French capital before Allied troops

72 liberated the city in August of 1944. The best-selling book was adapted into a film by Rene Clement, with a script by Francis Ford Coppola and Gore Vidal, in 1966, and an all-star French and American cast. Collins and Lapierre left their day jobs to concentrate on further projects, authoring a chronicle of Israel’s early day of independence, O Jerusalem!, in 1972. They also wrote a popular biography about Spanish bullfighter El Cordobes, Or I’ll Dress You in Mourning (1968), and two books about independence of India, Freedom at Midnight (1975) and Mountbatten and the Partition of India (1982). The duo also collaborated on several fiction novels, including the nuclear thriller The Fifth Horseman (1980). Collins also several solo novels including the World War II thriller Fall from Grace (1985), the 1989 novel about Cold War mind control Maze, Black Eagles (1995) about drug traffic in the inner city, and Road to Armageddon (2003), which speculated on Iran’s intentions to become a nuclear power. Collins reunited with Lapierre for a final novel, Is New York Burning?, centering around a nuclear terrorist assault on New York, in 2004. • Los Angeles Times, June 21, 2005, B11; New York Times, June 21, 2005, A19; Time, July 4, 2005, 21; Variety, June 27, 2005, 80.

COLLINS, LYN Singer Lyn Collins, who performed with James Brown in the 1970s, died suddenly in a Pasadena, California, hospital on March 13, 2005. She was 56. Collins was born in Dime Box, Texas, in 1948. She began singing while in her teens and was discovered by James Brown in the late 1960s. She joined his traveling show in 1970 and was nicknamed the “Female Preacher” because of her powerful singing voice. She recorded her first solo album Think (About It) in 1972, and released Check Me Out if You Don’t Know Me by Now in 1975. She continued to perform until several years ago, when rheumatoid arthritis forced her to limit her touring.

Lyn Collins

Larry Collins

COLOME, ANTONITA Spanish actress Antonita Colome died in Madrid, Spain, on August 28, 2005. She was 93. Colome was born in Seville, Spain, on February 18, 1912. She was a leading actress and singer on the Spanish stage from the 1930s. She was also featured in numerous films including Mercedes (1932), The Man

73

Antonita Colome

Who Laughed at Love (1932), World Crisis (1934), Alala (1934), Rataplan (1935), Miss Trevelez (1936), and The Dancer and the Worker (1936). She left Spain during the Spanish Civil War, returning in 1940. She continued appearing in such films as Heroe a la Fuerza (1941), Idyll in Mallorca (1943), La Sevillane (1943), Mi Fantastica Esposa (1944), El Crimen de Pepe Conde (1946), and Revelacion (1948). Colome’s career wound down from the 1950s, though she continued to perform on occasion. She also appeared in the films Tercio de Quites (1951), La Viuda Andaluza (1976), Los Alegres Bribones (1982), and Pasodoble (1988).

COLONNELLO, ANTONINO Italian actor Antonio Colonnello died of a heart attack in Rome, Italy, on May 30, 2005. He was 67. He was a leading dubbing voice for U.S. film and television productions into Italian. He was the Italian voice of Larry Hagman’s J.R. Ewing in Dallas and of Henry Winkler’s Fonzie from Happy Days. He also dubbed John Travolta from Welcome Back Kotter, Judd Hirsch from Taxi, Claude Akins from Lobo, and Robert Wagner from It Takes a Thief and Switch. He was also a voice in numerous films, dubbing such stars as Maximilian Schell (in The Black Hole), Bruce Boxleitner (in Tron), Jeff Conaway (in Grease), Leslie Nielsen, Clint Eastwood and Steven Seagal.

2005 • Obituaries COLVIN, JACK Actor Jack Colvin, who starred as tabloid reporter Jack McGee in the television series The Incredible Hulk with Bill Bixby in the 1970s, died of complications from a stroke in a North Hollywood nursing home on December 1, 2005. He was 71. Colvin was born in Lyndon, Kansas, on October 13, 1934, and moved to Los Angeles with his family at an early age. He began performing on stage as a child and teamed with Yvonne Wilder in the comedy act Colvin and Wilder in the 1960s. The duo performed on stage and television variety shows. Colvin made his film debut in the late 1960s, appearing in such features as How Sweet It Is! (1968), Viva Max! (1969), Monte Walsh (1970), Jeremiah Johnson (1972), Hickey & Boggs (1972), The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean (1972), Scorpio (1973), The Stone Killer (1973), The Terminal Man (1974), The Crazy World of Julius Vrooder (1974), Rooster Cogburn (1975), Embryo (1976), and Child’s Play (1988). He was also seen in the tele-films Footsteps (1972), Hurricane (1974), Knuckle (1975), Amelia Earhart (1976), Benny and Barney: Las Vegas Undercover (1977), The Spell (1977), and Exo-Man (1977). Colvin starred as Jack McGee in the 1977 telefilm The Incredible Hulk, and remained with the subsequent series for four seasons from 1978 to 1982. He also directed several episodes of the series. He reprised his role as McGee in the 1988 tele-film sequel The Incredible Hulk Returns. Colvin’s other television credits include episodes of The Rat Patrol, Tarzan, Kojak, Petrocelli, The Six Million Dollar Man, The Invisible Man, Baretta, Harry O, The Rookies, Switch, The Rockford Files, The Bionic Woman, Westside Medical, Quincy, Switch, Hunter, Cagney and Lacey, MacGyver, Scarecrow and Mrs. King, and Murder, She Wrote. He also was active in local theater as an actor and director. • Los Angeles Times, Dec. 5, 2005, B9; Variety, Dec. 12, 2005, 67.

Jack Colvin

Antonino Colonnello

COMANOR, PAULINE Cartoonist Pauline Comanor died of heart failure in Little Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey, on May 22, 2005. She was 91. Comanor was born in West Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1913. She began drawing cartoons while attending high school and she joined Max Fleischer’s animation studio in New York in 1934. She worked as an artist on many of Fleischer’s Betty Boop cartoons during the decade and also performed a live act with Betty Boop’s voice, Lit-

Obituaries • 2005

74 Week (1965), Don Camillo in Moscow (1965), Misunderstood (1966), Italian Secret Service (1968), Giacomo Casanova: Childhood and Adolescence (1969), The Adventures of Pinocchio (1972), The Scientific Cardplayer (1972), How Long Can You Fall? (1974), Somewhere Beyond Love (1974), Goodnight, Ladies and Gentlemen (1976), Strange Occasion (1976), The Sunday Woman (1976), The Cat (1978), Traffic Jam (1979), Eugenio (1980), Catherine’s Wedding (1982), Looking for Jesus (1983), The Boy from Calabria (1987), The Cowboy and the Frenchman (1988), La Boheme (1988), Merry Christmas ... Happy New Year (1989), and Miracle of Marcellino (1991).

Pauline Comanor

tle Ann Little. She left the industry in 1940 after her marriage, which ended ten years later. In 1950 returned to Philadelphia where she hosted a local Saturday morning television program. She also hosted the local Cartoon Party, and later was host of a cartoon program in Orlando, Florida. In the late 1960s Comanor began doing art performances at shopping malls throughout the country. She would draw cartoons that incorporated audience members. She also created the cartoon character Chunky Monkey in the 1970s. She and ice cream makers Ben & Jerry’s later collaborated on a plush toy Chunky Monkey. Comanor continued to perform at malls and shopping centers until her retirement in 2001.

COMENCINI, LUIGI Italian film director Luigi Comencini died in Rome on April 21, 2005. He was 88. Comencini was born in Salo, Lombardy, Italy, on June 8, 1916. He worked in films from the 1930s, and directed and scripted numerous films during his career. Comencini’s numerous film credits include Children in Cities (1946), The Emperor of Capri (1949), Behind Closed Shutters (1950), Heidi (1952), Girls Marked Danger (1953), Bread, Love and Jealousy (1954), Frisky (1954), The Belle of Rome (1955), The Window to Luna Park (1956), Husbands in the City (1957), Surprise of Love (1959), And That On Monday Morning (1959), Everybody Go Home (1960), Jail Break (1961), The Police Commissioner (1962), Bebo’s Girl (1963), Three Nights of Love (1964), My Wife (1964), The Dolls (1965), Six Days a

CONAN, ZOILA Actress Zoila Conan died in Los Angeles on May 12, 2005. She was 101. Conan was born on July 29, 1903. She appeared in several films in the 1930s including Sensation Hunters (1933), Miss Fane’s Baby Is Stolen (1934), and The First Round-Up (1934). She also worked as a stage manager and story analyst. She was the widow of Vernon E. Rickard. CONCANNON, JACK Football player Jack Concannon died of a heart attack in a Newton, Massachusetts, hospital on November 28, 2005. He was 62. Concannon was born on February 25, 1943. He played for Boston College before turning pro in the mid–1960s. He was quarterback for the Philadelphia Eagles from 1964 to 1966, and for the Chicago Bears from 1967 to 1971. He also played with the Green Bay Packers in 1974 and the Detroit Lions in 1975. Concannon was also seen as a football player in the 1970 film version of M*A*S*H, and appeared as himself in the 1971 tele-film Brian’s Song.

Jack Concannon

Luigi Comencini

CONEY, MICHAEL G. Science fiction writer Michael G. Coney died of lung cancer in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, on November 4, 2005. He was 73. Coney was born in Birmingham, England, in 1932. He moved to Canada in the early 1970s, where he worked for the British Columbia Forest Service. He also began writing science fiction, authoring such novels as Mirror Image (1972), Friends Come in Boxes (1973), The Hero of Downways (1973), Syzyg y (1973), Winter’s Children (1974), Charisma (1975), The Jaws That Bite, the Claws That Catch (1975), Hello Summer, Goodbye (1975), Brontomek! (1975), The Ultimate Jungle (1981), Neptune’s Cauldron (1981), Cat Karina (1982), The Celestial Steam

75

Michael G. Coney

Locomotive (1983), The Gods of the Greatway (1984), Fang, the Gnome (1988), King of the Sceptre’d Isle (1989), A Tomcat Called Sabrina (1992), and No Place for a Sealion (1992). Coney was nominated for the Nebula Award for his novelette Tea and Hamsters in 1995.

CONROY, FRANK Author Frank Conroy died of colon cancer at his home in Iowa City, Iowa, on April 6, 2005. He was 69. Conroy was born in New York City on January 15, 1936. He began writing short fiction while in college and his first story was published in 1957. Conroy’s best known book was his 1967 coming-of-age work Stop-Time. He also wrote the short-story collection Midair, the novel Body and Soul, and the essay collection Dogs Bark, but the Caravan Rolls On. His last book was 2004’s Time and Tide: A Walk Through Nantucket. Conroy was also a teacher and headed the University of Iowa’s Writer’s Workshop of for nearly twenty years. • Los Angeles Times, Apr. 8, 2005, B11; New York Times, Apr. 7, 2005, B10; People, Apr. 25, 2005, 91; Time, Apr. 18, 2005, 26.

2005 • Obituaries as a child. He came to Hollywood in the 1940s and made his film debut in 1947’s The Secret Life of Walter Mitty with Danny Kaye and Boris Karloff. Corden also appeared in the films She Shoulda Said No (aka Marijuana, the Devil’s Weed) (1949), Bride of Vengeance (1949), Abbott and Costello in the Foreign Legion (1950), Please Believe Me (1950), The Asphalt Jungle (1950), The Toast of New Orleans (1950), Kim (1950), Mrs. O’Malley and Mr. Malone (1951), The Sword of Monte Cristo (1951), Behave Yourself (1951), Viva Zapata! (1952), Scaramouche (1952), The Wild North (1952), Carbine Williams (1952), Son of Ali Baba (1952), The Black Castle (1952), Hiawatha (1952), I Confess (1953), The System (1953), Abbott and Costello Meet Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1953), Fort Algiers (1953), King Richard and the Crusaders (1954), The Eg yptian (1954), Jupiter’s Darling (1955), The Ten Commandments (1956), Cry Tough (1959), The Adventure of Huckleberry Finn (1960), Blueprint for Robbery (1961), When the Clock Strikes (1961), Tammy Tell Me True (1961), Island of Love (1963), Strange Bedfellows (1965), McHale’s Navy Joins the Air Force (1965), Frankie and Johnny (1966), Don’t Worry, We’ll Think of a Title (1966), Hook, Line & Sinker (1969), and Modern Problems (1981). Corden began voicing Fred Flintstone after the death of Fred’s original voice, Alan Reed, in 1977. He played Flintstone in cartoons, animated films, and cereal commercials through the 1990s. He also worked as a voice actor on such cartoon programs The Jetsons, The Secret Squirrel Show, The Atom Ant Show, The Banana Splits Adventure Hour, Josie and the Pussycats, Jonny Quest, The Harlem Globetrotters, The Barkleys, The New Scooby-Doo Movies, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kids, These Are the Days, Return to the Planet of the Apes, The New Tom & Jerry Show, The Scooby-Doo/Dynomutt Hour, The C.B. Bears, The Challenge of the SuperFriends, Thundarr the Barbarian, Heathcliff, Fangface and Fangpuss, The Smurfs, The Kwicky Koala Show, Goldie Gold and Action Jack, Here Comes Garfield, Mister T, and Challenge of the GoBots. Corden also made numerous appearances in liveaction television series from the 1950s, guest-starring in episodes of Space Patrol, Terry and the Pirates, Dangerous Assignment, Superman, Soldiers of Fortune, Dragnet, Jane Wyman Presents the Fireside Theatre, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, The Millionaire, Sally, Perry Mason, Richard Diamond, Private Detective, The Restless Gun, Gunsmoke,

Frank Conroy

CORDEN, HENRY Veteran character actor Henry Corden, who provided the voice for animated caveman Fred Flintstone for the past two decades, died of emphysema in a Los Angeles hospital on May 19, 2005. He was 85. Corden was born in Montreal, Canada, on January 6, 1920, and moved to New York City

Henry Cordon

Obituaries • 2005 Tales of Wells Fargo, Peter Gunn, Steve Canyon, The Lawless Years, 21 Beacon Street, Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse, The Gale Storm Show, Wagon Train, Have Gun —Will Travel, Alcoa Theatre, Tightrope, The Detectives Starring Robert Taylor, Tate, The Islanders, 77 Sunset Street, Thriller, Bonanza, Guestward Ho!, The Lawless Years, Ben Casey, Mister Ed, Maverick, Father of the Bride, The Twilight Zone, The Wide Country, Bob Hope Presents Chrysler Theatre, McHale’s Navy, Burke’s Law, My Favorite Martian, The Great Adventure, Vacation Playhouse, I Dream of Jeannie, Hogan’s Heroes, Hank, Gilligan’s Island, The Monkees, Daniel Boone, Bewitched, Hey, Landlord, The F.B.I., The Beverly Hillbillies, The Second Hundred Years, Green Acres, It Takes a Thief, Land of the Giants, The Doris Day Show, Get Smart, Mary Tyler Moore, The Bob Newhart Show, The Brady Bunch, Lotsa Luck, Police Story, The Streets of San Francisco, Harry O, and Welcome Back, Kotter. • Los Angeles Times, May 21, 2005, B17; New York Times, May 21, 2005, B7; Variety, May 30, 2005, 44.

CORDIC, VOJKA Serbian actress Vojka Cavajda Cordic died in Belgrade, Serbia, on May 27, 2005. She was 43. Cordic was born in Belgrade on April 26, 1962. She appeared in films and television from the early 1980s. Cordic was featured in the films Moljac (1984), The Misfit Brigade (1987), Cudna noc (1990), Velika Frka (1992), and We Are Not Angels (1992). She also starre as Zaga in the 1988 television series Dome, Slatki Dome, and was Tetka Rosa in 2003’s Neki Novi Klinci.

76

William Corlett

and The Islamic Space (1979). He received his greatest acclaim for his series of novels about magician Stephen Tyler and a host of talking animals in The Magician’s House series. The quartet of novels began with The Steps Up the Chimney in 1990 and continued with The Door in the Tree (1991), Tunnel Behind the Waterful (1991), and The Bridge in the Clouds (1992). The first two books were adapted for the BBC in 1999, and were followed by an adaptation of the third as The Magician’s House II in 2000. Corlett also wrote the television productions Barriers (1980), The Christmas Tree (1986), Dreams Lost, Dreams Found (1987), The Watch House (1988), The Torch (1992), Moonacre (1994), and Winter Solstice (2003).

CORREA E CASTRO, CLAUDIO Brazilian actor Claudio Correa e Castro died of complications from diabetes and hypertension in Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on August 16, 2005. He was 77. Correa e Castro was born in Rio de Janeiro on February 27, 1928. He appeared in numerous films and television productions in Brazil from the late 1950s. Correa e Castro’s film credits include Um Caso de Policia (1959), Amante Muito Louca (1973), The Claudia Case (1979), Prova de Fogo (1980), La Fuerza del Deseo (1984), Tiradentes (1999), Duas Vezes com Helena (2000), Xuxa Popstar (2000), and Irmaos de Fe (2004). He was best known for his many television performances, appearing in such productions as Os Estranhos (1969), Dez Vidas (1969), Vojka Cordic

CORLETT, WILLIAM British writer William Corlett died in Sarlat, France, on August 16, 2005. He was 66. Corlett was born in Darlington, Curham, England, on October 8, 1938. He began his career writing for the stage with the 1963 play Another Round. This was followed by The Gentle Avalanche (1964) and Return Ticket (1966). He was best known for his novels for children and young adults, beginning with The Gate of Eden in 1974. It was adapted as a television mini-series in 1979. The novel was part of a trilogy that continued with The Land Beyond (1974) and Return to the Gate (1975). Corlett also wrote for the television series Emmerdale Farm, The Paper Lads, The Machine Gunners, and The Agatha Christie Hour. Corlett also wrote several non-fictions including The Hindu Sound (1978), The Christ Story (1978),

Claudio Correa e Castro

77

2005 • Obituaries

As Bruxas (1970), Signo da Esperanca (1972), Signo da Esperanca (1972), Os Inocentes (1974), A Viagem (1975), Zeque-Mate (1976), O Profeta (1977), Dancin’ Days (1978), Cabocla (1979), Chega Mais (1980), Jogo da Vida (1981), Paraiso (1982), Eu Prometo (1983), A Gata Comeu (1985), Cambalacho (1986), Sinha Moca (1986), Bambole (1987), Tieta (1989), Boca do Lixo (1990), La Mamma (1990), Agosto (1993), Quatro Por Quatro (1994), Incidente em Antares (1994), New Wave (1995), Anjo au (1997), Forca de Um Desejo (1999), Porto dos Milagres (2001), O Quinto dos Infernos (2002), A Casa das Sete Mulheres (2004), Kubanacan (2003), and Senhora do Destino (2004).

CORREA-MCMULLEN, TARA Teen actress Tara Correa-McMullen was shot to death outside an apartment complex in Inglewood, California, in what police believed to be a gang-related shooting, on October 21, 2005. She was 16. Correa-McMullen was born in Westminster, Vermont, on May 24, 1989. She starred in the recurring role of former gang member Graciela Reyes in the television series Judging Amy from 2004 to 2005, and was seen in an episode of Zoey 101. She also appeared as Big Mac in the 2005 comedy film Rebound with Martin Lawrence. • Los Angeles Times, Oct. 29, 2005, B1; People, Nov. 14, 2005, 150; Variety, Nov. 14, 2005, 61.

Alfredo Corvino

2005. He was 64. Cosmatos was born in Tuscany, Italy, on January 4, 1941. He began working in films in the 1960s as an assistant director for such productions as Exodus (1960), Zorba the Greek (1964), All the Way to Paris (1965), and The Day the Fish Came Out (1967). He produced, directed and wrote the 1970 feature The Beloved. He directed the 1973 film Massacre in Rome and wrote and directed the 1976 thriller The Cassandra Crossing. He also directed the films Escape to Athena (1979) and Of Unknown Origin (1983). He also helmed Sylvester Stallone action films Rambo: First Blood Part II (1985) and Cobra (1986). Cosmatos’ next film with the 1989 underwater science fiction thriller Leviathan, which was followed by his 1993 retelling of the Wyatt Earp legend Tombstone. His final film with the 1997 thriller Shadow Conspiracy starring Charlie Sheen. • Los Angeles Times, Apr. 28, 2005, B12; Times (of London), Apr. 28, 69; Variety, May 2, 2005, 84.

Tara Correa-McMullen

CORVINO, ALFREDO Ballet dancer Alfredo Corvino died in a Manhattan hospital on August 2, 2005. He was 89. Corvino was born in Montevideo, Uruguay, on February 2, 1916. He attended the National Academy of Ballet in Montevideo, and soon became principal dancer at the Municipal Theater. He toured throughout South America with Kurt Jooss’s company. Corvino became a principal dancer with the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo and toured the United States. He also danced with the Metropolitan Opera Ballet in New York in the 1940s. Corvino joined the dance division of the Juilliard School in 1952, serving as the company’s balletmaster until retiring in 1994. • New York Times, Aug. 5, 2005, B7. COSMATOS, GEORGE PAN Film director George Pan Cosmatos died of lung cancer on April 19,

George Pan Cosmatos

COSTA-GREENSPON, MURIEL Opera singer Muriel Costa-Greenspon died in a Manhattan, New York, hospital on December 26, 2005. She was 68. Costa-Greenspon was born in Detroit, Michigan, in 1937. She was a leading mezzo-soprano with the New York City Opera from the early 1960s, playing character roles in such productions as Street Scene, Ballad of Baby Doe, and Candide. She also performed in numerous operas by Gian Carlo Menotti including Old Maid and the

Obituaries • 2005

Muriel Costa-Greenspon

Thief, Medium, and The Saint of Bleecker Street. CostaGreenspon also appeared on television in several operatic productions including The Daughter of the Regiment (1974), Street Scene (1979), Candide (1986), and The New Moon (1989). • New York Times, Jan. 8, 2006, 25.

COWSILL, BARRY Barry Cowsill, a member of the 1960s singing family The Cowsills, was found dead on December 28, 2005, on a New Orleans wharf four months after he disappeared in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina’s flooding of the city. He had last been heard from on September 1, 2005, when he left a phone message for his sister. He was 51. The Cowsills began performing in Newport, Rhode Island, in 1965. Barry Cowsill played bass in the band, with his brother Bill on guitar, Bob on guitar and organ, and John on drums. Their mother, Barbara, and younger sister, Susan, also performed with the group. The television series “The Partridge Family” was based on The Cowsills, who recorded such hit songs as “Hair” and “The Rain, the Park, and Other Things.” The band’s break up in the 1970s divided some members of the band for many years. Barry Cowsill is survived by his siblings. Barbara Cowsill died in 1985. • Los Angeles Times, Jan. 6, 2006, B9; New York Times, Jan. 7, 2006, C14; Time, Jan. 16, 2006, 29.

78 brother Blue in the 2003 comedy Old School, died at his home in Fort Worth, Texas, on December 28, 2005. He was 86. He was born Joseph Patrick Cranshaw in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, on June 17, 1919. He began his career on screen playing a bartender in the 1955 western Texas Lady. He was featured in numerous films over the next 50 years, appearing in The Seventh Commandment (1960), The Amazing Transparent Man (1960), Under Age (1964), Curse of the Swamp Creature (1966), Mars Needs Women (1967), Hip, Hot & 21 (1967), Bonnie and Clyde (1967) as a bank teller, Bandolero! (1968), Nightmare Honeymoon (1973), Frasier, the Sensuous Lion (1973), Slumber Party ’57 (1976), Mule Feathers (1977), Thunder and Lightning (1977), Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (1978), The Gong Show Movie (1980), The Private Eyes (1981), Yes, Giorgio (1982), Pee-wee’s Big Adventure (1985), Runaway to Glory (1988), Moving (1988), The Beverly Hillbillies (1993), The Hudsucker Proxy (1994), Ed Wood (1994), Everyone Says I Love You (1996), Ground Zero (1997), Nothing to Lose (1997), Broken Vessels (1998), Almost Heroes (1998), The Cracker Man (1999), MVP: Most Valuable Primate (2000), Best in Show (2000), Bubble Boy (2001), Air Bud: Seventh Inning Fetch (2002) as Sheriff Bob, Frank McKlusky, C.I. (2002), Air Bud: Spikes Back (2003), My Boss’s Daughter (2003), Old School (2003) as Joseph “Blue” Palasky, Brakin’ All the Rules (2004), One More Round (2005), and Herbie: Fully Loaded (2005) as Jimmy D. the demolition derby owner. Cranshaw had completed filming the latest Air Bud sequel, Air Buddies at the time of death. He was also featured in the tele-films Return of the Rebels (1981), Quantum Leap (1989), and Alien Avengers II (1998). Cranshaw starred as Bert Taylor in the 1973 television sit-com Thicker Than Water, and was Gabby in the comedy series On the Rocks from 1975 to 1976. He also appeared in the recurring role of Andy in the sit-com Alice from 1976 to 1978. He also appeared as Bob Scannell in the 1983 series AfterMASH. His numerous television credits also include guest roles in such series as The Doris Day Show, Green Acres, The Odd Couple, Temperatures Rising, Adam12, The Bob Newhart Show, Jigsaw John, Police Woman, Sanford and Son, Baby, I’m Back, Mork and Mindy, Little House on the Prairie, Wonder Woman, The Dukes of Hazzard, CHiPs, Best of the West, It’s a Living, Archie Bunker’s Place, Diff ’rent Strokes, Night Court, Three’s a

Barry Cowsill

CRANSHAW, PATRICK Veteran character actor Patrick Cranshaw, who starred as elderly frat

Patrick Cranshaw

79

2005 • Obituaries

Crowd, Perfect Strangers, Hunter, Growing Pains, Married ... with Children, Ellen, Coach, All-American Girl, Pig Sty, Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman, The Single Guy, The Drew Carey Show, Just Shoot Me, ER, Boy Meets World, Veronica’s Closet, Suddenly Susan, Ladies Man, The Norm Show, Dead Last, Monk, and 7th Heaven. • Los Angeles Times, Dec. 31, 2005, B14; New York Times, Jan. 4, 2006, C15; People, Jan. 16, 2006, 75; Variety, Jan. 16, 2006, 47.

CRESSWELL, HELEN British children’s writer Helen Cresswell died of ovarian cancer in England on September 26, 2005. She was 71. Cresswell was born in Nottingham, England, on July 11, 1934. She began her writing career in the early 1960s with the children’s book Sonya-by-the-Shore. She also began writing for children’s dramas for BBC television in the early 1960s. She also wrote the popular children’s book The Piemakers in 1967, and inaugurated her best known work, Lizzie Drippings, in 1973. Lizzie Drippings became a series of six books and spawned two BBC television series. She also created a series of novels about a disaster prone family with The Bagthorpe Saga, which began as a trilogy but extended to 11 books between 1978 and 2001. The Bagthorpe’s Saga was also adapted for television in 1981. Cresswell also created the television productions The Secret World of Polly Flint (1987), Mondial (1988), Five Children and It (1991), The Return of the Psammead (1993), The Phoenix and the Carpet (1997), and Little Grey Rabbit (2000), and adapted Enid Blyton’s works for The Famous Five in 1997. • Times (of London), Sept. 30, 2005, 69.

N.J. Crisp

self (1972), Dangerous Knowledge (1976), and The Odd Job Man (1984). Crisp scripted several films including The Masks of Death (1984) starring Peter Cushing as Sherlock Holmes, Murder Elite (1985), and Sunday Pursuit (1990). He was also an acclaimed playwright, whose plays include Fighting Chance (1985), Dangerous Obsession (1987) which was filmed as Darkness Falls in 1999, and That Good Night (1996). • Times (of London), Aug. 2, 2005, 43.

CUMMINGS, CONSTANCE Actress Constance Cummings died in England on November 23, 2005. She was 95. Cummings was born in Seattle, Washington, on May 15, 1910. She came to Hollywood in the early 1930s, where she starred in such features as The Criminal Code (1931), The Last Parade (1931), Lover Come Back (1931), Traveling Husbands (1931), The Guilty Generation (1931), Behind the Mask (1932), The Big Timer (1932), Attorney for the Defense (1932), Frank Capra’s American Madness (1932), Movie Crazy (1932) with Harold Lloyd, The Last Man (1932), Washington MerryGo-Round (1932), Night After Night (1932), Billion Dollar Scandal (1933), The Mind Reader (1933), Channel Crossing (1933), Broadway Through a Keyhole (1933), Heads We Go (1933), This Man Is Mine (1934), Looking for Trouble (1934), Glamour (1934), Remember Last Night? (1935), Seven Sinners (1936), and Strangers on Honeymoon (1936). She married British playwright Benn Levy

Helen Cresswell

CRISP, N.J. British television writer N.J. Crisp died in a Southampton, England, hospital after a long illness on June 14, 2005. He was 81. He was born Norman John Crisp in England on December 11, 1923. He began his career writing short stories and soon began scripting for television in the early 1960s. He wrote for such series as Dixon of Dock Green, Compact, Danger Zone, The Man in Room 17, The First Lady, Quick Before They Catch Us, Doomwatch, The Brothers, The Long Chase, Colditz, Orson Welles’ Great Mysteries, You’re On Your Own, Oil Strike North, The Mackinnons, Secret Army, Enemy at the Door, Buccaneer, Squadron, and Strike It Rich! He also wrote the television productions Man Who Was Hunting Him-

Constance Cummings

Obituaries • 2005 in 1933, and was soon appearing in stage productions of his work. She developed into a leading stage actress in such productions as Goodbye Mr. Chips, Long Day’s Journey into Night with Laurence Olivier, George Bernard Shaw’s Saint Joan, Romeo and Juliet, Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf, Jean-Paul Sartre’s No Exit, and Hamlet. She also continued to appear in such films as Haunted Honeymoon (1940), This England (1941), The Foreman Went to France (1942), Blithe Spirit (1945) with Rex Harrison, Into the Blue (1950), Three’s Company (1954), John and Julie (1955), The Intimate Stranger (1956), The Battle of the Sexes (1959) with Peter Sellers, A Boy Ten Feet Tall (1963), and In the Cool of the Day (1963). Cummings also appeared on television in episodes of Lux Video Theatre, Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., Presents, Screen Directors Playhouse, Schlitz Playhouse of Stars, Menace, and Jemima Shore Investigates, and productions of Wings (1983), Love Song (1985), and Agatha Christie’s Dead Man’s Folly (1986). • Los Angeles Times, Nov. 29, 2005, B10; New York Times, Nov. 29, 2005, A25; Time, Dec. 12, 2005, 29; Times (of London), Nov. 28, 2005, 55; Variety, Dec. 12, 2005, 67.

CUMMINGS, DALE Actor Robert Dale Cummings died on August 19, 2005. He was 72. Cummings was born in Syracuse, New York, on August 9, 1933. He was active in films and television from the mid–1950s, appearing in such features as The Enemy Below (1957), Operation Petticoat (1959), Barabbas (1962), One Step to Hell (1967), Buona Sera, Mrs. Campbell (1968), Cowards Don’t Pay (1969), The Battle of the Damned (1969), and Rangers Attack at Hour X (1970). He also appeared on television in episodes of Navy Log, State Trooper, 26 Men, and Have Gun —Will Travel. Cummings returned to the screen in the 1980s to appear in the features Wild Wind (1986) and Samurai Cop (1989), and guest star in an episode of L.A. Law.

80 Cruiser. He also served as a special effects consultant for the science fiction series Lexx.

CUNHA, RICHARD Richard Cunha, the director of several cult horror films from the 1950s, died of a heart ailment on September 18, 2005. He was 84. Cunha was born in Honolulu, Hawaii, on March 4, 1921. He served in the United States Air Corps during World War II, working with the newsreel and motion picture units. After the war he continued to work in films, making commercials and industrial films. He was also cinematographer for the 1950 western film Red Rock Outlaws. In the late 1950s Cunha teamed with Arthur A. Jacobs to form the production company Screencraft Enterprises. He wrote and directed the cult classic She Demons (1958) starring Irish McCalla and Giant from the Unknown (1958) starring Ed Kemmer. Cunha also helmed 1958’s Frankenstein’s Daughter and Missile to the Moon, a schlockier remake of the slightly earlier schlock classic Catwomen of the Moon. He wrote and directed the thriller Girl in Room 13 (1961), and was cinematographer on the films Bloodlust! (1961) and Silent Witness (1962). Cunha subsequently abandoned films and worked largely as a television commercial director for the remainder of his career. • Los Angeles Times, Oct. 3, 2005, B9; Times (of London), Oct. 7, 2005, 78; Variety, Oct. 10, 2005, 93.

Richard Cunha

Dale Cummings

CUNEO, MICHAEL Michael Cuneo, who created props and models for Star Trek: The Next Generation, died of a brain tumor in a Woburn, Massachusetts, hospital on June 25, 2005. He was 41. A civil engineer, Cuneo designed the alien landscapes for the planets Romulus and Bajor for Star Trek: The Next Generation, and created various prop ships including a Klingon Battle

CURTIS, CHRIS British drummer Chris Curtis died in Liverpool, England, after a long illness on February 28, 2005. He was 63. Curtis was born Christopher Crummey in Oldham, Lancashire, England, on August 26, 1941. He was a founding member of the popular 1960s group The Searchers in 1960, with Mike Pender, Tony Jackson and John McNally. They recorded the hit songs “Needles and Pins,” “Sugar and Spice,” and “Sweets for My Sweet.” Curtis was seen with the group in the 1963 musical film Saturday Night Out. Jackson left the group in 1964, and was replaced by Frank Allen. The Searchers continued their succession of hits with “Love Potion Number 9” and “He’s Got No Love.” Curtis left the group in 1966 and, under the name The Flowerpot Men, had a hit with “Let’s Go to San Francisco. He was a founder of the band Roundabout the following year. The group eventually evolved into Deep Purple,

81

2005 • Obituaries

Chris Curtis

Jojo D’Amore

but Curtis had left the group before then. He worked as a music producer for several years before largely abandoning the music industry to work in civil service. He had recently returned to the stage, performing with the charity group The Merceycats after having retired from his job due to ill health. • Los Angeles Times, Mar. 2, 2005, B11; New York Times, Mar. 2, 2005, D8; Times (of London), Mar. 2, 2005, 77.

the Doomed (1976), Dracula’s Dog (1978), Alligator (1980), the tele-film A Cry for Love (1980), The Idolmaker (1980), The Sword and the Sorcerer (1982), and Hollywood Harry (1986). D’Amore also appeared on television in episodes of 227 and Curb Your Enthusiasm, and in the 1998 documentary Lenny Bruce: Swear to Tell the Truth. • Los Angeles Times, Oct. 3, 2005, B9; Variety, Oct. 17, 2005, 65.

D’AMARIO, TONY

French actor Tony D’Amario died of an heart attack in France on June 29, 2005. He was 44. D’Amario made his film debut as the Mayor of Compiegne in Luc Besson’s The Messenger: The Story of Joan of Arc (1999). He was also seen in the films Would I Lie to You? 2 (2001), Tanguy (2001), Aram (2002), Lovely Rita (2003), and Banlieue 13 (2004) as K2. He also appeared in several productions on French television.

DANGERFIELD, WINNIE British silent film child actress Winnie Dangerfield died in a retirement home in Bromley, Kent, England, after a short illness on March 13, 2005. She was 96. She was born to a musical family in Croydon, Surrey, England, on June 13, 1908. She began her career in films as a child, appearing in the film Sweep! Sweep! Sweep!!!, written by her father in 1913. She also appeared in the silent films When the Pie Was Opened (1915), The Society Visit (1915), Rough on Uncle (1915), and Amusing the Kids (1915). She later trained as a singer and appeared in numerous stage musicals, often under the stage name of Unita Hanson. She appeared in several variety shows from Tom Arnold in the 1930s and 1940s including Walk This Way. She also appeared in the West End in productions of Sunny South and Hello Beautiful. She entertained troops throughout England during World War II, and continued her career on stage after the war. She worked often with her brother, bandleader Leslie Hanson, appearing in his operetta, The Missing Princess. She retired after his death in 1985.

Tony D’Amario

D’AMORE, JOJO Comic actor Joseph “Jojo” D’Amore died of emphysema and cancer in Los Angeles on September 24, 2005. He was 74. D’Amore was born in Brooklyn, New York, on October 11, 1930. He came to California as a child when his father opened an Italian restaurant in Los Angeles. D’Amore became a stand-up comedian and a friend of comic Lenny Bruce. He appeared in several films from the 1970s including The Doberman Gang (1972), Little Cigars (1973), Mansion of

Winnie Dangerfield

Obituaries • 2005 DANINOS, PIERRE French author and humorist Pierre Daninos died in Paris on January 7, 2005. He was 91. Daninos was born in Paris on May 26, 1913. He began his career as a journalist in the early 1930s, and wrote the award-winning book The Notebooks of the Good God in 1947. He wrote several other humorous works including Sonia, the Others and Myself (1952), A Certain Monsieur Blot (1960), and Snobbismo (1964). Daninos was best known for his creation of Major Thompson, a proper British army major, who witty observations of both the French and the British were first recounted in the best selling 1954 work The Notebooks of Major Thompson. Daninos’ book was adapted the following year as the film The French, They Are a Funny Race. Daninos returned to Major Thompson in his 1968 book The Tricolor Major, bringing his character to France. • Times (of London), Jan. 15, 2005, 71.

82 Inside Out, Ting Tang Mine, and A Place Called Mars. Several of his works were adapted for British television including Farmers Arms in 1983 and The Bench in 1999. He and his wife, filmmaker Jane Darke, became active in the protection of the Cornish coast and their environmental struggles were the subject of the BBC documentary The Wrecking Season (2004), which Darke wrote and his wife directed.

DARLTON, CLARK Walter Ernsting, who wrote numerous science fiction novels in the Perry Rhodan series under the pseudonym Clark Darlton, died in Salzburg, Austria, on January 15, 2005. He was 84. Ernsting was born in Koblenz, Germany, on June 13, 1920. He wrote over a dozen of the popular Perry Rhodan science fiction series, which was adapted to film for 1967’s Mission Stardust. Ernsting also wrote the science fiction novels Mutants Vs. Mutants (1972), A World Gone Mad (1973), The Dead Live (1974), Prisoner of Time (1974), The Phantom Fleet (1976), Atom Fire on Mechanica (1978), The Phantom Horde (1979), and Sentinels of Solitude (1979). • Times (of London), Mar. 7, 2005, 52.

Pierre Daninos

DARKE, NICK British playwright Nick Darke died of complications from a stroke in England on June 11, 2005. He was 56. Darke was born in St. Eval, Cornwall, England, on August 29, 1948. He began his career on stage as an actor until 1978, when he wrote his first play, Never Say Rabbit in a Boat. He continued to write such plays as A Tickle on the River’s Back, Landmarks, and Catch. The were followed by a cycle of more experimental plays that included The Body, The Earth Turned

DAVIES, MEREDITH British conductor Meredith Davies died in England on March 9, 2005. He was 82. Davies was born in Birkenhead, England, on July 20, 1922. He served as organist and music director at St. Albans and Hereford cathedrals, and conducted such

Nick Darke

Meredith Davies

Clark Darlton

83 groups as the Birmingham City Orchestra, the BBC Training Orchestra, the Royal Choral Society, and others. He was often associated with British composer Benjamin Britten, conducting the premier of his War Requiem in 1962. Davies also premiered the works of such composers as Humphrey Searle, Lennox Berkeley, and Richard Rodney Bennett. • Times (of London), Apr. 2, 2005, 66.

DAVIS, C. MARIE Visual effects producer C. Marie Davis died of breast cancer in Los Angeles on November 9, 2005. She was 47. Davis was born in Duncan, British Columbia, Canada, in 1958. She began working in films as an assistant to voice actor Mel Blanc and his son Noel in the 1980s. She subsequently began working as a visual effects editor and producer at such companies as Dream Quest Images, Free Range Imaging, Cinema Research Company, and CIS Hollywood. She rose to the position of president and executive producer at CIS, and served as vice president of production services at Sony Pictures Imageworks. Davis’ numerous film credits include Big Business (1988), The Blob (1988), Scrooged (1988), The Abyss (1989), Fat Man and Little Boy (1989), Ernest Goes to Jail (1990), Total Recall (1990), Ernest Scared Stupid (1991), Patriot Games (1992), The Muppet Christmas Carol (1992), Blink (1994), The Little Rascals (1994), Star Trek: Generations (1994), Batman Forever (1995), Dante’s Peak (1997), Contact (1997), George of the Jungle (1997), Titanic (1997), Deep Impact (1998), The Parent Trap (1998), Jane Austen’s Mafia! (1998), Rush Hour (1998), Practical Magic (1998), Mission to Mars (2000), Men of Honor (2000), Charlie’s Angels (2000), What Women Want (2000), Cats & Dogs (2001), Scary Movie 2 (2001), The Score (2001), Planet of the Apes (2001), Kate & Leopold (2001), We Were Soldiers (2002), Spider-Man (2002), S1m0ne (2002), Frida (2002), The Tuxedo (2002), and Star Trek: Nemesis (2002). • Variety, Nov. 28, 2005, 73. DAVIS, OSSIE Ossie Davis, a leading actor in stage and films for over sixty years, was found dead in his Miami hotel room on February 4, 2005. He was 87. Davis was in Miami filming an upcoming feature Retirement. Davis was born in Cogdell, Georgia, on December 18, 1917. He entered Howard University in 1935, where he studied drama. He began acting on stage later in the decade, performing with the Rose McClendon Players in Harlem. During World War II Davis served as a surgical technician in a U.S. Army hospital in Liberia. He resumed his career after the war and made his Broadway debut in Jeb in 1946. His co-star in the drama about a returning soldier was actress Ruby Dee. They became close collaborators both on and off the stage and were married in December of 1948. Despite Davis’ outspoken leftist political sentiments and affiliation with such figures as W.E.B. DuBois and Paul Robeson, he and Dee largely escaped the blacklist that cast a pall over the show business community in the 1950s. He was later an active participant in the civil rights movement and a friend of Malcolm X. He delivered the eulogy at Malcolm X’s funeral in 1966. While mainly performing on stage in the 1950s, he appeared in several films including No Way Out (1950), Fourteen Hours

2005 • Obituaries (1951), and The Joe Louis Story (1953). He also appeared in television productions of The Emperor Jones (1955) and Seven Times Monday (1962), and in episodes of Kraft Television Theatre, The Defenders, The Great Adventure, The Nurses, Slattery’s People, The Fugitive, Run for Your Life, Twelve O’Clock High, N.Y.P.D., Bonanza, Rod Serling’s Night Gallery, and Love, American Style. Davis also appeared in the recurring role of Omar in the television comedy series Car 54, Where Are You? and was District Attorney Daniel Jackson in the legal drama series The Defenders in the mid–1960s. Davis’ play, Purlie Victorious, was filmed in 1963 as Gone Are the Days!, with Davis in the lead role. He also starred in the films The Cardinal (1963), Shock Treatment (1964), The Hill (1965) with Sean Connery, A Man Called Adam (1966), The Scalphunters (1968), Sam Whiskey (1969), Slaves (1969), Let’s Do It Again (1975), and Countdown at Kusini (1976) which he also wrote and directed. Davis also directed the films Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970) which he also scripted, Kongi’s Harvest (1970), Black Girl (1972), and Gordon’s War (1973). He also continued to appear in such films Hot Stuff (1979), Harry and Son (1984), The House of God (1984), School Daze (1988), Spike Lee’s Do the Right Thing (1989), Joe Versus the Volcano (1990), Jungle Fever (1991), Gladiator (1992), Malcolm X (1992), Grumpy Old Men (1993), John Grisham’s The Client (1994), Get on the Bus (1996), I’m Not Rappaport (1996) reprising his Broadway role as Midge Carter, Doctor Dolittle (1998) with Eddie Murphy, Alyson’s Closet (1998), the animated Dinosaur (2000) as the voice of Yar, Here’s to Life! (2000), Bubba Ho-tep (2002) as nursing home resident and mummy-fighter John F. Kennedy, Proud (2003), How to Get the Man’s Foot Outta Your Ass (2003), and She Hate Me (2004). Davis also appeared in many tele-films and mini-series including The Outsider (1967), Teacher, Teacher (1969), The Sheriff (1971), The Tenth Level (1975), Billy: Portrait of a Street Kid (1977), King (1978) as Martin Luther King, Sr., Roots: The Next Generation (1979), Freedom Road (1979) as the Narrator, All God’s Children (1980), Don’t Look Back: The Story of Leroy “Satchel” Paige (1981), We’ll Take Manhattan (1990), King of Jazz (1990), Die Laughing (1990), The Ernest Green Story (1993), Alex Haley’s Queen (1993), the 1994 Stephen King mini-series The Stand, Ray Alexander: A Taste for Justice (1994) as Uncle Phil, The Android Affair (1995), Home of the

Ossie Davis (with wife, Ruby Dee)

Obituaries • 2005 Brave (1996), Miss Evers’ Boys (1997), 12 Angry Men (1997), The Secret Path (1999), The Soul Collector (1999), A Vow to Cherish (1999), Finding Buck McHenry (2000), Legend of the Candy Cane (2001), and Anne Rice’s The Feast of All Saints (2001). Davis and Ruby Dee hosted the television series Ossie and Ruby! in the early 1980s. Davis also appeared as Oz Jackson in the series B.L. Stryker from 1989 to 1990, and co-starred with Burt Reynolds in the comedy series Evening Shade, playing Ponder Blue in the 1990s. He reprised his role of Judge Harry Roosevelt in the 1995 television series based on John Grisham’s novel The Client, and was Erasmus Jones in the series Promised Land from 1996 to 1998. His other television credits include episodes of Touched by an Angel, Cosby, Third Watch, City of Angels, Philly, Presidio Med, JAG, and The L Word. He and Dee, who appeared together in 11 stage productions and five films during their mutual careers, published a dual autobiography, In This Life Together, in honor of their 50th wedding anniversary in 1998. • Los Angeles Times, Feb. 5, 2005, A1; New York Times, Feb. 5, 2005, A14; People, Feb. 21, 2005, 73; Time, Feb. 14, 2005, 19; Times (of London), Jan. 23, 2005, 62; Variety, Feb. 14, 2005, 55.

DAVIS, PHIL Television comedy writer Phil Davis died on October 8, 2005. He was 101. Davis was born on February 9, 1904. He scripted episodes of numerous television series in the 1950s and 1960s including Private Secretary, The Ann Sothern Show, The Thin Man, The Donna Reed Show, O.K. Crackerby, My Mother, the Car, Family Affair, and My Three Sons. He also wrote for the animated series Josie and the Pussycats in Outer Space in the early 1970s. DAVIS, RAY Singer Ray Davis, who was a founding member of George Clinton’s funk band Parliament-Funkadelic, died of respiratory complications in New Brunswick, New Jersey, on July 5, 2005. He was 65. Davis was born in Sumter, South Carolina, on March 29, 1940. He began performing with Clinton with the original Parliaments while in high school in the 1950s. The Parliaments had a hit single with “(I Wanna) Testify” in 1967. Clinton changed the band’s name to Parliament-Funkadelic in the early 1970s, which overlapped several of the bands he had organized, which were usually known as P-Funk. Davis sang bass vocals on

84 some of their hit songs including “One Nation Under a Groove” and “Flashlight.” P-Funk was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1997. Davis continued to perform, sometimes filling in for the late Melvin Franklin in the Temptations in the mid–1990s. He also toured with fellow Parliaments bandmates Clarence Haskins and Grady Thomas in recent years. • New York Times, July 8, 2005, B8.

DAVIS, TYRONE Soul singer Tyrone Davis died of complications from a stroke on February 9, 2005. He was 66. Davis was born in Greenville, Mississippi, on May 4, 1938. He began singing professionally in Chicago in the early 1960s and recorded his first song, “Suffer,” under the name Tyrone the Wonder Boy. He had a hit record with his 1968 soul ballad “Can I Change My Mind.” His other popular recordings include “Is It Something You’ve Got,” “Turn Back the Hands of Time,” “I’ll Be Right Here,” “Let Me Back In,” “Could I Forget You,” “I Had It All the Time,” “Without You in My Life,” “There It Is,” and “Turning Point.” He was signed by Columbia in the mid–1970s, where he continued producing such hits as “This I Swear,” “Give It Up (Turn It Loose),” “Get On Up (Disco),” and “In the Mood.” He continued to perform and record until suffering a stroke in October of 2004, which kept him hospitalized until his death. • Los Angeles Times, Feb. 11, 2005, B13; New York Times, Feb. 14, 2005, A19.

Tyrone Davis

DAWKINS, BILL Actor Bill Dawkins died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease in Maine on December 30, 2005. He was 87. Dawkins was an actor and director in numerous productions in Maine for many years. He was featured as Elwyn Adamson in the 2001 film In the Bedroom, co-starring with his wife Harriet as a elderly married couple.

Ray Davis

DAY, SONNY Country musician Sonny Day died of bone cancer on February 7, 2005. He was 80. He was an original member of Roy Acuff ’s Smoky Mountain Boys, playing accordion with the group from the 1940s. He appeared with Acuff in the film Night Train to Memphis. Day also appeared regularly with the Grand Ole Opry, and performed or recorded with such stars as Patsy Cline, Tanya Tucker, and Minnie Pearl.

85

2005 • Obituaries Bloody Sunday (1971), Don’t Just Lie There, Say Something (1973), In Celebration (1975), and Cry Wolf (1980). She also appeared in television productions of Your Name’s Not God, It’s Edgar (1968), Persuasion (1971), Sunset Across the Bay (1975), The Patricia Neal Story (1981), and A Very British Coup (1988). Her television credits also include episodes of Jacks and Knaves, Dial RIX, Rogues’ Gallery, I Didn’t Know You Cared, Survivors, All Creatures Great and Small, Angels, Juliet Bravo, and Ever Decreasing Circles.

Bill Dawkins

Sonny Day

DAYE, GABRIELLE British character actress Gabrielle Daye died in England on January 5, 2005. She was 93. Daye was born in Manchester, England, on October 2, 1911. She was best known for her role as Beattie Pearson in the popular British television series Coronation Street from 1975 to 1981. Daye also starred as Mrs. Pring in the comedy series Bless Me Father from 1978 to 1981, and was Mrs. Burrows in Flying Lady (1987). She appeared in a handful of films during her career including Twilight Hour (1945), Saints and Sinners (1949), Little Big Shot (1952), 10 Rillington Place (1971), Sunday

Gabrielle Daye

DAYTON, RONN Actor Ronn Dayton, who doubled for Frankie Avalon in several of the Beach Party films in the 1960s, died of complications from heart surgery in Reno, Nevada, on August 27, 2005. He was 70. Dayton was born in Chicago, Illinois, on September 29, 1934. He was active in films in the 1960s, doubling for Avalon and appearing in small roles in Bikini Beach (1964), Robin and the 7 Hoods (1964), Pajama Party (1964), Beach Blanket Bingo (1965), How to Stuff a Wild Bikini (1965), Dr. Goldfoot and the Bikini Machine (1965), Thunder Alley (1967), Devil’s Angels (1967), Maryjane (1968), and Helle’s Belles (1970). Dayton retired to Wakiki, Hawaii, in the 1980s. DE ALBA, FELIPE Character actor Felipe de Alba died in New York on November 15, 2005. He was 81. He began his film career in Mexico in the 1940s when he was chosen by actress Maria Felix to appear opposite her in 1946’s La Devoradora. He also appeared in the films El Puente del Castigo (1946), El Gallero (1948), Yo Dormi con un Fantasma (1949), Una Familia de Tantas (1949), The Perez Family (1949), Eterna Agonia (1949), Canta y no Llores (1949), Love for Love (1950), Mi Querido Capitan (1950), Furia Roja (1951), Stronghold (1951), El Martir del Calvario (1952), Mujer de Medianoche (1952), Las Carinosas (1953), and Luis Bunuel’s The Adventures of Robinson Crusoe (1954) as Captain Oberzo. De Alba subsequently came to the United States. He was married for one day to actress Zsa Zsa Gabor in 1982. The couple were married aboard ship and the union was annulled soon afterwards. De Alba appeared as the grandfather in the 2002 film Real Women Have Curves (2002). He also wrote, produced, and appeared in the 2002 Mexican-made films El Sueno de Elias and Noche y Luz.

Felipe De Alba

Obituaries • 2005 DE ANGELIS, RICHARD Character actor Richard De Angelis died of congestive heart failure and complications from prostate cancer at his home in Silver Springs, Maryland, on December 28, 2005. He was 73. De Angelis was born in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1932. He worked as an accountant for over a decade before embarking on a career in show business. He worked as a stand up comic and appeared in small roles in several films including Being There (1979), First Monday in October (1981), The Man Who Wasn’t There (1983), Chances Are (1989), Men Don’t Leave (1990), Replay (2003), and A Dirty Shame (2004). He also appeared in the 2000 tele-film Homicide: The Movie and starred in the recurring role of Baltimore police Col. Raymond Foerster in the HBO crime series The Wire from 2003 to 2004. • New York Times, Jan. 3, 2006; People, Jan. 16, 2006, 75.

Richard De Angelis

86 Loneliest Runner (1976), Sergeant Matlovich Vs. the U.S. Air Force (1978), Cocaine: One Man’s Seduction (1983), The Execution (1985), Wes Craven’s Chiller (1985), Streets of Justice (1985), Outrage! (1986), and Shannon’s Deal (1989). His numerous television credits also include roles in such series as Mary Tyler Moore, Police Woman, The Incredible Hulk, The Amazing Spider-Man, The Phoenix, Dynasty, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Scarecrow and Mrs. King, Our House, Matlock, Sisters, Coach, Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman, Beverly Hills, 90210, Martial Law, Cold Case, and CSI: Crime Scene Investigation.

DE CASTRO, ISABEL Portuguese actress Isabel de Castro died of cancer in Borba, Portugal, on November 23, 2005. She was 74. De Castro was born in Lisbon, Portugal, on August 1, 1931. She was a popular star in Portuguese films from the 1940s, appearing in Barrio (1947), Fuego! (1949), La Danza del Corazon (1952), El Presidio (1954), As Pupilas do Senhor Reitor (1961), Sunday Afternoon (1966), Lerpar (1975), Brandos Costumes (1975), Francisca (1981), A Portuguese Farewell (1986), O Desejado (1988), Tall Stories (1988), Three Less Me (1988), Hard Times (1988), The Blood (1989), Xavier (1992), Vertigem (1992), Abraham’s Valley (1993), Shadows in a Conflict (1993), Here on Earth (1993), Three Palm Trees (1994), Taxi to Portugal (1994), Down to Earth (1995), Isle of Contempt (1996), Voyage to the Beginning of the World (1997), Traffic (1998), Senhor Jeronimo (1998), Gloria (1999), When It Thunders (1999), Low Flying Aircraft (2002), Us (2003), and A Casa Esquecida (2004). She also appeared frequently in character roles on Portuguese television, starring in such series as Alves dos Reis (2000) and Anjo Selvagem (2001).

DEARTH, BILL Character actor Bill Dearth died in Los Angeles on May 21, 2005. He was 57. Dearth was born in Cleveland, Ohio, on November 16, 1947. He moved to Los Angeles to pursue an acting career in the early 1970s and made his film debut in Marathon Man. Dearth was also seen in the films 48 Hrs. (1982) with Eddie Murphy and Nick Nolte, Rhinestone (1984), Banzai Runner (1987), The Glass Shield (1994), Spark (1996), and Officer Down (2005). Dearth, who was often cast as police officers, also appeared in the tele-films The

Isabel De Castro

DE CLOSS, JAMES Actor James De Closs died on May 4, 2005. He was 71. De Closs was born on September 7, 1933. He was seen in the films Cinderella Liberty (1973), Freebie and the Bean (1974), Harry and Walter Go to New York (1976), Hide in Plain Sight (1980), Lookin’ to Get Out (1982), and Alien Nation (1988). He also appeared in the 1972 pilot tele-film Longstreet, and guest-starred in episodes of Lawman and Daniel Boone. Bill Dearth

DEE, SANDRA Actress Sandra Dee, who became a film icon in the 1950s and early 1960s starring in

87

Sandra Dee

such roles as Gidget and Tammy, died of complications from kidney disease and pneumonia in a Thousand Oaks, California, hospital on February 20, 2005. She was 63. She was born Alexandra Zuck in Bayonne, New Jersey, on April 23, 1941 (though sources also indicate 1942 or 1944). She began working as a model in her early teens and made her film debut in the 1957 feature Until They Sail. She soon became a popular teen star in such films as The Reluctant Debutante (1958), The Restless Years (1958), A Stranger in My Arms (1959), Gidget (1959) as surfing girl Francine “Gidget” Lawrence, Imitation of Life (1959), The Wild and the Innocent (1959), and A Summer Place (1959). Dee starred with Rock Hudson and Bobby Darin in the 1960 film Portrait in Black and married Darin soon after the production was completed. She continued to star in films throughout the 1960s including Romanoff and Juliet (1961), Tammy Tell Me True (1961), taking over the role that Debbie Reynolds had created several years earlier, Come September (1961), If a Man Answers (1962), Tammy and the Doctor (1863), Take Her, She’s Mine (1963), I’d Rather Be Rich (1964), That Funny Feeling (1965), A Man Could Get Killed (1966), Doctor, You’ve Got to Be Kidding (1967), and Rosie! (1967). Dee’s marriage to Darin ended in 1967, and her film career largely ended as well. She next appeared in the 1970 horror film The Dunwich Horror based on a story by H.P. Lovecraft, and was seen in tele-films The Manhunter (1972), The Daughters of Joshua Cabe (1972), Houston, We’ve Got a Problem (1974), and the 1977 pilot film for Fantasy Island. She also appeared on television in episodes of Rod Serling’s Night Gallery, Love, American Style, The Sixth Sense, Police Woman, and Fantasy Island. She made her final film appearance in the 1983 feature Lost. Dee suffered from many physical and psychological problems ranging from alcoholism, depression and anorexia, to diagnoses of throat cancer and kidney failure in recent years. Her stormy marriage to Bobby Darin was recounted in the 2004 film Beyond the Sea, starring Kevin Spacey as Darin and Kate Bosworth as Dee. She is survived by her only child, Dodd Darin, and two granddaughters. • Los Angeles Times, Feb. 21, 2005, B8; New York Times, Feb. 21, 2005, A17; People, Mar. 7, 2005, 74; Time, Mar. 7, 2005, 27; Times (of London), Jan. 22, 2005, 56; Variety, Feb. 28, 2005, 53.

2005 • Obituaries DEEL, GUY Artist and illustrator Guy Deel died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease in Los Angeles on December 13, 2005. He was 72. Deel was born in Tuxedo, Texas, on July 7, 1933. He began drawing professionally after attending the Art Center College of Design in Los Angeles in the early 1950s. His work was published in such magazines as Saturday Evening Post, Good Housekeeping, Reader’s Digest, and Redbook. He also designed the painted the numerous book cover illustrations for such western authors as Louis L’Amour, J.T. Edson, and Elmer Kelton. Deel also worked for Disney Studios and a designer and stylist. He designed the titles for the films The Strongest Man in the World (1975) and The Shagg y D.A. (1976), and was an artist and character designer on the animated films The Rescuers (1977), Oliver and Company (1988), The Lion King (1994), The Pebble and the Penguin (1995), Pocahontas (1995), Tarzan (1999), and Fantasia 2000 (1999). Deel was also the artist who created the huge mural that graces the Gene Autry Western Heritage Museum in Los Angeles.

Guy Deel

DEES, MARY Actress Mary Dees died on August 4, 2005. She was 93. Dees was a stand-in and double for film star Jean Harlow in the 1930s. She doubled for Harlow in 1937’s Saratoga and finished Harlow’s scenes in the film when the actress died before shooting

Mary Dees

Obituaries • 2005 was completed. Another actress, Paula Winslowe, dubbed Harlow’s voice in the footage. Dees also appeared in the films Dinner at Eight (1933), Kid Millions (1934), The Man with Two Faces (1934), Let’s Talk It Over (1934), Two-Fisted (1935), Hoi Polloi (1935) with the Three Stooges, Born to Dance (1936), Bad Guy (1937), The Last Gangster (1937), The Shopworn Angel (1938), and The Women (1939). Dees made her final film appearance in the 1946 Marx Brothers comedy A Night in Casablanca.

DEGUERE, PHILIP, JR. Television producer, director and writer, Philip DeGuere, Jr. died of cancer in Los Angeles on January 24, 2005. He was 60. DeGuere was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, on July 19, 1944. He began working at Universal Studios after attending Stanford University. He wrote for such television series as Alias Smith and Jones, Baretta, City of Angels, Stone, Magnum, P.I., and Whiz Kids. He also scripted the telefilms How to Steal an Airplane (1971), The 3,000 Mile Chase (1977), Dr. Strange (1978) which he also directed, and The Last Convertible (1979). DeGuere was a producer and director for the series Baa Baa Black Sheep and was the producer and creator of the popular CBS detective series Simon and Simon, which aired from 1981 to 1988. He also produced, directed and scripted episodes of the new Twilight Zone series in 1985, and the series Max Headroom. He wrote and created the 1998 series Air America, and was a writer and producer for Navy NCIS: Naval Criminal Investigative Service. He also wrote episodes of JAG and Stephen King’s The Dead Zone. • Los Angeles Times, Feb. 2, 2005, B10; Variety, Feb. 7, 2005, 92.

88 See Arnold Run, and appeared on television as Alexis Cameron in the series The Court in 2002. Her other television credits include episodes of CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, The Practice, Without A Trace, Dragnet, Monk, and CSI: Miami. • People, Mar. 28, 2005, 97; Variety, Feb. 28, 2005, 54.

Nicole DeHuff

DELFINO, LUIZ Brazilian actor Luiz Delfino died in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on May 25, 2005. He was 83. Delfino was born in Ouro Preto, Brazil, in 1921. He began his career on stage in 1946. He performed in films, radio, and television during his career. His film credits include Tudo Azul (1952), Com o Diabo no Corpo (1952), Teus Olhos Castanhos (1961), Em Busca do Tesouro (1967), Papai Trapalhao (1968), Ali Baba e os Quarenta Ladroes (1972), O Comprador de Fazendas (1974), As Deliciosas Traicoes do Amor (1975).

Philip DeGuere, Jr.

DEHUFF, NICOLE Nicole DeHuff, who starred as the older sister in the popular comedy film Meet the Parents, died in Hollywood on February 16, 2005. She was 31. DeHuff was born in Oklahoma on January 6, 1974. She made her film debut in 2000’s Meet the Parents with Ben Stiller and Robert DeNiro. She played Deborah Byrnes, the sister of Stiller’s girlfriend, whose wedding leads to the comedy situations in the film. She also appeared in the 2004 thriller Suspect Zero, and the independent films Killing Cinderella and Unbeatable Harold. She was also seen in the 2005 tele-film

Luiz Delfino

DELGADO, JUNIOR Jamaican reggae singer Junior Delgado died in London on April 11, 2005. He was 46. He was born Oscar Hibbert in Kingston, Jamaica, on August 25, 1958. He began performing while in his teens, singing with the group Time Unlimited in the 1970s. His debut album, Taste of the Young Heart, was released in 1978. He toured and recorded often in England in the 1980s, producing such albums as Effort, The More She Love It, and Disco Style Showcase. His most popular songs

89

2005 • Obituaries

Junior Delgado

Tonino Delli Colli

include “Sons of Slaves,” “Away with Your Fussing and Fighting,” and “Raggamuffin Year.” • Times (of London), Apr. 15, 2005, 75.

Toto the Third Man (1951), City of Pain (1951), Accidents to the Taxes!! (1951), It’s Him! ... Yes! Yes! (1951), The Eleven Musketeers (1952), Three Corsairs (1952), Toto and the Women (1952), Italy’s first color film Toto in Color (1952), Jolanda, the Daughter of the Black Corsair (1952), I Always Loved You (1953), The Pagans (1953), Night of Love (1954), The Shadow (1954), Where Is Freedom? (1954), The Intruder (1956), Donatella (1956), Poor But Beautiful (1957), Oh! Sabella (1957), Poor Girl, Pretty Girl (1957), Venice, the Moon and You (1958), First Love (1958), Adorable and a Liar (1958), Seven Hills of Rome (1958), Poor Millionaires (1959), World by Night (1959), The Friend of the Jaguar (1959), Female Three Times (1959), Morgan the Pirate (1961), The Thief of Bagdad (1961), The Wonders of Aladdin (1961), Acattone! (1961), The Nun of Monza (1962), The New Angels (1962), Swordsman of Siena (1962), RoGoPaG (1963), Not On Your Life (1963), Extraconjugal (1964), A Very Handy Man (1964), Love in Four Dimensions (1964), The Beautiful Swindlers (1964), The Gospel According to St. Matthew (1964), The Mandrake (1965), Assembly of Love (1965), The Camp Followers (1965), The Hawks and the Sparrows (1966), The Sultans (1966), Sergio Leone’s landmark spaghetti western The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966), China Is Near (1967), Ghosts — Italian Style (1968), Mafia (1968), Caprice Italian Style (1968), Louis Malle’s “William Wilson” segment of 1968’s Spirits of the Dead, No Roses for OSS 117 (1968), Once Upon a Time in the West (1968), Love Circle (1969), Pigpen (1969), Operation Snafu (1970), Pussycat, Pussycat, I Love You (1970), Man of the Year (1971), The Decameron (1971), Come Together (1971), Pilgrimage (1972), Deaf Smith and Johnny Ears (1972), The Canterbury Tales (1972), The Master Touch (1972), Bawdy Tales (1973), Lovers and Other Relatives (1973), The Sensual Man (1973), How Long Can You Fall? (1974), Lacombe, Lucien (1974), Seven Beauties (1975), Salo, or The 120 Days of Sodom (1976), Dear Michael (1976), The Purple Taxi (1977), The Forbidden Room (1977), Beach House (1977), The New Monsters (1977), First Love (1978), Blood Feud (1978), Dear Papa (1979), A Trip with Anita (1979), The Photogenic (1980), Hurricane Rosie (1980), Sunday Lovers (1980), Ghost of Love (1981), Tales of Ordinary Madness (1981), Trenchcoat (1983), The Future Is Woman (1984), Ginger and Fred (1986), The Name of the Rose (1986), Fellini’s Intervista

DELIEGE, PAUL Belgian cartoonist Paul Deliege died in Belgium on July 7, 2005. He was 74. Deliege was born in Belgium on January 21, 1931. He began drawing cartoons in the 1950s at the Belgian daily Le Soir. He worked with the popular Spirou magazine from the 1960s, were he co-created the popular series Theophile & Philibert. He also drew numerous humorous strips including Bobo, Superdingue, and Cabanon. Deliege also created the popular strip Les Krostons in 1968, about three cartoon characters out to conquer the world. He continued the strip until 1983, and drew Bobo until his retirement in 1996.

Paul Deliege

DELLI COLLI, TONINO Italian cinematographer Tonino Delli Colli died of heart problems in his Rome, Italy, apartment on August 17, 2005. He was 81. Delli Colli was born in Rome on November 20, 1923. He began working in Rome’s Cinecitta studios while in his teens and went on to work with such esteemed directors as Federico Fellini, Sergio Leone, and Pier Paolo Pasolini. He was director of photography for over 100 films from the mid–1940s including Lost Happiness (1946), Nada (1947), The Island of Procida (1948), Fugitive Lady (1949), Nero and the Burning of Rome (1949), Man of Death (1949), Fame and the Devil (1949), Il Voto (1950),

Obituaries • 2005 (1987), Stradivari (1989), The African Woman (1990), The Voice of the Moon (1990), A Simple Story (1991), Especially on Sunday (1991), Bitter Moon (1992), The Thirst for Gold (1993), Death and the Maiden (1994), Looking for Paradise (1995), Marianna Ucria (1977), and Life Is Beautiful (1997). • Los Angeles Times, Aug. 24, 2005, B8; New York Times, Aug. 21, 2005, 27; Time, Aug. 29, 2005, 21.

DELOREAN, JOHN Z. Automobile designer and executive John Z. DeLorean died of complications from a stroke in a Summit, New Jersey, hospital on March 19, 2005. He was 80. DeLorean was born in Detroit, Michigan, on January 6, 1925. He began working in the automotive industry as an engineer with Packard Motor Car Company in 1952. He moved over to General Motors in 1956 and became general manager of the Pontiac division in 1965. He was promoted to manager of the Chevrolet division in 1969 and became a General Motors vice president in 1972. He left the company the following year, claiming G.M. had conflicts with his often flamboyant business style. He subsequently formed his own automobile company in 1981, with a factory in Denmurry, Northern Ireland. Despite a large investment by the British government, the company developed financial difficulties and closed the following year. DeLorean Motors produced only one model, the DMC12, with about 9,000 cars coming off the assembly line before the plant shut down. The stainless steel sports car with doors that resembled gull wings when opened left a lasting impression and were featured as the timetraveling vehicle in the Back to the Future film series in the 1980s starring Michael J. Fox. DeLorean was subsequently charged with dealing in cocaine to save his company from bankruptcy, but was acquitted in a widely publicized trial in 1984. He co-wrote the book On a Clear Day You Can See General Motors with J. Patrick Wright in 1979, and was the subject of a documentary film, DeLorean, in 1981. He divorced his first wife, Elizabeth, after fifteen years of marriage in 1969. He subsequently married actress Kelly Harmon. They divorced three years later and, in 1974, he married actress and model Cristina Ferrare. Ferrare supported him throughout his legal difficulties, but the couple divorced in 1985. He is survived by his fourth wife, Sally. • Los Angeles

90 Times, Mar. 21, 2005, A1; New York Times, Mar. 21, 2005, B7; People, Apr. 4, 2005, 81; Time, Apr. 4, 2005, 19; Times (of London), Mar. 22, 2005, 61.

DELORME, GUY French actor Guy Delorme died in Bry-sur-Marne, France, on December 26, 2005. He was 76. Delorme was born in France on May 23, 1929. He was a popular performer on the French stage, screen, and television from the early 1950s. Delorme’s numerous film credits include Under the Paris Sky (1951), The Hunchback of Paris (1960), The Battle of Austerlitz (1960), Captain Blood (1960), Fortunate (1960), The Fighting Musketeers (1961), The Miracle of the Wolves (1961), Vengeance of the Three Musketeers (1961), Long Live Henry IV ... Long Live Love (1961), Captain Fracasse (1961), Rocambole (1962), Ladies’ Man (1962), The Mysteries of Paris (1962), Clash of Steel (1962), Your Turn, Darling (1963), The Gallant Musketeer (1964), FX 18, Secret Agent (1964), The Gorillas (1964), The Majordomo (1965), The Sucker (1965), OSS 117: Mission for a Killer (1965), Seven Guys and a Gal (1966), A Ace and Four Queens (1966), The Big Vacation (1967), The Madman of Lab Four (1967), Fantomas Against Scotland Yard (1967), The Last Adventure (1967), I Killed Rasputin (1967), Dead Run (1967), Farewell, Friend (1968), The Return of Monte Cristo (1968), The Comeuppance (1969), The Brain (1969), The Southern Star (1969), My Uncle Benjamin (1969), Atlantic Wall (1970), Take It Easy It’s a Waltz (1971), Quentin Durward (1971), Jesus Franco’s 1974 horror film Lorna, the Exorcist, The Main Thing Is to Love (1975), Blue Rita (1977), Perceval (1978), and Le Fou du Roi (1984). He was also seen in the tele-films The Hostage Tower (1980) and Robinson Crusoe and Man Friday (1981).

Guy Delorme

John Z. DeLorean

DE LOS ANGELES, VICTORIA Spanish operatic soprano Victoria de los Angeles died of respiratory failure in Barcelona, Spain, on January 15, 2005. She was 81. De los Angeles was born in Barcelona on November 1, 1923. She studied at the Barcelona Conservatory and made her professional debut in 1945. She performed on the BBC’s production of La Vida Breve in 1948. Over the next several years she performed in Paris, Salzburg, and London’s Covent Garden. She made her debut with the Metropolitan Opera in New York as Mar-

91

Victoria de los Angeles

guerite in 1951. She also performed with La Scala in Milan, Italy, from 1950 to 1956, and appeared in other productions at the Met throughout the decade. De los Angeles performed primarily as a concert singer from the early 1960s. She continued to sing in concerts and occasional operas until her retirement in March of 1994. • Los Angeles Times, Jan. 18, 2005, B11; New York Times, Jan. 16, 2005, 26; Times (of London), Jan. 17, 2005, 49.

DE MASI, FRANCESCO Italian film composer Francesco de Masi died in Rome on November 6, 2005. He was 75. De Masi was born in Rome on January 11, 1930. He composed scores for hundreds of films from the early 1960s. His numerous film credits include Suleiman the Conqueror (1961), Toto vs. Maciste (1962), The Red Sheik (1962), Colossus of the Arena (1962), The Carpet of Horror (1962), The Shadow of Zorro (1962), Goliath and the Sins of Babylon (1963), Son of Hercules in the Land of Darkness (1963), Hypnosis (1963), The Ghost (1963), Scarlet Eye (1963), The Burning of Rome (1963), Weapons of Vengeance (1963), Hercules vs. the Giant Warrior (1964), The Sign of the Coyote (1964), Magnificent Brutes of the West (1964), Samson in King Solomon’s Mines (1964), Seven Slaves Against Rome (1964), Two Gunmen (1964), Tiko and the Shark (1964), Seven Rebel Gladiators (1965), Temple of a Thousand Lights (1965), The Man from Oklahoma (1965), The Last of the Mohicans (1965), The Lion of Thebes (1965), Serenade for Two Spies (1965), The Revenge of Spartacus (1965), Desperate Mission (1965),

Francesco De Masi

2005 • Obituaries Man of the Cursed Valley (1965), Lone and Angry Man (1965), Seven Dollars on the Red (1966), An Angel for Satan (1966), Third Eye (1966), Operation Apocalypse (1966), Arizona Colt (1966), Any Gun Can Play (1966), Your Turn to Die (1967), The Fantastic Three (1967), Death Trip (1967), Two Crosses at Danger Pass (1967), Master Stroke (1967), Ringo, Face of Revenge (1967), The Murder Clinic (1967), Spies Kill Silently (1967), Blood Calls to Blood (1968), Fifteen Scaffolds for the Killer (1968), Taste of Death (1968), The Moment to Kill (1968), Time and Place for Killing (1968), The Magnificent Texan (1968), Seven Pistols for a Massacre (1968), Rattle Kid (1968), Johnny Hamlet (1968), Seven Winchesters for a Massacre (1968), Kill Them All and Come Back Alone (1968), Love Me, Baby, Love Me! (1969), Sartana Does Not Forgive (1969), Three Golden Serpents (1969), Lesbo (1969), Two Brothers, One Death (1969), Battle Squadron (1969), Ostia (1970), Challenge of the McKennas (1970), For a Fist in the Eye (1970), Mission Phantom (1970), Sartana’s Coming, Get Your Coffins Ready (1970), The Weekend Murders (1970), Zorro, Rider of Vengeance (1971), Vendetta at Dawn (1971), Crime Boss (1972), The Big Game (1972), African Story (1972), The House of the Doves (1972), Bloody Friday (1972), Pirates of Blood Island (1972), Bawdy Tales (1973), The Weapon, the Hour, and the Motive (1973), Org y of the Dead (1973), Silence the Witness (1974), The Arena (1974), Private Vices and Public Virtues (1975), Ettore the Trunk (1975), Counterfeit Commandos (1977), Weapons of Death (1977), Vengeance (1977), Nazi Love Camp 27 (1977), New York Ripper (1982), Horror Safari (1982), Rush (1983), Thor the Conqueror (1983), Lone Wolf McQuade (1983), Escape from the Bronx (1983), Thunder Warrior (1983), Deadly Impact (1984), Cobra Mission (1985), Mad Dog (1985) Formula for a Murder (1985), Days of Hell (1986), Thunder Warrior III (1988), Bye Bye Vietnam (1988), The Hateful Dead (1989), and The Tortilla Road (1991).

DE MESQUITA, BUENO Dutch entertainer Bueno De Mesquita died of complications from lung cancer and a brain tumor in Lelystad, the Netherlands, on August 19, 2005. He was 87. De Mesquita was born in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, on July 23, 1918. He teamed with Rita Corita from the 1950s, performing in vaudeville, television and films. De Mesquita was fea-

Bueno De Mesquita

Obituaries • 2005 tured in the films Tante Trude aus Buxtehude (1971), SexExpress in Oberbayern (1977), and Himmel, Scheich und Wolkenbruch (1979).

DENIZ, FRANK Guitarist Frank Deniz died in Stanstead Abbots, Hertfordshire, England, on July 17, 2005. He was 92. He was born Francisco Antonio Deniz in Cardiff, Wales, on July 21, 1912. He learned the guitar at an early age and moved to London to perform in 1937. He became a fixture on the Latin music scene there. Deniz served in the Merchant Marine during World War II and resumed his music career after the war. He became a member of Harry Parry’s Radio Rhythm Club Sextet and performed often on British radio. He also joined with his younger brothers, Joe and Laurie, to form the Hermanos Deniz Cuban Rhythm Band. Deniz played in the 1959 film Our Man in Havana, and was a leading session musician over the next two decades. He retired from performing in 1980.

Frank Deniz

DENNEY, DODO Actress Dolores “Dodo” Denney died at her home in Crestline, California, after a brief illness on November 20, 2005. She was 77. Denney was born in Kansas City, Missouri, on May 5, 1928. She began her career on local television playing Marilyn the Witch on The Witching Hour television program. She also performed in plays off–Broadway in New York. Denney was also featured in several films, notably as

Dodo Denney (as Marilyn the Witch)

92 Mrs. Teevee in 1971’s Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory with Gene Wilder. Her other film credits include Who’s Minding the Mint? (1967), I Walk the Line (1970), American Hot Wax (1978), Splash (1984), Mr. & Mrs. Bridge (1990), and Ride with the Devil (1999). She was also seen in the tele-films Good Old Days (1966), Do Not Fold, Spindle, or Mutilate (1971), The Amazing Cosmic Awareness of Duffy Moon (1976), My Mom’s Having a Baby (1977), Trouble River (1977), Skag (1980), Ethel Is an Elephant (1980), The Burden of Proof (1992), A Matter of Justice (1993), and Truman (1995). She also appeared on television in episodes of My Favorite Martian, I Spy, Bewitched, Green Acres, Get Smart, Petticoat Junction, McCloud, The Sandy Duncan Show, Starsky and Hutch, Soap, and Eight Is Enough.

DENNIS, BEVERLY Actress Beverly Dennis died of multiple myeloma on January 20, 2005. She was 79. Dennis was born in Rahway, New Jersey, on December 12, 1925. She appeared in several films in the early 1950s including Westward the Women (1951), Challenge of the Wilderness (1951), and Take Care of My Little Girl (1951). She also starred as Red Buttons’ wife in the television comedy series The Red Buttons Show in 1952, and was featured in episodes of Kraft Television Theatre and Danger. Dennis’ career, along with that of her husband, actor Russell Dennis, largely ended when they fell victim to the House Un-American Activities Committee blacklist. Dennis returned to school and studied to become a psychotherapist. • New York Times, Feb. 14, 2005, A19; Variety, Jan. 31, 2005, 69. DENNY, MARTIN Pianist and bandleader Martin Denny, who was known for his popular exotic tropical instrumental compositions in the 1950s, died in Hawai’i Kai, Hawaii, on March 2, 2005. He was 93. Denny was born in New York City on April 10, 1911. He performed in bands from the early 1930s and served in the U.S. Army Air Force during World War II. After the war he performed as an accompanist for performers Betty Hutton and Hildegarde. He formed a popular musical group in Hawaii in 1955, and recorded the 1959 hit instrumental “Quiet Village.” He topped the charts with his album Exotica, and recorded such songs as “Primativa,” “Island of Dreams,” “Hypnotique,” “Love at Sight,” “Blue Paradise,” “Sake Rock,” “Cobra,” and

Martin Denny

93 “Burma Train.” Denny’s popularity subsided in the early 1960s. • Los Angeles Times, Mar. 7, 2005, B7; New York Times, Mar. 5, 2005, A11; Variety, Mar. 7, 2005, 62.

DENVER, BOB Bob Denver, who starred as First Mate Gilligan in the television cult comedy classic Gilligan’s Island, died of complications from surgery for throat cancer at a Winston-Salem, North Carolina, hospital on September 2, 2005. He was 70. Denver was born in New Rochelle, New York, on January 9, 1935. He began his career on stage in the late 1950s, making his debut in a production of The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial with the Del Ray Players in Los Angeles. Denver was given a screen test for a role in the comedy series The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis starring Dwayne Hickman. He landed the role of Dobie’s beatnik buddy Maynard G. Krebs. Denver became a comic icon with the laid-back Krebs character. Maynard was noted for his aversion to work, voicing a gasping exclamation “Work!?!” whenever anyone would evoke the word in his presence. The series ran from 1959 to 1963. He also appeared in small roles in several films including A Private’s Affair (1959), Take Her, She’s Mine (1963), and For Those Who Think Young (1964). In 1964 he began his best known role as Gilligan, first mate on the S.S. Minnow, a small ship whose “three hour tour” ends up with the passengers and crew stranded on an uncharted tropical island. Marooned with Gilligan were the Skipper (Alan Hale, Jr.), the millionaire, Thurston Howell, III ( Jim Backus), and his wife, Lovey Howell (Natalie Schafer), the movie star, Ginger Grant (Tina Louise), the Professor (Russell Johnson), and Mary Ann (Dawn Wells). Gilligan’s Island ran for three seasons and has aired in reruns ever since. It also spawned several reunion tele-films with Denver and most of the cast returning. They included Rescue from Gilligan’s Island (1978), The Castaways on Gilligan’s Island (1979) and The Harlem Globetrotters on Gilligan’s Island (1981). Denver also was the voice of Gilligan in the 1974 cartoon series The New Adventures of Gilligan and 1982’s Gilligan’s Planet. Denver also appeared in the films Who’s Minding the Mint? (1967), The Sweet Ride (1968), and Did You Hear the One About the Traveling Saleslady? (1968). He returned to television as Rufus Butterworth in the comedy series The Good Guys in 1968, co-starring with Herb Edelman for two seasons. He

2005 • Obituaries starred as Dusty in the comedy western Dusty’s Trail with Forrest Tucker in 1973, and was Junior in the children’s comedy series Far Out Space Nuts from 1975 to 1976. Denver was also a frequent performer in Steve Martin’s Twilight Theater in 1982, and appeared in the tele-films Scamps (1982), The Invisible Woman (1983), and High School U.S.A. (1983). He also appeared in the feature film Back to the Beach (1987). He reprised his role as Maynard G. Krebs in the 1988 television reunion film Bring Me the Head of Dobie Gillis. He appeared in the 2002 television documentary Surviving Gilligan’s Island: The Incredibly True Story of the Longest Three Hour Tour in History, and played Gilligan once more in the 2004 film Miss Cast Away. Denver’s other television credits include guest roles in episodes of Dr. Kildare, The Farmer’s Daughter, The Andy Griffith Show, Make Room for Daddy, I Dream of Jeannie, Love, American Style, The Love Boat, Fantasy Island, The New Gidget, ALF, Baywatch, Evening Shade, Herman’s Head, Roseanne, Meego, and The Simpsons as a voice actor. • Los Angeles Times, Sept. 7, 2005, B10; New York Times, Sept. 7, 2005, C20; People, Sept. 19, 2005, 208; Time, Sept. 19, 2005, 21; Times (of London), Sept. 9, 2005, 79; Variety, Sept. 12, 2005, 81.

DE ROOCK, ROBRECHT Belgian television actor and entertainer Robrecht De Roock died in Belgium on January 23, 2005. He was 33. De Roock was born in Ninove, Flanders, Belgium, on March 25, 1971. He starred in several television series in Belgium from the early 1990s including Familie Backelijau, Sterke Verhalen, De Jacques Vermeire Show, Chris & Co, and Zone Stad.

Robrecht De Roock

Bob Denver

DERVIN, JOSEPH T. Film and television editor Joseph T. Dervin died in Calabasas, California, on June 20, 2005. He was 90. Dervin was born in Somerville, Massachusetts, on November 4, 1914. He began working in films in the late 1930s, editing features at MGM Studios. He edited the films Desire Me (1947), No Questions Asked (1951), Desperate Search (1952), Bright Road (1953), and Fast Company (1953). He began working primarily in television in the 1950s, and was supervising editor on The Loretta Young Show for eight years. He also edited Kung Fu, Charlie’s Angels, The Eleventh Hour, The Ghost and Mrs. Muir, and The Young Lawyers.

Obituaries • 2005

94 Heels (2001), See Jane Run (2001), The Man Who Wasn’t There (2001), Human Nature (2001), I Am Sam (2001), Die, Mommie, Die! (2003), and The Aviator (2004) as Louis B. Mayer. DeSantis starred as Norman Neal Williams in the award-winning mini-series Armistead Maupin’s Tales of the City. He also appeared as Mr. V in the 2000 series The Near Future, and was producer Scott Wick on HBO’s Entourage in 2005. DeSantis’ other television credits include episodes of Fame, Moonlighting, Doctor Doctor, ALF, My So-Called Life in the recurring role of social studies teacher Mr. Demitri, Early Edition, NYPD Blue, Tracey Takes On, Stark Raving Mad, Curb Your Enthusiasm, and Six Feet Under. • Variety, Aug. 29, 2005, 85.

Joseph T. Dervin

Dervin received an Emmy Award for editing The Man from U.N.C.L.E. in 1966, and for his work on Longstreet in 1972. He also edited the feature film versions made from Man from U.N.C.L.E. episodes including The Spy with My Face (1965), The Spy in the Green Hat (1966), and The Helicopter Spies (1968), and edited the 1967 film Brighty of the Grand Canyon. • Variety, July 18, 2005, 49.

DESANTIS, STANLEY Character actor Stanley DeSantis died of a heart attack in Los Angeles on August 16, 2005. He was 52. DeSantis was born in Roslyn, New York, in 1953. He was raised in Chicago and attended New York University film school. He was featured as Gagarian in the television series Paper Chase from 1978 to 1979. He also appeared in the tele-films Rape and Marriage: The Rideout Case (1980), Paper Dolls (1982), Medusa: Dare to Be Truthful (1992), National Lampoon’s Attack of the 5 Ft. 2 Woman (1994), Witch Hunt (1994), Broken Trust (1995), The Barefoot Executive (1995), The Beneficiary (1997), and Lansky (1999). He was also seen in numerous feature films including Black Moon Rising (1986), Vital Signs (1990), Taking Care of Business (1990), Candyman (1992), Caged Fear (1992), Doppelganger (1993), Ed Wood (1994), The Birdcage (1996), The Truth About Cats & Dogs (1996), The Fan (1996), After the Game (1997), Fools Rush In (1997), Clockwatchers (1997), Boogie Nights (1997), Heartwood (1998), Bulworth (1998), Rush Hour (1998), Head Over

Stanley DeSantis

DESMOND, FRANKIE British comedian Frankie Desmond died in England on July 4, 2005. He was 74. Desmond was born in Cardiff, Wales, in May of 1931. He began his career performing in revues in Scarborough under the name of Mr. Scarborough. He wrote material for comedians on the BBC and had success as a stand-up comedian. He was best known for his performances as a pantomime dame. • Times (of London), Aug. 20, 2005, 67.

Frankie Desmond

DETLIE, JOHN S. Hollywood set designer and architect John S. Detlie died of lung cancer in Westlake Village, California, on November 30, 2005. He was 96. Detlie was born in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, on December 23, 1908. He studied architecture at the University of Pennsylvania and moved to Hollywood after his graduation in 1933 to work in films. He worked on numerous features over the next decade as an art director and production designer. His film credits include Mama Steps Out (1937), A Family Affair (1937), Saratoga (1937), Everybody Sing (1938), Test Pilot (1938), Hold That Kiss (1938), Three Loves Has Nancy (1938), A Christmas Carol (1938), Lucky Night (1939), On Borrowed Time (1938), Another Thin Man (1939), Broadway Melody of 1940 (1940), Edison, the Man (1940), Strike Up the Band (1940), Bitter Sweet (1940) which earned him an Academy Award nomination, Andy Hardy’s Private Secretary (1941), The Bad Man (1941), Lady Be Good (1941), The Chocolate Soldier (1941), I Married an Angel (1942), Crossroads (1942), The War Against Mrs. Hadley (1942), and

95

2005 • Obituaries

John S. Detlie

Armand Deutsch (with his wife, Harriet)

Panama Hattie (1942). Detlie left films in the early 1940s to join and architectural firm. During World War II he was assigned to camouflage the Boeing airplane factory in Seattle, Washington, to confuse enemy bombers. Detlie was married to actress Veronica Lake from 1940 until 1943. He is survived by his second wife, Virginia, whom he married in 1946.

When he was picked up by a chauffeur instead of walking home, Leopold and Loeb chose Bobby Franks as their victim instead on May 24, 1924. The notorious murder case in what was basically a motiveless crime, was the inspiration for several films including Alfred Hitchcock’s Rope. Deutsch worked as an investment broker after college and served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. After the war he went to Hollywood, where he produced several films including Ambush (1949), The Magnificent Yankee (1950), Right Cross (1950), Three Guys Named Mike (1951), Kind Lady (1951), The Girl in White (1952), Carbine Williams (1952), The Girl Who Had Everything (1953), Green Fire (1954), Slander (1956), and Saddle the Wind (1958). He became a close friend of such Hollywood personalities as Humphrey Bogart and Ronald and Nancy Reagan. He was also a leading patron of the arts, serving as president of the board of the Center Theater Group from 1972 to 1976. When Reagan became president he appoint Deutsch as a member of the Presidential Task Force on the Arts and Humanities. Deutsch was also author of the book Me and Bogie, and Other Friends and Acquaintances from a Life in Hollywood and Beyond in 1991. • Los Angeles Times, Aug. 17, 2005, B10; New York Times, Aug. 18, 2005, A23; Variety, Aug. 29, 2005, 85.

DETROIT JUNIOR Emery Williams, Jr., the blues pianist and songwriter who was known as Detroit Junior, died of heart failure at his home in Chicago on August 9, 2005. He was 73. Williams was born on October 26, 1931. He began his career playing clubs in Michigan, and was dubbed Detroit Junior when he began performing in Chicago in the 1950s. He recorded four albums during his career and his songs were also recorded by Kole Taylor and Albert King, including the hit tune “Call My Job.” • Los Angeles Times, Aug. 14, 2005, B14; Times (of London), Aug. 19, 2005, 63.

DEWEY, CHAS Actor and model Casand “Chas” Dewey drowned while swimming at Lake Isabella

Detroit Junior

DEUTSCH, ARMAND Film producer Armand Deutsch died of complications from pneumonia at a Los Angeles hospital on August 13, 2005. He was 92. Deutsch was born to a wealthy family in Chicago on January 25, 1913. He was the grandson of Julius Rosenwald, the chairman of Sears, Roebuck and Co. At the age of 11 he was the intended victim of murderers Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb, who planned to kill him.

Chas Dewey

Obituaries • 2005

96

near Bakersfield, California, on June 25, 2005. He was 20. Dewey was born in Alexandria, Virginia, on November 2, 1984. He began working as a model as a child, and performed in stage productions and operas in the 1990s. He starred as Neil in the MTV television series Undressed in 2001, and guest starred in an episode of Even Stevens.

DIAMOND, DAVID Leading American composer David Diamond died of congestive heart failure in an assisted living facility in Rochester, New York, on June 13, 2005. He was 89. Diamond was born in Rochester on July 9, 1915. He studied with Roger Sessions in New York and went to Paris to study under Nadia Boulanger in 1936. He was already an acclaimed composer when he returned to the United States, and his First Symphony premiered with the New York Philharmonic in 1941. Diamond’s best known compositions include “Rounds,” written for a string orchestra in 1944. He also composed eleven symphonies, ten string quartets, and various concertos and other pieces of chamber music. Diamond’s fame was eclipsed by the onset of atonal music in the 1950s, but there was a subsequent resurgence of his composition and 1980s and 1990s. • Los Angeles Times, June 16, 2005, B11; New York Times, June 15, 2005, C20; Time, June 27, 2005, 23; Times (of London), July 1, 2005, 70.

Romy Diaz

man’s 1957 science fiction feature Attack of the Crab Monsters, playing a small role in the film and assisting in the operation the Crab Monsters. He was also seen in the films Rock All Night (1957), Loving You (1957), Sorority Girl (1957), War of the Satellites (1958), Teenage Cave Man (1958) with Robert Vaughn, T-Bird Gang (1959) also serving as assistant director, G.I. Blues (1960), Creature from the Haunted Sea (1961), Shell Shock (1964), The Trip (1967), Like Mother Like Daughter (1968), The Savage Seven (1968), Killers Three (1968), Gun Runner (1969) and Angels Die Hard (1970) which he also produced, The Dunwich Horror (1970), Runaway, Runaway (1971), Bury Me an Angel (1972), Welcome Home, Soldier Boys (1972), Summer School Teachers (1974), Capone (1975), Crazy Mama (1975), Cocaine and Blue Eyes (1983), School Spirit (1985), Deadly Dreams (1988), and Future Kick (1991). Dickerson also appeared on television in episodes of The Fall Guy and The Greatest American Hero.

David Diamond

DIAZ, ROMY Philippine character actor Romy Diaz died of cancer of the tongue in a Manila, Philippines, hospital on May 10, 2005. He was 64. Dias appeared in numerous films from the 1960s including Kid Brother (1968), Diegong Daga (1968), Brothers for Hire (1968), Devil Woman (1970), Wonder Vi (1973), The Impossible Kod of Kung Fu (1982), Jungle Wolf (1986), Fast Gun (1987), Nam Angels (1989), Live by the Fist (1993), Angelfist (1993), The Dancer (1997), Spspek (1999), The Expert (2000), Tumbador (2000), Panabla (2001), and Putik (2003). DICKERSON, BEACH Actor Beach Dickerson, who was featured in such Roger Corman cult classics as Attack of the Crab Monsters and Creature from the Haunted Sea, died in Los Angeles of December 7, 2005. He was 81. Dickerson was born in Glenville, Georgia in 1924. He made his film debut working on Roger Cor-

Beach Dickerson

DI FRANCESCANTONIO, FRANCO Italian actor and dancer Franco Di Francescantonio died in Florence, Italy, after a long illness on July 27, 2005. He was 52. Di Francescantonio was born in Monterotondo, Italy, in 1953. He began his career on stage in Florence in the early 1970s. He performed on stage throughout Italy and Spain. He was also seen in several films including Endora (1999), Goya in Bordeaux (1999), The Comeback (2001), and God Is on Air (2002). • Variety, Dec. 26, 2005, 37.

97

2005 • Obituaries tary. He also appeared on Broadway in productions of The Wonderful World of Burlesque and Ziegfeld Follies. Dillon performed on television in the 1950s with Perry Como, Victor Borge, Milton Berle and Martha Raye. He also performed for over a decade with vaudeville star Bert Wheeler. Dillon was also seen in several films including The Two Mrs. Grenvilles, Anastasia, Slaughterhouse Five, and Family Business (1989). • Los Angeles Times, Mar. 17, 2005, B11; New York Times, Mar. 18, 2005, B8.

Franco Di Francescantonio

DI GIUSEPPE, ENRICO American operatic tenor Enrico Di Giuseppe died of cancer in Voorhees, New Jersey on December 31, 2005. He was 73. Di Giuseppe was born to Italian immigrants in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on October 14, 1932. He studied music and singing at Juilliard and performed in various productions. He made his debut with the New York City Opera on a 1965 production of Gian Carlo Menotti’s Saint of Bleecker Street. His debut at the Metropolitan Opera was in Madame Butterfly in 1970 opposite Martina Arroyo. He remained a fixture at the New York City Opera for nearly two decades starring in productions of La Traviata, Cavalleria Rusticana, and The Barber of Seville. From the mid–1980s Di Giuseppe performed primarily with the New York Grand Opera, notably starring in the cycle of Verdi Operas in Central Park. • New York Times, Jan. 6, 2006, B7.

Tom Dillon

DIMITROVA, GHENA Bulgarian operatic soprano Ghena Dimitrova died in a hospital in Milan, Italy, on July 11, 2005. She was 64. Dimitrova was born in Bulgaria on May 6, 1941. She made her professional debut in 1965, performing with the Sofia National Opera in Bulgaria. She also sang at La Scala in Milan, the Paris Opera, the Vienna State Opera, and starred in Turandot with the Metropolitan Opera in New York in 1987. She was noted for her performances in such productions as Verdi’s Nabucco, Aida, Cavalleria Rusticana, Tosca, and many others. • Los Angeles Times, June 12, 2005, B15; New York Times, June 13, 2005, B8.

Enrico Di Giuseppe

DILLON, TOM Actor Tom Dillon, who headed the show-business industry charity foundation The Actors’ Fund of America from 1989 to 2004, died at The Actors’ Fund Home in Englewood, New Jersey, on March 14, 2005. He was 86. Dillon was born in Brooklyn, New York, on September 3, 1918. He began performing on stage and radio in the 1930s. Dillon served in the U.S. Armed Forces during World War II and appeared on Broadway in the Moss Hart classic Winged Victory with servicemen from all branches of the mili-

Ghena Dimitrova

DIMITROVA, MARIANA Bulgarian actress Mariana Dimitrova committed suicide on June 2, 2005, by leaping from the eighth floor of a San Diego, California, building, where she had resided with her family

Obituaries • 2005

98 2010 (1994), Mario Puzo’s The Last Don (1997), and First-Time Felon (1997). His other television credits include episodes of Tales of the Gold Monkey, Spenser: For Hire, B.L. Stryker, Wiseguy, The 100 Lives of Black Jack Savage, Roc, The X Files, Nash Bridges, NYPD Blue, Millennium, Brooklyn South, ER, Chicago Hope, The Fugitive, and The Lone Gunmen. • Variety, Jan. 22, 2005, 69.

Mariana Dimitrova

since 1997. She was 51. Dimitrova was born in Kozarevetz, Bulgaria, on May 28, 1954. She was a leading actress in Bulgarian films from the 1970s, starring in such films as Strong Water (1975), Doomed Souls (1975), Bittersweet (1975), Fairy Dance (1976), Manly Times (1977), Be Blessed (1978), Almost a Love Story (1980), Ladies Choice (1980), Elegy (1982), Green Fields (1984), My Darling, My Darling (1986), Bird of Prey (1995), and TapTap (1996).

D’JOLA, BADJA Actor Badja D’jola died in Los Angeles of a heart attack on January 8, 2005. He was 56. D’jola was born on April 9, 1948. He performed on stage as a dancer and African drummer. He began his career in films in the late 1970s, appearing in such features as The Man Event (1979), Penitentiary (1980), Night Shift (1982), The Lonely Guy (1984), The Lightship (1985), The Serpent and the Rainbow (1988), Mississippi Burning (1988), An Innocent Man (1989), A Rage in Harlem (1991), The Last Boy Scout (1991), The Waterdance (1992), Who’s the Man? (1993), Eddie Presley (1993), Heaven’s Prisoners (1996), Rosewood (1997), Gunshy (1998), The Players Club (1998), Butter (1998), Deterrence (1999), The Hurricane (1999), Lost in the Pershing Point Hotel (2000), The Price of Air (2000), Night at the Golden Eagle (2002), Back in the Day (2004), and Slipdream (2005). D’jola was also featured in the tele-films Christmas on Division Street (1991), Marked for Murder (1993), Knight Rider

DJORDJEVIC, ALEKSANDAR Serbian film director Aleksandar Djordjevic died in Beograd, Serbia, on April 27, 2005. He was 80. Djordjevic was born in Subotica, Serbia, Yugoslavia, on July 28, 1924. He began his career as a director of stage productions at the National Theater. He also directed television dramas and series for Television Belgrade. He made his feature film debut with 1974’s Written Off. He also directed the films The Written Off Return (1976), Arrive Before Daybreak (1978), The Adventures of Borivoje Surdilovic (1980), Balkan Express 2 (1988), and Tajna Porodicnog Blaga (2000). He also continued to work in television, helming numerous productions until his death. DODD, MAURICE British cartoonist Maurice Dodd died of a brain hemorrhage at a hospital in Ashford, Surrey, England, on December 31, 2005. He was 83. Dodd was born in Hackney, England, on October 25, 1922. He served in the Royal Air Force during World War II, and studied art after his discharge. He worked in advertising before he began writing the comic strip The Perishers for The Daily Mirror in the late 1950s, partnered with artist Dennis Collins. The cartoon revolved around the antics of a group of children and their Old English Sheep Dog, Boot. He became involved in adapting the The Perishers for television in the early 1980s. Dodd continued to both write and draw the strip after Collins retired in 1983 until Bill Mevin became artist in 1992. Dodd wrote storylines for the comic until his death.

Maurice Dodd

Badja D’jola

DODDS, JOHN Canadian rodeo champion and stuntman John Dodds died of cancer in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, on April 24, 2005. He was 56. Dodds was born in Ponoka, Alberta, Canada, in 1948. He began competing in rodeos at the age of nine. He became a

99

2005 • Obituaries

DODERER, JOOP Dutch actor Joop Doderer died in Roelofarendsveen, the Netherlands, on September 22, 2005. He was 84. Doderer was born in Velsen, the Netherlands, on August 28, 1921. Active on stage, films, and television, he appeared in the films Op de Hollandse Toer (1973), Apart (1971), The Human Factor (1979), Moord in Extase (1984), De Prooi (1985), Wilde Harten (1989), Last Call (1995), Little Crumb (1999), Dial 9 for Love (2001), and Peter Bell (2002). He was also seen in television productions of De Ware Jakob (1983), De Sylvia Millecam Show (1995), Joop en Gaston (1995), De Kapsalon (1999), and Viva Boer Gerrit (2000).

DOOHAN, JAMES James Doohan, who starred as the Starship Enterprise chief engineer, Scotty, in the original Star Trek television series and subsequent films, died of complications from pneumonia and Alzheimer’s disease in Redmond, Washington, on July 20, 2005. He was 85. Doohan was born in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, on March 3, 1920. He served in the Canadian army during World War II, and was badly injured with six bullet wounds after landing on Juno Beach on D-Day. After the war he began studying drama in Toronto and at New York’s Neighborhood Playhouse. Doohan became a master of dialects and was a popular radio performer and appeared on television in Canada and the United States. He starred as Phil Mitchell in the 1953 science fiction television series Space Command. He was also seen in episodes of Tales of Tomorrow and Hawkeye and the Last of the Mohicans, and the Canadian short films Strike in Town (1955) and Strike in Town: Revised (1956). Doohan also appeared in the films The Cage (1956), Test Pilot (1957), and The Business of Farming (1961), and television productions of Flight into Danger (1956) and The Labyrinth (1963). He worked in Hollywood from the early 1960s, appearing in small roles in the films The Wheeler Dealers (1963), 36 Hours (1965), The Satan Bug (1965), and Bus Riley’s Back in Town (1965), and the tele-film Scalplock (1966). He also guest-starred in episodes of The New Breed, Bonanza, Gunsmoke, The Twilight Zone, Hazel, The Virginian, G.E. True, The Gallant Men, Empire, The Outer Limits, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, The Rogues, Ben Casey, The Fugitive, Laredo, Convoy, Bewitched, The F.B.I., A Man Called Shenandoah, The Iron Horse, and Jericho. When he auditioned for the role of the chief engineer for producer Gene Roddenberry’s new NBC science fiction television series, Doohan tried seven different accents for the role. When the producers asked him which he preferred, Doohan responded, “If this character is going to be an engineer, you’d better make him a Scotsman.” He was featured as Lt. Commander Montgomery “Scotty” Scott for three seasons on NBC from 1966 until 1969. The series starred William Shatner as the dynamic Captain James T. Kirk and Leonard Nimoy as the emotionless half–Vulcan science officer, Mr. Spock. Despite a huge fan following for the series the network cancelled Star Trek due to low ratings. The series leg-

Joop Doderer

James Doohan

John Dodds

member of the Canadian Professional Rodeo Association in the 1960s, He was the Canadian bull riding champion in 1969, 1971, 1972, and 1977. Dodds was also a stuntman in films, working on such features as Dead Bang (1989), The Fourth War (1990), Landslide (1992), Legends of the Fall (1994), Last of the Dogmen (1995), The Scarlet Letter (1995), Portraits of a Killer (1996), Carpool (1996), The Long Kiss Goodnight (1996), Wrongfully Accused (1998), The 13th Warrior (1999), Rat Race (2001), Jet Boy (2001), and John Q (2002). Dodds also worked on the telefilms Convict Cowboy (1995), Black Fox: Good Men and Bad (1995), Dead Man’s Gun (1997), Roughing It (2002), Johnson County War (2002), and Monte Walsh (2003), and did stuntwork for the television series Lonesome Dove: The Series and Lonesome Dove: The Outlaw Years.

Obituaries • 2005

100

endary fan base, known as “Trekkies” or “Trekkers,” kept interest in Star Trek and its cast and characters alive, and becoming even more popular in syndication. Doohan continued acting, appearing in the films Jigsaw (1968), Pretty Maids All in a Row (1971), Man in the Wilderness (1971), and Danny (1977), and guest-starring on television in episodes of Then Came Bronson, Daniel Boone, and Fantasy Island. He returned to the character of Scott for the first time in 1973, voicing the chief engineer and several other characters for the Star Trek animated series. After the success of George Lucas’ science fiction epic Star Wars in 1977, Paramount finally decided to create a film version of the Star Trek series. Reuniting Doohan with the rest of the original cast Star Trek: The Motion Picture was directed by veteran director Robert Wise and was one of 1979’s most successful releases. Doohan returned as Scotty in subsequent sequels including Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan (1982), Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (1984), Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1986), Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (1989), Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991), and Star Trek: Generations (1994). He also starred as Commander Canarvin in the Saturday morning juvenile science fiction series Jason of Star Command, which aired as a live-action segment of the animated Tarzan and the Super 7 series from 1978 to 1980. He was also seen in episodes of Magnum, P.I., Hotel, MacGyver, and The Ben Stiller Show. Doohan’s later film credits include the tele-film Knight Rider 2000 (1991), Double Trouble (1992), Amore! (1993), National Lampoon’s Loaded Weapon 1 (1993), New York Skyride (1994), Storybook (1995), Bug Buster (1998), Through Dead Eyes (1999), and The Duke (1999). Doohan visited the Star Trek spin-off series Star Trek: The Next Generation in 1992, emerging from suspended animation as Scotty in the episode “Relics.” He also made numerous live appearances at Star Trek fan gatherings and conventions throughout the world, and appeared in the 1997 about the series’ fandom, Trekkies. He also performed Scotty’s voice for many of the Star Trek video games. Doohan appeared as Damon Warwick on the daytime soap opera The Bold and the Beautiful in 1993 and in 1998, and starred as Pippen in the comedy sci-fi series Homeboys in Outer Space in 1996. His last film credit was the 2005 direct-to-video horror film Skinwalker: Curse of the Shaman. • Los Angeles Times, July 21, 2005, B8; New York Times, July 21, 2005, A27; People, Aug. 8, 2005, 77; Time, Aug. 1, 2005, 19; Times (of London), July 21, 2005, 62; Variety, July 25, 2005, 55.

DOUGHERTY, JAMES James Dougherty, who was married to Marilyn Monroe before she became a film star, died of complications from leukemia in San Rafael, California, on August 15, 2005. He was 84. Dougherty was born on April 12, 1921. He began dating Norma Jean Baker in January of 1942, and the two were married on June 19, 1942, when she was 16 years old. He joined the merchant marine several years later and was shipped overseas. Norma Jean Baker soon began getting modelling assignments and starting a film career. She divorced Dougherty in September of 1946 after signing a contract with 20th Century–Fox. She soon became known as sex symbol Marilyn Monroe. Dougherty

James Dougherty

joined the Los Angeles police department, serving 25 years until his retirement in 1974. He later wrote two books about his relationship with Monroe, The Secret Happiness of Marilyn Monroe (1976) and To Norma Jeane with Love, Jimmie (1997). He also appeared in the documentary film Marilyn’s Man in 2004. • Los Angeles Times, Aug. 18, 2005, B10; New York Times, Apr. 19, 2005, C13.

DOWNING, BIG AL Country singer and songwriter Big Al Downing died of leukemia in a Massachusetts hospital on July 4, 2005. He was 65. Downing was born in Leicester, Massachusetts, on January 9, 1940. He began his career as a keyboardist in Wanda Jackson’s rockabilly band in 1957, performing on many of her hit songs including “Let’s Have a Party.” He remained with Jackson until 1964. Fats Domino recorded two of Downing’s songs, “Heartbreak Hill” and “Mary, Oh Mary,” in the early 1960s, and such artists as Tom Jones, Webb Wilder, and Bobby ‘Blue’ Bland also recorded his compositions. Downing had a solo hit himself with 1974’s “I’ll Be Holdin’ On.” He became one of the few black artists to have success in the field of country music and was named Billboard’s Best New Male Country Singles Artist in 1979. His final album, One of a Kind, was released in 2003. • Los Angeles Times, July 7, 2005, B10; New York Times, July 8, 2005, B8; Times (of London), Aug. 4, 2005, 57.

Big Al Downing

101 DOWNING, PATRICK British film and television production designer Patrick Downing died in Norwich, Norfolk, England, on January 9, 2005. He was 76. Downing was born in London on April 5, 1928. He worked as a art director and set designer for the television series Dimensions of Fear, Armchair Theatre, The Avengers, and Out of This World. He was also production designer for the 1972 film Pulp, and the television mini-series Napoleon and Love (1972). DOYLE, TERRY Canadian actor Terry Doyle died of a heart attack in Grand Bend, Ontario, Canada, on June 3, 2005. He was 71. Doyle was born in Guelph, Ontario, Canada, in 1933. He began his acting career on stage at the Guelph Little Theatre. He appeared in several films from the 1970s including Recommendation for Mercy (1975), Night Friend (1987), Prom Night III: The Last Kiss (1989), Change of Heart (1992), and The Spreading Ground (2000). He was also seen in the tele-films Danielle Steele’s Kaleidoscope (1990), The Good Fight (1992), and Alley Cats Strike (2000). His other television credits include episodes of The Littlest Hobo, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Diamonds, Street Legal, and Maniac Mansion.

2005 • Obituaries

October 16, 2005. He was 80. Dresslar was born Elmer L. Dresslar in St. Francis, Kansas, on March 25, 1925. He began performing on stage in the 1950s, touring with the national production of South Pacific. He was a regular performer on the Chicago television variety program In Town Tonight from 1955 to 1960. During the 1960s Dresslar performed and recorded with the groups The J’s with Jamie and The Singers Unlimited. He also sang in numerous television and radio commercials for over forty years. Besides the Jolly Green Giant, Dresslar was the voice of Snap for Rice Krispies’ Snap, Crackle and Pop trio, Kellogg’s Sugar Smacks’ Dig’em the frog, and the Marlboro Man. He retired to Palm Springs in 1991. • Los Angeles Times, Oct. 27, 2005, B11; People, Nov. 14, 2005, 99; Time, Nov. 7, 2005, 23; Variety, Oct. 31, 2005, 73.

DRINDA , HORST German actor Horst Drinda died in Berlin on February 21, 2005. He was 77. Drinda was born in Berlin on May 1, 1927. He appeared in numerous German films from the 1950s including Dr. Semmelweis (1950), The Brave Little Tailor (1956), Lissy (1957), Encounters in the Dark (1960), The Best Years (1965), The Red Orchestra (1971), Two Lines in Small Font (1981), and Jailbirds (1996). He was also a popular performer on German television appearing in numerous tele-films and the series Zur See (1977), Alone Among Wolves (1979), and Aerolina (1990).

Terry Doyle

DRESSLAR, LEN Actor Len Dresslar, who was best known as the voice of the Jolly Green Giant in commercials, died in Palm Springs, California, on

Horst Drinda

DROVE , ANTONIO Spanish film director Antonio Drove died in Paris on September 24, 2005. He was 62. Drove was born in Madrid, Spain, on November 1, 1942. He wrote and directed the films La Primera Comunion (1966), La Caza de Brujas (1967), Que se Pueda Hacer con una Chica (1969), Tocata y Fuga de Lolita (1974), We Who Were So Happy (1976), The Truth on the Savolta Affair (1980), The Tunnel (1987), and the tele-film La Huella del Crimen 2: El Crimen de Don Benito (1990). Drove also scripted the films Al Diablo con el Amor (1973) and B Must Die (1975).

Len Dresslar

DRYDEN, SPENCER Musician Spencer Dryden, who served as the drummer for the legendary rock group Jefferson Airplane in the 1960s, died of stomach cancer at his home in Penngrove, California, on January 11, 2005. He was 66. Dryden was born in New York

Obituaries • 2005

102 and Svullo, and the 1991 sequel Angne and Svullo ’Har och Nu! He appeared frequently of Swedish television, starring in the series 1628 (1991), V som i Viking (1991), and Lukas 1:18 (1999). He was also featured in the films Lilla Jonssonligan och Cornflakeskuppen (1996), Lilla Jonssonligan pa Styva Linan (1997), Sex, Logner & Videovald (2000), and Naked (2000).

Antonio Drove

City on April 7, 1938, and moved to Los Angeles with his family as an infant. He began playing in rock bands in the 1950s and was selected to replace Skip Spence as Jefferson Airplane’s drummer in 1966. He performed on some of the group’s best known albums including Surrealistic Pillow, Bless Its Pointed Little Head, Volunteers, and Crown of Creation. He left the group in 1970 and joined the country-rock band New Riders of the Purple Sage the following year. He played on many of that bands albums including the 1973 hit The Adventures of Panama Red. He briefly served as the band’s manager before leaving in 1978. Dryden joined with other rock music veterans to form the group the Dinosaurs in the 1980s. He also played with Barry Melton’s band before retiring in 1995. Dryden was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame with the other members of Jefferson Airplane in 1996. He had been suffering from poor health for several years before his death. • Los Angeles Times, Jan. 14, 2005, B9; People, Jan. 31, 2005, 85; Time, Jan. 24, 2005, 21; Times (of London), Jan. 15, 2005, 71; Variety, Jan. 24, 2005, 55.

Micke Dubois

DUFILHO, JACQUES Leading French comic actor Jacques Dufilho died in Paris on August 28, 2005. He was 91. Dufilho was born in Begles, France, on February 19, 1914. He was a leading performer on the French stage, films and television from the late 1930s. Dufilho appeared in over 100 films during his career including Sideral Cruises (1942), Adieu Leonard (1943), Criminal Brigade (1947), The Farm of Seven Sins (1949), Unusual Tales (1949), Dear Caroline (1951), Two Pennies Worth of Violets (1951), Crimson Curtain (1952), Caroline Cherie (1953), Saadia (1953), Knight of the Night (1954), Love in a Hot Climate (1954), CadetRousselle (1954), Photo Finish (1956), Marie Antoinette (1956), Life Is Beautiful (1956), The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1956) with Anthony Quinn as Quasimodo, Until the Last One (1957), The Happy Road (1957), The Nude Set (1957), The Foxiest Girl in Paris (1957), A Tale of Two Cities (1958), Hardboiled Egg Time (1958), Honey, Scare Me (1958), Maxime (1958), The Little Pro-

Spencer Dryden

DUBOIS, MICKE Swedish actor Micke Dubois died in Sweden on December 2, 2005. He was 46. Dubois was born in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 21, 1959. He wrote and starred in the 1988 film Angne

Jacques Dufilho

103 fessor (1959), Bobosse (1959), The Overtaxed (1959), Julie the Redhead (1959), Signed, Arsene Lupin (1959), Work and Freedom (1959), Premeditation (1960), Zazie in the Subway (1960), Amazons of Rome (1961), The Black Monocle (1961), Moonlight in Maubeuge (1962), War of the Buttons (1962), The Doll (1962), Snobs! (1962), The Murderer Knows the Score (1963), Good King Dagobert (1963), Sweet and Sour (1963), Mission to Venice (1964), The Visit (1964), The Big Scare (1964), The Wacky World of James Tont (1965), Public School (1965), Lady L (1965), Y Manana? (1967), The Unknown Man of Shandigor (1967), Benjamin (1968), The Hotheads (1969), A Golden Widow (1969), Call Me Mathilde (1969), Rookies Run Amock (1971), Fantasia Among the Squares (1971), Chut! (1972), A Full Day’s Work (1973), The Lonely Heart (1973), The Heavenly Bodies (1973), The Three Fantastic Supermen in the Orient (1974), Soldier of Fortune (1975), Cher Victor (1975), Vow of Chastity (1976), Black and White in Color (1976), DrummerCrab (1977), Nosferatu the Vampyre (1979), Pierrot My Friend (1979), Street of the Crane’s Foot (1979), the 1980 television production of Fantomas as Inspector Juve, The Proud Ones (1980), A Bad Son (1980), Is There a Frenchman in the House? (1982), The Man Who Wasn’t There (1987), Mangeclous (1988), Shipwrecked Children (1992), Petain (1993), as Marshal Philippe Petain, Homer: Portrait of an Artist As an Old Man (1997), Children of the Marshland (1999), What’s Life? (1999), and Above the Clouds (2003). DUFRESNE, NICOLE Actress and playwright Nicole duFresne was shot to death during a confrontation with an armed robber on a New York city street on January 27, 2005. She and her fiancé and another couple had been approached by several gunmen after leaving a Lower East Side bar. DuFresne was shot and killed when she resisted the robber’s attempts at robbery. She was 28. She was a founding member of the Present Tense Theater Project and had performed with the LAByrinth Theater Co. She was also the co-author of the play Burning Cage.

2005 • Obituaries

78. Duke was born in Richmond, Virginia, in 1927. He began working as a newscaster on local radio while in his teens. He graduated from the University of Richmond in 1947 and subsequently joined the Associated Press as a sports reporter. He became involved in coverage of the civil rights movement in Virginia, which brought him to the AP’s Washington bureau in 1957. Duke joined the staff of The Wall Street Journal in 1959, covering Capitol Hill until 1963, when he became a congressional reporter from NBC. He became the host of PBS’s Washington Week in Review in 1974, and served in that capacity for two decades before stepping down in 1994. He briefly returned to the show in 1999 to fill in while PBS searched for another host when his successor was fired. Duke was also involved in the PBS documentary The Great Campaign of 1960 in 2000.

Paul Duke

DUMONT , DUCK Alan Shustak, who directed numerous adult videos under the name Duck Dumont, died of a heart attack on August 15, 2005. He was 56. Dumont was born on December 18, 1948. He helmed over 200 titles from the mid–1980s. He founded the production house RedBoard Video in the late 1990s. His numerous films include Passion Pit (1985), Pleasure Maze (1986), Out of Control (1987), Dream Lovers (1987), The Naked Truth (1990), Mummy Dearest (1990), The Luscious Baker Girls (1990), Sun Bunnies (1991), Sunrise Mystery (1992), and the series Pain, Torment, and Virgin Kink.

Nicole duFresne

DUKE, PAUL Paul Duke, a veteran television newscaster and long-time host of the PBC news series Washington Week in Review, died of leukemia at his home in Washington, D.C., on July 18, 2005. He was

Duck Dumont

Obituaries • 2005

104

DUNCAN, PAMELA Actress Pamela Duncan, who starred in Roger Corman’s sci-fi cult classics Attack of the Crab Monsters and The Undead in the 1950s, died of complications from a stroke at the Lillian Booth Actors’ Fund of American Home in Englewood, New Jersey, on November 11, 2005. She was 72. Duncan was born in Brooklyn, New York, on December 28, 1932. She went to Hollywood in the early 1950s and made her film debut in the 1951 Western Whistling Hills. Duncan was also seen in the films Lawless Cowboys (1951), Confidence Girl (1952), Two Gun Marshal (1953), Dragonfly Squadron (1954), The Saracen Blade (1954), Return from the Sea (1954), Seven Men from Now (1956), Julie (1956), Attack of the Crab Monsters (1957), The Undead (1957), My Gun Is Quick (1957), Gun Battle at Monterey (1957), Don’t Give Up the Ship (1959), Summer and Smoke (1961), and Girls! Girls! Girls! (1932). She also performed frequently on television, appearing in episodes of Adventures of Wild Bill Hickok, Terry and the Pirates, Craig Kennedy, Criminologist, Cowboy GMen, The Roy Rogers Show, Dragnet, Letter to Loretta, Four Star Playhouse, The Adventures of Kit Carson, Rocky Jones, Space Ranger, Studio 57, Soldiers of Fortune, The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin, Screen Directors Playhouse, The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp, The George Sanders Mystery Theater, Blondie, Panic!, Tales of Wells Fargo, M Squad, General Electric Theater, Maverick, Tombstone Territory, Harbor Command, Death Valley Days, Sea Hunt, Perry Mason, The Adventures of Jim Bowie, World of Giants, Death Valley Days, Rawhide, Tombstone Territory, Bat Masterson, Peter Gunn, Death Valley Days, Laramie, Mr. Lucky, Colt .45, Lock Up, Boris Karloff ’s Thriller, The Brothers Brannagan, Whispering Smith, Dr. Kildare, The Detectives Starring Robert Taylor, and The Tall Man. She largely retired from acting in the early 1960s. Duncan moved to the Actors’ Home in 1995. She was one of several entertainers who were featured in Curtain Call, the Oscar nominated 2000 documentary about the home’s residents. • Variety, Nov. 28, 2005, 73.

Alan Dundes

tember 8, 1934. He earned a doctorate in folklore at Indiana University in 1962, and began teaching at Berkeley the following year. He became a leading authority on contemporary folklore, authoring the books Interpreting Folklore (1980), Cracking Jokes: Studies of Sick Humor Cycles and Stereotypes (1987), Why Don’t Sheep Shrink When It Rains? A Further Collection of Photocopier Folklore (2000), and The Shabbat Elevator and Other Sabbath Subterfuges (2002). Dundes studies incorporated the usual subjects of folklore scholarship such as fairly tales, proverbs, and superstitions, but extended the field to include graffiti, off-color jokes, and chain letters. Dundes summed up his studies with the words “my professional goals are to make sense of nonsense, find a rationale for the irrational, and seek to make the unconscious conscious.” • Los Angeles Times, Apr. 3, 2005, B14; New York Times, Apr. 2, 2005, A12.

DUNHILL, DAVID British radio announcer David Dunhill died in England on March 20, 2005. He was 88. Dunhill was born in England on March 1, 1917. He began working for the BBC after World War II as a newsreader and announcer. He became announcer for the popular radio comedy Take It from Here. He continued to work for the BBC for nearly five decades as an announcer for the Home Service and its successor, Radio 4. • Times (of London), Apr. 19, 2005, 54.

Pamela Duncan (from Attack of the Crab Monsters)

DUNDES, ALAN Folklorist Alan Dundes died of a heart attack while teaching a class at the University of California at Berkeley on March 30, 2005. He was 70. Dundes was born in New York City on Sep-

David Dunhill

105 DUNNE, HUGH Former child actor Hugh Dunne died of colon cancer in New York City on October 2, 2005. He was 62. Dunne was born in New York on June 5, 1943. He appeared as a child performer on television in the 1950s, playing Tommy in the Watch Mr. Wizard science series, and appearing in I Remember Mama.

2005 • Obituaries

of the Yukon, State Trooper, General Electric Theater, Wagon Train, Maverick, Perry Mason, The Gale Storm Show, Trackdown, Colgate Theatre, Zane Grey Theater, Man with a Camera, Wanted: Dead or Alive, Richard Diamond, Private Detective, The Twilight Zone, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, The Virginian, The Wide Country, Arrest and Trial, and Wagon Train. • Los Angeles Times, Mar. 24, 2005, B11; New York Times, Mar. 29, 2005, A15; Variety, Apr. 11, 2005, 59.

Hugh Dunne

DUPARINOVA, MARGARITA Bulgarian actress Margarita Duparinova died in Bulgaria on November 3, 2005. She was 84. Duparinova was born in Bulgaria on July 1, 1921. She began her career on stage with the National Theatre in 1944, appearing in numerous productions over the next sixty years. She was also featured in several films during her career including Daughter-in-Law (1954), Riot (1975), and Four (2002). Duparinova also performed often on Bulgarian radio and television.

Don Durant (as Johnny Ringo)

DURANTON, ROBERT French body-builder, wrestler and occasional actor Robert Duranton died in Saint-Gervais, Savoie, France, on February 9, 2005. He was 78. Duranton was born in Paris on September 11, 1926. He held the title of Mr. France from 1948 through 1951. He was a leading professional wrestler in France in the 1950s and 1960s. He also appeared in a handful of films including The Sucker (1965), Woman Times Seven (1967), The Burglars (1971), The Mad Adventures of Rabbi Jacob (1973), and Baby Cat (1983).

Margarita Duparinova

DURANT, DON Don Durant, who starred as Johnny Ringo in the 1959 television western series, died of heart failure and complications from cancer in Monarch Beach, California, on March 15, 2005. He was 72. Durant was born in Long Beach, California, on November 20, 1932. He appeared in a small role in the 1955 war film Battle Cry and starred in Roger Corman’s 1958 adventure film She Gods of Shark Reef. He was also soon on television in episodes of Sergeant Preston

Robert Duranton

DUSE, VITTORIO Italian actor Vittorio Duse died in Rome on June 2, 2005. He was 89. Duse was born in Loreto, Italy, on March 21, 1916. He was featured in numerous Italian films from the early 1940s including Girl of the Golden West (1942), The Lion of Damascus (1942), Redenzione (1943), Two Anonymous

Obituaries • 2005

106

Vittorio Duse

Letters (1945), Outcry (1946), The Tragic Pursuit (1947), The Mysterious Rider (1948), Altura (1949), The Walls of Malapaga (1949), Santa Lucia Luntana (1951), You Saved My Daughter (1951), Attention! Bandits! (1951), Island Sinner (1952), Foreign Earth (1953), Lo Scocciatore (1954), Ultima Illusione (1954) which he also directed, The Loves of Salammbo (1960), A Man for Burning (1962), The Leopard (1963), The Possessed (1965), Two Sergeants of General Custer (1966), Kill and Say Your Prayers (1967), The Stranger (1967), Galileo (1969), Let’s Have a Riot (1970), Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion (1970), Corbari (1970), Black Turin (1972), Alfredo, Alfredo (1972), The Assassin of Rome (1972), City Under Siege (1974), Kiss of a Dead Woman (1974), The Iron Prefect (1977), La Bravata (1977), The Human Beast (1977), Aurora by Night (1984), the television mini-series The Octopus (1984), Queen of Hearts (1989), The Godfather: Part III (1990) as Don Tommasino, Enchanted April (1992), The Mysterious Enchanter (1996), That’s It (1998), Give Us a Smile (2000), and When in Rome (2002).

ceived acclaim for his role in the 1956 film Mother Indian, which was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Film. His numerous film credits include Railway Platform (1955), Kundan (1955), The Only Way (1956), Payal (1957), The Penance (1958), Post Box 999 (1958), Untouchable Girl (1959), Didi (1959), Chhaya (1961), I Shall Remain Silent (1962), Jhoolya (1962), Dancer (1963), Cry for Life (1963), Gumrah (1963), Today or Tomorrow (1963), Memories (1964), Ghazal (1964), Time (1965), Aristocratic Family (1965), Gaban (1966), Reunion (1967), Grace (1967), Confidante (1967), The Sage and the Devil (1968), Padosan (1968), Jwala (1969), Chirag (1969), Brother and Sister (1969), Darpan (1970), Reshma and Shera (1971), Jwala (1971), Jai Jwala (1972), Heera (1973), My Name Is Geeta (1974), Zakhmee (1975), Nagin (1976), Paapi (1977), Darinda (1977), Ram Kasam (1978), Mugabla (1979), Beloved Enemy (1979), Ahimsa (1979), Lahu Pukarega (1980), Laila (1984), Distances (1985), Mangala Dada (1986), Bound by an Oath (1991), Jurbaan (1991), Tradition (1992), Phool (1993), and Warriors (1993). He was married to actress Nargis Dutt, his co-star in Mother India, until her death in 1981. Their son, Sanjay, is also a popular Indian actor. Dutt joined India’s Congress party in 1984, and became a leading political figure in the government. He served in the Congress-led cabinet as Minister of Sport. Dutt’s final film appearance was in 2004’s Munnabhai MBBS, which starred his son, Sanjay. • New York Times, May 26, 2005, C18; Times (of London), June 4, 2005, 71; Variety, June 13, 2005, 56.

DUTT, SUNIL Indian actor and political figure Sunil Dutt died of a heart attack in Mumbai, India, on May 25, 2005. He was 74. Dutt was born in Jhelum, now in Pakistan, on June 6, 1930. He went to India after the two countries were partitioned in 1947 and began his career as an actor the early 1950s. He re-

DUXBURY, LESLIE British television journalist and writer Leslie Duxbury died in Clayton-leMoors, Lancashire, England, on October 17, 2005. He was 79. Duxbury was born in Clayton-le-Moors on June 13, 1926. He began his career as a journalist after service in the Royal Navy during World War II. In the early 1960s he began trying his hand at television scriptwriting, and became a storyline writer for the popular British soap opera Coronation Street in January of 1966. He soon became a scripter for the series, which he continued to write for over the next 25 years. Duxbury also was briefly producer for Coronation Street in 1974 and 1977. During his career he also scripted episodes of the series Z Cars, Her Majesty’s Pleasure,

Sunil Dutt

Leslie Duxbury

107

2005 • Obituaries

Angels, A Sharp Intake of Breath, Crown Court, and Pleasures, and the daytime serials Marked Personal and Rooms. Duxbury retired in December of 1991 after writing 415 episodes of Coronation Street. • Times (of London), Oct. 25 2005, 67.

DWAN, ROBERT Television director Robert Dwan died of complications from pneumonia in Santa Monica, California, on January 21, 2005. He was 89. Dwan was born on April 1, 1915. He began his career in radio as an announcer in the 1930s. He served in the merchant marine during World War II, and resumed his career in radio after the war. He was a writer for the Art Linkletter series People Are Funny. Dwan served as director of Groucho Marx’s radio and, later, television series You Bet Your Life, which began on radio in 1947 and aired on television from 1950 to 1961. He also directed Marx in a television production of The Mikado in 1960. Dwan wrote a memoir of his years with Groucho in 2000 entitled As Long as They’re Laughing. • Los Angeles Times, Jan. 27, 2005, B10; Variety, Feb. 7, 2005, 92.

Robert Dwan

DWORKIN, ANDREA Feminist writer Andrea Dworkin died after a long illness at her home in Washington, D.C., on April 9, 2005. She was 58. Dworkin was born in Camden, New Jersey, on September 26, 1946. She began a life-long crusade against pornography with the publication of her first book, Woman Hating, in the early 1970s. Dworkin, who had been a rape victim, battered wife, and prostitute earlier in her life, fought against what she considered the subordination of women through pornography and archaic marriage laws. She wrote over a dozen other books including Our Blood: Prophesies and Discourses on Sexual Politics (1976), The New Woman’s Broken Heart (1980), Pornography — Men Possessing Women (1981), Intercourse (1988), Letters from a War Zone: Writings, 1976–1987 (1988), Right-Wing Women: The Politics of Domesticated Females (1991), the 2001 American Book Award–winner Scapegoat: The Jews, Israel, and Women’s Liberation, and Heartbreak: The Political Memoir of a Feminist Militant (2002). She also wrote two novels, Ice and Fire (1986) and Mercy (1990), and appeared in the 1995 television documentary Pornography: Andrea

Andrea Dworkin

Dworkin. • Los Angeles Times, Apr. 15, 2005, B10; New York Times, Apr. 12, 2005, B7; Time, Apr. 25, 2005, 15; Times (of London), Apr. 13, 2005, 58.

EASTHAM, RICHARD Character actor Richard Eastham died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease at an assisted-living facility in Pacific Palisades, California, on July 10, 2005. He was 87. Eastham was born Dickinson Swift Eastham in Opelousas, Louisiana, on June 22, 1918. He began his career as a singer, performing with the St. Louis Grand Opera while a student at Washington University. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II and studied drama at the American Theatre Wing in New York City after the war. He performed on the New York Stage from the late 1940s, replacing Ezio Pinza in the lead role of South Pacific on Broadway and appearing with Ethel Merman in a production of Call Me Madam. He made his film debut in the 1954 musical There’s No Business Like Show Business, and was seen in the 1957 feature Man on Fire. Eastham subsequently moved to Los Angeles. He starred as Harris Claibourne in the western television series Tombstone Territory from 1957 to 1960. He was also seen in the films Toby Tyler (1960), That Darn Cat! (1965), Not with My Wife, You Don’t! (1966), Murderers’ Row (1966), Tom Sawyer (1973), Battle for the Planet of the Apes (1973) as a Mutant Captain, and McQ (1974). He appeared as Red Wilson in the daytime soap

Richard Eastham

Obituaries • 2005

108

opera Bright Promise from 1969 to 1972. Eastham starred as General Phil Blankenship in the super-hero adventures series Wonder Woman with Lynda Carter from 1976 to 1977, and was Dr. Howell in the primetime soap opera Falcon Crest from 1982 to 1983. Eastham also guest-starred in such series as Men of Annapolis, Zane Grey Theater, The Aquanauts, King of Diamonds, Perry Mason, Bat Masterson, The Barbara Stanwyck Show, Ripcord, Ensign O’Toole, Alcoa Premiere, Bonanza, The Invaders, Cowboy in Africa, The F.B.I., The Mad Squad, Adam-12, The Young Lawyers, Cade’s County, Cannon, The Streets of San Francisco, Kojak, Barnaby Jones, McMillan and Wife, Baretta, Galactica 1980, The Waltons, and Tales of the Gold Monkey. He was also featured in the tele-films Silent Night, Lonely Night (1969), The President’s Plane Is Missing (1973), The Missiles of October (1974), Attack on Terror: The FBI vs. the Ku Klux Klan (1975), Mallory: Circumstantial Evidence (1976), Salvage (1979), Condominium (1980), and A Wedding on Walton’s Mountain (1982). He retired from the screen in the early 1980s. • Los Angeles Times, July 23, 2005, B17.

EASTON , JUNE

Actress and dialect coach June Easton died in Los Angeles following a long battle with lupus on April 2, 2005. She was 72. Easton was born on June 19, 1932. She was married to actor Robert Easton, and appeared with him in several films and television productions. They also worked together with the Henry Higgins of Hollywood, Inc. dialect coaching firm. Her film credits include The Sound of Fury (1950), Two Tickets to Broadway (1951), The Racket (1951), The Las Vegas Story (1952), Son of Paleface (1952), Jalopy (1953), White Lightning (1953), Serpent of the Nile (1953), Abbott and Costello Go to Mars (1953), City of Bad Men (1953), The French Line (1954), Bitter Creek (1954), Son of Sinbad (1955), The Purple Mask (1955), The Brothers Rico (1957), Jet Pilot (1957), Paint Your Wagon (1969), Timber Tramps (1975), and Tai-Pan (1986).

Emilio Ebergenyi

a leading voice on Mexican radio from the 1980s. He also appeared in several films during his career including Tacos de Oro (1985), Calacan (1987), La Ultima Luna (1990), and Jolts to the Heart (1996).

ECCLES, CLANCY Jamaican reggae singer Clancy Eccles died of complications from a stroke in Spanish Town, Jamaica, on June 30, 2005. He was 64. Eccles was born Dean Pen in Jamaica on December 9, 1940. He began singing professionally in the 1950s and had a hit with his performances of “River Jordan” in 1961. He became a reggae producer in the late 1960s, recording Lord Creator’s “Kingston Town” in 1967. He was an active supporter of Jamaican Prime Minister Michael Manley in the 1970s, producing the song “My Leader Born Yah” in his honor. • Los Angeles Times, July 2, 2005, B19; New York Times, July 2, 2005.

Clancy Eccles

June Easton (with her husband, Robert Easton)

EBERGENYI, EMILIO Mexican radio performer Emilio Ebergenyi died of an aneurysm in Mexico City on November 10, 2005. He was 55. Ebergenyi was born in Mexico City on September 1, 1950. He was

EDER, SHIRLEY Show business columnist Shirley Eder died after a long illness with Alzheimer’s disease in New York on May 29, 2005. She was 85. Eder was born in New York City in 1920. She began her career working in radio reading war bulletins during World War II. She soon became the entertainment reporter for several New York radio stations and became host of the television series Women Talk It Over in 1951. She went to Detroit with her husband in the mid–1950s where she continued to cover show business for the Detroit Free Press and a syndicated column for the next

109

Shirley Eder

three decades. She maintained a good relationship with numerous Hollywood celebrities including Joan Crawford, Ginger Rogers, Bob Hope, Frank Sinatra, and Lana Turner. She appeared in small roles in the films Palm Springs Weekend (1963) and C.C. and Company (1970). She retired from her regular column in 1993. • Los Angeles Times, June 3, 2005, B10.

EDWARDS, RALPH Ralph Edwards, the host of the 1950s television series This Is Your Life, died of heart failure in Los Angeles on November 16, 2005. He was 92. Edwards was born in Merino, Colorado, on June 13, 1913. He began working in radio while a teenager in the late 1920s. He had his first hit creating the game show Truth or Consequences for radio in 1940. The game show had contestants performing novelty stunts for prizes. The program also appeared on television in 1941, becoming the first commercial show for NBC. Though experimental television faded during the war, Truth or Consequences remained a popular radio program and returned to the television airwaves in 1950. Edwards selected Bob Barker as master of ceremonies of the series in 1956, which established him as a leading television personality. Edwards also created This Is Your Life for television, using the program to surprise celebrity guests with people from their past. This series also moved to television in 1952, and ran with Edwards as host through 1961. Edwards also ap-

2005 • Obituaries

peared in several films during his career including Manhattan Merry-Go-Round (1937), Seven Days’ Leave (1942), Radio Stars on Parade (1945), The Bamboo Blonde (1946), and Beat the Band (1947). He also guest starred on such television variety programs as Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In, The Sonny and Cher Comedy Hour, and The Flip Wilson Show. Edwards also served as a creator of producer on such television programs as Name That Tune, Cross Wits, Superior Court, Place the Face, About Faces, Funny Boners, It Could Be You, End of the Rainbow, Who in the World, The Woody Woodbury Show, Wide Country, and The People’s Court with Judge Joseph Wapner. Both Truth or Consequences and This Is Your Life have frequently returned to television as syndicated programs. • Los Angeles Times, Nov. 17, 2005, B8; New York Times, Nov. 17, 2005, A28; People, Dec. 5, 2005, 129; Time, Nov. 28, 2005, 27; Variety, Nov. 21, 2005, 73.

EFEKAN, EFGAN Leading Turkish actor Efgan Efekan died of lung cancer in Istanbul, Turkey, on September 8, 2005. He was 70. Efekan was born in Izmir, Turkey, on May 6, 1935. He appeared in numerous Turkish films from the 1950s including The Immortal Love (1959), The Transitory World (1960), The Ominous Woman (1960), Cilali Ibo’s Ordeal (1960), Forbidden Love (1961), The Quarter Friends (1961), The Singer Girl (1962), The Five Stories (1962), The Love Race (1962), The Love Stairs (1962), The Acrobat Girl’s Love (1962), Secret Love (1963), My Killer Is Osman (1963), The Sugar Almonds (1963), Aysecik the Poor Princess (1963), The Angry Young Man (1964), Five Sweet Girls (1964), The Thief (1965), The Bread Seller Woman (1965), Kismet (1974), Geri Don (1987), Yalniz Deglsiniz (1990), and Askimizda Olum Var (2004).

Efgan Efekan

Ralph Edwards

EFFNER, RYAN Special effects artist and prop maker Ryan Effner died on April 18, 2005. He was 40. Effner was born on October 28, 1964. He worked in films from the 1980s and was involved with creating the effects for the 1989 Freddy Kruger horror film A Nightmare on Elm Street: The Dream Child. He also worked on S.P. Somtow’s horror film The Laughing Dead (1989), playing a supporting role in the film. Recently Effner worked as a propmaker on the 1999 film She’s All That.

Obituaries • 2005

110

Ryan Effner

Sixten Ehrling

EGOLF, TRISTAN Novelist Tristan Egolf was found dead of a self-inflicted gunshot wound at his apartment in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, on May 7, 2005. He was 33. Egolf was born in San Lorenzo del Escorial, Spain, on December 19, 1971. He was raised in Washington and Louisville, Kentucky. Egolf ’s first novel, Lord of the Barnyard: Killing the Fatted Calf and Arming the Aware in the Corn Belt, was published in 1998. The tale of a farm boy’s misadventures became a cult hit. His second novel, Skirt and the Fiddle, was published in 2002, and a third, Kornwolf, about an Amish werewolf, was scheduled for publication in 2006. • New York Times, May 14, 2005, A13; Times (of London), July 8, 2005, 72.

(1957), and the 1961 television production of Boheme. • Los Angeles Times, Feb. 16, 2005, B9; New York Times, Feb. 16, 2005, B9; Times (of London, Feb. 17, 2005, 61.

EICHHORN , WERNER German character actor Werner Eichhorn died in Hamburg, Germany, on July 14, 2005. He was 83. Eichhorn was featured in the films A Happy Family Life (1975), The Lost Honor of Katharina Blum (1975), Death Is My Trade (1977), Endstation Freiheit (1980), Nuclearvision (1982), Sheer Madness (1983), Edith’s Diary (1984), Burning Beds (1988), and Lebewohl, Fremde (1991). He also appeared frequently on German television from the early 1970s in such productions as Tatort— Schones Wochenende (1980), Die Pawlaks (1982), Diese Drombuschs (1983), Der Schwarze Obelisk (1988), Le Gorille (1990), Tatort— Experimente (1992), Arzte: Nachtrunden (1994), Over the Edge (1996), Cape Town Blues (1998), Ein Mann wie Eine Waffe (1999), Stubbe — Von Fall zu Fall: Tod des Models (2000), and Stahlnetz — Innere Angelegenheiten (2001).

Tristan Egolf

EHRLING, SIXTEN Swedish orchestra conductor Sixten Ehrling died in New York City on February 13, 2005. He was 86. Ehrling was born in Malmo, Sweden, on April 3, 1918. He attended Stockholm’s Royal Academy of Music and joined the Royal Swedish Opera, where he rose to become principal conductor. He left Sweden to become conductor at the Detroit Symphony Orchestra in 1963. He left Detroit in 1973 and subsequently worked with the New York Metropolitan Opera, the Denver and San Antonio Symphonies, and was a teacher at Juilliard School of Music. Ehrling also was orchestral conductor for several film scores including Miss Julie (1951), The Seventh Seal

Werner Eichhorn

EISNER, WILL Legendary comic creator Will Eisner died of complications from quadruple heart bypass surgery in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, on January 3, 2005. He was 87. Eisner was born in Brooklyn, New York, on March 6, 1917. He began working in comics in 1936, creating the features Harry Karry and The

111

Will Eisner

Flame for WOW What a Magazine! He joined with Jerry Iger to form the Eisner-Iger Studio soon afterwards, where such future comic legends as Bob Kane and Jack Kirby began their early careers. In 1939 Eisner joined Quality Comics, where he produced a 16-page comic newspaper supplement. Eisner created the cemeterydwelling crime fighter, The Spirit, for the supplement. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II. He resumed The Spirit after his discharge and continued the weekly series until 1952. Eisner also founded the American Visuals Corporation, which produced commercial art for such companies as RCA Records, New York Telephone, and the Baltimore Colts. He was also a pioneer in the “graphic novel” with A Contract with God in 1978. Over the next two decades Kitchen Sink Press published more of Eisner’s works including The Dreamer, To the Heart of the Storm, The Building, Invisible People, and Life on Another Planet. The Spirit was the subject of a 1987 tele-film. Eisner was also seen in the 1988 film Comic Book Confidential. • Los Angeles Times, Jan. 5, 2005, B8; New York Times, Jan. 5, 2005, C14; People, Jan. 24, 2005, 107; Time, Jan. 17, 2005, 19; Times (of London), Jan. 13, 2004, 68; Variety, Jan. 10, 2005, 58.

ELCAR, DANA Veteran character actor Dana Elcar, who was best known for his role as Pete Thornton in the action television series MacGyver from 1986 to 1992, died of complications from pneumonia in a Ventura, California, hospital on June 6, 2005. He was 77. Elcar was born Ibson Dana Elcar in Fernadale, Michigan, on October 10, 1927. He began performing on stage while a student at the University of Michigan. Elcar began working in television in the late 1950s, appearing in episodes of Play of the Week, Way Out, Naked City, The DuPont Show of the Week, The Nurses, Car 54, Where Are You?, The Defenders, Hallmark Hall of Fame, Espionage, The Trials of O’Brien, ABC Stage 67, and N.Y.P.D. . He also appeared in television productions of Burning Bright (1959), Our Town (1959), and The Sacco-Vanzetti Story (1960). Elcar starred as District Attorney Andrew Murray in the daytime soap opera The Guiding Light in 1962, and was Clinton Wheeler in The Edge of Night from 1964 to 1965. He starred as Sheriff George Patterson in the Gothic soap opera Dark

2005 • Obituaries

Shadows from 1966 to 1967. Elcar also appeared in numerous films during his career including Fail-Safe (1964), The Fool Killer (1965), A Lovely Way to Die (1968), The Boston Strangler (1968), Pendulum (1969), The Maltese Bippy (1969), The Learning Tree (1969), Soldier Blue (1970), Adam at 6 A.M. (1979), Zigzag (1970), Mrs. Pollifax — Spy (1971), A Gunfight (1971), The Great Northfield, Minnesota Raid (1972), The Sting (1973), Report to the Commissioner (1975), Baby Blue Marine (1976), W.C. Fields and Me (1976), St. Ives (1976), The Champ (1979), Good Luck, Miss Wyckoff (1979), The Nude Bomb (1980) as Maxwell Smart’s Chief, The Last Flight of Noah’s Ark (1980), Condorman (1981), Buddy Buddy (1981), Breach of Contract (1982), Blue Skies Again (1983), Jungle Warriors (1984), All of Me (1984), 2010 (1984), and Inside Out (1987). He was also a familiar face in many tele-films including The Borgia Stick (1967), The Sound of Anger (1968), Deadlock (1969), The Whole World Is Watching (1969), D.A.: Murder One (1969), San Francisco International (1970), Sarge (1971), The Death of Me Yet (1971), The Bravos (1972), Fireball Forward (1972), Hawkins on Murder (1973), Dying Room Only (1973), Columbo: Any Old Port in a Storm (1973), Heat Wave! (1974), Senior Year (1974), Panic on the 5:22 (1974), The Missiles of October (1974) as Defense Secretary Robert McNamara, Law of the Land (1976), Gemini Man (1976), Waiting for Godot (1977), Centennial (1978), Crisis in Mid-Air (1979), Samurai (1979), Death Penalty (1980), Mark, I Love You (1980), Help Wanted: Male (1982), The Day the Bubble Burst (1982), Forbidden Love (1982), I Want to Live (1983), Quarterback Princess (1983), Sweet Revenge (1984), Toughlove (1985), Agatha Christie’s Murder in Three Acts (1986), These Were Times, Dear (1987), and For Their Own Good (1993). Elcar starred as Inspector Shiller in the 1975 police drama Baretta with Robert Blake, and was Colonel Lard in the war drama Baa Baa Black Sheep from 1976 to 1978. He co-starred with Richard Dean Anderson in the MacGyver series from 1986, playing think tank director and MacGyver’s nominal boss, Peter Thornton. When Elcar began going blind due to glaucoma four seasons into the series, they incorporated his disability into the show until MacGyver left the air in 1992. His numerous television credits also include guest starring roles in episodes of

Dana Elcar

Obituaries • 2005

112

such series as Mannix, Run for Your Life, The F.B.I., The Invaders, Judd for the Defense, The Outsider, Bonanza, Medical Center, The Virginian, The Bold Ones: The Lawyers, Get Smart, Hawaii Five-O, Mission: Impossible, Storefront Lawyers, Gunsmoke, The Bold Ones: The Senator, Marcus Welby, M.D., Ironside, Alias Smith and Jones, Love, American Style, Longstreet, Cannon, The Sixth Sense, The Partridge Family, Hawkins, Kung Fu, The Waltons, Petrocelli, The Rockford File, The Six Million Dollar Man, Police Story, The Incredible Hulk, One Day at a Time, B.J. and the Bear, Eight Is Enough, Galactica 1980, Flamingo Road, Benson, Falcon Crest, Herbie, the Love Bug, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, Newhart, Voyagers!, Trapper John, M.D., Knight Rider, Hart to Hart, Hardcastle and McCormick, Matt Houston, The Paper Chase, The Fall Guy, The A-Team, Scarecrow and Mrs. King, Hill Street Blues, Riptide, Matlock, Law & Order, and ER. Elcar also directed several episodes of television series including Baa Baa Black Sheep, The Rockford Files, The Duke, Salvage 1, and MacGyver. • Los Angeles Times, June 10, 2005, B11; New York Times, June 11, 2005, B7; People, June 27, 2005, 124; Time, June 20, 2005, 23.

ELLIOTT, STEPHEN Veteran character actor Stephen Elliott died of congestive heart failure at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital in Woodland Hills, California, on May 21, 2005. He was 84. He was born Elliott Pershing Stilzel in New York City on November 27, 1920. He began his career on stage at New York’s Neighborhood Playhouse, where he studied with Sanford Meisner. He served in the Merchant Marine during World War II and made his debut on Broadway in a production of The Tempest in 1945 after his discharge. He appeared on television in the early DuMont Television Network series Hands of Murder in 1949, and was also seen in episodes of such series as Actor’s Studio, The Philco Television Playhouse, Danger, Tales of Tomorrow, and Studio One. He also played Dr. Pauli in the juvenile science fiction series Captain Video from 1954 to 1955. Elliott appeared in several films in the 1950s including Three Hours to Kill (1954), Canyon Crossroads (1955), and Street of Sinners (1957). He was also a familiar face on daytime soap operas, guest starring on The Secret Storm and Young Dr. Malone, and

Stephen Elliott

starring as Dr. Jerry Stephens on As the World Turns from 1960 until 1962. He also continued his career on stage, earning a Tony nomination for his role in the 1967 Broadway revival of Marat/Sade. He also performed on Broadway in productions of A Whistle in the Dark (1969) and An Enemy of the People (1971). He was Jack Condon on the soap A World Apart from 1970 to 1971. Elliott co-starred with George C. Scott in the 1971 black comedy The Hospital and was the police commissioner in Charles Bronson’s vigilante thriller Death Wish in 1974. He was also featured in the telefilms Pueblo (1973), Steambath (1973), The Gun (1974), and The Chinese Prime Minister (1974). He starred as Benjamin Lassiter in the prime-time soap opera Beacon Hill in 1975, and was Howell Rutledge in the shortlived comedy series Executive Suite in 1976. Elliott also appeared in the films The Hindenburg (1975) and Report to the Commissioner (1975), and the tele-films Two Brothers (1976), The November Plan (1976), The Invasion of Johnson County (1976), Young Joe, the Forgotten Kennedy (1977) as Joseph Kennedy, Sr., The CourtMartian of George Armstrong Custer (1977), How the West Was Won (1978), Mom and Dad Can’t Hear Me (1978), Sergeant Matlovich vs. the U.S. Air Force (1978), Overboard (1978), Betrayal (1978), Some Kind of Miracle (1979), The Ordeal of Patty Hearst (1979) as Randolph Hearst, Son-Rise: A Miracle of Love (1979), Can You Hear the Laughter? The Story of Freddie Prinze (1979), Mrs. R’s Daughter (1979), and The Golden Honeymoon (1980). His other television credits include episodes of The Nurses, Barnaby Jones, Kojak, Petrocelli, Bronk, Visions, The Bionic Woman, The Six Million Dollar Man, The Rockford Files, Hawaii Five-O, Lou Grant, Vega$, Quincy, Hart to Hart, Taxi, Nero Wolfe, Little House on the Prairie, Magnum, P.I., Remington Steele, Benson, Hardcastle and McCormick, Scarecrow and Mrs. King, Faerie Tale Theatre’s production of Beauty and the Beast, Murder, She Wrote, Highway to Heaven, Hotel, Sledge Hammer, Max Headroom, and Law & Order. He played Scotty Demarest on several seasons of Dallas in the 1980s, and was Jane Wyman’s ex-husband, Douglas Channing, on Falcon Crest from 1981 to 1982. Elliott played Dudley Moore’s domineering millionaire father in the 1981 comedy film Arthur, and reprised the role in the 1988 sequel Arthur 2: On the Rocks. He also appeared in the films Cutter’s Way (1981), Kiss Me Goodbye (1982), Roadhouse 66 (1964), Beverly Hills Cop (1984) with Eddie Murphy, Assassination (1987), Walk Like a Man (1987), and Taking Care of Business (1990). He also appeared in the tele-films Winston Churchill: The Wilderness Years (1981) as William Randolph Hearst, Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy (1981) again playing Joseph P. Kennedy, My Body, My Child (1982), Not in Front of the Children (1982), Prototype (1983), Midas Valley (1985), Perry Mason: The Case of the Lost Love (1987), Remo Williams (1988), Columbo: Grand Deceptions (1989), When He’s Not a Stranger (1989), and The Big One: The Great Los Angeles Earthquake (1990). He appeared in the recurring role of Manny Schecter in the television series St. Elsewhere in 1984, and was Edmund Kittle in the short lived series Trial and Error in 1988. His final television appearances were in several episodes

113 of the medical drama Chicago Hope in the recurring role of Judge Harold Aldrich. • Los Angeles Times, May 24, 2005, B11; Variety, May 30, 2005, 44.

ELLIS, ALICE THOMAS British novelist Alice Thomas Ellis died of cancer in London on March 8, 2005. She was 72. She was born Anna Margaret Haycraft in Liverpool, England, on September 9, 1932. She began writing fiction in the late 1970s and her first novel, The Sin Eater, was published in 1977. She continued to write such popular works as The Birds of the Air (1980), The 27th Kingdom (1982), The Other Side of the Fire (1983), and Unexplained Laughter (1985), which was adapted for a tele-film in 1988. She wrote the Summerhouse trilogy, consisting of The Clothes in the Wardrobe (1987), The Skeleton in the Cupboard (1988), and The Fly in the Ointment (1989). The trilogy was adapted as a tele-film, Clothes in the Wardrobe, in 1992. Her later works include The Inn at the Edge of the World (1990), Pillars of Gold (1992), The Evening of Adam (1994), and Fairy Tale (1996). He most recent book, Fish, Flesh and Good Red Herring, was serialized for BBC Radio in 2004. • Los Angeles Times, Mar. 15, 2005, B9; New York Times, Mar. 12, 2005, C11; Times (of London), Mar. 10, 2005, 67.

2005 • Obituaries

from lung cancer on September 7, 2005. He was 72. Endrigo was born in Pula, Italy (now Croatia), on June 15, 1933. He was a popular performer in Italy in the 1960s, recording such songs as “I Who Love Only You” and “Song for You.” He expanded his audiences to South America in the 1970s, penning numerous songs with such Brazilian artists as Vinicius de Moraes and Toquinho. • Times (of London), Oct. 7, 2005, 77.

ENGEL , MORRIS Independent filmmaker Morris Engel died of cancer at his home in New York City on March 5, 2005. He was 86. Engel was born in New York City on April 8, 1918. He began his career as a photographer, working for such magazines as Collier’s and McCall’s. He made his first film, Little Fugitive, in 1953, and the low-budget feature received the Silver Lion Award at the Venice Film Festival. Engel was also nominated for an Academy Award for writing the film with his wife, Ruth Orkin, and journalist Ray Ashley. The film inspired the French New Wave filmmakers including Francois Truffaut. He and Orkin also collaborated on the films Lovers and Lollipops (1956) and Weddings and Babies (1958). Engel returned to working as a photographer, abandoning films for the next decade. His next film, a 1968 feature about East Village hippies, I Need a Ride to California, was never released. He was also involved in the productions of several video documentaries including A Little Bit Pregnant (1993) and Camelia (1998). • Los Angeles Times, Mar. 13, 2005, B14; New York Times, Mar. 7, 2005, B7; Time, Mar. 21, 2005, 25; Times (of London), Mar. 21, 2005, 51.

Alice Thomas Ellis

ENDRIGO, SERGIO Italian singer and songwriter Sergio Endrigo died in Rome of complications Morris Engel (with wife, Ruth Orkin)

Sergio Endrigo

ENSLEY, HAROLD Harold Ensley, the longtime host of the syndicated television series The Sportsman’s Friend, died of complications from heart problems at his home in Kansas City, Kansas, on August 24, 2005. He was 92. Ensley was born on November 20, 1912. He worked in advertising sales when he decided to produce a fishing show in the Kansas City area. In 1953 The Sportsman’s Friend began airing weekly on WCMO-TV. It was soon being syndicated in numerous markets and Ensley was hosting celebrity fishing excursions for the stars of such series as The Beverly Hillbillies and Gunsmoke. He also appeared in a small

Obituaries • 2005

114

Harold Ensley

Siv Ericks

role in a Gunsmoke episode in 1965. He produced over 1,500 television programs and 5,000 radio shows before retiring in 2001.

and Illusioner (1994). Ericks also appeared in numerous character roles on Swedish television.

Swedish actress Ingrid Envall died of heart failure in Stockholm, Sweden, on July 6, 2005. She was 87. Envall was born in Stockholm on March 8, 1918. She was active in films in the 1930s and 1940s, appearing in Dollar (1938), Good Friends and Faithful Neighbours (1938), One Single Night (1939), Sussie (1945), Each to His Own Way (1948), and The Girl from the Third Row (1949).

ESPOSITO, PHILLIP Actor Phillip Esposito died in Hollywood, California, on July 21, 2005. He was 50. Esposito was born in Manhattan, New York, in 1955. He moved to Los Angeles in 1979 to become an actor. He appeared in small roles in several television series including General Hospital, America’s Most Wanted, and Knot’s Landing. He was also seen in the independent films The Velocity of Gary (1998) and Identity Lost (2001). • Variety, Aug. 22, 2005, 42.

Ingrid Envall

Phillip Esposito

ERICKS, SIV Swedish actress Siv Ericks died in Sweden on July 3, 2005. She was 87. Ericks was born in Oxelosund, Sweden, on July 1, 1918. She began performing on stage and in films in the 1930s. She was featured in numerous films during her career including Rosor Varje Kvall (1939), Soderpojkar (1941), Morgondagens Melodi (1942), A Leson in Love (1954), Simon the Sinner (1954), The Yellow Squadron (1954), Dreams (1955), Seventh Heaven (1956), The Staffan Stolle Story (1956), Summer Place Wanted (1957), You Are My Adventure (1958), Woman in a Fur Coat (1958), The Judge (1960), Swedish Portraits (1964), Sailors (1964), Pippi Longstocking (1969), Exposed (1971), The Decoy (1971), Pippi Goes on Board (1973), Maria (1975), Hello Baby (1976), The Score (1978), Flourishing Times (1980), The Flight of the Eagle (1982), Fanny and Alexander (1982),

ESTRADA, ANGELINA Actress Angelina Estrada died of heart failure in Las Vegas, Nevada, on August 5, 2005. She was 73. Estrada was born in Los Angeles on February 28, 1932. She was active in films from the 1970s, appearing in such features as Cheech and Chong’s Up in Smoke (1978), Carbon Copy (1981), The Jigsaw Murders (1988), Ghost (1990), The Unborn (1991), Fires Within (1991), Freddy’s Dead: The Final Nightmare (1991), Big Girls Don’t Cry... They Get Even (1992), Pentathlon (1994), There Goes My Baby (1994), My Family (1995), The Big Squeeze (1996), and Luminarias (2000). She also appeared in the tele-films The Best Place to Be (1979), Joshua’s Heart (1990), Danielle Steel’s Fine Things (1990), One Woman’s Courage (1994), Zooman (1995), A Vow to Cherish (1999), and The

ENVALL, INGRID

115

2005 • Obituaries

Angelina Estrada

Jason Evers

Princess and the Barrio Boy (2000). Estrada played the recurring character of Aunt Connie in the sit-com Chico and the Man in the mid–1970s, and was Gloria Rodriguez on Martin in the mid–1990s. She also gueststarred on episodes of Barney Miller, Bosom Buddies, Dream On, and Sister, Sister.

reer on stage, appearing on Broadway before heading to Hollywood in the late 1950s. He starred as Pitcairn in the television western series Wrangler in 1960, and was Prof. Joseph Howe in the drama series Channing from 1963 to 1964. Evers was also seen in the films Pretty Boy Floyd (1960), House of Women (1962), Tarzan’s Jungle Rebellion (1967), P.J. (1968), The Green Berets (1968) with John Wayne, the 1969 film adaptation of Ray Bradbury’s The Illustrated Man, A Man Called Gannon (1969), Escape from the Planet of the Apes (1971), A Piece of the Action (1977), Claws (1977), and Barracuda (1978). Evers also appeared in several tele-films including The Young Lawyers (1969), Shadow of Fear (1973), Fer-de-Lance (1974), and Golden Gate (1981). He also guest starred in numerous television series including Cheyenne, Hong Kong, Bonanza, Perry Mason, The Rebel, Laramie, Lawman, Surfside 6, Bus Stop, Adventures in Paradise, Gunsmoke, Tales of Wells Fargo, Frontier Circus, The Defenders, Alcoa Premiere, Branded, Death Valley Days, The Big Valley, The F.B.I., T.H.E. Cat, The Green Hornet, Combat!, Felony Squad, The Road West, The Invaders, The Guns of Will Sonnett in the recurring role of the elusive Jim Sonnett, Wild Wild West, Run for Your Life, Mannix, Felony Squad, Star Trek, It Takes a Thief, Mission: Impossible, The Mod Squad, The Bold Ones: The New Doctors, Hawaii Five-O, Medical Center, Cannon, The Streets of San Francisco, Banacek, The Rookies, Barnaby Jones, Police Story, Hec Ramsey, Matt Helm, Marcus Welby, M.D., The Streets of San Francisco, McMillan and Wife, Barnaby Jones, The Fantastic Journey, Emergency!, The Bionic Woman, The Rockford Files, Charlie’s Angels, Happy Days, CHiPs, Vega$, Hart to Hart, Fantasy Island, The Fall Guy, Knight Rider, T.J. Hooker, Scarecrow and Mrs. King, The Dukes of Hazzard, Murder, She Wrote, The A-Team, and Matlock. Evers’ last film role was Editor Lou in Frank Henenlotter’s cult horror classic Basket Case 2 in 1990. He subsequently retired from acting. Evers was married to actress Shirley Ballard from 1953 until his death. • Los Angeles Times, Mar. 27, 2005, B12; Variety, Mar. 28, 2005, 56.

ESTRIN, MARK Screenwriter turned winery founder Mark Estrin died of a brain tumor at his parents’ home in Keizer, Oregon, on May 7, 2005. He was 57. Estrin was born in Chicago on November 4, 1947. He began writing in the late 1970s and co-scripted the tele-films Warm Hearts, Cold Feet (1987) and Bare Essentials (1991) with his brother Allen. He abandoned screenwriting in 1994 to work in sales of cigars, wines and fine foods. He was co-founder of the Santa Barbara County winery Red Car Wine Co. with film producer Carroll Kemp in 2000, which was noted for its distinctive labels and varieties of Syrah and Pinoto Noir. • Los Angeles Times, May 12, 2005, B10.

Mark Estrin

EVERS, JASON Actor Jason Evers, who was best known for his role as the mad scientist who keeps his fiancée’s disembodied head in his basement laboratory in the 1962 schlock horror classic The Brain That Wouldn’t Die, died of heart failure in Los Angeles on March 13, 2005. He was 83. He was born Herb Evers in New York City on January 2, 1922. He began his ca-

FALKENHAGEN, RUDI Dutch actor Rudi Falkenhagen died of esophageal cancer in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, on January 26, 2005. He was 71. Falkenhagen was born in Diemen, the Netherlands, on

Obituaries • 2005

116

Rudi Falkenhagen

May 26, 1933. He was a popular performer in Dutch films and television, appearing in the films Bicycling to the Moon (1963), the 1974 sci-fi film Lifespan with Klaus Kinski, Paul Verhoven’s Spetters (1980), Black Rider (1983), Ciske the Rat (1984), Gaston and Leo in Hong Kong (1988), and The Polish Bride (1998). He starred as Jonathan Brewster in a Dutch television production of Arsenic and Old Lace in 1971, and starred in the television series Pipo the Clown (1958), Dossier Verhulst (1986), and Tax Free (1994). He was also the voice of Launchpad McQuack in the Dutch version of the animated series Darkwing Duck.

FARKASH, MICHAEL R. Playwright and screenwriter Michael R. Farkash was found dead after a long illness at his home in Granada Hills, California, on June 9, 2005. He was 53. Farkash wrote a number of science fiction stories before embarking on a career as a playwright. He was noted for his dark comedies which include Perpetual Care (1989), Meat Dreams (1990) about a deranged delicatessen owner, and the 1991 musical Frozen Futures. Farkash also wrote and produced the 1997 independent film Street Vengeance. He also wrote for other local publications including The Hollywood Reporter. • Los Angeles Times, June 18, 2005, B18.

on the Channel Island of Guernsey on April 23, 2005. He was 87. Farnon was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, on July 24, 1917. A talented trumpeter, Farnon came to England in 1944 as conductor of the Canadian Band of the Allied Expeditionary Forces. He remained in England after the war where he was a leading film composer, working on such features as Just William’s Luck (1948), Elizabeth of Ladymead (1948), Paper Orchid (1949), Maytime in Mayfair (1949), Captain Horatio Hornblower (1951), Circle of Danger (1951), His Majesty O’Keefe (1954), All for Mary (1955), Gentlemen Marry Brunettes (1955), True as a Turtle (1956), It’s a Wonderful World (1956), The Little Hut (1957), The Sheriff of Fractured Jaw (1958), Expresso Bongo (1960), The Road to Hong Kong (1962), The Truth About Spring (1964), Shalako (1968), The Disappearance (1977), Alistair MacLean’s Bear Island (1979), Mary and Joseph: A Story of Faith (1979), and Friend or Foe (1981). He also composed music for several television series including Quatermass II, The Prisoner, The Champions, Colditz, Secret Army, and the 1979 mini-series A Man Called Intrepid. • Los Angeles Times, Apr. 28, 2005, B12; New York Times, May 1, 2005, 37; Times (of London), Apr. 27, 2005, 65.

Robert Farnon

FASS , GERTRUDE Radio and television scripter Gertrude Fass died on March 6, 2005. She was 95. Fass was born on July 1, 1909. She and her husband, George, wrote scripts for such radio programs as Suspense. They also scripted numerous television episodes for such series as Four Star Playhouse, Science Fiction Theater, The Case of the Dangerous Robin, Foreign Intrigue, Sherlock Holmes, The Adventures of Robin Hood, Highway Patrol, Casey Jones, Peter Gunn, The Rough Riders, Behind Closed Doors, and 77 Sunset Strip. George Fass died in 1965.

Michael R. Farkash

FARNON, ROBERT Canadian composer and arranger Robert Farnon died at a hospice near his home

FAURE, RENEE French leading actress Renee Faure died in France of complications following surgery on May 2, 2005. She was 86. Faure was born in Paris on April 14, 1919. She starred in numerous films from the early 1940s including Who Killed Santa Claus? (1941), Le Prince Charmant (1942), Angels of the Streets (1943), Beatrice (1944), Francois Villon (1945), The Bellman (1945), The Great Dawn (1946), Torrents (1947),

117

2005 • Obituaries

bidon (1962). He also appeared in the films Give Me a Hand (1965), This Is No Time for Romance (1966), Les Indrogables (1972), and the tele-film The Horse Trader’s Daughter (1990).

FAWCETT, PAULINE Pauline Fawcett, the mother of Charlie’s Angels actress Farrah Fawcett, died in Houston, Texas, on March 4, 2005. She was 91. She was born Pauline Alice Evans in Henryetta, Oklahoma, on January 30, 1914. Pauline and her husband of 67 years, James, were both featured in early episodes of their daughter’s reality television series Chasing Farrah in March of 2005. Pauline Fawcett also appeared with Farrah in the 1979 tele-film Sunburn, and was featured in Richard Simmons’ Silver Foxes Aerobics exercise videos along with the parents of other celebrities. Renee Faure

Charterhouse at Parma (1948), One Only Loves Once (1949), Adorable Creatures (1952), Koenigsmark (1953), Rasputin (1954), Blood to the Head (1956), Bel Ami (1957), Illegal Cargo (1958), Rue de Paris (1959), The President (1961), David Copperfield (1965), The Sultans (1966), The Judge and the Assassin (1976), Love on the Quiet (1985), The Little Thief (1988), Dede (1990), Miss Moscou (1992), Stranger in the House (1992), and Homer: Portrait of the Artist as an Old Man (1997). She was also seen on television in productions of David Copperfield (1965), Lancelot of the Lake (1970), PotBouille (1972), Julia von Mogador (1972), Madame Bovary (1974), Le Naufrage de Monte-Cristo (1977), Les Mysteres de Paris (1980), Antoine et Julie (1981), Tante Blandine (1983), La Ruele au Clair de Lune (1988), Les Grandes Families (1989), Maigret and the Burglar’s Wife (1991), and Un Ange Passe (1994).

Pauline Fawcett (left, with daughter Farrah)

Canadian actor Marc Favreau died of cancer in a Montreal, Canada, hospital on December 17, 2005. He was 76. Favreau was born in Montreal on November 9, 1929. He was best known for performing the character of Sol the hobo clown, who surreal humor and mangling of the French language entertained audiences in Quebec for many years. Favreau starred in several Canadian television series including 14, rue de Galais (1954), Le Survenant (1957), La Cote de Sable (1960), and Les Enquetes Jo-

FEDERSPIEL, BIRGITTE Danish actress Birgitte Federspiel died in Odense, Denmark, on February 2, 2005. She was 89. Federspiel was born in Denmark on September 6, 1925. She was a leading performer on stage and in films, and appeared in numerous movies from the 1940s. Her credits include Susanne (1950), Familien Schmidt (1951), Adam and Eve (1953), Carl Dryer’s Ordet (aka The Word) (1955), A Stranger Knocks (1959), Charles’ Aunt (1959), The Last Winter (1960), The Musketeers (1961), Suddenly, a Woman! (1963), Death Comes at High Noon (1964), Hunger

Marc Favreau

Birgitte Federspiel

FAVREAU, MARC

Obituaries • 2005

118

(1966), Hagbard and Signe (1967), The Performance Will Be Followed by a Dance (1970), Z.P.G. (1972), The Olsen Gang Runs Amok (1973), 19 Red Roses (1974), That Brief Summer (1976), The Office Party (1976), The New Toy (1977), Mind Your Back, Professor (1977), The Factory Outing (1978), Peter Von Scholten (1987), Babette’s Feast (1987), Carlo & Ester (1994), Looping (1995), Barbara (1997), Southern Comfort (1997), Indien (1999), and Kat (2001). She also starred as Baroness von Rytger in the 1978 television series Matador.

FEINBERG, RON Character actor Ron Feinberg died in Los Angeles on January 29, 2005. He was 72. Feinberg was born on October 10, 1932. appeared as Fellini in the 1975 science fiction cult classic, A Boy and His Dog, starring Don Johnson and Jason Robards, Jr., based on a story by Harlan Ellison. He also appeared in the film Thunder and Lightning in 1977. Feinberg was featured in numerous tele-films including Brian’s Song (1971), Dying Room Only (1973), Hijack (1973), Money to Burn (1973), The Missiles of October (1974) as Gen. Charles de Gaulle, and The Man in the Santa Claus Suit (1979). His other television credits include episodes of I Spy, Cowboy in Africa, Run for Your Life, It’s About Time, Hawaii Five-O, It Takes a Thief, Here Come the Brides, The High Chaparral, Mission; Impossible, The Partridge Family, Cannon, Kung Fu, Lotsa Luck, Emergency!, Barney Miller, Diff ’rent Strokes, Archie Bunker’s Place, Hill Street Blues, Bring ’Em Back Alive, Night Court, and thirtysomething. Feinberg was also a voice actor in such animated series as Hong Kong Phooey, The Scooby-Doo/Dynomutt Hour, Jabberjaw, Spider-Man, The Incredible Hulk, Transformers, The Centurions, Hulk Hogan’s Rock ’N’ Wrestling as Andre the Giant, Defenders of the Earth, Tale Spin, Darkwing Duck, The Tick, The Fantastic Four, and Extreme Ghostbusters.

Camillo Felgen

small roles in the German films When Conny and Peter Do It Together (1958) and Five Sinners (1960). He represented Luxembourg in the Eurovision Song Contest in 1960 and 1962. He was best known as the host of the television series Spiel ohne Grenzen (Play Without Borders) from 1965 to 1973. He also hosted numerous television variety programs.

FERNANDEZ, JAIME Mexican actor Jaime Fernandez died of a heart attack in Mexico City, Mexico, on April 15, 2005. He was 67. Fernandez was born in Monterrey, Mexico, on December 6, 1937. He was the younger brother of actor and director Emilio El Indio” Fernandez and singer Fernando Fernandez. He began his career in films as a boy in the late 1940s and was featured in nearly 200 productions during his career. His numerous films include Out on the Big Ranch (1949), Soledad’s Shawl (1952), The Brute (1953), The Proud Ones (1953), The Adventures of Robinson Crusoe (1954) as Friday, The Rebellion of the Hanged (1954), Untouched (1954), Mortal Sin (1955), The River and Death (1955), Massacre (1956), Talpa (1956), The Headless Rider (1957), The Head of Pancho Villa (1957), Zonga, the Diabolical Angel (1958), Beneath the Sky of Mexico (1958), Thirst for Love (1959), Two Disobedient Sons (1960), Tragic Inheritance (1960), The Imposter (1960), Northern Courier (1960), The Mask of Death (1961), Jalisco Gals Are Beautiful (1961), Santo Vs. the

Ron Feinberg

FELGEN, CAMILLO Luxembourg singer and television personality Camillo Felgen died in Luxembourg on July 16, 2005. He was 84. Felgen was born in Tetange, Luxembourg, on November 17, 1920. He began his career as a newscaster with Radio Luxembourg in 1946. He soon began singing and appeared in

Jaime Fernandez

119 Zombies (1962), Santo vs. the Vampire Women (1962), The Incredible Face of Dr. B (1963), Song of the Soul (1964), Always Further On (1965), Blue Demon vs. the Satanical Power (1966), A Bullet for the General (1967), The Female Soldier (1967), The Last Gunman (1968), Day of the Evil Gun (1968), Guns for San Sebastian (1968), Lucio Vazquez (1968), Laura Punales (1969), Emiliano Zapata (1970), Chicano (1975), The Bricklayers (1976), Mi Fantasma y Yo (1988), El Gato de Chihuahua (1996), Outside the Law (1998), The Gardeners (1999), and Deaths at Midnight (2001). He was also seen in numerous television productions including the 1977 mini-series El Mexicano. Fernandez was also a leader of the actors’ union, the National Actors Association (ANDA), serving as the group’s general secretary from 1966 to 1977. • Variety, Apr. 25, 2005, 69.

FERRER, IBRAHIM

Cuban singer Ibrahim Ferrer, who performed with the Buena Vista Social Club, died of complications from emphysema in Cuba on August 6, 2005. He was 78. Ferrer was born in Santiago, Cuba, on February 20, 1927. He began singing professionally in his teens in the early 1940s, and was a popular performer in Cuba by the 1950s. He performed with bandleader Pacho Alonso’s group for over two decades. He emerged from retirement in 1999 when he was recruited by musician Ry Cooder to join other aging Cuban musicians for the Buena Vista Social Club album and film. The album earned a Grammy Award and Ferrer also recorded the album Buena Vista Social Club Presents Ibrahim Ferrer in 1999. He earned a Latin Grammy Award as best new artist in 2000. • Los Angeles Times, Aug. 8, 2005, B9; New York Times, Aug. 8, 2005, B8; People, Aug. 22, 2005, 99; Time, Aug. 15, 2005, 25; Times (of London), Aug. 9, 2005, 47; Variety, Aug. 15, 2005, 48.

2005 • Obituaries

Jacques Ferriere

(1981), and Tete a Claques (1982). Ferriere was also a voice actor for the film Tintin and the Lake of Sharks (1972), and the animated series UFO Robot Goldorak (1975) and Pac-Man (1982).

FIEDLER , JOHN Character actor John Fiedler, who starred in films, and on television and Broadway, and delighted younger audiences as the voice of Piglet in Walt Disney’s Winnie-the-Pooh animated films for over 35 years, died of cancer in Englewood, New Jersey, on June 25, 2005. He was 80. Fiedler was born in Platteville, Wisconsin, on February 3, 1925. He served stateside in the U.S. Navy during World War II. After the war he went to New York, where he joined the Neighborhood Playhouse. He appeared in a OffBroadway production of The Sea Gull with Montgomery Clift in 1954, and subsequently was featured in Broadway productions of A Raisin in the Sun and The Odd Couple. Fiedler also appeared as Cadet Alfie Higgins in the children’s science fiction television series Tom Corbett, Space Cadet from 1951 to 1954. He made his film debut as Juror #2 in 1957’s 12 Angry Men. The balding Fiedler was usually cast as meek characters, appearing in the films Stage Struck (1958), the 1961 film version of A Raisin in the Sun (1961) reprising his stage role of Mark Lindner, That Touch of Mink (1962), The World of Henry Orient (1964), Kiss Me Stupid (1964), Girl Happy (1965) with Elvis Presley, A Fine Madness

Ibrahim Ferrer

FERRIERE, JACQUES French actor Jacques Ferriere died in France on April 9, 2005. He was 72. He appeared in numerous films from the 1950s including Gas-Oil (1955), It Happened in Aden (1956), Modigliani of Montparnasse (1958), The Sucker (1965), Nights of Farewell (1966), Franciscan of Bourges (1968), A Slightly Pregnant Man (1973), The Persian Lamb Coat (1979), The Telephone Bar (1980), Madame Claude 2

John Fiedler

Obituaries • 2005

120

(1966), The Ballad of Josie (1967), Fitzwilly (1967), The Odd Couple (1968) as Vinnie, True Grit (1969) with John Wayne, Rascal (1969), and The Great Bank Robbery (1969). Fiedler was also a prolific television performer, appearing in television productions of All the King’s Men (1958), Mickey and the Contessa (1963), and Guns of Diablo (1964). He was also seen in episodes of Armstrong Circle Theatre, Studio One, The United States Steel Hour, Hallmark Hall of Fame, Brenner, The Twilight Zone, Adventures in Paradise, The Aquanauts, Peter Gunn, Have Gun —Will Travel, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Peter Loves Mary, The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis, Pete and Gladys, Checkmate, Dr. Kildare, Thriller, 87th Precinct, Outlaws, The Tall Man, The New Breed, Bonanza, My Favorite Martian, The Great Adventure, Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre, The Farmer’s Daughter, The Travels of Jaimie McPheeters, Destry, The Fugitive, The Munsters, Gunsmoke, The Donna Reed Show, Captain Nice, Bewitched, Star Trek as Mr. Hengist in the “Wolf in the Fold” episode, Get Smart, Felony Squad, Death Valley Days, I Spy, The Most Deadly Game, The Doris Day Show, Cannon, The Odd Couple, Banacek, Banyon, A Touch of Grace, Gunsmoke, McMillan and Wife, Police Story, The Streets of San Francisco, Dirty Sally, The Manhunter, and Mobile One. Fiedler made his debut as Piglet in Disney’s 1968 animated film Winnie the Pooh and the Blustery Day. He played Pooh’s fretful friend in numerous cartoons and films including Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too! (1974), The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh (1977), Winnie the Pooh and a Day for Eeyore (1983), Winnie the Pooh & Christmas Too (1991), Boo to You Too! Winnie the Pooh (1996), Pooh’s Grand Adventure: The Search for Christopher Robin (1997), A Winnie the Pooh Thanksgiving (1998), Winnie the Pooh: A Valentine for You (1999), Winnie the Pooh: Seasons of Giving (1999), The Tigger Movie (2000), The Book of Pooh (2001), Piglet’s Big Movie (2003), Winnie the Pooh: Springtime with Roo (2004), and Pooh’s Heffalump Movie (2005). Fiedler also worked as a voice-over artist on the films Robin Hood (1973) as Sexton, The Rescuers (1977) as Deacon Owl, the imported Pokemon television cartoons as the Narrator from 1997 to 1999, and The Emperor’s New Groove (2000) as the Old Man. He also continued his film career in such features as Suppose They Gave a War and Nobody Came? (1970), Making It (1971), Honky (1971), Shadow House (1972), Skyjacked (1972), Deathmaster (1972), Superdad (1973), The Fortune (1975), The Shagg y D.A. (1976), Harper Valley P.T.A. (1978), Boulevard Nights (1979), Midnight Madness (1980), The Cannonball Run (1981), Sharky’s Machine (1981), Savannah Smiles (1982), I Am the Cheese (1983), Seize the Day (1986), and Weekend with Kate (1990). Fiedler appeared regularly as Emil Peterson in the television comedy series The Bob Newhart Show in the 1970s. He was also featured as Gordy Spangler in Kolchak: The Night Stalker with Darren McGavin from 1974 to 1975. He starred was Woody Deschler in the 1983 comedy series Buffalo Bill, and was Gilbert Lange and Virgil in the daytime soap opera One Life to Life in 1987. He was also seen in the tele-films Cannon (1971), Hitched (1971), A Tattered Web (1971), Columbo: Blueprint for Murder (1972), Mys-

tery in Dracula’s Castle (1973), Double Indemnity (1973), The Whiz Kid and the Mystery at Riverton (1974), Bad Ronald (1974), Who Is the Black Dahlia? (1975), Woman of the Year (1976), Human Feelings (1978), The Monkey Mission (1981), and A Raisin in the Sun (1989) again in the role of Mark Lindner. Fiedler’s other television credits include episodes of Jigsaw John, Ark II, Alice, Three’s Company, Switch, Tabitha, Quincy, The Rockford Files, Fantasy Island, Hart to Hart, Cheers, Father Murphy, Amazing Stories, Tales from the Darkside, The Golden Girls, The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd, L.A. Law, George & Leo, and Cosby. • Los Angeles Times, June 28, 2005, B10; New York Times, June 27, 2005, B6; People, July 11, 2005, 83; Time, July 11, 2005, 21; Variety, July 11, 2005, 46.

FIELD, SUSAN British character actress Susan Field died in London on March 19, 2005. Field starred as Rose Cullen in the British television series Crossroads in the mid–1960s and was Mrs. Vincent in the 1966 series Weavers Green. She appeared as Queen Victoria in the 1975 comedy film The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes’ Smarter Brother with Gene Wilder. Her other film credits include The Beginning (1978), Clockwise (1986), Consuming Passions (1988), The Tall Guy (1989), Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1994) as Frau Brach, and Ever After (1998). She also remained a familiar face on British television, appearing in productions of The Glittering Prizes (1976), The Phoenix and the Carpet (1976), Thomas and Sarah (1978), Breakaway (1980), The Jewel and the Crown (1984), John Le Carre’s A Perfect Spy (1987), Troubles (1988), Sir Norbert Smith, a Life (1989), The Man Who Cried (1993), The Plant (1995), and Bramwell: Our Brave Boys (1998). Her other television appearances include episodes of Out of the Unknown, The Jazz Age, Angels, Dixon of Dock Green, Blakes 7, Nanny, Dempsey & Makepeace, Fairly Secret Army, Ever Decreasing Circles, The Bill, Chelmsford 123, KYTV, Poirot, Where the Heart Is, Inspector Morse, Midsomer Murders, and Harbour Lights. FIERRO, AURELIO Italian singer Aurelio Fierro died in a Naples, Italy, hospital after a long illness on March 11, 2005. He was 81. Fierro was born in Montella, Italy, on September 13, 1923. He was a popular singer in Italy from the 1950s. Fierro also appeared

Aurelio Fierro

121 in several films including Lazzarella (1957), Ricordati di Napoli (1958), Caporale di Giornata (1958), Quel Tesoro di Papa (1959), Luna e l’Altra (1996), and Altanic (2000).

FINCHAM , BARRY Actor Barry Fincham, who also performed under the name Michael Chase, died of a stroke in Torrance, California, on March 4, 2005. He was 69. Fincham was born in Toronto, Canada, on November 8, 1935. He was a former boxer who began his career on stage in Florida in the late 1960s. He subsequently moved to Hollywood, where he was seen in the films Paper Lion (1968), Midnight Cowboy (1969), and Pistole (1975). He also appeared on television in episodes of Gentle Ben, Bill Cosby, and General Hospital. FISCHER, MARIE LOUISE

Popular German novelist Marie Louis Fischer died in Prien, Germany, on April 2, 2005. She was 82. Fischer was born in Dusseldorf, Germany, on October 28, 1922. She was the author of numerous books from the 1960s, several of which were adapted for film. Her novel Peter and Sabine was made into a 1968 film. Other film adaptations include Women in Hospital (1976) and the 1993 tele-film Alarm auf Station 2.

2005 • Obituaries

ufacturer, died in Van Nuys, California, after a long illness on July 1, 2005. He was 87. Fisher was born in Great Falls, Montana, on March 30, 1918. He began working with MGM laboratories in 1938. He worked for Republic Studios in the 1940s, where he helped improve the quality of microphone booms. Founding J.L. Fisher, Inc., he designed and manufactured the first lighter and more functional microphone boom and base in 1951. Fisher was given a Technical Achievement Award by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in 1978 for the design and manufacture of a small, mobile motion picture camera platform known as the Fisher Model Ten Dolly. His work on the Fisher Model Ten Dolly also earned him the Academy’s Scientific and Engineering Award in 1989.

FISHER, SONNY Rockabilly singer and songwriter Therman “Sonny” Fisher died in Houston, Texas, on October 8, 2005. He was 73. Fisher was born in Chandler, Texas, on November 13, 1931. He began performing in 1954 after forming the hillbilly band the Rocking Boys. They released their first record, “Rockin’ Daddy,” the following year. He also wrote the songs “Sneaky Pete,” “Rockin’ and A’Rollin,” and “Pink and Black.” Known as the Wild Man from Texas, he continued to record and perform over the next decade before retiring from the music scene. Fisher came out of retirement when Ace Records tracked him down in 1979 and they released his albums Texas Rockabilly and Texas Rockabilly Tear Up. He continued to perform throughout the 1980s and recorded “Rockabilly Fiesta” with Sleepy LaBeef in 1993 before again retiring. • Times (of London), Nov. 23, 2005, 65.

Marie Louise Fischer

FISHER, JAMES L. James L. Fisher, an Academy Award–winning motion picture equipment man-

Sonny Fisher

James L. Fisher

FITZGERALD , GERALDINE Irish actress Geraldine Fitzgerald died of a respiratory infection and complications from Alzheimer’s disease at her Manhattan, New York, home on July 17, 2005. She was 91. Fitzgerald was born in Dublin, Ireland, on November 24, 1913. She began her career on stage in Dublin, performing at the Gate Theater. She also appeared in a handful of films including Open All Night (1934), Blind Justice (1934), Turn of the Tide (1935), Three Witnesses (1935), Lieutenant Daring, R.N. (1935), The Lad (1935), Department Store (1935), The Ace of Spades

Obituaries • 2005

122

Geraldine Fitzgerald

(1935), Debt of Honor (1936), Cafe Mascot (1936), and The Mill on the Floss (1937). She accompanied her husband, Edward Lindsay-Hogg, to the New York in 1938 and was soon cast by Orson Welles in his Mercury Theater production of Heartbreak House. The beautiful red-head with a light Irish accent soon caught the attention of Hollywood, and she was signed to a contract at Warner Bros. by Hal Wallis. She was featured as Bette Davis’ best friend in the 1939 drama Dark Victory, which led to her role as Isabella Linton in the 1939 production of Wuthering Heights. She earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress for her performance. She remained in the United States during World War II, appearing in the films A Child Is Born (1939), ’Til We Meet Again (1940), Flight from Destiny (1941), Shining Victory (1941), The Gay Sisters (1942), Watch on the Rhine (1943), Ladies Courageous (1944), Wilson (1944) as First Lady Edith Wilson, The Strange Affair of Uncle Harry (1945), Three Strangers (1946), O.S.S. (1946), Nobody Lives Forever (1946), and So Evil My Love (1948). Fitzgerald had divorced LindayHogg in 1946 and married wealthy businessman Stuart Scheftel later in the year. After moving back to New York, her film roles became more scarce, though she was seen in the features The Late Edwina Black (1951), Ten North Frederick (1958), The Fiercest Heart (1961), The Pawnbroker (1964) with Rod Steiger, Rachel, Rachel (1968), The Last American Hero (1973), Harry and Tonto (1974), Echoes of Summer (1976), The Mango Tree (1977), Bye Bye Monkey (1978), Diary of the Dead (1980), Arthur (1981) as Martha Bach, Lovespell (1981), Blood Link (1982), Easy Money (1983), Poltergeist II: The Other Side (1986) as Gramma Jess, and Arthur 2: On the Rocks (1988). She also remained active on stage and founded the Everyman Street Theater in the 1960s to bring theater to New York’s poorest sections. She also performed frequently on television from the 1950s. She starred in the 1965 prime time soap opera Our Private World as Helen Eldredge, and was Violet Jordan in the daytime soap The Best of Everything in 1970. She also appeared in episodes of Robert Montgomery Presents, Armstrong Circle Theatre, Somerset Maugham TV Theatre, Schlitz Playhouse of Stars, CBS Television Workshop, Studio One, Suspense, Lux Video Theatre, ABC Album, Goodyear Television Playhouse, Justice, Front Row

Center, Climax!, Producers’ Showcase, Shirley Temple’s Storybook, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Naked City, The Nurses, The Defenders, The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, Lou Grant, Oh Madeline, Trapper John, M.D., Cagney & Lacey, St. Elsewhere, Vacation Playhouse, and The Golden Girls. Fitzgerald was also seen in the tele-films Untold Damage (1971), The Widowing of Mrs. Holroyd (1974), Forget-Me-Not-Lane (1975), Beyond the Horizon (1975), Ah, Wilderness! (1976), Yesterday’s Child (1977), The Quinns (1977), Tartuffe (1978), The Jilting of Granny Weatherall (1980), Dixie: Changing Habits (1983), Kennedy (1983) as Rose Kennedy, Do You Remember Love (1985), Circle of Violence: A Family Drama (1986), Night of Courage (1987), and Bump in the Night (1991). Fitzgerald earned her only Tony nomination in 1982 as director of the play Mass Appeal. Fitzgerald was widowed in 1994 and suffered from Alzheimer’s disease for the past decade. Her survivors include her son, director Michael Lindsay-Hogg, and daughter Susan Scheftel. • Los Angeles Times, July 19, 2005, B11; New York Times, July 19, 2005, B7; People, Aug. 1, 2005, 69; Time, Aug. 1, 2005, 19; Times (of London), Sept. 3, 2005, 64; Variety, July 25, 2005, 55.

FLANAGIN, STEVE Actor Steve Flanagin died by suicide in Austin, Texas, on November 10, 2005. He was 60. Flanagin was born on April 26, 1945. He was featured in films and television from the early 1990s. He appeared in such films as Natural Selection (1999), The Life of David Gale (2003), and Screen Door Jesus (2003). He was also featured in the tele-films A Seduction of Travis County (1991), Witness to the Execution (1994), Shadows of Desire (1994), and Tornado! (1996). Flanagin also guest-starred on several episodes of Walker, Texas Ranger, and was a voice actor in the dubbed version of several Japanese productions including Devil Lady (1998), Soul Hunter (1999), and GetBackers Recovery Service (2002).

Steve Flanagin

FLETCHER, CYRIL British comedian Cyril Fletcher died at his home in St. Peter Port, Guernsey, the Channel Islands, on January 1, 2005. He was 91. Fletcher was born in Watford, Hertfordshire, England, on June 25, 1913. A stage comedian, he was a pioneer in British television, making his first appearance in

123

Cyril Fletcher

1937. He appeared in the early BBC comedy review Tele-Ho. He was also featured as the Emperor of Morocco in a 1937 television production of Dick Whittington and His Cat. Fletcher was also featured in several films including Yellow Canary (1943), Nicholas Nickleby (1947), and A Piece of Cake (1948), which he also scripted. He remained a familiar face of television, appearing regularly on Does the Team Think? and hosting the comedy show That’s Life from 1973 to 1981. • Times (of London), Jan. 3, 2005, 42.

FLON, SUZANNE French stage and film actress Suzanne Flon died in Paris of complications from a stomach illness on June 15, 2005. She was 87. Flon was born in Le-Kremlin-Bicetre, France, outside of Paris, on January 28, 1918. She began working in show business as a secretary to French singer Edith Piaf. She became a popular performer on stage and screen from the late 1940s. Flon was seen in numerous films including Capitaine Blomet (1947), Bed for Two (1949), Last Love (1949), Cage of Girls (1949), The Beautiful Image (1951), John Huston’s Moulin Rouge (1952), Miracle of Saint Therese (1952), Orson Welles’ Mr. Arkadin (1955), Thou Shalt Not Kill (1961), Famous Love Affairs (1961), A Monkey in Winter (1962), The Trial (1962), The Bread Peddler (1963), Nutty, Naughty Chateau (1963), John Frankenheimer’s The Train (1964), If I Were a Spy (1967), Action Man (1967), Zita (1968),

2005 • Obituaries

Under the Sign of the Bull (1968), Franciscan of Bourges (1968), La Chasse Royale (1969), Jeff (1969), Teresa (1970), As Far as Love Can Go (1971), Closed Shutters (1973), Escape to Nowhere (1973), the 1974 television production of The Turn of the Screw, Loving in the Rain (1974), No Time for Breakfast (1975), Monsieur Albert (1976), Boomerang (1976), Hotel Baltimore (1976), Mr. Klein (1976), Black-Out (1977), Quartet (1981), One Deadly Summer (1983), Triple Sec (1986), Widow’s Walk (1987), Diary of a Mad Old Man (1987), No Harm Intended (1988), La Vouivre (1989), Gaspard et Robinson (1990), Voyage a Rome (1992), The Children of the Marshland (1999), A Crime in Paradise (2001), The Landlords (2002), The Flowers of Evil (2003), and Strange Gardens (2003). She was a two-time recipient of the Cesar Award, France’s version of the Oscar, and received two Moliere Awards for her theatrical performances during her lengthy career. • Los Angeles Times, June 20, 2005, B9; New York Times, June 18, 2005, A11; Variety, June 27, 2005, 80.

FLOREN, MYRON Accordion player Myron Floren, who was a regular on The Lawrence Welk Show from the 1950s, died of cancer at his home in Los Angeles on July 23, 2005. He was 85. Floren was born in Webster, South Dakota, on November 5, 1919. He began playing the accordion at an early age. During World War II Floren entertained the troops as part of the USO band. After the war he joined the group The Buckeye Four, performing on the radio and local television in St. Louis. He was invited to join Lawrence Welk’s orchestra in 1950 and became nationally renowned when The Lawrence Welk Show began airing on television several years later in 1955. The musical program aired on Saturday nights on ABC for the next 16 years before the network cancelled the program. The show became even more popular when it continued as a syndicated program for over a decade, finally ending in 1982. Floren, who was known as “The Happy Norwegian,” continued performing and making appearances with fellow Welk alumni after the show ceased production. • Los Angeles Times, July 24, 2005, B13; New York Times, July 25, 2005, B7.

Myron Floren Suzanne Flon

FOLON, JEAN-MICHEL Belgian surrealist illustrator and poster designer Jean-Michel Folon died

Obituaries • 2005

124

Jean-Michel Folon

of leukemia in Monaco on October 20, 2005. He was 71. Folon was born in Uccle, Belgium, on March 1, 1934. He began drawing at an early age and moved to Paris in 1960 to work as an illustrator. He was soon doing drawings for such magazines as The New Yorker, Time, and Esquire. He also illustrated numerous book editions including works by Ray Bradbury, Jorge Luis Borges, H.G. Wells, Lewis Carroll, and Franz Kaf ka. Folon also produced cartoon idents for French television station Antenne 2 in the 1970s. He began designing for theatrical and operatic stage productions in the 1980s. Folon also appeared in a handful of films including Fall of a Body (1973), Lily, Love Me (1975), F as in Fairbanks (1976), A Guy Like Me Should Never Die (1976), and L’Amour Nu (1981). Folon was best known for his numerous illustrations and sculptures feature his Everyman figure, dressed in blue or gray with a brimmed hat and raincoat, set in an urban landscape. • Los Angeles Times, Oct. 21, 2005, B9; New York Times, Oct. 22, 2005, C14; Time, Oct. 31, 2005, 27.

FONTOURA, AGNES Brazilian television actress Agnes Fontoura died of cancer in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on March 5, 2005. She was 76. Fontoura was born in Rio de Janeiro on April 4, 1928. She starred in numerous Brazilian television series in the 1970s and 1980s including Selva de Perda, Dona Xepa, Maria, Miria, Pecado Rasgado, and Viver a Vida.

FOOTE, SHELBY Civil War historian Shelby Foote, who was featured in Ken Burns 1990 documentary mini-series The Civil War on PBS, died at his home in Memphis, Tennessee, on June 27, 2005. He was 88. Foote was born in Greenville, Mississippi, on November 17, 1916. He worked as a reporter in Mississippi before writing his first novel, Tournament, which was published in 1949. He continued to write the novels Follow Me Down (1950), Love in a Dry Season (1951), Shiloh (1952), and Jordan County (1954). He began working on a history of the Civil War for Random House in 1954. The project evolved into a threevolume work that was completed in 1974. • Los Angeles Times, June 29, 2005, B10; New York Times, June 29, 2005, B8; People, July 11, 2005, 83; ; Time, July 11, 2005, 21.

Shelby Foote

FORD, PHIL Entertainer Phil Ford died in Las Vegas, Nevada, of natural causes on June 15, 2005. He was 85. Ford was born in San Francisco, California, on June 21, 1919. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II. He began working as an entertainer after the war. He met performer Mimi Hines in 1952 and they married two years later. The formed a popular husband-and-wife comedy team in nightclubs and on television. They also starred in Broadway musicals and appeared together in the 1965 comedy film Satur-

Agnes Fontoura Phil Ford (with Mimi Hines)

125

2005 • Obituaries

day Night Bath in Apple Valley They were also seen on television in Toast of the Town, Summer Playhouse, The Merv Griffin Show, The Pat Boone Show, The Mike Douglas Show, and The Tonight Show. They were a popular act in Vegas from the late 1950s. He and Hines divorced in 1972, though they occasionally reunited professionally, appearing together in small role in the 1982 film Fake-Out. Ford was also seen on television in episodes of Love, American Style and Quincy. • Los Angeles Times, June 18, 2005, B18; New York Times, June 18, 2005, A11.

FORRESTER, CAY Actress Cay Forrester died of pneumonia on June 18, 2005. She was 83. She began her film career in the early 1940s, appearing in Blazing Guns (1943), San Fernando Valley (1944), Song of the Range (1944), Brenda Starr, Reporter (1945), Dakota (1945), Strange Impersonation (1946), Suspense (1946), Below the Deadline (1946), That Brennan Girl (1946), Queen of the Amazons (1947), Smash-Up: The Story of a Woman (1947), Violence (1947), The Pretender (1947), Blonde Savage (1947), The Challenge (1948), Canon City (1948), Hollow Triumph (1948), Hold That Baby! (1949), D.O.A. (1950) with Edmond O’Brien, and To Please a Lady (1950). Forrester scripted and co-starred with Johnny Cash in the psycho-thriller Door-to-Door Maniac in 1961. She also appeared in the films Advise and Consent (1962) and Fuzz (1972). Forrester also appeared on television in episodes of Family Affair, Adam-12, and Mannix.

Robert Fortier

Full Circle. His television credits also include episodes of the series Letter to Loretta, Studio 57, Colt .45, Have Gun —Will Travel, U.S. Marshal, The Law and Mr. Jones, Outlaws, Bonanza, The Gallant Men, Gunsmoke, Combat!, The Outer Limits, Kraft Suspense Theatre, Star Trek, and Insight.

FOWLES, JOHN British author John Fowles, who novels included such notable works as The Collector and The French Lieutenant’s Woman, died after a long illness at his home in Lyme Regis, England, on November 5, 2005. He was 79. Fowles was born in Leigh-on-Sea, Essex, England, on March 31, 1926. His first novel, The Collector, about a disturbed young butterfly collector who “collects” a beautiful young woman, was published in 1963. It was adapted for a 1965 film directed by William Wyler starring Terrence Stamp and Samantha Eggar. He scripted the adaptation of his next novel, the mystical The Magus, for film in 1968. Set on a Greek isle, the film version starred Michael Caine, Anthony Quinn, and Candice Bergen. Fowles short story was the basis for the 1974 film The Last Chapter. His best known work, the Victorian novel The French Lieutenant’s Woman, was published in 1969. It was filmed in 1981, earning Oscar nominations for star Meryl Streep and screenwriter Harold Pinter. Fowles’ other works of fiction include The Ebony Tower (1974) which was adapted as a tele-film in 1984, the semi-autobiographical Daniel Martin (1977), Mantissa (1982), and A Maggot (1985). He also wrote the non-

Cay Forrester (with Edmund O’Brien from D.O.A.)

FORTIER, ROBERT Actor Robert Fortier died in California on January 1, 2005. He was 78. Fortier was born in West Hollywood, California, on November 5, 1926. He began his career as a dancer and appeared in such film musicals as Let’s Dance (1950), Show Boat (1951), and Texas Carnival (1951). He was also featured in the films The Girl Rush (1955), The Fearmakers (1958), and the 1965 Esperanto-language experimental film Incubus. His later screen appearances included several Robert Altman films including McCabe and Mrs. Miller (1971), 3 Women, Heaven Can Wait (1978), A Wedding (1978), Popeye (1980) as Bill Barnacle, HealthH (1982), and O.C. and Stiggs (1987). Fortier also starred as Scotty in the 1959 television series Troubleshooters, and was Gary Donovan in 1960’s

John Fowles

Obituaries • 2005

126

fiction works The Aristos: A Self-Portrait in Ideas (1964), The Enigma of Stonehenge (1980), A Short History of Lyme Regis (1983), and Wormholes: Essays and Occasional Writings (1998). • Los Angeles Times, Nov. 8, 2005, B10; New York Times, Nov. 8, 2005, A25; Time, Nov. 21, 2005, 27; Times (of London), Nov. 8, 2005, 58; Variety, Nov. 14, 2005, 61.

FOX, FRED S. Television comedy writer Fred S. Fox died of pneumonia in Encino, California, on October 23, 2005. He was 90. Fox was born in St. Louis, Missouri, on July 26, 1915, and began his career writing for radio in San Francisco in the late 1930s. He moved to Hollywood in 1943 to write comedy material for such stars as George Burns and Gracie Allen, Bing Crosby, Jack Carson, and Spike Jones. He joined Bob Hope’s writing staff the following year, writing for The Bob Hope Pepsodent Show on radio. He also wrote material for Hope and Crosby for the Road films. He continued to work with Hope over the next forty years, writing for his tours and television specials. He scripted episodes of numerous television comedy series including The Real McCoys, The Red Skelton Show, The Andy Griffith Show, Petticoat Junction, F Troop, Mona McCluskey, The Mothers-in-Law, Here’s Lucy, The Doris Day Show, The Jimmy Stewart Show, Temperatures Rising, Sigmund and the Sea Monsters, Hong Kong Phooey, Alice, The Love Boat, and Diff ’rent Strokes. Fox also wrote for several George Burns television specials and the 1980 film Oh, God! Book II. • Los Angeles Times, Nov. 3, 2005, B11; New York Times, Nov. 4, 2005, C14; Times (of London), Nov. 4, 2005, 80; Variety, Nov. 14, 2005, 61.

Peter Foy

as Mary Martin in 1954, Sandy Duncan in 1979, and Cathy Rigby in the early 1990s. He founded the Flying by Foy company in the late 1950s, and continually upgraded the technology utilized in his stage flying sequences. He also served as a technical advisor on the 1966 science fiction film Fantastic Voyage and the 1967 television series The Flying Nun, starring Sally Field. He was supervisor of the flying rigs for the 1978 musical film The Wiz. Flying by Foy effects were also utilized in Broadway productions of Raggedy Ann, Fool Moon, The Who’s Tommy, The Red Shoes, Dracula, and the upcoming Spamalot and Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. Foy had worked and lived in Las Vegas from the mid–1960s. • Los Angeles Times, Feb. 28, 2005, B7; New York Times, Mar. 2, 2005, D8; Time, Mar. 14, 2005, 19; Variety, Mar. 7, 2005, 62.

FRANCOIS, ANDRE French cartoonist and illustrator Andre Francois died of heart and kidney failure at his home in Grisy-les-Platres, France, on April 11, 2005. He was 89. He was born Andre Farkas in Timisoara, Romania, in 1915. He moved to Paris in the early 1930s where he worked as a graphic artist. He became noted for his humorous drawings, which appeared in such magazines as Le Rire in France and Punch in England. His first book, Double Bedside Book, was published in 1952, and his children’s book Crocodile Tears was published in 1956. During the 1950s he worked often in advertising and also worked as a set

Fred S. Fox

FOY, PETER Peter Foy, whose theatrical flying effects were utilized on stage in such productions as Peter Pan and The Lion King, died in Las Vegas, Nevada, on February 17, 2005. He was 79. Foy was born in London, England, on June 11, 1925. He began performing on stage while in his teens. He served in the Royal Air Force during World War II, and resumed his stage career as an assistant to Joseph Kirby after the war. Foy went to Broadway in 1950 to stage Jean Arthur’s flying sequences in the musical Peter Pan. He also designed the flying effects for such later Peter Pans

Andre Francois

127 and costume designer for the Royal Shakespeare Theater’s production of Merry Wives of Windsor in 1956. Several volumes of his cartoon anthologies were also published including The Penguin Andre Francois, The Tattooed Sailor and Other Cartoons from France, and The Half-Naked Knight. • New York Times, Apr. 15, 2005, C13; Times (of London), Apr. 30, 2005, 71.

FRANK, HAL Character actor Hal Frank died on August 18, 2005. He was 68. Frank was born on September 6, 1936. He was featured as the 1912 stage manager in the science fiction romance Somewhere in Time in 1980. He also appeared in the films Thief (1981) and Class (1983).

Hal Frank

FRANKEL, GENE Stage director and acting teacher Gene Frankel died of heart failure in Manhattan on April 20, 2005. He was 85. Frankel was born on December 23, 1919. He began his career as an actor and performed with the Actors Studio. In the 1950s Frankel became better known as a teacher and director. He received an Obie Award for directing the OffBroadway production of Volpone in 1957. He also received acclaim for his director of the 1961 production of Jean Genet’s avant-garde play The Blacks. Frankel also directed seven productions on Broadway including A Cry of Players (1968), Indians (1969), and The Lincoln Mask (1972), and the 1975 musical The Night

2005 • Obituaries

That Made America Famous. He continued to teach an actor’s workshop at his Gene Frankel Theater throughout his life. • Los Angeles Times, Apr. 23, 2005, B16; New York Times, Apr. 22, 2005, B7; Variety, May 2, 2005, 84.

FRANKLIN, GRETCHEN British character actress Gretchen Franklin died in London on July 11, 2005. She was 94. Franklin was born in London on July 7, 1911. She began her film career in the early 1950s, appearing in such features as Shadow of Fear (1954), Cloak Without Dagger (1956), High Terrace (1956), Bullet from the Past (1957), Flame in the Streets (1961), The Hidden Face (1965), Help! (1965) with the Beatles, The Murder Game (1965), Die, Monster, Die! (1965) with Boris Karloff and Nick Adams, How I Won the War (1967), Twisted Nerve (1968), Subterfuge (1969), The Night Visitor (1971), Richard Lester’s The Three Musketeers (1973) as D’Artagnan’s Mother, Quincy’s Quest (1979), Ragtime (1981), and Return to Waterloo (1985). She was also seen in television productions of The Company Man (1970), Secrets (1973), Nicholas Nickleby (1977), Quatermass (1979), and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1981). Franklin was featured as Sara Meek in the 1969 television series Castle Haven, and was Mum in the 1973 comedy series Bowler. She was Myrtle Cavendish in the series Crossroads in 1974, and was Auntie Lil in I Didn’t Know You Cared in 1975. Franklin was also seen as Alice in the series Dead Ernest in 1982. She was best known for her role as Ethel Skinner on the popular series EastEnders from 1985 until her semiretirement in 1993. She continued to make cameo roles on the series’ Christmas episodes until 1997, and returned again in 2000. Franklin’s other television credits include episodes of Dixon of Dock Green, Silent Evidence, Suspense, Z Cars, Till Death Us Do Part, Danger Man, Journey to the Unknown, Follyfoot, The Organisation, Budgie, Sykes, Softly Softly, Black and Blue, George and Mildred, Hazell, Rising Damp, The Famous Five, The Sweeney, Some Mothers Do ’Ave ’Em, Danger UXB, How’s Your Father?, Terry and June, The Black Adder, In Loving Memory, Victoria Wood: As Seen on TV, and Keeping Up Appearances. • Los Angeles Times, July 13, 2005, B11; Times (of London), July 13, 2005, 55.

Gretchen Franklin Gene Frankel

Obituaries • 2005

128

FRASER , ELISABETH Actress Elisabeth Fraser died of congestive heart failure in Woodland Hills, California, on May 5, 2005. She was 85. Fraser was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1920. She began her career on stage, performing in the Broadway production of There Shall Be No Night in 1940. She was featured in numerous other Broadway productions over the next three decades including The Russian People, The Family, Tunnel of Love, and The Best Man. She also began performing in films in the early 1940s, appearing in such features as One Foot in Heaven (1941), The Man Who Came to Dinner (1942), Busses Roar (1942), The Hidden Hand (1942), Commandos Strike at Dawn (1942), All My Sons (1948), Roseanna McCoy (1949), Dear Wife (1949), Hills of Oklahoma (1950), When I Grow Up (1941), Callaway Went Thataway (1951), Death of a Salesman (1951), So Big (1953), The Steel Cage (1954), Young at Heart (1954), The Tunnel of Love (1958), Ask Any Girl (1959), Two for the Seesaw (1962), Who’s Been Sleeping in My Bed? (1963), A Patch of Blue (1965) as Shelley Winter’s brassy pal Sadie, The Glass Bottom Boat (1966), Seconds (1966), The Ballad of Josie (1967), The Way West (1967), Tony Rome (1967), The Graduate (1967), Nine to Five (1980), and the 1980 telefilm The Scarlett O’Hara War. Fraser was best known for her roles on television, starring as Sergeant Bilko’s girlfriend Sgt. Joan Hogan on The Phil Silvers Show from 1955 to 1958 and as Hazel Norris on the comedy series Fibber McGee and Molly in 1959. She was also seen in episodes of Four Star Playhouse, The Revlon Mirror Theater, Dragnet, Kraft Television Theater, Man with a Camera, The Vise, Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Richard Diamond, Private Detective, Perry Mason, Car 54, Where Are You?, The Defenders, The Dick Powell Show, McKeever and the Colonel, The Lloyd Bridges Show, 77 Sunset Strip, Wagon Train, Ben Casey, The Eleventh Hour, The Jack Benny Program, Kilroy, Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C., The Addams Family, Rawhide, Bewitched, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Gunsmoke, Vacation Playhouse, Hey, Landlord, The Monkees, Mannix, and Maude. • New York Times, May 18, 2005, B10; Times (of London), May 18, 2005, 62; Variety, May 16, 2005, 66.

FRAZIER, AL Al Frazier, who sang with the 1960s group the Rivingtons, died at his home in Las Vegas, Nevada, on November 13, 2005. He was 75. Frazier was born on May 3, 1930. He joined with Sonny Harris, Rocky Wilson, Jr., and the late Carl White to form the Rivingtons. They had previously been backup singers for such recording stars as Paul Anka and Duane Eddy. They recorded several popular novelty hits in the early 1960s including “Papa-Oom-MowMow” and “The Bird’s the Word.” • Los Angeles Times, Nov. 20, 2005, B12.

Al Frazier (left, with the Rivingtons)

FREAS, KELLY Leading science fiction artist Frank Kelly Freas died at his home in Los Angeles on January 2, 2005. He was 82. Freas was born in Hornell, New York, on August 27, 1922. He began his career as a commercial artist, but soon moved to creating illustrations for science fiction and fantasy publications. He provided cover illustrations for such magazines as Weird Tales, Analog, and Astounding Science Fiction, and the works of such writers as Isaac Asimov, Robert Heinlein, Arthur C. Clarke, and Poul Anderson. Freas also began working for Mad magazine in the 1950s, becoming the lead cover artist for the magazine for seven years. He also illustrated the covers for several Mad paperbacks including Son of Mad and Ides of Mad. Freas’ work also ranged from creating the of-

Elisabeth Fraser (with Phil Silvers) Kelly Freas

129

2005 • Obituaries

ficial NASA patch for the 1973 Skylab 1 mission to drawing the cover for the rock group Queen’s 1977 album News of the World. He was the recipient of 11 Hugo Awards for his drawings in the science fiction field. • Los Angeles Times, Jan. 4, 2005, B10; New York Times, Jan. 5, 2005, C13; People, Jan. 17, 2005, 95; Time, Jan. 17, 2005, 19.

FRED, JOHN John Fred Gourrier, who recorded the popular 1960s tune “Judy in Disguise (With Glasses),” died in a New Orleans hospital of complications from a kidney transplant on April 15, 2005. He was 63. Gourrier was born in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, in May 8, 1941. He and his band, John Fred and the Playboys, became performing in the late 1950s and recorded the local hits “Shirley” and “Good Lovin’“. He returned to the music scene in the mid–1960s with a new Playboy Band, and had his first hit with a parody of the Beatles’ song “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds,” recording “Judy in Disguise (With Glasses)” in 1967. The tune topped the pop charts for two weeks. The band split in 1969 and John Fred continued as a solo performer for several years. He reformed the Playboy Band to play regional venues in the early 1980s, and formed The Louisiana Boys in the 1990s. • New York Times, Apr. 19, 2005, C17; Times (of London), May 4, 2005, 54.

John Fred

FREEDMAN , HARRY Canadian composer Harry Freedman died of cancer in Toronto, Canada, on September 16, 2005. He was 83. Freedman was born in Lodz, Poland, in 1922. He joined the Toronto Symphony Orchestra as an English horn player in 1946, and remained with the orchestra until 1970. He composed nearly 200 works during his career including three symphonies and nine ballets. Freedman also composed scores to several films including Isabel (1968), November (1970), Tilt (1972), The Pyx (1973), Kavik, the Wolf Dog (1980), and Something Hidden — A Portrait of Wilder Penfield (1981). FREEMAN, DAVE British film and television comedy writer Dave Freeman died at his home in London, England, after a long illness on March 28, 2005. He was 82. Freeman was born in England on August 22, 1922. He began working with comedian Benny Hill in

Harry Freedman

the mid–1950s and wrote for the series, The Benny Hill Show, for over a decade. Freeman also wrote comedy sketches for such performers as Frankie Howerd, Arthur Askey and Tony Hancock. Freeman also wrote for such television series as Great Scott, It’s Maynard, Arthur’s Treasured Volumes, The Avengers, The Arthur Askey Show, World of His Own, Scott On..., Mr. Aitch, Knock Three Times, The Dustbinmen, The Fossett Saga, Bless This House, The Howerd Confessions, Robin’s Nest, Terry and June, and Keep It in the Family. Freeman also wrote for several films including Those Fantastic Flying Fools (aka Jules Verne’s Rocket to the Moon) (1967), Simon Simon (1970), The Magnificent Seven Deadly Sins (1971), Carry on Behind (1975), and Carry on Columbus (1992). • Times (of London), Apr. 6, 2005, 54.

FREEMAN, DEVERY Film and television writer Devery Freeman died of complications from open heart surgery in a Los Angeles hospital on October 7, 2005. He was 92. Freeman was born in Brooklyn, New York, on February 18, 1913. Freeman began his career writing for such magazines as Saturday Evening Post and The New Yorker before moving to Hollywood in the late 1930s. He wrote numerous films over the next two decades including Main Street Lawyer (1939), Ziegfeld Follies (1946), The Thrill of Brazil (1946), The Guilt of Janet Ames (1947), The Fuller Brush Man (1948), A Kiss in the Dark (1949), Miss Grant Takes Richmond (1949), Tell It to the Judge (1949), Borderline

Devery Freeman

Obituaries • 2005

130

(1950), The Yellow Cab Man (1950), Watch the Birdie (1950), Dear Brat (1951), Three Sailors and a Girl (1953), Francis Joins the WACS (1954), Ain’t Misbehavin’ (1955), Francis in the Navy (1955), Three Bad Sisters (1956), The First Traveling Saleslady (1956), Dance with Me Henry (1956), Public Pigeon No. One (1957), and The Girl Most Likely (1957). He also began working in television in the 1950s, scripting episodes of Playhouse 90, The 20th Century–Fox Hour, Climax, and Desilu Playhouse. Freeman also wrote and produced the series Letter to Loretta, The Thin Man, The Ann Sothern Show, and Pete and Gladys. He also created the western series Sugarfoot in 1957. He worked as a network executive at CBS for several years in the 1960s. Freeman wrote a novel, Father Sky, in the 1970s, which was adapted to the screen in 1981 as the film Taps starring George C. Scott and Timothy Hutton. • Los Angeles Times, Oct. 12, 2005, B10; New York Times, Oct. 14, 2005, C15; Variety, Oct. 17, 2005, 64.

FREY, JACK Actor Jack Frey died on February 14, 2005. He was 66. Frey was born on April 26, 1938. He appeared in small roles in the films Funny Lady (1975), The Eiger Sanction (1975), Let’s Do It! (1982), and You Talkin’ to Me? (1987). He also appeared in the tele-films It Couldn’t Happen to a Nicer Guy (1974), Amelia Earhart (1976), The Magnificent Magical Magnet of Santa Mesa (1977), and Street of Dreams (1988). His other television credits include episodes of Lucas Tanner, The Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew Mysteries, and CHiPs.

Louis Friedland

in 1978. Friedland retired in 1986, though he remained with the company as a consultant for several years. • Los Angeles Times, July 5, 2005, B9; New York Times, July 2, 2005, C16.

FRIEDMAN, ED Animator Ed Friedman died of complications from a stroke in Los Angeles on April 29, 2005. He was 92. Friedman was born on October 23, 1912. He began working in animation in the early 1930s, and worked with such studios as Iwerks, Mintz/Screen Gems, UPA, and Disney over the next fifty years. Friedman animated numerous Mister Magoo cartoons in the 1950s and worked on the 1974 animated film Journey Back to Oz. He also was an animation director on the television series Mighty Mouse, Star Trek: The Animated Series, He-Man and the Masters of the Universe, She-Ra: Princess of Power, Ghostbusters, and BraveStarr.

Jack Frey

FRIEDLAND , LOUIS Television executive Louis N. Friedland died in a Great Neck, New York, hospital after a brief illness on June 29, 2005. He was 92. Friedland was born in Brooklyn, New York, on April 18, 1913. After graduation from New York University, he served in the Coast Guard during World War II. Friedland joined MCA (then known as Music Corporation of America) in 1952. He served as director of distribution of Universal Studios television programs from 1963 to 1978, while MCA was owner of Universal. He played a leading role in the development of programming for syndicated television in that position and as chairman of MCA-TV, which he assumed

Ed Friedman

FROES, HEMILCIO Brazilian actor Hemilcio Froes died after a long illness in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on April 27, 2005. He as 84. Froes was born in Campos dos Goitacases, Brazil, on July 10, 1920. He acted in many film and television productions in a career that began in the 1940s. He was featured in the films Terra Violenta (1948), Katucha (1950), Murder in Copacabana (1962), El Justicero (1967), Marilie e Marina (1976), and The Naked Man (1997). He also appeared in numerous television series including A Pe-

131

2005 • Obituaries

quena Orfa (1968), Gabriela (1975), Capital Sins (1975), Os Gigantes (1979), and Aqua Viva (1980).

FROHLICH, SIG Veteran actor Sig Frohlich, who worked as Mickey Rooney’s stand-in from the late 1930s, died of pneumonia in a Los Angeles hospital on September 30, 2005. He was 95. Frohlich was born on January 8, 1910. He began appearing in small roles in films in the 1930s. He was seen in Riffraff (1936), and was a Flying Monkey in 1939’s The Wizard of Oz. He was also featured in the films This Time for Keeps (1942), Sunday Punch (1942), Killer McCoy (1947), B.F.’s Daughter (1948), Easter Parade (1948), Words and Music (1948), Three Little Words (1950), Dial 1119 (1950), Right Cross (1950), The Strip (1951), Off Limits (1953), The Atomic Kid (1954), How to Stuff a Wild Bikini (1965), Jacqueline Susann’s Once Is Not Enough (1975), Harry and Walter Go to New York (1976), First Monday in October (1981), True Confessions (1981), Lookin’ to Get Out (1982), American Flyers (1985), Clue (1985), and Jo Jo Dancer, Your Life Is Calling (1986). He also worked as Rooney’s stand-in on many films and television productions through the 1960s. • Times (of London), Oct. 13, 2005, 70.

Sid Frohlich

FRY , CHRISTOPHER British dramatist Christopher Fry died in Chichester, England, on June 30, 2005. He was 97. Fry was born Christopher Fry Harris in Bristol, England, on December 18, 1907. He became interested in writing while in school, and became a teacher after graduation. He became involved with the theater in 1929, overseeing an amateur theater and repertory company in Tunbridge Wells. He wrote the verse drama Boy With a Cart in 1938 to commemorate the jubilee year of a church near his home in Sussex. A lifelong pacifist, Fry served in a noncombatant army unit during World War II. His play A Phoenix Too Frequent was stage in 1946, and his most notable work, The Lady’s Not for Burning, was produced in 1948. The play was restaged by John Gielgud in the West End the following year, featuring early performances by Richard Burton and Claire Bloom. Laurence Olivier starred in the debut of Fry’s Venus Observed, and The Lady’s Not for Burning opened on Broadway in 1950. He met with less success with his next work, The Dark Is Light

Christopher Fry

Enough, in 1954. Fry also wrote several films including A Queen Is Crowned (1953) and The Beggar’s Opera (1953). He subsequently wrote adaptations of Jean Anouilh’s The Lark and Giraudoux’s Tiger at the Gates, Judith, and Duel of Angels. He worked for over a year doctoring the script for the 1959 film Ben-Hur. His work on that film led to screenwriting assignments on Barabbas (1962) and The Bible ... In the Beginning (1966). He also wrote a play about Henry II, Curtmantle, in 1962, and the love story A Yard of Sun in 1970. He spent his later years translating Rostand’s Cyrano and writing the television series The Brontes of Haworth (1973). The Lady’s Not for Burning was adapted for television in 1974 and again in 1987. He continued to write into his 90s, penning a play for his old school, A Ringing of Bells, in 2000. • Los Angeles Times, July 7, 2005, B11; New York Times, July 5, 2005, B7; Time, July 18, 2005, 25; Times (of London), July 4, 2005, 59; Variety, July 11, 2005, 46.

FU BIAO Chinese actor Fu Biao died of liver cancer in a Beijing, China, hospital on August 30, 2005. He was 40. He had undergone a liver transplant in September of 2004 but had relapsed in May of 2005. He had been in a coma for over a week. Fu was a leading film actor in China from the 1990s, appearing in such films as Shanghai Triad (1995), The Dream Factory (1997), Restless (1998), A Sign (2000), Happy Times (2001), and A World Without Thieves (2004).

Fu Biao

Obituaries • 2005

132

FUJIKI, YU Japanese character actor Yu Fujiki died of a pulmonary embolism resulting from complications from surgery for a broken leg in a Tokyo, Japan, hospital on December 19, 2005. He was 74. Fujiki was born in Tokyo on March 2, 1931. He appeared in numerous films from the 1950s including Farewell Rabaul (1954), Saturday Angel (1954), Ghost Man (1954), A Man Among Men (1955), No Time for Tears (1955), Samurai II: Duel at Ichijoji Temple (1955), The Tears of Geisha Konatsu (1955), Rainy Night Duel (1956), Throne of Blood (1967), Be Happy, These Two Lovers (1957), Sazae-San, Part 2 (1957), Last Day of Samurai (1957), The Lower Depth (1957), Sazae’s Youth (1957), Anzukko (1958), All About Marriage (1958), The Inn in Front of the Train Station (1958), The Hidden Fortress (1958), A Salaryman’s Commandments (1959), An Echo Calls You (1959), Aisaiki (1959), Magic Monkey Sky (1959), The Birth of Japan (1959), The Gambling Samurai (1960), Wanton Journey (1960), New Ladies’ University (1960), Salary Man Chushingura (1960), Daredevil in the Castle (1961), A Night in Hong Kong (1961), The End of Summer (1961), Different Sons (1961), Ganba (1961), Star of Hong Kong (1962), King Kong vs. Godzilla (1962), The Loyal 47 Ronin (1962), Sensation Seekers (1963), Young Guy in Hawaii (1963), Operation Mad Dog (1963), Stragon (1963), Godzilla vs. the Thing (1964) as the comic egg-loving reporter, The Sandal Keeper (1964), Blood and Diamond (1964), Yearning (1964), We Will Remember (1965), White Rose of Hong Kong (1965), The Stranger Within a Woman (1966), The Daphne (1966), Operation Crazy Gold (1967), Japan’s Longest Day (1967), Ghost Story of Two Travelers at Ernamonya (1967), Scattered Clouds (1967), Imaginary Paradise (1968), Admiral Yamamoto (1968), Freshman Young Guy (1969), Yog: Monster from Space (1970), It’s My Sky! Young Guy (1970), A Salaryman’s Honor (1973), Hurry, Young Ones! Tomorrow Never Waits (1974), Go For It! Young Guy (1975), Clash! Young Guy (1976), Young Guy Returns (1981), Station (1981), At This Late Date, the Charleston (1981), Southern Cross (1982), Time and Tide (1983), Lost in the Wilderness (1986), Rainbow Kids (1991), Transparent: Tribute to a Sad Genius (2001), and Year One in the North (2005). Fujiki was also featured in a supporting role in the Japanese television drama series G-Men ’75 in the 1970s.

Yu Fujiki

FUMO, NUCCIA Italian character actress Nuccia Fumo died in Naples, Italy, on September 21, 2005. She was 88. Fumo was born in Naples in 1917. She appeared in numerous theatrical productions during her career. She was also featured in several films including Let’s Hope It’s a Girl (1986), Chiari di Luna (1988), The House of Smiles (1988), Saturday, Sunday, and Monday (1990), I Thought It Was Love (1991), Package, Double Package and Counterpackage (1993), I’m Crazy About Iris Blond (1996), Pictures Deep in One’s Eyes (2000), and A Children’s Story (2004).

Nuccia Fumo

FURST , JOSEPH Austrian character actor Joseph Furst died on November 29, 2005. He was 95. Furst was born in Vienna, Austria, on October 12, 1910. He appeared in numerous films and television productions in England from the 1950s. Furst was featured in Otto Preminger’s 1960 film Exodus (1960). His other film credits include Off beat (1961), Very Important Person (1961), John Huston’s Freud (1962), 55 Days at Peking (1963), The High Bright Sun (1964), Theatre of Death (1966), The Brides of Fu Manchu (1966) with Christopher Lee, Arrivederci, Baby! (1966), Hammerhead (1968), Eyewitness (1970), Goodbye Gemini (1970), the 1971 James Bond film Diamonds Are Forever as Dr. Metz, ...And Millions Will Die! (1973), Inn of the Damned (1974), and Plugg (1975). He was also seen in

Joseph Furst

133 television productions of The Poisoned Earth (1961), The Midnight Men (1964), The July Plot (1964), A Magnum for Schneider (1967), Lucinda (1967), Number 96 (1972), Luke’s Kingdom (1976), Jonah (1982), The Schippan Mystery (1984), The Dunera Boys (1985), and Tusitala (1986). Furst starred as Heinrik Smeaton in the television series The Young Doctors in 1978. His other television credits include episodes of One Step Beyond, Ghost Squad, Man of the World, Studio Four, The Saint, Espionage, The Saint, The Wednesday Play, The Saint, The Baron, Doctor Who, Callan, Boy Meets Girl, The Troubleshooters, The Champions, Doomwatch, Paul Temple, The Persuaders!, Division 4, Ryan, Kingswood Country, A Country Practice in the recurring role of Alex Popovich, and Special Squad. Furst retired to Australia in the 1980s.

GABRIEL, JIM

Actor Jim Gabriel died in San Angelo, Texas, on October 5, 2005. He was 63. Gabriel was born in Spur, Texas, on December 20, 1941. He operated a clothing store in San Angelo for over thirty years before moving to Hollywood in 2001 to work as a character actor. He played small roles in several films and was featured as the Secretary of Defense in an episode of The West Wing. He returned to Texas in 2003 where he worked in real estate.

GAETE, MARCELO Chilean actor and director Marcelo Gaete died of cancer in San Jose, Costa Rica, on October 10, 2005. He was 60. He was a popular comic actor from the 1950s, appearing in the films Tres Miradas a la Calle (1957), The Witnesses (1969), and The Promised Land (1971), and the television series El Rosario de Plata (1969) and Don Camilo (1969). He left Chile with his wife, actress Sara Astica, after the 1973 military coup and settled in Costa Rica. He remained a popular comic performer on stage, television and films. His film credits include Alsino and the Condor (1982) and The Bicycle Racer (1983). He also wrote and directed the films Mas Alla (2000) and A Diestra y Siniestra (2001).

Marcelo Gaete

GALIANA, FRED

Spanish boxer Fred Galiana died of pneumonia and complications from Alzheimer’s disease at an Orihuela, Spain, nursing home on July 4, 2005. He was 74. He was born Exuperancio Galiana

2005 • Obituaries

Fred Galiana

Diaz in Spain in 1931. He began boxing professionally in the early 1950s, gaining the Spanish and European championship. He also appeared in two films, School of Journalism (1960) and He Is My Man (1966). Galiana retired from the ring in 1964 to open a restaurant.

GALINDO , OCTAVIO Mexican actor Octavio Galindo died of renal failure in a Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico, hospital on March 28, 2005. He was 62. Galindo was born in Hermosillo on August 1, 1942. He began his career on stage, appearing in over 100 productions during his career. He was a leading film and television actor from the early 1970s. Galindo was featured in the films Ya Somos Hombres (1970), El Ausente (1971), Todo en el Juego (1972), Apolinar (1972), El Rey (1976), Herederos en Aprietos (1989), El Mutilador (1991), Marea Suave (1992), and Me Tengo que Casar (1995). Galindo also starred in numerous Mexican television series including Lucia Sombra (1971), Acompaname (1978), Papa Soltero (1986), Il Alcanzar una Estrella (1991), Caminos Cruzados (1994), Nunca te Olvidare (1999), DKDA: Suenos de Juventud (1999), and El Noveno Mandamiento (2000).

Octavio Galindo

GANESAN , GEMINI Indian leading actor Gemini Ganesan died in Bangalore, India, after a long illness on March 22, 2005. He was 84. He began his career in films working as a production assistant. He became a leading film star in the 1950s and 1960s,

Obituaries • 2005

134 Garcia began his career as a playwright in Venezuela. He also scripted several. films including Ifigenia (1986), Reflejos (1987), and Tosca, the True Story (2001). He moved to Mexico in 1996 where he became a leading writer of telenovelas for Argos production house. He wrote such series as Ka Ina (1995), Quirpa de Tres Mujeres (1996), Amor Mio (1997), Todo Por Amor (2000), and Ladron de Corazones (2003). • Variety, Dec. 26, 2005, 37.

Gemini Ganesan

known as the “King of Romance” because of his onscreen image. He appeared in over 200 films in Tamil, Malayalam, Telugu, Kannada, and several in Hindi. He remained active in films as a character performer later in his career. His numerous film credits include Avaiyar (1953), Miss Mary (1957), Maya Bazaar (1957), The Wedding Gift (1959), The Flower of Love (1961), The Atonement of Sin (1961), Holy Love (1962), Great Leader (1970), I Am Not He (1974), Stephen (1980), Brother, It Is Possible! (1988), Veena of Shiva (1988), and Avvai Shanmugi (1996). His survivors include his daughter Rekha, a leading actress in India. • Variety, Mar. 28, 2005, 56.

GARBER , H OPE Character actress Hope Garber died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease on September 7, 2005. She was 81. Garber was born on February 18, 1924. She was a singer who hosted as television show in her hometown of London, Ontario, Canada. She was also featured in the tele-films She Cried Murder (1973) and The Haunted (1991), and the movies Wag the Dog (1997) and The Politics of Desire (1998). She also appeared in an episode of television’s Who’s the Boss? She was the mother of actor Victor Garber.

GARDELLA, KAY Longtime television critic Kay Gardella died of cancer in a Manhattan hospital on April 13, 2005. She was 82. Gardella was born in Belleville, New Jersey, in 1922. She began working for the Daily News as a copygirl in 1946. She soon began reporting on early television productions. She became radio and television editor for the paper in 1975 and took over as television critic in 1981. She continued to write a column for the Daily News until shortly before her death. Gardella had also been a frequent guest on such early television series as What’s My Line?, and was a commentator on several radio programs and a cable television show. • New York Times, Apr. 15, 2005, C13.

Kay Gardella

GARDINER , BOB Artist and writer James Robbins “Bob” Gardiner committed suicide at his home in Grass Valley, California, on April 21, 2005. He was 54. Gardiner was born on March 19, 1951. He was noted for his clay animation, which he termed “sculp-

Hope Garber

GARCIA, RICARDO Venezuelan television writer Ricardo Garcia died of a cerebral edema in Caracas, Venezuela, on December 16, 2005. He was 46.

Bob Gardiner

135

2005 • Obituaries

timation,” which was featured in commercials and films. He earned an Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film in 1974 for Closed Mondays, which he coproduced, directed, wrote and animated. Gardiner also worked on several Smothers Brothers television specials.

GARFINKLE, LOUIS Screenwriter Louis A. Garfinkle, who was nominated for an Academy Award for the 1978 film The Deer Hunter, died of complications from Parkinson’s disease at his home in Studio City, California, on October 3, 2005. He was 77. Garfinkle was born in Seattle, Washington, on February 11, 1928. He began working in films in the late 1950s, scripting the western The Young Guns (1956), and writing and producing the horror films I Bury the Living (1958) and Face of Fire (1959). Garfinkle also wrote the European features The Cruel Ones (1967) and A Minute to Pray, a Second to Die (1968). His other screenwriting credits include The Doberman Gang (1972), Little Cigars (1973), and Milena (1991). Garfinkle also created the interactive scriptwrighting computer program, Collaborator, in the 1990s. GARMENDIA, MIKEL Leading Basque actor Mikel Garmendia died after a long illness on August 5, 2005. He was 60 Garmendia was born in Ordizia, in the Basque region of Spain, on January 22, 1945. He began his career on stage, training at the Antzerti Drama School. He made his film debut in the early 1980s, appearing in Pedro Olea’s Akelarre (1984), El Polizon del Ulises (1987), Kareletik (1987), The Anonymous Letter (1990), The Winter in Lisbon (1991), Question of Luck (1996), Airbag (1997), Si, quiero... (1999), and Visionaires (2001).

Mikel Garmendia

GARRISON, GREG Veteran television director Greg Garrison died of pneumonia in Los Angeles on March 25, 2005. He was 81. Garrison was born on February 20, 1924. He began working in television in 1946 with Philadelphia’s WFIL, rising to the position of cameraman and director. He subsequently moved to Chicago where he directed Super Circus and Stand by for Crime for WENR. Moving to New York in the late 1940s he continued to direct such early television series as Ladies Be Seated, Bon Voyage, Majority Rules,

Greg Garrison (right, with Dean Martin)

Sid Caesar’s Your Show of Shows, The Kate Smith Evening Hour and The Milton Berle Show. He also directed episodes of the 1957 television sit-com Bachelor Father, and helmed numerous specials for such stars as Lucille Ball, Jack Benny, Fred Astaire and Gene Kelly. Garrison directed two feature films during his career, Hey, Let’s Twist (1961) and Two Tickets to Paris (1962). He teamed with Dean Martin to produce and direct his television variety series in the 1960s. He also directed many of Martin’s televised celebrity roast specials. • Los Angeles Times, Apr. 2, 2005, B14; New York Times, Apr. 5, 2005, B8; Time, Apr. 18, 2005, 26; Variety, Apr. 4, 2005, 80.

GAVIN, JAMES Veteran actor James Gavin died in California on August 13, 2005. He was 70. Gavin was born on March 13, 1935. A stuntman and character actor, he worked on numerous films and television productions from the 1950s through the 1970s. He was seen in the films The Werewolf (1956), Face of a Fugitive (1959), The Gazebo (1959), Rampage (1963), Coogan’s Bluff (1968), A Man Called Gannon (1969), Wild Rovers (1971), Dirty Mary, Crazy Larry (1974), Airport (1974), The Domino Principle (1977), Heroes (1977), Dog Soldiers (1978), The Day the World Ended (1979), The Nude Bomb (1980), The Border (1981), and Blue Thunder (1983). He was also featured in the telefilms The Other Man (1970), Nightmare (1975), Fire! (1975), Hanging By a Thread (1979), The Return of Frank Cannon (1980), and Disaster on the Coastliner (1981). Gavin’s other television credits include episodes of Front Row Center, Frontier, You Are There, Cheyenne, Zane Grey Theater, Perry Mason, Tales of the Texas Rangers, Casey Jones, Jane Wyman Presents the Fireside Theatre, Trackdown, Have Gun —Will Travel, Fury, Dragnet, Gunsmoke, 26 Men, Frontier Justice, Frances Farmer Presents, Colgate Theatre, M Squad, Rawhide, Maverick, Bonanza, Playhouse 90, Two Faces West, The Rifleman, The Twilight Zone, Cain’s Hundred, Wagon Train, The Big Valley, Man from U.N.C.L.E., A Man Called Shenandoah, The F.B.I., Mission: Impossible, Cimarron Strip, Wild Wild West, It Takes a Thief, The High Chaparral, Daniel Boone, McCloud, and Apple’s Way. GAVIRA, GONZALO Oscar-winning Mexican sound effects editor Gonzalo Gavira died in Mex-

Obituaries • 2005

136

Gonzalo Gavira

Henri Genes

ico City from blood circulation problems on January 9, 2005. He was 79. Gavira, who shared the Academy Award for his sound effects work on William Friedkin’s 1973 horror classic The Exorcist, worked on over 60 films in Mexico from the early 1950s. His numerous film credits include Bullfighter (1956), El Topo (1970), National Mechanics (1972), Dr. Tarr’s Torture Dungeon (1972), The Holy Mountain (1973), El Andariego (1976), Alucarda (1978), Guaguasi (1983), Arizona (1984), Silencio Mortal (1991), Starfighters (1992), The Steel Horseman (1994), and Streeters (2001).

Farm (1945), The Chocolate Girl (1949), We Will All Go to Paris (1950), The Lovers of Bras-Mort (1951), Paris Is Always Paris (1951), We Will All Go to Monte Carlo (1952), Women of Paris (1953), A Woman of Evil (1954), Trois de la Canebiere (1956), The Counterfeit Constable (1964), The Sucker (1965), Don’t Look Now —We’re Being Shot At (1966), The Mad Adventures of the Bouncing Beauty (1967), The Brain (1969), The Song of the Balalaika (1970), Young Casanova (1974), Le Pied! (1975), The Animal (1977), The Gendarme and the Creatures from Outer Space (1979), The Miser (1980), La Soupe aux Choux (1981), Vive la Sociale! (1983), Garcon! (1983), Le Facteur de Saint Tropex (1985), La Fille des Collines (1990), Le Provincial (1990), and Justinien Troube, or God’s Bastard (1993). Genes also appeared often on the French stage and television.

GELMAN, ERIC Eric Gelman, an aspiring actor who had appeared in two episodes of the television series Monk, was stabbed and killed during a robbery attempt as he walked to his car in the Wilshire area of Los Angeles after work on April 17, 2005. He was 32. Gelman was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, on July 10, 1972. He studied acting in college before moving to New York in 1996. He appeared in several plays and commercials, then moved to Los Angeles in 2003. He had appeared in an episode of the quirky mystery series Monk as a paparazzi photographer before his death.

GEORGE, ANTHONY Films and television actor Anthony George died of a lung condition in Los Angeles on March 16, 2005. He was 84. He was born Octavio George in Endicott, New York, on January 29, 1921. He began his career in films in the late 1940s with 20th Century–Fox. He was featured in a handful of films including Black Hand (1950), Under My Skin (1950), Where the Sidewalk Ends (1950), Inside the Walls of Folsom Prison (1951), The Fat Man (1951), and You Never Can Tell (1951), and co-starred with Pinky Lee on the variety television series Those Two. He returned to New York in the early 1950s when he felt unable to

Eric Gelman

GENES, HENRI French character actor Henry Genes died in Paris on August 22, 2005. He was 86. Genes was born in Tarbes, France, on July 2, 1919. He was a leading performer in French films from the mid–1940s, appearing in such features as Hanged Man’s

Anthony George

137 handle the stress of Hollywood. He continued to find work in television there, appearing in episodes of Studio One, Tales of Tomorrow, and General Electric Theater. George again returned to Hollywood were he continued to appear in such series as Brave Eagle, Crossroads, The Adventure of Rin Tin Tin, The 20th Century–Fox Hour, On Trial, Crusader, Soldiers of Fortune, Tales of Wells Fargo, Cheyenne, How to Marry a Millionaire, Zorro, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Tombstone Territory, Lawman, Sugarfoot, Sky King, Death Valley Days, Sea Hunt, Hawaiian Eye, 77 Sunset Strip, Miami Undercover, Alcoa Premiere, Wagon Train, The Wide Country, and The Alfred Hitchcock Hour. He also appeared in small roles in several films including Three Bad Sisters (1956), The Ten Commandments (1956), Chicago Confidential (1957), and Gunfire at Indian Gap (1957). George appeared regularly with Robert Stack as Elliot Ness’s ill-fated partner Agent Cam Allison in the first season of The Untouchables in 1960. He subsequently starred as Don Corey in the drama series Checkmate from 1960 to 1962. George again returned to New York, where he appeared in numerous theatrical productions including The Front Page, Come Blow Your Horn, The Tender Trap, Cactus Flower, and Funny Girl. He replaced Mitchell Ryan as Burke Devlin in the Gothic soap opera Dark Shadows in 1967, and remained on the show as the character Jeremiah Collins. George also starred as Dr. Tony Vincente on the daytime soap opera Search for Tomorrow from 1970 to 1975, and was Dr. Will Vernon on One Life to Live from 1977 to 1984. He also appeared in episodes of Wonder Woman, Police Woman, and Simon & Simon, and did voice-over commercial work. • Los Angeles Times, Mar. 27, 2005, B12; Variety, Apr. 4, 2005, 80.

GEPRTOVA, LIBUSE Czech actress Libuse Geprtova died in Prague, Czech Republic, on November 18, 2005. She was 63. Geprtova was born in Kolin, Bohemia, Czechoslovakia, on December 21, 1941. She was active in films from the 1960s, appearing in Lady on the Tracks (1966), Babicka (1971), Smrt Stoparek (1979), Hordubal (1980), Zachvev Strachu (1983), Komediant (1984), and Houpacka (1990). She also appeared on the Czech stage and television.

2005 • Obituaries

GERRETSEN, P ETER Canadian film producer Peter Gerretsen died in Toronto, Canada, after a long bout with lung cancer on August 16, 2005. He was 66. Gerretsen was born in the Netherlands in 1939. He and his wife, Pat, founded Gerretsen Film Productions in 1974, and he produced, directed, and wrote numerous pro-life films including Two Is a Crowd and The Slippery. He also produced the films Night Friend (1987), The Kidnapping of Baby John Doe (1987), and Apocalypse: Caught in the Eye of the Storm (1998).

Peter Gerretsen

GERRY, VANCE Disney animator and artist Vance Gerry died of complications from cancer in a Pasadena, California, hospital on March 5, 2005. He was 75. Gerry was born in Pasadena on August 21, 1929. He began working at Disney Studios in 1955 as an assistant. He soon moved up to layout artist, working on such Disney television productions as The Goofy Success Story, Goofy’s Cavalcade of Sports, and How to Relax. He also worked on the animated shorts The Truth About Mother Goose and Donald in Mathmagic Land. He was also a layout artist on the features 101 Dalmatians (1961) and The Sword in the Stone (1963). Gerry worked on numerous other Disney films over the next forty years, working as a writer, storyboard artist, or character designer for such features as The Jungle Book (1967), Winnie the Pooh and the Blustery Day (1968), The Aristocats

Libuse Geprtova Vance Gerry

Obituaries • 2005

138

(1970), Robin Hood (1973), The Rescuers (1977), The Fox and the Hound (1981), The Black Cauldron (1985), The Great Mouse Detective (1986), Oliver & Company (1988), Pocahontas (1995), Hercules (1997), Fantasia 2000 (2000), and many more. • Los Angeles Times, Mar. 11, 2005, B11; Variety, Mar. 14, 2005, 64.

GETZ, ILEEN Actress Ileen Getz died of cancer in New York City on August 4, 2005. She was 44. Getz was best known for her recurring role as Judith Draper in the television series Third Rock from the Sun from 1996 to 2001. She also was featured in several films including Celebrity (1998), Lovely & Amazing (2001), The Next Big Thing (2001), Changing Lanes (2002), The Station Agent (2003), A Hoe in One (2004), and Social Grace (2005). Getz appeared in the 1996 tele-film The Prosecutors, and guest-starred in episodes of Law & Order, Caroline in the City, Cybill, Seinfeld, NYPD Blue, Chicago Hope, The $treet, That 70s Show, Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, Queens Supreme, and The Jury. She was also active on stage, performing on Broadway and with regional theaters. • Variety, Aug. 15, 2005, 48.

Ileen Getz

GHIA, F ERNANDO Italian film producer Fernando Ghia died in Rome, Italy, on June 1, 2005. He was 69. Ghia was born in Rome on July 22, 1935.

Fernando Ghia

He began working in film as an actor in the late 1950s, though he soon became a business associate of producer Franco Cristaldi. Ghia produced his first film, Robert Bolt’s Lady Caroline Lamb, in 1972. He again worked with Bolt in 1986, producing with David Putnam the Oscar-nominated feature The Mission. He spent a decade in Hollywood before returning to Rome in the late 1980s, where he founding Pixit Productions. He produced the 1990 film Tre Colonne in Cronaca, and the television productions The Endless Game (1990) and Joseph Conrad’s Nostromo (1997). • Los Angeles Times, June 11, 2005, B18; Times (of London), July 4, 2005, 50.

GIBBINS, MIKE Mike Gibbins, the drummer for the hit pop group Badfinger, died at his home in Florida on October 4, 2005. He was 56. Gibbins was born in Swansea, Wales, on March 12, 1949. The group was formed in the mid–1960s as the Iveys, including Gibbins on drums, Tom Evans on guitar, Ron Griffiths on bass, and Pete Ham as lead singer. They were signed by the Beatles’ record label, Apple, in 1968 and, after Griffiths was replaced by Joey Molland, their first single, “Maybe Tomorrow,” was released. The record was not a success so the group was repackaged as Badfinger in 1969. Their next record, “Come and Get It,” became a hit and was heard in the 1969 film “The Magic Christian.” Other hit songs followed including “No Matter What” and “Day After Day” in the early 1970s. There subsequent albums, Straight Up (1972) and Ass (1973), proved disappointing and they left Apple for Warner Bros. A financial dispute with Warner delayed they’re next album, Wish You Were, which also failed to catch on. The group’s singer and songwriter, Pete Ham, hanged himself in April of 1975 and the group broke up. Gibbins returned to Wales, playing backup on such recordings as Bonnie Tyler’s 1976 hit “It’s a Heartache.” Evans and Molland reformed Badfinger without Gibbins in 1978, but soon disbanded. Evans also committed suicide by hanging in 1983. Gibbins joined with Molland for another version of Badfinger in 1986, and they toured for several years before Gibbins relocated to Florida. He later recorded two solo albums, A Place in Time (1998) and More Annoying Songs (2000). • Times (of London), Oct. 20, 2005, 73.

Mike Gibbins (second from right, with Pete Ham, Tommy Evans and Joey Molland of Badfinger)

139 GIBSON, MICHAEL Michael Gibson, who orchestrated the hit Broadway musical Grease, died of lung cancer in a Dover, New Jersey, hospital on July 15, 2005. He was 60. Gibson was born in Wilmington, Delaware, on September 29, 1944. He began working as a studio musician in New York City before becoming an orchestrator. Gibson orchestrated the Broadway musical Grease in 1972, and orchestrated the soundtrack of the film version in 1978. He often collaborated with the composing team of John Kander and Fred Ebb, orchestrating their productions The Ring (1984), Kiss of the Spider Woman (1995), and Steel Pier (1997). He also orchestrated several revivals of Kander and Ebb’s hit Cabaret. Gibson also worked on several films, composing scores for Summerdog (1977), Roseland (1977), and Cold River (1982). He was orchestrator for the film Still of the Night (1982) and the tele-film Breathing Lessons (1994).

2005 • Obituaries

to television four years laster. He worked as a producer on the educational series Monitor. Gill made the award winning short film The Peaches, a fantasy written by his wife, in 1963. He remained with the BBC where he produced the art series Giacometti in 1966. Later in the decade he directed the landmark mini-series Civilisation written by Kenneth Clark. The award-winning work was followed in 1972 by an adaptation of Alistair Cooke’s America. In 1977 he joined with Adrian Malone to form the production company Malone Gill. They produced the 1981 nautical series The Commanding Sea. Gill directed the 1988 documentary feature Paul Gauguin: The Savage Dream and the television mini-series Vintage: The History of Wine. His later works include Nature Perfected: The Story of the Garden (1995), Highlanders (1995), Vermeer: Light, Love and Silence (1997), and Beyond Wall Street (1997). After producing the 1998 BBC mini-series The Face of Russia Gill retired to write his memoirs. • Los Angeles Times, Oct. 28, 2005, B11; New York Times, Oct. 29, 2005, C16; Times (of London), Oct. 20, 2005, 76.

GILL, TOM Cartoonist Tom Gill died of heart failure at his home in Croton-on-Hudson, New York, on October 17, 2005. He was 92. Gill was born on June 3, 1913, and was raised in Brooklyn, New York. He began his career working for the New York Daily News. He moved to the New York Herald Tribune in 1946, where he created the comic strip Flower Potts. Gill was artist for The Lone Ranger comic book for Dell and Gold Key for twenty years between 1950 and 1970. Gill also drew several other western comics for Gold Key including, The Owl, Hi-Yo Silver and Bonanza. Michael Gibson

GILL, MICHAEL British television director Michael Gill, who helmed the PBS mini-series Civilisation and America died in London of complication from Alzheimer’s disease on October 20, 2005. He was 81. Gill was born in Winchester, England on December 10, 1923. He began working as a journalist in the early 1950s and wrote short stories for various literary magazines. He joined BBC Radio in 1954 and moved

Tom Gill

Michael Gill

GISH , SHEILA British actress Sheila Gish died of cancer in London on March 9, 2005. She was 62. Gish was born in Lincoln, England, on April 23, 1942. She began her career on stage in the early 1960s, appearing in productions of Noel Coward’s Present Laughter (1963) and the musical Robert and Elizabeth (1964). She married fellow actor Roland Curram and made her film debut in a cameo role with Curram in John Schlesigner’s 1965 featuring Darling. Though she remained best known for her works on stage, she was also featured in such films as The Reckoning (1969),

Obituaries • 2005

140

Sheila Gish

Every Home Should Have One (1970), A Day in the Death of Joe Egg (1972), Hitler: The Last Ten Days (1973), Quartet (1981), Highlander (1986) and the 2000 sequel Highlander: Endgame as Rachel Ellenstein, Separate Bedrooms (1990), Seasick (1996), and Mansfield Park (1999). Gish also appeared in television productions of The First Churchills (1969), Anna Karenina (1977), Thomas and Sarah (1979), That Uncertain Feeling (1985), Stanley and the Women (1991), Danielle Steel’s Jewels (1992), Brighton Belles (1993), Resnick: Rough Treatment (1993), Company (1996), Supply and Demand (1998), The Blonde Bombshell (1998), and Love in a Cold Climate (2001). Her other television credits include episodes of Z Cars, The Troubleshooters, The Adventurer, The Sweeney, Tales of the Unexpected, The Gentle Touch, Worlds Beyond, Boon, The House of Eliott, Inspector Morse, Ghostbusters of East Finchley, Jonathan Creek, and Pie in the Sky. Divorced from Curram, she met actor Denis Lawson in the mid–1980s, and the two became life partners, eventually marrying in 2004. Gish had continued to perform on stage despite the loss of her eye in 2003 because of a cancerous facial tumor. • Times (of London), Mar. 12, 2005, 81.

ing the violin at the age of five and later performed with the Santa Cecilia Orchestra. An anti–Fascist, he led the Santa Cecilia Orchestra in the first concert after the Allied liberation of Rome during World War II. He subsequently served as assistant conductor of the Rome Radio Symphony. In 1953 Giulini became conductor at La Scala, where he conducted Maria Callas in productions of La Traviata and Falstaff. He left La Scala after five years to concentrate on recordings, conducting Mozart’s Don Giovanni and The Marriage of Figaro in 1959. He conducted the Royal Orchestra in England for Luchino Visconti’s 1958 film production of Verdi’s Don Carlos. Giulini became principal guest conductor with the Chicago Symphony in 1969, and also served as music director of the Vienna Symphony in the mid–1970s. Giulini served as music director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic from 1978 to 1984, which included a popular production of Verdi’s Falstaff. He left Los Angeles after his wife suffered a cerebral aneurysm and the couple returned to Italy. Giulini earned a Grammy Award for leading the La Scala opera orchestra and pianist Vladimir Horowitz in a recording of Mozart in 1989. He continued to make occasional orchestral appearances until a heart condition forced his retirement in the late 1990s. • Los Angeles Times, June 16, 2005, A1; New York Times, June 16, 2005, B11; Time, June 27, 2005, 23.

GIULINI, CARLO MARIA Carlo Maria Giulini, who conducted the Los Angeles Philharmonic in the late 1970s and early 1980s, died at his home in Brescia, Italy, on June 14, 2005. He was 91. Giulini was born in Barletta, Italy, on May 9, 1914. He began play-

GLAISTER, GERARD British television producer and director Gerard Glaister died in England on February 5, 2005. He was 89. Glaister was a producer with BBC Television from the 1950s. He oversaw production, and sometimes wrote and directed, for such series as The Men from Room 13 (1959), The Dark Island (1962), Moonstrike (1963), The Revenue Men (1967), The Expert (1968), Codename (1970), The Passengers (1971), The Brothers (1972), The Long Chase (1972), Colditz (1972), Oil Strike North (1975), The Mackinnons (1977), Secret Army (1977), Buccaneer (1980), Blood Money (1981), Kessler (1981), The Fourth Arm (1983), Skorpion (1983), Cold Warrior (1984), Howard’s Way (1985), and Trainer (1991). Glaister also directed several Edgar Wallace mystery films in the early 1960s including The Clue of the Silver Key (1961), The Share Out (1962), The Set-Up (1963), and The Partner (1963). • Times (of London), Mar. 21, 2005, 51.

Carlo Maria Giulini

Gerard Glaister

141

2005 • Obituaries

GLEASON, JACK Television editor Jack Gleason died on April 24, 2005. He was 86. Gleason was born on October 8, 1918. He received an Emmy Award nomination for editing the television series Naked City in 1963. He also worked as an editor on such series as Navy Log, Behind Closed Doors, Route 66, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, Hawaii Five-O, Harper Valley P.T.A., and Private Benjamin. Gleason also edited the tele-films Cry Rape (1973), Fun and Games (1980), Marilyn: The Untold Story (1980), The Day the Loving Stopped (1981), and The Jerk, Too (1984). GLEASON, WILLIAM Actor William Gleason died at his home in Santa Monica, California on August 25, 2005. He was 76. Gleason was born on September 25, 1928. He began his career on stage performing in productions in New York and London. He was also featured in the daytime soap opera The Edge of Night. Gleason appeared in several films including That Touch of Mink (1962), The Minx (1969), and Shakedown (1988), and guest starred in an episode of McCloud on television. GLITTERS, GOLDIE Michael Heesey, who performed in the as Goldie Glitters with the San Francisco–based transvestite troupe The Cockettes, died in Dorset, England, on October 9, 2005. He was 59. He was born in Los Angeles, California, on October 15, 1945. He performed with The Cockettes from 1969 to 1972, and appeared with them in the films Groupies (1970) and Tricia’s Wedding (1971) as Tricia Nixon.

Gloriella

GOKEN, TRICIA Tricia Goken, who served as a script supervisor for numerous independent films and the television spy series Alias, was killed in an automobile accident along with her fiancé, Denis Tri, in Maryland on January 29, 2005. She was 35. Goken was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on November 16, 1969. She was a script supervisor for the films The Keening (1999), Bust (1999), On Duty (2000), Talk to You Later (2000), Gulp (2001), All Over the Guy (2001), Second to Die (2001), and The Road Home (2003). She was working with Alias, the popular espionage series starring Jennifer Garner, at the time of her death.

Tricia Goken (with her fiancé, Denis Tri)

Goldie Glitters

GLORIELLA Mexican actress Gloriella was shot to death in Colima, Mexico, on December 2, 2005. She was 52. She was born Gloria Cardenas Sandoval in Ixtlahuacan, Colima, Mexico, in 1953. She appeared in numerous films in the 1970s and 1980s including Capulina Against the Monsters (1974), Rarotonga (1978), El Fin del Tahur (1979), En la Cuerda del Hambre (1979), Los Mantenidos (1980), La Grilla (1980), La Coralillo (1981), Un Macho en la Casa de Citas (1982), Sexo, Sexo, Ra Ra Ra (1987), and Un Macho en el Salon de Belleza (1987).

GOLDSTEIN, HERB Character actor Herb Goldstein died on August 25, 2005. He was 78. Goldstein was born on September 13, 1926. He was featured in such films as Let’s Play Dead (1973), Mako: The Jaws of Death (1976), Bloodstalkers (1978), King Frat (1979), Super Fuzz (1980), Freddie of the Jungle (1981), Eyes of a Stranger (1981), The Pilot (1981), A Friend Is a Treasure (1981), Masterblaster (1985), Miami Blues (1990), Twin Sisters (1992), and Dr. Jekyll and Ms. Hyde (1995). He was also seen in the tele-films Beyond the Bermuda Triangle (1975) and Charley Hannah (1986), and an episode of Miami Vice. GOLIAS, RONALD Brazilian comedian Ronald Golias died of multiple organ failure in a Sao Paulo, Brazil, hospital on September 27, 2005. He was 76.

Obituaries • 2005

142

Herb Goldstein

Dolores Golightly (left)

Golias was born in Sao Carlos, Brazil, on May 4, 1929. He began his career on radio and became a popular comic in the 1950s after appearing in the television comedy series Happiness Plaza as Pacifico. Golias also starred as Bronco in the television sit-com The Trapo Family in the 1960s. Golias’ film credits include Um Marido Barra Limpa (1957), Os Tres Cangaceiros (1959), Tudo Legal (1960), O Dono da Bola (1961), Os Cosmonautas (1962), and Agnaldo, Perigo a Vista (1969). Most recently, he was featured as Carlos Bronco in the 2004 television series Meu Cunhado.

try with his family during the Russian Revolution. They eventually settled in Seattle, Washington, where Golitzen studied architecture at the University of Washington. He subsequently moved to Los Angeles where he worked as an assistant to art director Alexander Toluboff at MGM. Golitzen worked on several films including Call of the Wild (1935), The Hurricane (1937) and Trade Winds (1938). He became an art director in 1939 and rose to unit art director and then supervising art director at Universal from 1942, where he was credited on hundreds of films. Golitzen earned his first Oscar nomination for Alfred Hitchcock’s 1940 film Foreign Correspondent. He was also nominated for Sundown (1941) and Arabian Nights (1942), and won the Oscar for 1943’s Phantom of the Opera. He was also nominated for The Climax (1944) before receiving his second Academy Award for Stanley Kubrick’s Spartacus (1961). Golitzen earned nominations for Flower Drum Song (1961) and That Touch of Mink (1962), and another Oscar for To Kill a Mockingbird (1963). He was also nominated for Gambit (1966), Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967), Sweet Charity (1969), Airport (1970), and Earthquake (1974). His numerous film credits also include Eternally Yours (1939), Slightly Honorable (1940), The House Across the Bay (1940), That Uncertain Feeling (1941), Sundown (1941), Eagle Squadron (1942), We’ve Never Been Licked (1943), Gung Ho! (1943), Ladies Courageous (1944), Cobra Woman (1944), San Diego I

Ronald Golias

GOLIGHTLY, DOLORES Actress Dolores Golightly died of heart failure in Fresno, California, on June 5, 2005. She was 76. Golightly was born on December 7, 1928. She was a popular performer in local theatrical productions in Fresno from the mid–1970s. She also was seen in numerous television commercials and was featured in Alan Autry’s 2002 tele-film The Legend of Jake Kincaid. Golightly also appeared in the 2003 horror film Dark Walker. GOLITZEN, ALEXANDER Art director Alexander Golitzen, who shared three Academy Awards for his work as a film art director, died of congestive heart failure in a San Diego, California, healthcare center on July 26, 2005. He was 97. Golitzen was born in Moscow, Russia, on February 28, 1908, and left the coun-

Alexander Golitzen

143 Love You (1944), Hi, Beautiful (1944), Salome, Where She Danced (1945), Fritz Lang’s Scarlet Street (1945), A Night in Paradise (1946), Magnificent Doll (1946), Smash-Up: The Story of a Woman (1947), Something in the Wind (1947), The Lost Moment (1947), Letter from an Unknown Woman (1948), Tap Roots (1948), You Gotta Stay Happy (1948), The Saxon Charm (1948), The Lady Gambles (1949), Sword in the Desert (1949), Bagdad (1949), Spy Hunt (1950), Frenchie (1950), Double Crossbones (1951), Up Front (1951), Smuggler’s Island (1951), You Never Can Tell (1951), The Golden Horde (1951), The Treasure of Lost Canyon (1952), The Duel at Silver Creek (1952), The World in His Arms (1952), It Grows on Trees (1952), Against All Flags (1952), Girls in the Night (1953), The Mississippi Gambler (1953), City Beneath the Sea (1953), Seminole (1953), Gunsmoke (1953), Desert Legion (1953), Thunder Bay (1953), Lone Hand (1953), Law and Order (1953), Take Me to Town (1953), Column South (1953), The Great Sioux Uprising (1953), All I Desire (1953), Abbott and Costello Go to Mars (1953), The Man from the Alamo (1953), The Veils of Bagdad (1953), The Glenn Miller Story (1953), War Arrow (1953), Playgirl (1954), Fireman Save My Child (1954), Francis Joins the WACS (1954), Dawn at Socorro (1954), The Black Shield of Falworth (1954), Naked Alibi (1954), The Far Country (1954), Ricochet Romance (1954), Four Guns to the Border (1954), Bengal Brigade (1954), Destry (1954), The Yellow Mountain (1954), Sign of the Pagan (1954), Six Bridges to Cross (1955), So This Is Paris (1955), Abbott and Costello Meet the Keystone Kops (1955), Man Without a Star (1955), Captain Lightfoot (1955), Smoke Signal (1955), The Man from Bitter Ridge (1955), Chief Crazy Horse (1955), Revenge of the Creature (1955), This Island Earth (1955), The Purple Mask (1955), Abbott and Costello Meet the Mummy (1955), Ain’t Misbehavin’ (1955), The Shrike (1955), Foxfire (1955), The Looters (1955), The Private War of Major Benson (1955), Francis in the Navy (1955), Cult of the Cobra (1955), Female on the Beach (1955), To Hell and Back (1955), One Desire (1955), Kiss of Fire (1955), The Second Greatest Sex (1955), Lady Godiva of Coventry (1955), Running Wild (1955), The Rawhide Years (1955), Tarantula (1955), The Spoilers (1955), The Square Jungle (1955), The Benny Goodman Story (1955), All That Heaven Allows (1955), Rock, Pretty Baby (1956), There’s Always Tomorrow (1956), World in My Corner (1956), Never Say Goodbye (1956), The Price of Fear (1956), Raw Edge (1956), Red Sundown (1956), Backlash (1956), The Creature Walks Among Us (1956), The Kettles in the Ozarks (1956), A Day of Fury (1956), Star in the Dust (1956), The Toy Tiger (1956), Francis in the Haunted House (1956), Congo Crossing (1956), Behind the High Wall (1956), Away All Boats (1956), Outside the Law (1956), Walk the Proud Land (1956), Pillars of the Sky (1956), Showdown at Abilene (1956), Everything but the Truth (1956), The Unguarded Moment (1956), Written on the Wind (1956), The Mole People (1956), Battle Hymn (1956), Four Girls in Town (1957), Istanbul (1957), Gun for a Coward (1957), The Incredible Shrinking Man (1957), Mister Cory (1957), The Tattered Dress (1957), Kelly and Me (1957), Man Afraid (1957), The Girl in the Kremlin (1957), The Night Runner (1957),

2005 • Obituaries

The Kettles on Old MacDonald’s Farm (1957), Joe Butterfly (1957), The Deadly Mantis (1957), Quantez (1957), The Midnight Story (1957), Night Passage (1957), Man of a Thousand Faces (1957), The Land Unknown (1957), Slaughter on Tenth Avenue (1957), Man in the Shadow (1957), Interlude (1957), Joe Dakota (1957), Appointment with a Shadow (1957), My Man Godfrey (1957), Slim Carter (1957), The Monolith Monsters (1957), The Tarnished Angels (1958), The Female Animal (1958), The Lady Takes a Flyer (1958), Day of the Bad Man (1958), Damn Citizen (1958), Summer Love (1958), Touch of Evil (1958), Live Fast, Die Young (1958), Girls on the Loose (1958), Flood Tide (1958), This Happy Feeling (1958), The Thing That Couldn’t Die (1958), A Time to Love and a Time to Die (1958), The Last of the Fast Guns (1958), Twilight of the Gods (1958), Voice in the Mirror (1958), Wild Heritage (1958), The Saga of Hemp Brown (1958), Raw Wind in Eden (1958), Kathy O’ (1958), Step Down to Terror (1958), Ride a Crooked Trail (1958), Once Upon a Horse... (1958), The Restless Years (1958), The Perfect Furlough (1958), Monster on the Campus (1958), Money, Women and Guns (1959), Never Steal Anything Small (1959), No Name on the Bullet (1959), A Stranger in My Arms (1959), Imitation of Life (1959), The Wild and the Innocent (1959), Curse of the Undead (1959), This Earth Is Mine (1959), Operation Petticoat (1959), The Leech Woman (1960), Seven Ways from Sundown (1960), Midnight Lace (1960), The Private Life of Adam and Eve (1960), The Great Impostor (1961), Posse from Hell (1961), The Last Sunset (1961), Tammy Tell Me True (1961), Back Street (1961), Lover Come Back (1961), The Outsider (1961), Cape Fear (1962), Six Black Horses (1962), Lonely Are the Brave (1962), The Spiral Road (1962), If a Man Answers (1962), 40 Pounds of Trouble (1962), The Ugly American (1963), Showdown (1963), Tammy and the Doctor (1963), The List of Adrian Messenger (1963), A Gathering of Eagles (1963), The Thrill of It All (1963), For Love or Money (1963), Captain Newman, M.D. (1963), Man’s Favorite Sport? (1964), The Brass Bottle (1964), Wild and Wonderful (1964), Bedtime Story (1964), Bullet for a Badman (1964), McHale’s Navy (1964), Island of the Blue Dolphins (1964), I’d Rather Be Rich (1964), Send Me No Flowers (1964), The Lively Set (1964), Kitten with a Whip (1964), Father Goose (1964), Taggart (1964), William Castle’s The Night Walker (1964), Strange Bedfellows (1965), The Sword of Ali Baba (1965), Wild Seed (1965), Mirage (1965), Shenandoah (1965), Fluffy (1965), The Art of Love (1965), McHale’s Navy Joins the Air Force (1965), A Very Special Favor (1965), I Saw What You Did (1965), Love and Kisses (1965), That Funny Feeling (1965), The War Lord (1965), Blindfold (1965), Moment to Moment (1965), The Rare Breed (1966), Incident at Phantom Hill (1966), Gunpoint (1966), Madame X (1966), The Ghost and Mr. Chicken (1966), Munster, Go Home (1966), The Pad and How to Use It (1966), The Plainsman (1966), Beau Geste (1966), And Now Miguel (1966), The Appaloosa (1966), Texas Across the River (1966), Let’s Kill Uncle (1966), The Ballad of Josie (1967), Tobruk (1967), Gunfight in Abilene (1967), Ride to Hangman’s Tree (1967), The Young Warriors (1967), The Reluctant Astronaut (1967),

Obituaries • 2005

144

Rough Night in Jericho (1967), The King’s Pirate (1967), The Perils of Pauline (1967), Games (1967), Rosie! (1967), Banning (1967), Nobody’s Perfect (1968), P.J. (1968), Counterpoint (1968), The Secret War of Harry Frigg (1968), Madigan (1968), A Lovely Way to Die (1968), What’s So Bad About Feeling Good? (1968), Journey to Shiloh (1968), The Shakiest Gun in the West (1968), Did You Hear the One About the Traveling Saleslady? (1968), In Enemy Country (1968), The Hell with Heroes (1968), Don’t Just Stand There! (1968), The Pink Jungle (1968), Coogan’s Bluff (1968), House of Cards (1968), Hellfighters (1968), Angel in My Pocket (1969), Death of a Gunfighter (1969), Winning (1969), A Man Called Gannon (1969), Eye of the Cat (1969), The Lost Man (1969), The Love God? (1969), Tell Them Willie Boy Is Here (1969), The Story of a Woman (1970), the tele-film Company of Killers (1970), The Forbin Project (1970), Cockeyed Cowboys of Calico County (1970), Pufnstuf (1970), I Love My Wife (1970), Raid on Rommel (1971), How to Frame a Figg (1971), The Beguiled (1971), One More Train to Rob (1971), Red Sky at Morning (1971), Shoot Out (1971), Play Misty for Me (1971), Slaughterhouse-Five (1972), The Great Northfield Minnesota Raid (1972), Joe Kidd (1972), That Man Bolt (1973), and Breezy (1973). He also worked on the television series Playhouse 90, Peter Gunn, One Step Beyond, and The Twilight Zone, and several Academy Award ceremonies. Golitzen retired in the early 1970s. • Los Angeles Times, Aug. 13, 2005, B16; New York Times, Aug. 20, 2005, C16; Times (of London), Aug. 26, 2005, 74; Variety, Aug. 22, 2005, 43.

GOMIASHVILI, ARCHIL Russian actor Archil Gomiashvili died in Russia on May 31, 2005. He was 79. Gomiashvili was born in Chiatura, Soviet Union (now Georgia), on March 23, 1926. He was a leading performer on the Russian stage and screen, appearing in such films as Personally Known (1958), Mole (1962), You Cannot See What I Had Seen (1965), An Extraordinary Assignment (1966), Explosion After Midnight (1969), Twelve Chairs (1971), Mimino (1977), My Love, My Sorrow (1978), Golden Fleece (1981), Early, Early Morning... (1983), Copper Angel (1984), and My Favourite Clown (1986).

GONZALEZ, AGUSTIN Spanish actor Agustin Gonzalez died of complications from pneumonia in Madrid, Spain, on January 16, 2005. He was 74. Gonzalez was born in Madrid on March 24, 1930. He made his film debut in the 1954 feature Happy Easter, and starred in over 100 films in a career on screen that lasted fifty years. His numerous credits include The Devil Made a Woman (1959) Life Around Us (1959), My Last Tang (1960), At Five in the Afternoon (1961), The Big Family (1962), Gunfight at Red Sands (1963), Fair of the Dove (1963), Sword of Zorro (1963), Weeping for a Bandit (1964), Death Travels Too Much (1965), Life Goes On (1965), That Man in Istanbul (1965), Behind the Mask of Zorro (1965), A Little Maiden in White (1965), Los Flamencos (1968), Don Quixote Rides Again (1973), Love Doll (1974), The Regent’s Wife (1974), Silk Worms (1977), The National Shotgun (1978), Confessions of a Congressman (1979), Honey (1979), The Nest (1979), Five Forks (1979), Chocolates (1980), Gary Cooper, Who Art in Heaven (1980), Kargus (1981), National Heritage (1981), Begin the Beguine (1982), Hooray for Divorce! (1982), The Beehive (1982), National III (1982), The Crack II (1983), Bicycles Are for the Summer (1984), The Holy Innocents (1984), Poppers (1984), The Heifer (1985), Bohemian Nights (1985), The Court of the Pharaoh (1985), The Old Music (1985), Mambru Went to War (1986), Voyage to Nowhere (1986), The Bastard Brother of God (1986), Moors and Christians (1987), Scent of a Crime (1988), Let’s Trash the Poor (1991), After the Dream (1992), The Age of Beauty (1992), Everyone Off to Jail (1993), Tales of the Stinking Military Service (1994), The Worst Years of Our Lives (1994), Long Life Together (1994), On Earth as It Is in Heaven (1994), Caresses (1998), The Grandfather (1998), Said (1999), The Ugliest Woman in the World (1999), First and Last Love (2002), Story of a Kiss (2002), and Witchery Deal (2003). Gonzalez also appeared often on Spanish television from the 1990s, staring in the series Los Ladrones van a la Oficina (1993), Mama Quiere ser Artista (1997), Ni Contigo ni Sin Ti (1998), A Las Onc een Casa (1998), La Vida de Rita (2003), and Paco y Veva (2004).

Agustin Gonzalez Archil Gomiashvili

GOODMAN , BURT Character actor Burt Goodman died on July 23, 2005. He was 70. Goodman was born on February 18, 1935. He was a regular

145

2005 • Obituaries

GORDON, HASKELL Stage and television actor Haskell Gordon died of respiratory failure in Miami, Florida, on January 8, 2005. He was 83. Gordon was born in Chicago, Illinois, on May 28, 1921. He began his career on stage there before moving to New York in the 1950s. He appeared on Broadway in original productions of 1776, Sugar Babies, and Amadeus. Gordon was also seen on television in an episode of the 1960s series Route 66, and had a recurring role in the daytime soap opera One Life to Live. He also appeared in the 1980 comedy film Getting Wasted. • Variety, Mar. 14, 2005, 64.

Burt Goodman

performer in the television series America’s Funniest People and Candid Camera in the early 1990s. He was also featured in the 1988 tele-film Perry Mason: The Case of the Avenging Ace, and the features Loving Deadly (1994), Shooting Lily (1996), Storm Catcher (1999), Shteps (2002), and Interviewing Norman (2005). Goodman’s other television credits include episodes of Boston Common and Will and Grace.

GOODMAN, SHIRLEY Rhythm and blues singer Shirley Goodman died of complications from a stroke in California on July 5, 2005. She was 69. Goodman was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, on June 19, 1936. She began performing while in her teens, recording “I’m Gone” with childhood friend Leonard Lee in the early 1950s. The record became a R&B hit for the duo who became known as “the sweethearts of the blues.” They continued to record and perform together over the next decade, producing such hits as “Let the Good Times Roll” and “Feel So Good.” The duo split in the early 1960s and Goodman moved to California where she did session work with such artists as the Rolling Stones and Sonny and Cher. She recorded the disco hit “Shame, Shame, Shame” under the credit of Shirley and Company in 1974. Goodman subsequently retired from performing to work for a cable television company in New Orleans. • Times (of London), July 30, 2005, 72.

GORDY Gordy, a popular seal who starred in the German television series Hallo Robbie! since 2001, was found dead in Tetzitser Lake in Rugen, Germany, on May 17, 2005. He was ten. Gordy starred as Robbie in the series which also featured human actor Karsten Bacon. Seals Chico and Tino, who also appeared in the series, took over Gordy’s role after his death.

Gordy

GORMLEY, CHARLES Scottish film director and writer died of cancer in Glasgow, Scotland, on September 22, 2005. He was 67. Gormley was born in Rutherglen, Scotland, on December 19, 1937. He began working in films as a writer of documentaries in the late 1960s, and co-scripted the children’s film The Big Catch

Shirley Goodman Charles Gormley

Obituaries • 2005

146

(1968). He joined with Bill Forsyth and Nick Lewis to form Tree Films in 1972, and made numerous documentaries including If Only We Had the Space (1974), Keep Your Eye on Paisley (1975), The Legend of Los Tayos (1976), and The Cromarty Bridge (1979). Gormley also co-wrote the Dutch sexploitation film Blue Movie in 1971. He also scripted VD (1972), Dakota (1974), Alicia (1974), My Nights with Susan, Sandra, Olga and Julie (1975), and The Forbidden Bacchanal (1981). Gormley wrote and directed the feature Living Apart Together in 1982. He also wrote and directed the comedy Heavenly Pursuits starring Tom Conti in 1985. Gormley also directed The Bogie Man (1992) and Down Among the Big Boys (1993) for the BBC. • Times (of London), Oct. 7, 2005, 77.

GORSHIN, FRANK Actor and impressionist Frank Gorshin, who was best known for his role as the villainous Riddler on the 1960s cult television series Batman, died of complications from lung cancer and emphysema on May 17, 2005. He was 71. Gorshin was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on April 5, 1934. He began his career in show business after serving in the Army during the Korean War. An impressionist and comic, Gorshin began acting in films in the 1950s, often playing psychotic young men in such features as The Proud and Profane (1956), Hot Rod Girl (1956), Between Heaven and Hell (1956), Runaway Daughters (1956), The True Story of Jesse James (1957), Dragstrip Girl (1957), The Delicate Delinquent (1957), Invasion of the Saucer Men (1957), Portland Expose (1957), Tank Battalion (1958), Night of the Quarter Moon (1959), Warlock (1959), Bells Are Ringing (1960), Studs Lonigan (1960), Where the Boys Are (1960), The Great Impostor (1961), Ring of Fire (1961), The George Raft Story (1961), Sail a Crooked Ship (1961), That Darn Cat! (1965), Ride Beyond Vengeance (1966), and Skidoo (1968). He also was seen on television in episodes of Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Navy Log, The Restless Gun, Frontier Doctor, General Electric Theater, Hennesey, The Detectives Starring Robert Taylor, Mr. Lucky, Toast of the Town, The Defenders, The Untouchables, Empire, Combat!, Naked City, The DuPont Show of the Week, The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, Nurses, A Man Called Shenandoah, The Munsters, and Garrison’s Gorillas. Gorshin’s career was

Frank Gorshin (as the Riddler from Batman)

forever impacted when he starred as The Riddler in the first episode of the Batman television series in January of 1966. The series, which starred Adam West as Batman and Burt Ward as Robin, the Boy Wonder, became a cult phenomena with colorful villains played by prominent actors including The Joker (Cesar Romero), The Penguin (Burgess Meredith), King Tut (Victor Buono), The Catwoman ( Julie Newmar and Eartha Kitt), Egghead (Vincent Price), The Black Widow (Tallulah Bankhead), The Archer (Art Carney), The Bookworm (Roddy McDowall) and many more. Gorshin donned the green bowler hat and question-marked green outfit, playing the Riddler in over a dozen episodes of the series over the next two years. He earned an Emmy nomination for the role. He also joined fellow Bat-Villains Romero, Meredith and Lee Meriwether (taking over the role of Catwoman) in the 1966 feature film version of the series. He earned another Emmy nomination in 1969 for his performance as the half-black half-white Commissioner Bele pursuing a half-white half black fugitive in the racially-themed Star Trek episode “Let That Be Your Last Battlefield.” Gorshin also became a popular performer on the Las Vegas stage with his comedy routines and impressions, which earned him the title of “the man with 100 faces.” He also performed on such television series as The Andy Williams Show, The Dean Martin Show, The Jackie Gleason Show, The Carol Burnett Show, Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In, The High Chaparral, The Name of the Game, The Virginian, The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, O’Hara, U.S. Treasury, The Flip Wilson Show, The Kopycats, Ironside, Hawaii Five-O, Get Christie Love, S.W.A.T., Police Woman, Charlie’s Angels, Wonder Woman, Buck Rogers in the 25th Century, and The Fall Guy. Gorshin also appeared in the tele-films Sky Heist (1975), Greatest Heroes of the Bible (1978), and Death Car on the Freeway (1979). He reprised his role of the Riddler in the 1979 television special Legend of the Superheroes, and starred as Smiley Wilson in the daytime soap opera The Edge of Night from 1981 to 1982. He was also seen in the films Record City (1978), Underground Aces (1981), The Uppercrust (1981). Gorshin starred as Dan Wesker in the 1981 tele-film Goliath Awaits, and appeared in the tele-films Princess Ida (1982), A Night on the Town (1983), and A Masterpiece of Murder (1986). Other television credits include guest roles in The Fall Guy, Murder, She Wrote, Monsters, Are You Afraid of the Dark, and Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman. He was a voice actor in and episode of the animated Ren & Stimpy Show and the 1987 animated film The Gnomes’ Great Adventure (1987). He also appeared in the films Hot Resort (1985), Uphill All the Way (1986), Hollywood Vice Squad (1986), Beverly Hills Bodysnatchers (1989), Midnight (1989), Sweet Justice (1992), The Hollywood Beach Murders (1992), Body Trouble (1992), Amore! (1992), The Meteor Man (1993), Hail Caesar (1994), Twelve Monkeys (1995), Threshold (1997), Better Than Ever (1997), After the Game (1997), Twilight of the Ice Nymphs (1997), Bloodmoon (1997), The Rules (for Men) (1999), The Art of Murder (1999), All Shook Up (1999), Man of the Century (1999), Game Day (1999), Castlerock (2000), Luck of the Draw (2000),

147 Beethoven 3rd (2000), The Curio Trunk (2000), Something Else (2000), High Times Potluck (2002), Manna from Heaven (2002), Mail Order Bride (2003), and The Creature of the Sunny Side Up Trailer Park (2004). Gorshin appeared as the old codger in the 1999 cable Halloween mini-series Roger Corman’s The Phantom Eye, and was Rev. Love on the soap General Hospital in 1999. He again revisited his super-villain roots as Benjamin Tickerman, aka the costumed felon Clockwise, in an episode of the cable series Black Scorpion in 2001. Gorshin again co-starred with Adam West and Burt Ward in the 2003 tele-film Return to the Batcave: The Misadventures of Adam Burt. He captivated a new generation of theater goers in recent years with his masterful performance as George Burns in the one-man show Say Goodnight Gracie which opened on Broadway in 2002. His final television performance, in an episode of CSI: Crime Scene Investigations, aired several days after his death. • Los Angeles Times, May 19, 2005, B10; New York Times, May 19, 2005, C23; People, June 6, 2005, 142; Time, May 30, 2005, 25; Times (of London), May 20, 2005, 73; Variety, May 23, 2005, 52.

GOSNELL, RAY Assistant director Raymond A. Gosnell, Jr., died at his home in Los Angeles of lung cancer on August 14, 2005. He was 81. Gosnell was born on July 26, 1924. He began working in films in the 1950s and served as second assistant director on William Wyler’s 1958 film The Big Country. He worked with such directors as John Ford, John Huston, George Roy Hill, Stanley Kramer, and Peter Bogdanovich during his career, and was assistant director on the features Pork Chop Hill (1959), The Horse Soldiers (1959), Battle of the Coral Sea (1959), The Gene Krupa Story (1959), Ocean’s Eleven (1960), Posse from Hell (1961), Lover Come Back (1961), Cape Fear (1962), Freud (1962), Cat Ballou (1965), Hawaii (1966), Murderers’ Row (1966), The Happening (1967), Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner (1967), Funny Girl (1968), The Secret of Santa Vittoria (1969), What’s Up, Doc? (1972), Slaughterhouse-Five (1972), Paper Moon (1973), The Sting (1973), and The Great Waldo Pepper (1975). He subsequently served as executive vice president of production management of feature films at 20th Century–Fox under Alan Ladd, Jr. Gosnell was an agent at the Smith Gosnell Nicholson

2005 • Obituaries

& Associates Agency for the past 16 years, representing cinematographers, editors, and other film personnel.

GOSS, JOE Special effects artist Joseph Franklin Goss, who worked on the science fiction series Battlestar Galactica, died on August 5, 2005. He was 90. He was born on November 13, 1914. Goss earned an Emmy Award with John Dysktra and Robert Edlund for his work on the series. He did mechanical special effects for Galactica. He also did effects work for the 1979 film The Concorde: Airport ’79. GOTTLER, JEROME S. Film and television writer Jerome S. Gottler died in Los Angeles on November 1, 2005. He was 89. Gottler was born in New York City on December 2, 1915, the son of composer and film director Archie Gottler. He served with the Signal Corps Photographic Center during World War II, writing numerous training films for the War Department. He often worked with his father as a songwriter, composing such tunes as “He Took Her for a Sleigh Ride,” “Yes, There Ain’t No Moonlight, So What,” and “The Girl on the Isle of Man.” Gottler also wrote several films including High Society (1955), Spy Chasers (1955), and Sweet and Hot (1958), and scripted episodes of Racket Squad and Circus Boy for television. GOTTSCHALL , ROBERT Actor Robert Gottschall, who appeared in films in the late 1930s and early 1940s under the name Robert Shaw, died on January 3, 2005. He was 89. Gottschall was born in Dallas, Texas, on September 15, 1915. He was featured in such films as Rose of Washington Square (1939), Young Mr. Lincoln (1939), Boy Friend (1939), 20,000 Men a Year (1939), Quick Millions (1939), The Grapes of Wrath (1940), The Great Profile (1940), Tobacco Road (1941), Adam Had Four Sons (1941), Rise and Shine (1941), Son of the Guardsman (1946), Captain from Castile (1947), and Berlin Express (1948). Gottschall joined the U.S. Army during World War II, and continued his career in the military after the war, rising to the rank of lieutenant colonel. He again returned to the screen in the early 1980s, appearing in the films Honeysuckle Rose (1980) and The Big Brawl (1980), and the tele-films Adam (1983) and The Sky’s No Limit (1984).

Robert Gottschall Ray Gosnell

Obituaries • 2005

148

GOURRIER, JOHN FRED see FRED, JOHN GOWER, JOHN British stage actor John Gower died in England on August 1, 2005. He was 74. Gower was born in Dar es Salaam, Tanganyika, in 1931. He made his professional debut in a stage production of The Three Caskets in 1956. He continued to play leading roles in such plays as Zuleika (1957), The Love Doctor (1959), Oh What a Lovely War! (1963), Dearest Dracula (1965), Half a Sixpence (1966), and Phil the Fluter (1970). Gower was also featured often in British radio plays, and appeared on television in episodes of Dixon of Dock Green and On the Up. He appeared in the 1992 television production of Sherlock Holmes and the Leading Lady, and was Prince Fuspoli in the 1996 film version of Evita starring Madonna. • Times (of London), Aug. 25, 2005, 60.

Joe Grant

(1998). His short animated film, Lorenzo, earned an Academy Award nomination earlier in 2005. • Los Angeles Times, May 10, 2005, B10; New York Times, May 11, 2005, B10; Time, May 23, 2005, 25; Times (of London), May 13, 2005, 62; Variety, May 16, 2005, 66.

John Gower (with Mary Millar from Dearest Dracula)

GRANT, JOE Animator and writer Joe Grant, who was instrumental in the creation of many of Disney Studio’s most enduring classics, died of a heart attack at his drawing board at Disney in Glendale, California, on May 6, 2005. He was 96. Grant was born in New York City on May 15, 1908, and raised in Los Angeles. He began drawing at an early age and worked as a caricaturist for the Los Angeles Record. He was first hired by Disney in 1933 to draw cartoon versions of Hollywood stars for the cartoon Mickey’s Gala Premiere. Walt Disney was impressed with Grant’s work and offered him a permanent job with the studio. He was instrumental in the development of the first animated feature film Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs in 1937. He was also involved in designing the Wicked Witch for the film. Grant also helped conceive Disney’s animated tribute to classical music, Fantasia, and the adaptation of the children’s classic Pinocchio in 1940. He was also involved in the production of Dumbo (1941), The Reluctant Dragon (1941), Saludos Amigos (1942), and Alice in Wonderland (1951). Grant left the studio in the late 1940s to form a greeting card company, but an earlier idea of his was the basis for the 1955 animated film Lady and the Tramp. Grant returned to Disney in the early 1990s to work as a writer, character designer, and animator on the films Beauty and the Beast (1991), The Lion King (1994), Pocahontas (1995), and Mulan

GRANT, SIMONE Actress Simone Grant Timoney died of breast cancer in New York City on November 2, 2005. She was 44. She appeared in numerous regional productions and performed in New York City Opera productions of Dead Man Walking, La Boheme, and Haroun. She also worked as a voice actor in the English language versions of such anime series as Record of Lodoss War (1990), The Heroic Legend of Arislan (1991), Record of Lodoss War: Chronicles of the Heroic Knight (1998), Boogiepop Phantom (2000), and Space Travelers (2000). • Variety, Nov. 21, 2005, 73.

Simone Grant (with husband, actor Michael Timoney)

GRAUNKE, KURT German symphony conductor and orchestrator Kurt Graunke died in Munich, Germany, on June 5, 2005. He was 89. Graunke was born in Stettin, Germany, on September 20, 1915. He began playing the violin at an early age and studied music at Berlin University. He formed the Graunke Symphony Orchestra in Munich in 1945. The orchestra toured Germany and performed on radio. It was also noted for orchestral work in numerous films, with Graunke conducting for such features as Peter and the

149

2005 • Obituaries

Kurt Graunke

Guy Green

Wolf (1946), Make Mine Music (1946), Fanfares of Love (1951), Mask in Blue (1953), Ski Crazy! (1955), The Trapp Family (1956), The Trapp Family in America (1958), Grand Canyon (1958), and Captain Sinbad (1963).

Captain Horatio Hornblower (1951), Night Without Stars (1951), The Story of Robin Hood (1952), The Hour of 13 (1952), The Beggar’s Opera (1953), Decameron Nights (1953), Cocktails in the Kitchen (1954), Rob Roy, the Highland Rogue (1954), Souls in Conflict (1955), I am a Camera (1955), and The Dark Avenger (1955). Green also began directing films, helming such features as River Beat (1954), Postmark for Danger (1955) which he also scripted, Tears for Simon (1955), House of Secrets (1956), Desert Patrol (1958), The Snorkel (1958), SOS Pacific (1959), The Angry Silence (1960), The Mark (1961), Light in the Piazza (1962), Diamond Head (1963), 55 Days at Peking (1963), A Patch of Blue (1965) which he also produced and scripted, Pretty Polly (1967), The Magus (1968), Walk in the Spring Rain (1970), Luther (1973), Jacqueline Susann’s Once Is Not Enough (1975), and The Devil’s Advocate (1977). He also directed several tele-films including The Incredible Journey of Doctor Meg Laurel (1979), Jennifer: A Woman’s Story (1979), Jimmy B. & Andre (1980), Inmates: A Love Story (1981), Isabel’s Choice (1981), and Arthur Hailey’s Strong Medicine (1986). • New York Times, Sept. 17, 2005, A16; Times (of London), Sept. 17, 2005, 75; Variety, Sept. 26, 2005, 72.

THE GREAT JOHN L. Burly stuntman, character actor, and professional wrestler The Great John L. died in Springdale, Arkansas, on November 6, 2005. He was 80. He was born William H. Clark in Bowling Green, Kentucky, on March 25, 1925. He began his career as a professional wrestler in the 1950s. He made his film debut as a stuntman in the 1958 adaptation of Jules Verne’s Journey to the Center of the Earth. He was also featured in such films as Vengeance (1964), Breaker! Breaker (1977), The Island of Dr. Moreau (1977) as one of Burt Lancaster’s beastmen, Zero to Sixty (1978), and Silent Rage (1982) with Chuck Norris. He also appeared on television in episodes of The Munsters, Burke’s Law, Little House on the Prairie, Archie Bunker’s Place, and Life Goes On. GREEN, BRIAN WESLEY Animator Brian Wesley Green died after collapsing at his home in Texas on May 15, 2005. Green worked as an animator for Disney from the 1990s, working on such films as The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1996), Fantasia 2000 (1999), Dinosaur (2000), and Atlantis: The Lost Empire (2001). GREEN, GUY Oscar-winning cinematographer and film director Guy Green died of heart and kidney failure at his Beverly Hills home on September 14, 2005. He was 91. Green was born in Somerset, England, on November 5, 1913. He began his career in London as a portrait photographer before he began working in films in 1929 as an assistant cameraman. He served as a camera operator on several films including the wartime productions of One of Our Aircraft Is Missing (1942) and In Which We Serve (1942). He became director of photography in the early 1940s, serving as cinematographer on Spellbound (1941), Escape to Danger (1943), The Way Ahead (1944), Carnival (1946), David Lean’s Great Expectations (1946) which garnered him an Academy Award, Take My Life (1947), Blanche Fury (1947), Oliver Twist (1948), The Passionate Friends (1949), Adam and Evelyne (1949), Madeleine (1950),

GREGORY, MARY ETHEL Character actress Mary Ethel Gregory died in a Salt Lake City, Utah, hospital after a long battle with cancer on February 22, 2005. She was 79. She was born Mary Ethel Eccles in

Mary Ethel Gregory

Obituaries • 2005

150

Salt Lake City on November 27, 1925. She appeared frequently on the local stage before earning a supporting role in the 1982 tele-film about executed killer Gary Gilmore, The Executioner’s Song. She also appeared in the films Footloose (1984) and The Red Fury (1984), and the tele-films The Deliberate Stranger (1986) and Double Jeopardy (1992). Gregory was also featured in the 1994 television mini-series adaptation of Stephen King’s The Stand.

GREY, JASMINE Model Jasmine Grey died of injuries she received in an automobile accident in Medina, Ohio, on December 10, 2005. She was 21. Grey was born in Cleveland, Ohio, on March 8, 1984. She worked as a nude model for various publications and internet sites, and appeared in Candy Girl Video’s Personal Panties and Sweet Satisfaction DVDs. She was also a guest at numerous GlamourCon and comic book conventions for the past two years.

Jasmine Grey

GRIFFIN, CHRIS Trumpeter Chris Griffin died of cancer in Danbury, Connecticut, on June 18, 2005. He was 89. He was born Gordon Claude Griffin in Binghamton, New York, on October 31, 1915. He began playing the trumpet at the age of 12, and was playing professionally with Charlie Barnet’s band in New York in the early 1930s. He played with Barnet for two years, then accompanied such singers as Mildred

Bailey and Rudy Vallee. He joined Benny Gordman’s orchestra in May of 1936. Griffin remained part of Goodman’s trumpet section with jazz legends Harry James and Ziggy Elman for three years, performing with the band at the 1938 Carnegie Hall concert, and appearing with the band in the films The Big Broadcast of 1937 and Hollywood Hotel. He left Goodman in 1939 to work as a studio musician, playing lead trumpet on radio and television for Ed Sullivan, Milton Berle, and Jackie Gleason. He was also heard on albums recorded by Ella Fitzgerald, Charlie Parker, Billie Holiday, and Tony Bennett. Griffin later taught the trumpet and embarked on a European tour in the 1970s. He also played with Tex Beneke’s band. Griffin was married to singer Helen O’Brien from the 1930s until her death in 2000. • Los Angeles Times, June 27, 2005, B7; New York Times, June 25, 2005, A16; Times (of London), July 19, 2005, 48.

GRIFFIN , JIMMY Jimmy Griffin, the cofounder of the soft-rock band Bread who earned an Academy Award for co-writing the song “For All We Know” for the 1970 film Lovers and Other Strangers, died of cancer at his home in Nashville, Tennessee, on January 11, 2005. He was 61. Griffin was born in Memphis, Tennessee, on August 10, 1943. He moved to Los Angeles in the early 1960s, where he appeared in several films including For Those Who Think Young (1964) and None but the Brave (1965). He also signed a recording contract with Reprise Records. He soon joined with fellow musicians David Gates and Robb Royer to form the group Bread in 1969. Their first single, “Make It with You,” was a major hit in 1970. He won the Academy Award for The Carpenters hit “For All We Know” in 1970, writing the song under the pseudonym Arthur James. Bread also recorded the hit albums Baby I’m a Want You, Guitar Man and If before splitting in 1973. They regrouped three years later and recorded another hit single, “Lost Without Your Love.” • Los Angeles Times, Jan. 14, 2005, B9; New York Times, Jan. 14, 2005, B9; Times (of London), Jan. 24, 2005, 52.

Jimmy Griffin

Chris Griffin

GRIFFITHS, ERIC Guitarist Eric Griffiths, who was founding member of the rock group The Quarry Men in the late 1950s, died of pancreatic can-

151

2005 • Obituaries

film credits include Cop or Hood (1979), I Love you All (1980), Choice of Arms (1981), The North Star (1982), The Big Brother (1982), I Don’t Kiss (1991), Death in Therapy (1996), and Signe Picpus (2003). He also wrote for television, creating the detective character Helene Franck for S.O.S. Disappeared in 1988, and writing several episodes of Maigret in the early 2000s.

Eric Griffiths

cer at his home in Edinburgh, Scotland, on January 29, 2005. He was 63. Griffiths was born in Denbigh, North Wales, on October 31, 1941, and was raised in Liverpool after his father’s death during World War II. He joined with several schoolmates, including John Lennon, Pete Shotton, and Rod Davis, to form the Quarry Men. They were joined by Paul McCartney in 1957 who aspired for Griffiths’ role as lead guitarist in the band. The group decided neither musician was suitable for the job and brought in George Harrison to replace Griffiths in the band. Griffiths entered the Merchant Navy soon after and remained with them until 1964. He subsequently began working with the prison system in England and, later, Scotland, and continued for the next three decades. He attended a reunion of his surviving Quarry Men in 1997, and they took the stage to perform. They played a charity benefit together later in the year and Griffiths reformed the band to record an album, John Lennon’s Original Quarrymen — Get Back Together. The group toured together through 2004, until Griffiths was diagnosed with cancer. • Los Angeles Times, Feb. 6, 2005, B13; New York Times, Feb. 4, 2005, B7; Times (of London), Feb. 5, 2005, 63.

GROLLMAN, ELAINE Actress Elaine Grollman died in Bayside, New York, on November 17, 2005. She was 77. She was born in the Bronx, New York, on October 22, 1928. Grollman made her Broadway debut in the original stage version of Yentl. She toured the United States and Canada in numerous productions of Fiddler on the Roof in the role of Yente the Matchmaker. Grollman was also seen in several films including Woody Allen’s Broadway Danny Rose, Zelig, and The Purple Rose of Cairo (1985). Her other film credits include In America (2002) and Untitled: A Love Story (2003).

Elaine Grollman

GRISOLIA, MICHEL French writer Michel Grisolia died of an aneurysm in Paris on March 29, 2005. He was 56. Grisolia was born in Nice, France, on August 12, 1948. Many of his novels were adapted for film, often with Grisolia providing the scripts. His

GRUSKIEWICZ, PAULA Actress Paula Gruskiewicz died of breast cancer in a Washington, D.C., hospital on December 31, 2005. She was 47. Gruskiewicz was born in Woodbridge, New Jersey, in 1958. She began performing on stage in the 1980s, and performed frequently in the Washington, D.C., area from the late 1980s. She appeared in such productions

Michel Grisolia

Paula Gruskiewicz

Obituaries • 2005

152

as Lillian Hellman’s The Children’s Hour, Eileen Atkin’s Vita and Virginia, and David Mamet’s The Old Neighborhood. Her final performance on stage with in an October production of Paul Osborn’s Mornings at Seven. During her career she also appeared in several television commercials and was featured in a small role in the NBC television series Homicide. • Variety, Jan. 23, 2006, 48.

GRUSKIN, EDWARD Television writer and producer Edward Gruskin died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease on November 15, 2005. He was 91. Gruskin was born on June 16, 1914. He began his career as a writer for such 1940s comic books as Doc Savage, The Shadow, Beebo, and Supersnipe. He also produced a radio version of Doc Savage. Gruskin wrote and produced the 1950 television version of Flash Gordon starring Steve Holland. GUASCH, SARA Mexican actress Sarah Guasch died of a heart attack in Mexico City on June 1, 2005. She was 86. Guasch was born in Chile in 1918. She was a leading performer in Spanish-language films from the 1940s, appearing in such features as My Memories of Mexico (1944), The House of the Fox (1945), Una Virgen Moderna (1946), A Story of the Nineties (1949), Jewels of Sin (1950), Cry of the Flesh (1951), Cradle Song (1953), Witchcraft (1954), White as an Angel (1954), The Hidden One (1956), Bambalinas (1957), Island for Two (1959), Tigers of the Ring (1960), The Killer Lacks a Name (1968), Mothers’ Day (1969), Survive! (1976), Mil Caminos Tiene la Muerte (1977), El Color de Nuestra Piel (1981), El Barrendero (1982), Abortion: A Song to Life (1983), and Nana (1985).

Sara Guasch

GUERRERO , EDDIE Professional wrestler and former WWE world champion Eddie Guerrero was found dead in a hotel room in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on November 13, 2005. He was 38. Guerrero was born in El Paso, Texas, in September of 1967, the youngest son of wrestler Gory Guerrero. He followed his father and older brothers Chavo, Hector, and Mando, into the wrestling arena in the late 1980s. He began wrestling in Mexico in 1987. He wrestled as Mascara Magica in EMLL and AAA in 1992 and 1993,

Eddie Guerrero

where he teamed with El Hijo de Santo as the Atomic Pair. He also wrestled as the Black Tiger in New Japan in 1993. During 1995 he wrestled with New Japan and ECW, where he often competed against Dean Malenko. Guerrero subsequently entered the WCW and, in December of 1996, defeated Diamond Dallas Page in a tournament final for the vacant U.S. Heavyweight Title. He lost the belt to Malenko in March of 1997. He began teaming, and sometimes battling, his nephew, Chavo Jr. later in the year. Guerrero held the WCW Cruiserweight title several times against such competitors as Chris Jericho, Rey Misterio, Jr., and the Ultimo Dragon. His career was sidelined on December 31, 1998, when he was seriously injured in an automobile accident. Guerrero was out of action for six months, returning to the ring in June of 1999. He joined Konnan, Kidman and Rey Misterio, Jr., in the Filthy Animals. He subsequently broke with the group and was again out of action due to surgery for his elbow at the end of 1999. Guerrero left the WCW in January of 2000, joining Dean Malenko, Chris Benoit and Perry Saturn as the Radicals in the WWF. In his WWF debut match Guerrero again injured his elbow, temporarily keeping him out of action. After his return he paired up with Chyna, calling himself Latino Heat. Chyna assisted him in his victory over Chris Jericho for the WWF European Title in April of 2000. His relationship with Chyna ended soon after he defeated her for the WWF Intercontinental Title in September of 2000. He held the belt for several months before losing to Billy Gunn in November. Problems with alcohol and a drunk driving arrest in November of 2001, led to Guerrero being released from the WWF. He wrestled on the independent circuit before returning to the WWE in April of 2002. He often wrestled Rob Van Dam, Steve Austin, and Chris Benoit, and held the WWE Tag Team title with his nephew, Chavo Jr. He defeated Brock Lesnar for the WWE Championship in February of 2004, holding the belt for several months before losing to John Bradshaw Layfield. He participated in several notable feuds in 2005 including battles with Chavo Jr., Rey Misterio, Jr., and Batista. He was comfortable addressing his former problems with drugs and alcohol and was the subject of the 2004 documentary video Cheating Death, Stealing Life: The

153

2005 • Obituaries

Eddie Guerrero Story. • Los Angeles Times, Nov. 16, 2005, B9; New York Times, Nov. 15, 2005, A25; People, Nov. 28, 2005, 207.

GUERRERO, LALO Singer Eduardo “Lalo” Guerrero, Jr., who was known as the “Father of Chicano Music,” died in an assisted living facility in Palm Springs, California, on March 17, 2005. He was 88. Guerrero was born on December 24, 1916, in Tucson, Arizona. He began performing and recording in Los Angeles in the early 1930s after dropping out of high school. He wrote or recorded over 700 songs during his career. He was best known to mainstream audiences for his 1955 parody song “Pancho Lopez,” based on the popular “Ballad of Davy Crockett.” He also wrote and sang such comic parodies as “Pancho Claus,” “Tacos for Two,” “No Chicanos on TV,” and “Mexican Mamas, Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Bus Boys.” He also recorded a series of popular children’s albums featuring the squeaky-voiced talking squirrels Las Ardillitas. Some of his songs were featured in Luis Valdez’s 1977 stage production Zoot Suit, and the subsequent movie in 1981. Guerrero was awarded the presidential Medal of the Arts from Bill Clinton in 1997. He owned and operated a popular East Los Angeles nightclub for many years. His most recent recording were three songs for Ry Cooder’s forthcoming album Chavez Ravine. • Los Angeles Times, Mar. 18, 2005, B10; New York Times, Mar. 19, 2005, A13; Variety, Mar. 28, 2005, 56.

Marco Guglielmi

Calais (1962), Planets Against Us (1962), The Carpet of Horror (1962), Family Diary (1962), Imperial Venus (1963), Summer Night (1963), The Visit (1964), Spy in Your Eye (1965), The Looters (1966), Secret Agent Super Dragon (1966), The Stranger Returns (1967), You Die ... but I Live (1967), Big Gundown 2 (1968), Anyone Can Play (1968), Revenge (1969), The Battle of El Alamein (1969), Plagio (1969), Probability Zero (1969), Mafia Killer (1973), Loves of a Nymphomaniac (1973), How to Kill a Judge (1974), The Last Days of Mussolini (1974), La Minorenne (1974), A Man for Sale (1977), The Cynic, the Rat, and the Fist (1977), The Biggest Battle (1978), and Un Uomo di Razza (1989).

GUIGUET, JEAN-CLAUDE French film director and writer Jean-Claude Guiguet died of cancer in a French hospital on September 18, 2005. He was 56. Guiguet was born in France on November 22, 1948. He wrote and directed the 1979 film Fine Manners. He also directed and scripted the films L’Archipel des Amours (1983), Faubourg Saint Martin (1986), Le Mirage (1992), Love Reinvented (1996), The Passengers (1999), and Metamorphose (2003).

Lalo Guerrero

GUGLIELMI, MARCO Italian actor Marco Guglielmi died in Rome on December 23, 2005. He was 79. Guglielmi was featured in numerous films from the early 1950s including They Were 3000 (1952), Folgore Division (1954), Attila (1954), Forbidden (1954), Abandoned (1955), Destination Piovarolo (1955), The Art of Getting Along (1955), Andrea Chenier (1955), Rio Guadalquivir (1956), The Song of Destiny (1957), Lost Souls (1958), Maid, Thief and Guard (1958), Adorable and a Liar (1958), El Alamein (1958), Always Victorious (1958), The Savage Innocents (1959), Seven in the Sun (1959), Pensione Edelweiss (1959), The Black Chapel (1959), The Night They Killed Rasputin (1960), The Story of Joseph and His Brethren (1960), Terror of the Red Mask (1960), Mill of the Stone Women (1960), Seven Seas to

Jean-Claude Guiguet

GUILLEMOT, AGNES French film editor Agnes Guillemot died in Paris on December 17, 2005. She was 74. Guillemot was born in Roubaix, Nord, France, in 1931. She was active in films from the early 1960s, editing many of the works of Jean Luc Godard

Obituaries • 2005

154

and Francois Truffaut. Her film credits include A Woman Is a Woman (1961), My Life to Live (1962), The Little Soldier (1962), RoGoPaG (1963), The Riflemen (1963), Contempt (1963), Band of Outsiders (1964), The Beautiful Swindlers (1964), A Married Woman (1964), All About Loving (1964), Alphaville (1965), MasculineFeminine (1966), The Oldest Profession (1967), Weekend (1967), Stolen Kisses (1968), Sympathy for the Devil (1968), Love and Anger (1969), Mississippi Mermaid (1969), The Wild Child (1970), Bed and Board (1970), Blue Country (1976), A Guy Like Me Should Never Die (1976), It’s a Long Time I’ve Loved You (1979), Dangerous Moves (1984), Staircase C (1985), Every Other Weekend (1990), Dirty Like an Angel (1991), North (1991), Lovers (1994), The Favorite Son (1994), Don’t Forget You’re Going to Die (1995), Perfect Love (1996), and Romance (1999).

GUILMAIN, OFELIA

Spanish actress Ofelia Guilmain died of respiratory failure and pneumonia in Mexico City, Mexico, on January 14, 2005. She was 83. Guilmain was born in Madrid, Spain, on November 17, 1921. She began her career on stage in Spain, performing with the Republican government’s Guerrillas of Theater groups. Guilmain fled to Mexico in 1939 as Francisco Franco’s forces achieved victory in the Spanish Civil War. She married soon after and was inactive in performing for the next decade. She renewed her acting career in the 1950s, appearing in numerous films, plays and television productions. Her many film credits include Nazarin (1959), The Man and the Monster (1959), The Queen’s Swordsmen (1961), Little Red Riding Hood and the Monsters (1962), The Brainiac (1962), Luis Bunuel’s The Exterminating Angel, Panico (1966), Sor Ye-Ye (1968), The Prophet Mimi (1973), Celestina (1976), and El Patrullero 777 (1978). She also appeared in numerous Mexican television series and soap operas. • Los Angeles Times, Jan. 16, 2005, B15; Variety, Jan. 24, 2005, 55.

Natalya Gundareva

Her numerous film and television credits include Passing Through Moscow (1970), Hello and Goodbye (1972), Truffaldino from Bergamo (1972), Looking for a Man (1973), Autumn (1974), They Fought for the Motherland (1975), A Sweet Woman (1976), The Orphans (1976), Guarantee Life (1977), Citizen Nikanorova Waits for You (1978), Autumn Marathon (1979), Once Upon a Time Twenty Years Later (1980), Say a Word for Poor Cavalrymen (1980), The Imaginary Invalid (1980), Culdinea of Tobossa (1980), White Snow of Russia (1980), Sold Laughter (1981), The Uninvited Friend (1981), Time Barred (1983), Life, Tears and Love (1984), Winter Evening in Gagry (1985), Children of the Sun (1985), The Life of Klim Samgin (1986), Aelita, Do Not Pester Men! (1988), Heart Is Not a Stone (1989), It (1989), Two Arrows: The Crime Story from the Stone Age (1989), Dogs Feats (1990), The Passport (1990), Temptation of B. (1990), Vivat, Naval Cadets! (1991), The Promised Land (1991), The Hen (1991), Crazies (1991), 1000 Dollars One Way (1991), Lost in Siberia (1991), Naval Cadets III (1992), Devil’s Hostages (1993), The Private Life of Queens (1993), Alfons (1993), The Mysteries of Sankt Petersburg (1995), and Moscow Vacation (1995).

GUR, BATYA Israel detective novelist Batya Gur died of cancer in Jerusalem on May 19, 2005. She was 57. Gur was born in Tel Aviv, Israel, in 1947. She was educated in Hebrew literature at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and taught high school literature

Ofelia Guilmain

GUNDAREVA , NATALYA Russian actress Natalya Gundareva died in Moscow of complications from a stroke on May 15, 2005. She was 56. Gundareva was born in Moscow on August 28, 1948. She was a leading actress in Russian films from the early 1970s.

Batya Gur

155

2005 • Obituaries

before she began writing in the 1980s. She created the character of Chief Superintendent Michael Ohayon of the Jerusalem police, who starred in a series of detective novels. Five of her novels featuring Ohayon were published in English including The Saturday Morning Murder (1992), Literary Murder (1993), Murder on a Kibbutz (1994), Murder Duet (1999), and Bethlehem Road Murder (2004). • Los Angeles Times, June 1, 2005, B11; New York Times, May 30, 2005, B7; Times (of London), June 2, 2005, 269.

GUSSOW, MEL Mel Gussow, the long-time theatrical critic for The New York Times, died of cancer in a Manhattan, New York, hospital on April 29, 2005. He was 71. Gussow was born in New York City on December 19, 1933. He studied journalism and began working for Newsweek in the late 1950s. He soon became theatrical critic for the publication where he became a champion of the works of such playwrights as Edward Albee, Tom Stoppard, and Harold Pinter. He began writing for The New York Times in 1969 and wrote a biography of film producer Darryl F. Zanuck in 1971. He continued to write for the Times for the next 35 years. He was also the author of eight books including a series on Arthur Miller, Samuel Beckett, Harold Pinter, and Tom Stoppard. He also wrote the 1999 biography Edward Albee: A Singular Journey. His final book, Michael Gambon: A Life in Acting, was published in 2004. • Los Angeles Times, May 2, 2005, B9; New York Times, May 1, 2005, 36.

Juancho Gutierrez

semblance to the late Chinese leader Chairman Mao Zedong, died of a heart attack in China’s southern Guangdon Province on July 2, 2005. He was 68. Gu began playing Chairman Mao in films in 1978, and appeared as Mao in over 80 film and television productions. He won China’s prestigious film award, the Hundred Flowers Awards, for his performances in 1990 and 1993. Gu appeared in the films After the Final Battle, The Founding Ceremony of China, and The Story of Mao Zedong.

Gu Yue

HAAS, KARL Musicologist and radio personality Karl Haas died in a Royal Oak, Michigan, hospiMel Gussow

GUTIERREZ, JUANCHO Philippine leading actor Juancho Gutierrez died of multiple organ failure and complications from diabetes in a Manila, the Philippines, hospital on October 1, 2005. He was 73. Gutierrez was a leading matinee idol in films in the Philippines from the 1950s. He starred with actresses Amalia Fuentes and Gloria Romero, who became his wife in 1960. His film credits include Rodora (1956), Lydia (1956), Sonata (1957), Baby Bubot (1958), Wedding Bells (1959), Amy, Susie, Tesie (1960), Tatlong Panata (1961), Dope Addict (1961), Historia de un Amor (1963), and Senyorito at Ang Atsay, Ang (1964). GU YUE Chinese actor Gu Yue, as soldier who began a film career in the late 1970s because of his re-

Karl Haas

Obituaries • 2005

156

tal on February 6, 2005. He was 91. Haas was born in Germany on December 6, 1913. A classical pianist, he came to the United States in 1936 after fleeing from the Nazi regime. He settled in Detroit, where he formed the Chamber Music Society of Detroit in 1944. During the 1950s he began doing music commentary on radio, and began hosting the classical syndicated radio program Adventures in Good Music in 1959, which was broadcast for many years. • Los Angeles Times, Feb. 8, 2005, B9; New York Times, Feb. 8, 2005, C19.

HAEFNER, MICHAEL German singer and actor Michael Haefner committed suicide by hanging in Munich, Germany, on January 3, 2005. He was 45. Haefner was born in Germany on October 14, 1959. He appeared in numerous musicals on the German stage. He also starred as Heinz Trilling in the German television series Marienhof in 1992, and appeared in television productions of Die Goldene Gans (1994), Anwalt Abel — Der Voyeur un das Madchen (2000), and Weissblaue Geschichten (2000).

Michael Haefner

HAGEN , KEVIN Veteran character actor Kevin Hagen, who was best known for his role as Dr. Hiram Baker on the television series Little House on the Prairie, died of complications from esophageal cancer at his home in Grants Pass, Oregon, on July 9, 2005. He was 77. Haven was born in Chicago, Illinois, on April 3, 1928. He attended the University of Southern California, where he earned a degree in international relations. He worked with the U.S. State Department in Germany and served in the Navy after World War II. Hagen briefly attended law school before he began acting on stage in California. He was soon appearing on television and films. He guest-starred in episodes of Jane Wyman Presents the Fireside Theatre, Tales of Wells Fargo, Wagon Train, M Squad, Schlitz Playhouse of Stars, Dragnet, General Electric Theater, The Walter Winchell File, Gunsmoke, Goodyear Theatre, Have Gun —Will Travel, Perry Mason, Laramie, Riverboat, The Twilight Zone, Sugarfoot, Mr. Lucky, The Deputy, The Rifleman, Hotel de Paree, Outlaw, Thriller, Bat Masterson, The Untouchables, Cain’s Hundred, Straightaway, and Cheyenne. Hagen starred as John Colton in the television western series Yancy Derringer from 1958 to 1959.

Kevin Hagen (as Insp. Kobick from Land of the Giants)

He was also seen in the films The Light in the Forest (1958), Gunsmoke in Tucson (1958), Pork Chop Hill (1959), Rider on a Dead Horse (1962), The Man from Galveston (1963), Rio Conchos (1964), Shenandoah (1965), The Last Challenge (1967), and The Learning Tree (1969). He also guest-starred in episodes of Bonanza, Rawhide, Lawman, The New Breed, Maverick, 77 Sunset Strip, G.E. True, The Gallant Men, The Virginian, Kraft Suspense Theatre, Daniel Boone, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Profiles in Courage, Branded, The Big Valley, A Man Called Shenandoah, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, Blue Light, Lost in Space, Felony Squad, The Time Tunnel, The High Chaparral, Ironside, Mission: Impossible, Wild Wild West, Cimarron Strip, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, Lancer, The Guns of Will Sonnett, The Outcasts, The Mod Squad, Mannix, Bracken’s World, The Bold Ones: The Senator, The Silent Force, The Bold Ones: The New Doctors, The New Perry Mason, The Cowboys, Harry O, M*A*S*H, Sara, Fantasy Island, Simon & Simon, Amazing Stories, and Matlock. Hagen also starred as Inspector Kobick in Irwin Allen’s science fiction television series Land of the Giants from 1969 to 1970. He was also seen in the tele-films Weekend of Terror (1970), Vanished (1971), Dead Men Tell No Tales (1971), The Delphi Bureau (1972), Honky Tonky (1974), The San Pedro Bums (1977), Power (1980), Beulah Land (1980), and Bonanza: The Next Generation (1988). Hagen’s later film credits include Gentle Savage (1973), The Legend of Nigger Charley (1973), The Hunter (1980), Power (1986), and The Ambulance (1990). Hagen starred as kindly Dr. Hiram Baker on Michael Landon’s television series Little House on the Prairie from 1974 through 1983. He was also seen in the subsequent tele-films Little House: Look Back to Yesterday (1983), Little House: The Last Farewell (1984), and Little House: Bless All the Dear Children (1984). He also starred as the Judge in the 1987 series Trial by Jury. • Los Angeles Times, July 13, 2005, B11; Variety, July 18, 2005, 48.

HALE , UNA Australian soprano Una Hale died in Bath, England, on March 4, 2005. She was 82. Hal was born in Adelaide, Australia, on November 18, 1922. She studied at the Royal College of Music in England after World War II. She performed in numerous operas with the Carl Rosa Opera Company, including

157

2005 • Obituaries

Una Hale

Jimmy Hall

leading roles in La Traviata and Carmen. She also starred in the Australian premiere of Ariadne auf Naxos in 1962. Hale subsequently married ballet director Martin Carr, and retired to Bath to raise a family. • Times (of London), Mar. 12, 2005, 81.

ing partner Keith Waterhouse were nominated for Best British Screenplay BAFTAs for three subsequent years with their scripts for Whistle Down the Wind (1961), A Kind of Loving (1962), and Billy Liar (1963). Hall also wrote such films as The Valiant (1962), West 11 (1963), Man in the Middle (1964), Pretty Polly (1967), and Lock Up Your Daughters! (1969). He also wrote often for television for such series as Suspense, That Was the Week That Was, The Frost Report, According to Dora, Budgie, Queenie’s Castle, The Upper Crusts, Billy Liar, Village Hall, The Crezz, Robin’s Next, Secret Army, The Fuzz, Hazell, Worzel Gummidge, Minder, The Return of the Antelope, and Moving Story. • Times (of London), Mar. 14, 2005, 51.

HALJALA, AHTI Leading Finnish actor Ahti Haljala died in Tampere, Finland, on November 7, 2005. He was 80. Haljala was born in Sakkola, Finland, in 1925. He was a popular performer on stage, screen, and television. Haljala was featured in the films Syoksykierre (1981) and Kaikki Pelissa (1994), and appeared in such television series as Heikki ja Kaija (1961), Rintamakelaiset (1972), Kotirappu (1987), and Metsolat (1993).

Ahti Haljala

HALL, JIMMY

William James “Jimmy” McCallum, who wrestled professionally in the South as Jimmy Hall, died at his home in Collierville, Tennessee, on August 28, 2005. He was 35. McCallum was born on December 30, 1969. He began wrestling in the 1990s, competing primarily in Mid-South arenas.

HALL, WILLIS British playwright and television writer Willis Hall died in England on March 7, 2005. He was 75. Hall was born in Leeds, Yorkshire, England, on April 6, 1929. He scripted the 1960 war film The Long and the Short and the Tall. Hall and writ-

Willis Hall

HALLSTROM, MALOU Swedish actress and television producer Malou Hallstrom was found dead of an accidental drowning in her bathtub in Stockholm, Sweden, on February 3, 2005. She was 63. She was born in Stockholm on May 11, 1941. She was the former wife of Swedish film director Lasse Hallstrom, and edited her husband’s 1977 concert film ABBA: The Movie. She appeared in several films in the early 1980s including The Charter Trip (1980) and The Children from Blue Lake Mountain (1980). She was later involved in producing programs for Swedish television.

Obituaries • 2005

158

Malou Hallstrom

Ruth Hampton

HAMILTON, BRUCE Comic publisher Bruce Hamilton, who founded the Gladstone imprint for Walt Disney characters, died after a long illness on June 18, 2005. He was 72. Hamilton was born on October 11, 1932. He was a pioneer dealer in rare Golden Age comics, and served as an early adviser The Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide after its initial publication in 1971. He joined with Russ Cochran in 1980 to acquire the license to produce the prestige publication The Fine Art of Walt Disney’s Donald Duck, which spotlighted Disney artist Carl Barks. Hamilton subsequently worked with Barks to produced limited edition lithographs based on his oil paintings. Hamilton took over the publication rights to the Disney comic books in the mid–1980s, founding the Gladstone Publishing Co. for that purpose.

The Glenn Miller Story (1953), Johnny Dark (1954), and Ricochet Romance (1954). She retired from the screen following her marriage to television performer Byron Palmer 1954.

HANLON, ROY British stage and screen actor Roy Hanlon died in England on April 19, 2005. He was 66. Hanlon was born in Greenock, England, on June 30, 1938. He studied at the Royal Scottish Academy of Music an Drama in the 1950s and began appearing on British television in the early 1960s. Hanlon was seen in such series as The Dark Island, The Villains, Z Cars, Adam Adamant Lives!, The Baron, Softly Softly, Dixon of Dock Green, The Saint, Out of the Unknown, The Borderers, Detective, Department S, Spyder’s Web, Budgie, Sutherland’s Law, The Mackinnons, The Wilde Alliance, The Standard, and Taggart. He also appeared in several films during his career including The Vulture (1967), Robbery (1967), The Naked Runner (1967), and The Fiction Makers (1968). He also appeared in the 1979 British television production of A Sense of Freedom, and starred as Dad in the 1994 comedy series Takin’ Over the Asylum. He appeared in the tele-films The Witch’s Daughter in 1996.

Bruce Hamilton (right, with Carl Barks)

HAMPTON, RUTH Actress Ruth Hampton died in Merriam, Kansas, on August 25, 2005. She was 74. She was born Regina Ruth Jane Hampton in Throop, Pennsylvania, on April 25, 1931. She began her career as a dancer, performing with the Rockettes at Radio City Music Hall in New York. She was also a beauty pageant winner, and was crowned Miss New Jersey in 1952. She subsequently moved to Hollywood where she was featured in a handful of films including Abbott and Costello Go to Mars (1953), Law and Order (1953) with Ronald Reagan, Take Me to Town (1953),

Roy Hanlon

HANNA, RAY British pilot Ray Hanna died in England on December 1, 2005. He was 77. He was born Raynham Hanna in Takapuna, New Zealand, on August 28, 1928. He learned to fly in the late 1940s and

159

2005 • Obituaries

Ray Hanna

Hisako Hara

came to England to join the Royal Air Force in 1949. He served as a flight instructor and was a member of the Meteor aerobatic team. He was a founding member of the Red Arrows aerobatic team in 1964, and led the group for four years before leaving the Royal Air Force in 1971. In the early 1980s he formed the Old Flying Machine Company with his son Mark. They restored early aircrafts and made appearances at numerous airshows. They also were stunt pilots in such films as Hope and Glory (1987), Empire of the Sun (1987), Memphis Belle (1990), The River Wild (1994), Species (1995), and Steven Spielberg’s Saving Private Ryan (1998). Hanna continued to operate the Old Flying Machine Company after the death of Mark Hanna in Spain in 1999. • Times (of London), Dec. 10, 2005, 75.

HARDEE, MALCOLM British comedian Malcolm Hardee was reported missing in London on January 31, 2005, and his body was recovered from the Thames River two days later. No foul play was suspected in the drowning. He was 55. Hardee was born in London on January 5, 1950. He was known for outrageous antics and stage performances, which often concluded by his standing naked in front of his audience and launching fireworks from his rear. He also appeared on British television in episodes of The Black Adder, The Comic Strip Presents, and The People vs. Jerry Sadowtiz. • Times (of London), Feb. 7, 2005, 52.

HANSEN, ED Film director and writer Ed Hansen died of bladder cancer in Antioch, California, on December 16, 2005. Hansen was born in Minnesota on January 30, 1937. He began his career as a commercial director before he began directing and writing exploitation films in the early 1980s. Hansen’s film credits include Eroticise (1983), Takin’ It Off (1985), Takin’ It All Off (1987), Party Favors (1987), Party Plane (1988), Cyber-C.H.I.C. (1989), The Bikini Car Wash (1992), and Takin’ It Off Out West (1995). He also worked as an editor on such films as Code Name: Zebra (1984), 9∂ Weeks (1986), and Skeeter (1993), and the children’s tele-films The Elf Who Saved Christmas (1992) and The Elf and the Magic Key (1993). Hansen also wrote the films Hell’s Belles (1997) and Wooly Boys (2001). HANSON, UNITA see DANGERFIELD,

WINNIE

HARA, HISAKO Japanese actress Hisako Hara died of heart failure in a Tokyo hospital on December 4, 2005. She was 95. Hara was born Hisa Ishijima in Japan in 1909. She made her debut on stage in 1933 and was later featured in numerous film and television productions. Hara played supporting roles in such films as Weaker Sex (1960), Girl of Dark (1961), The Scarlet Man (1961), Bullet Wound (1969), Rhyme of Vengeance (1977), Black Rain (1989), Fancy Dance (1989), Water Creature (1994), A Quiet Life (1995), After Life (1998), and By Player (2000).

Malcolm Hardee

HARMS , CARL Puppeteer and actor Carl Harms died in New York City on August 11, 2005. He was 94. Harms was born in Chicago, Illinois, on August 30, 1910. He began his career on stage and was a member of the WPA Federal Theatre. He learned to create puppets and participated in the First American Puppetry Festival in Detroit in 1936. He also performed as a dancer with the Great Northern Theatre’s Federal Ballet. Harms joined Bil Baird with the Marionettes in 1940. After serving in the merchant marines during World War II, Harms continued her career on stage. He again worked with Bil Baird on the television show The Adventures of Snarky Parker in 1948. He also created puppets and had a supporting role in the 1950s children’s program Johnny Jupiter. Harms made his Broad-

Obituaries • 2005

160 director for the talk show The Mike Douglas Show from 1967 to 1973. Harnell subsequently moved to California, where he scored numerous films and television shows. He composed music for such series as The Bionic Woman, The Incredible Hulk, Cliff hangers: Stop Susan Williams, Cliff hangers: The Curse of Dracula, Cagney & Lacey, V, Santa Barbara, Shadow Chasers, In the Heat of the Night, and Alien Nation. He also was composer on the tele-films The Murder That Wouldn’t Die (1980), Senior Trip (1981), Hot Pursuit (1984), The Liberators (1987), and The Death of the Incredible Hulk (1990). Harnell earned three Emmy nominations for best dramatic score for his compositions. • Los Angeles Times, July 17, 2005, B14; New York Times, July 20, 2005, A21; Variety, July 25, 2005, 55.

Carl Harms

way debut in the 1951 musical Flahooley, and appeared on Broadway in Much Ado About Nothing, Man in the Moon, and The Girl on the Via Flamina. Harms also appeared in such television productions as The Tempest, Barefoot in Athens, and A Cry of Angels. He also appeared in an episode of Hallmark Hall of Fame and was the voice of Tigger in the Shirley Temple Storybook production of Winnie-the-Pooh in 1960. In the 1960s Harms was involved with NBC News, working with Bil Baird to create replicas of the spacecrafts for the 1967 Gemini space walk and of the lunar surface for man’s first walk on the moon in 1969. • Variety, Aug. 22, 2005, 42.

HARNELL , JOE Pianist and composer Joe Harnell died of heart failure in a Sherman Oaks, California, hospital on July 14, 2005. He was 80. Harnell was born in The Bronx, New York, on August 2, 1924. He began performing professionally as a jazz musician while in his teens. He served in the Army Air Force during World War II and toured with Glenn Miller’s Air Force band. After the war he worked as an accompanist and arranger for many singers. He worked with Peggy Lee on several projects, conducting the orchestra for her albums Anything Goes: Cole Porter and Pegg y Lee and the George Shearing Quintet. He was arranger for the hit song “Fly Me to the Moon Bossa Nova” in 1962, which earned him a Grammy Award for best performance by an orchestra for dancing. He was music

HARNESS, CHARLES L. Science fiction writer Charles L. Harness died in North Newton, Kansas, on September 20, 2005. He was 89. Harness was born in Colorado City, Texas, on December 29, 1915. He worked as a patent attorney from the late 1940s. He also began writing science fiction stories for pulp magazines, beginning with “Time Trap” for Astounding Science Fiction in 1948. His first novel, Flight into Yesterday (aka The Paradox Men) was published in 1953. His best known work was the novella The Rose, which was published in England in 1953 and in the United States in 1969. Harness authored 14 books during his career including the novels The Ring of Ritormel (1968), Wolf head (1978), The Venetian Court (1986), and Cybele, with Bluebonnets (2002). Many of his short stories were included in the two collections An Ornament to His Profession (1998) and Rings (2000).

Charles L. Harness

HARPEL, LARRY Actor and dialogue coach Larry Harpel died at his home in Venice, California, on October 17, 2005. He was 55. Harpel was born in Boston, Massachusetts, on May 23, 1950. He worked in Los Angeles as a dialogue coach on such series as Hard Time on Planet Earth, Amen, and Cheers during the 1980s. He also appeared as Larry, a bar customer, on several episodes of Cheers. • Variety, Oct. 24, 2005, 40. Joe Harnell

HARPER, JERRY Actor Jerry Harper died of prostate cancer in Alaska on April 8, 2005. He was 75.

161

2005 • Obituaries

He also was a composer or orchestrator of such films as Kiss Me Deadly (1955), Showdown at Boot Hill (1958), Alakazam the Great (1960), Master of the World (1961), The Raven (1963), Dr. Goldfoot and the Bikini Machine (1965), The Ghost in the Invisible Bikini (1966), and the 1979 Curse of Dracula segment of the television series Cliff hangers. Harris retired to New Zealand in 1992.

Larry Harpel

HARRIS, GEORGE Actor George E. Harris, II, died in Margaretville, New York, on December 29, 2005. He was 84. Harris was born in Bronxville, New York, on April 12, 1921. He was an actor and director in the early Off-Off Broadway stage and made his Broadway debut in The Great White Hope in 1968. He appeared in several films including Cops and Robbers in 1973. Harris was best known for his film role as Officer Mooney in 1978’s Superman, who reports an early sighting of the Man of Steel to his sergeant.

Harper was born the The Dalles, Oregon, on March 1, 1930. He began performing in the 1950s at circuses and carnivals before making his way to Hollywood in the 1960s. He was seen on television in episodes of Occasional Wife, Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C., The Mod Squad, Alias Smith and Jones, and M*A*S*H. He also appeared in the 1971 tele-film Once Upon a Dead Man and the features Bombs Away (1985) and Avalanche (1999). Harper returned to Alaska in 1987 where he operated the Off Center Playhouse theater and Cyrano’s Bookstore.

George Harris

Jerry Harper

HARRIS, ALBERT Composer, musician and orchestrator Albert Harris died in Auckland, New Zealand, on January 14, 2005. He was 88. Harris was born in London, England, on February 13, 1916. He studied piano from an early age and came to the United States in 1936, playing in various big bands across the country. He was co-founder of Music Service Incorporated, which was responsible for the music for several television shows including The Andy Griffith Show, The Danny Thomas Show, The Ray Bolger Show, and The Dick Van Dyke Show. Harris was also music director for Barbra Streisand’s television special Barbra and Other Instruments, and was a conductor and composer for Quinn Martin Productions on such series as Cannon, Barnaby Jones, Streets of San Francisco, and The F.B.I.

HARVEY, DOMINO Domino Harvey, the daughter of British film star Laurence Harvey who went from a career as a fashion model to the life of a bounty hunter, was found dead in her bath at her home in West Hollywood, California, on June 27, 2005. She was 35. She was born on August 7, 1969, to actor Harvey and his third wife, British model Paulene Stone. Domino abandoned a career with the Ford modeling agency in the 1980s and emerged as a bounty hunter

Domino Harvey

Obituaries • 2005

162

working for bailbondsmen in Los Angeles in the early 1990s. She was the subject of a biographical film by Tony Scott, Domino, starring Keira Knightley, that was released later in 2005. Harvey had been arrested in 2004 on charges of drug dealing and conspiracy and was facing a lengthy prison sentence if convicted.

HASHIMOTO, KOJI Japanese film director Koji Hashimoto died of heart disease in Ashikaga, Japan, on January 9, 2005. He was 68. Hashimoto was born in Tochigi Prefecture, Japan, on January 21, 1936. He worked to Toho Films from the early 1960s, serving as an assistant director on such films as King Kong vs. Godzilla (1962), Ghidrah, the Three-Headed Monster (1964), Frankenstein Conquers the World (1965), Monster Zero (1965), Operation Crazy (1966), Latitude Zero (1969), Konto Five-Five’s Adventure in Outer Space (1969), Godzilla’s Revenge (1969), Dodes’ka-den (1970), The Pacifist Children (1973), Long Journey Into Love (1973), Tidal Wave (1973), The Last Days of Planet Earth (1974), The Gates of Youth (1976), and High Teen Boogie (1982). Hashimoto advanced to director for the 1983 science fiction film Bye Jupiter. The following year he helmed the return of Japan’s best known giant lizard with Godzilla: 1985.

in Yokohama, Japan, on July 11, 2005. He was 40. Hashimoto was born in Gisu, Japan, on July 3, 1965. He began wrestling in September of 1984, competing often with New Japan. He briefly wrestled as Hashif Khan in Canada in 1987. Hashimoto held the IWGP Heavyweight Title in 1994 and 1995. He also captured the IWGP International Tag Team Title in July of 1995, teaming with Junji Hirata. He temporarily retired from the ring, and his subsequent comeback was short lived when he was fired from New Japan. In 2001 Hashimoto formed his own independent promotion, Zero-One. In recent years he also appeared in several films in Japan including 2002’s Blood Heat.

HASKINS, JIM Jim Haskins, whose book The Cotton Club inspired Francis Ford Coppola’s 1984 film of the same name, died of emphysema at his Manhattan, New York, apartment on July 6, 2005. He was 63. Haskins was born in Demopolis, Alabama, on September 19, 1941, and raised in Boston, Massachusetts. He took a job as English professor at the University of Florida in Gainesville in 1977, and commuted from New York to Gainesville to teach. He wrote numerous books including children’s texts and biographies of such celebrities as Spike Lee and Rosa Parks. His 1977 picture book about the Harlem speakeasy, The Cotton Club, inspired Coppola and writers Mario Puzo and William Kennedy to pen the subsequent film. Another book, Mr. Bojangles: The Biography of Bill Robinson, served as the basis for the 2001 television production Bojangles. • Los Angeles Times, July 17, 2005, B14; New York Times, July 11, 2005, B7.

Koji Hashimoto

HASHIMOTO , SHINYA Japanese wrestler Shinya Hashimoto died suddenly of a brain aneurysm Jim Haskins

Shinya Hashimoto

HASLUND, VESLEMOY Norwegian actress Veslemoy Haslund died in Norway on November 7, 2005. She was 66. Haslund was born in Norway on April 8, 1939. She was active in films and television from the early 1960s. Haslund was seen in such films as Pan (1962), Hunger (1966), The Greatest Gamble (1967), Operasjon V for Vanvidd (1970), Streik! (1975), The Guardians (1978), Kvinnen (1979), For Tor’s Sake (1982), Kristin Lavransdotter (1995), and Hamsun (1996). She also starred as Erna Hjeltevik in the television series Familiesagaen de Syv Sostre from 1999 to 2000.

163 HATTA , KAYO Hawaiian filmmaker Kayo Hatta died in San Diego, California, in a drowning accident at a friend’s home on July 20, 2005. She was 47. Hatta was born in Honolulu on March 18, 1958, and studied film at UCLA. She made her first film, Picture Bride, which chronicled the sugarcane plantation life in Hawaii in the early 20th century, while a student. The film earned an audience award as best drama at the Sundance Film Festival in 1995. She had recently completed work on the short film Fishbowl, which was scheduled to air on PBS later in the year. • Los Angeles Times, July 29, 2005, B10; New York Times, July 31, 2005, 31.

Kayo Hatta

HAVER, JUNE Actress and singer June Haver died of respiratory failure at her Brentwood, California, home on July 4, 2005. She was 79. Haver was born June Stovenour in Rock Island, Illinois, on June 10, 1926. She made her musical debut at the age of seven playing the piano with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. She was soon performing on radio and with local dance bands. She began her film career in the early 1940s, singing with Ted Fio Rito’s Band in Skyline Serenade (1941). She also appeared in small roles in Tune Time (1942) and The Gang’s All Here (1943). Haver was groomed for stardom at 20th Century–Fox, starring in Home in Indiana (1944), Irish Eyes Are Smil-

2005 • Obituaries

ing (1944), Where Do We Go from Here? (1945) with future husband Fred MacMurray, Three Little Girls in Blue (1945), The Dolly Sisters (1945) with Betty Grable, Wake Up and Dram (1946), I Wonder Who’s Kissing Her Now (1947), Scudda Hoo! Scudda Hay! (1948), Look for the Silver Lining (1949), Oh, You Beautiful Doll (1949), The Daughter of Rosie O’Grady (1950), I’ll Get By (1950), Love Nest (1951), and The Girl Next Door (1953). Haver was married to trumpeter Jimmy Zito for less than a year in 1947. She became engaged to dentist John Duzik in 1949, but he died following routine surgery. In the early 1950s Haver broke her contract with Fox and joined the Sisters of Charity convent in Kansas, as a novice nun. She left the convent after eight months. Returning to Hollywood she again encountered Fred MacMurray at a New Year’s Eve party in 1953. His wife of 17 years, Lillian Lamont, had died earlier in the year. She and MacMurray became involved and were married on June 28, 1954. She and MacMurray, who had two children from his earlier marriage, adopted twin girls in December of 1956. Haver abandoned her film career to raise a family. She and MacMurray remained married for 37 years until his death in 1991. She is survived by her two daughters, her stepdaughter and a step-son. • Los Angeles Times, July 6, 2005, B11; New York Times, July 7, 2005, B11; Time, July 18, 2005, 25; Times (of London), Aug. 4, 2005, 57; Variety, July 11, 2005, 44.

HAWELL, NICHOLAS British actor and director Nicholas Hawell died of injuries he suffered in an automobile accident in England on September 13, 2005. He was 49. Hawell was born in England on April 6, 1956. He began his career on stage as a child actor and made his television debut in 1969’s Christ Recrucified. He was also featured on television in productions of Tom Brown’s Schooldays (1971) and ...And Mother Makes Three (1973) with Wendy Craig.

Nicholas Hawell

June Haver (with husband Fred MacMurray)

HAYAFUNE, CHIYO Japanese author Chiyo Hayafune died in a Yugawara, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, hospital on October 8, 2005. She was 91. Hayafune was best known for the 1961 novel Cupola, Where the Furnaces Glow. It was adapted as the 1962 film Foundry Town, starring actress Sayuri Yoshinaga.

Obituaries • 2005

164

HAYASHI, YUMIKA Japanese adult actress Yumika Hayashi was found dead in her Tokyo apartment on June 29, 2005. She was 35. She began her career starring in adult videos in the 1980s. During the 1990s she began appearing in more mainstream films including the gruesome horror features ExorSister 4 (1994) and Splatter: Naked Blood (1995). She was also seen in the films All Night Long 3: The Final Chapter (1996), Sunday’s Dream (2000), and the soft-core art film Lunch Box (2003).

joined the WWF in 1982, where he served as co-host of Tuesday Night Titans with Vince McMahon, Jr. Hayes did numerous comedy skits with the WWE over the next decade on Titans, The Bobby Heenan Show, and other wrestling programs. He left the WWE in 1995 and suffered numerous health problems for the remainder of his life. • Times (of London), Sept. 7, 2005, 62.

HAYES, LORD ALFRED British professional wrestler, manager, and commentator Lord Alfred Hayes died of complications from a stroke in a Dallas, Texas, hospital on July 21, 2005. He was 77. He began wrestling in Great Britain in the early 1950s as Judo Al Hayes. He held the British Wrestling Association Heavyweight Title in the late 1950s. He also held the Southern Area Heavyweight Title in England several times between 1967 and 1970. He subsequently came to the United States. He teamed with Roger Kirby to hold the NWA Central States Tag Team Title in January of 1974. He again held the Central States tag belts in February of 1974, teaming with Bob Brown. He retired from the ring to become a manager in the early 1980s. He managed Bobby Jaggers, Nikolai Volkoff and Chris Markoff in the NWA in the early 1980s. He

HEALEY, MYRON Veteran film western badman Myron Healey died on December 21, 2005. He was 82. Healey was born in Petaluma, California, on June 8, 1923. He began his career playing small roles in films and serials in the early 1940s. He was best known for his numerous appearances in B westerns as a villain or henchman. His many film credits include A Stranger in Town (1943), Salute to the Marines (1943), Young Ideas (1943), Swing Shift Maisie (1943), Thousands Cheer (1943), I Dood It (1943), The Iron Major (1943), See Here, Private Hargrove (1944), Meet the People (1944), The Time of Their Lives (1946), Crime Doctor’s Man Hunt (1946), That Brennan Girl (1946), Millie’s Daughter (1947), Buck Privates Come Home (1947), The Corpse Came C.O.D. (1947), Down to Earth (1947), It Had to Be You (1947), Silly Billy (1948), Tall, Dark and Gruesome (1948), I, Jane Doe (1948), Blondie’s Reward (1948), The Man from Colorado (1948), Walk a Crooked Mile (1948), Ladies of the Chorus (1948), The Return of October (1948), You Gotta Stay Happy (1948), Hidden Danger (1948), Wake of the Red Witch (1948), Slightly French (1949), Knock on Any Door (1949), Gun Law Justice (1949), Trail’s End (1949), Across the Rio Grande (1949), Laramie (1949), the 1949 serial Batman and Robin, Air Hostess (1949), Brand of Fear (1949), The Wyoming Bandit (1949), Range Justice (1949), South of Rio (1949), Haunted Trails (1949), The Girl from Gunsight (1949), Western Renegades (1949), Rusty’s Birthday (1949), Riders of the Dusk (1949), Pioneer Marshal (1949), Lawless Code (1949), Fence Riders (1950), Trail of the Rustlers (1950), West of Wyoming (1950), A Woman of Distinction (1950), Over the Border (1950), No Sad Songs for Me (1950), Kill the Umpire (1950), Salt Lake Raiders (1950), In a Lonely Place (1950), Federal Man (1950), Hi-Jacked (1950), I Killed Geronimo (1950), My Blue Heaven (1950), The Fuller Brush Girl (1950), Law of the Panhandle (1950), Between Midnight

Lord Alfred Hayes

Myron Healey

Yumika Hayashi

165 and Dawn (1950), Hot Rod (1950), Emergency Wedding (1950), Experiment Alcatraz (1950), Outlaw Gold (1950), Short Grass (1950), Sierra Passage (1951), Colorado Ambush (1951), Al Jennings of Oklahoma (1951), Baby Sitters’ Jitters (1951), Night Riders of Montana (1951), I Was an American Spy (1951), the 1951 serial Roar of the Iron Horse, Rail-Blazer of the Apache Trail, Lorna Doone (1951), The Texas Rangers (1951), Montana Desperado (1951), Bonanza Town (1951), Journey into Light (1951), Drums in the Deep South (1951), Slaughter Trail (1951), Elephant Stampede (1951), The Big Night (1951), The Longhorn (1951), Silver City (1951), The Wild Blue Yonder (1951), Fort Osage (1952), Rodeo (1952), Montana Territory (1952), Storm Over Tibet (1952), The Kid from Broken Gun (1952), Fargo (1952), Apache War Smoke (1952), Desperadoes’ Outpost (1952), Monsoon (1952), The Maverick (1952), Kansas Pacific (1953), White Lightning (1953), Son of Belle Starr (1953), The Moonlighter (1953), The Fighting Lawman (1953), Saginaw Trail (1953), Combat Squad (1953), Hot News (1953), Vigilante Terror (1953), Private Eyes (1953), Texas Bad Man (1953), Gang Busters (1954), They Rode West (1954), Rails into Laramie (1954), Silver Lode (1954), Cattle Queen of Montana (1954), the 1955 serial Panther Girl of the Kongo (1955), African Manhunt (1955), Man Without a Star (1955), Rage at Dawn (1955), Thunder Over Sangoland (1955), The Man from Bitter Ridge (1955), Ma and Pa Kettle at Waikiki (1955), Jungle Moon Men (1955), Tennessee’s Partner (1955), Count Three and Pray (1955), Dig That Uranium (1956), Slightly Scarlet (1956), The First Texan (1956), Magnificent Roughnecks (1956), The Young Guns (1956), Calling Homicide (1956), Running Target (1956), The White Squaw (1956), Guns Don’t Argue (1957), Hell’s Crossroads (1957), Shoot-Out at Medicine Bend (1957), The Restless Breed (1957), Lure of the Swamp (1957), the 1957 horror film The Unearthly with John Carradine, Undersea Girl (1957), The Hard Man (1957), Escape from Red Rock (1957), Cole Younger, Gunfighter (1958), Quantrill’s Raiders (1958), Apache Territory (1958), Onionhead (1958), Rio Bravo (1959), Ma Barker’s Killer Brood (1960), The Final Hour (1962), Convicts 4 (1962), the 1962 U.S. version of the Japanese monster movie Varan the Unbelievable, Cavalry Command (1963), He Rides Tall (1964), Mirage (1965), Harlow (1965), The Swinger (1966), Gunfight in Abilene (1967), Journey to Shiloh (1968), The Shakiest Gun in the West (1968), True Grit (1969), The Computer Wore Tennis Shoes (1969), The Cheyenne Social Club (1970), Which Way to the Front? (1970), Smoke in the Wind (1975), Claws (1977), The Incredible Melting Man (1977), The Other Side of the Mountain Part II (1978), Ghost Fever (1987), Pulse (1988), and Little Giants (1994). Healey was also seen in the tele-films Shadow on the Land (1968), The Overthe-Hill Gang (1969), The Honorable Sam Houston (1975), and the 1983 sci-fi mini-series V. Healey was a prolific performer on television from the 1950s, gueststarring in episodes of such series as The Lone Ranger, Ripcord, Gang Busters, Fireside Theatre, The Cisco Kid, The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show, The Range Rider, The Gene Autry Show, The Adventures of Kit Carson, Sky King, The Roy Rogers Show, Death Valley Days,

2005 • Obituaries

Cowboy G-Men, Your Jeweler’s Showcase, Ramar of the Jungle, Hopalong Cassidy, Annie Oakley, Stories of the Century, Lassie, Adventures of Rin Tin Tin, Hallmark Hall of Fame, Buffalo Bill Jr., Superman, The Adventures of Champion, Schlitz Playhouse of Stars, Cheyenne, Tales of the Texas Rangers, Judge Roy Bean, The 20th Century– Fox Hour, Broken Arrow, Matinee Theatre, State Trooper, You Are There, Conflict, Man Without a Gun, The Adventures of Jim Bowie, Colt .45, Casey Jones, The Veil, The Silent Service, Tombstone Territory, M Squad, Maverick, Sugarfoot, Wagon Train, Zane Grey Theater, Buckskin, Sea Hunt, 26 Men, Behind Closed Doors, Tales of Wells Fargo, Bronco, Rawhide, Cimarron City, Peter Gunn, Perry Mason, The Texan, Bat Masterson, Zorro, 21 Beacon Street, Swamp Fox, The Man and the Challenge, Lock Up, Riverboat, Bourbon Street Beat, The Alaskans, Tightrope, Men into Space, Checkmate, Laramie, The Deputy, The Case of the Dangerous Robin, Assignment Underwater, Surfside 6, The Islanders, The Rebel, Whispering Smith, Outlaws, Gunsmoke, The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, The Dakotas, The Virginian, Kraft Suspense Theatre, Destry, Arrest and Trial, Bonanza, Laredo, Daniel Boone, A Man Called Shenandoah, The Road West, The Guns of Will Sonnett, The High Chaparral, The Iron Horse, Land of the Giants, The Outsider, Ironside, Mannix, Adam-12, Cade’s County, Ghost Story, Kung Fu, The Cowboys, Kolchak: The Night Stalker, The Amazing Spider-Man, The Incredible Hulk, and Knight Rider. Healey was largely retired from acting for the past two decades, but made occasional appearances at film festivals. He was honored with a Backbone of the B’s Award at the Golden Boot Awards ceremony for westerns in 2000.

HEARD, CHARLES Actor Charles Heard died in San Antonio, Texas, on December 15, 2005. Heard appearing in supporting roles in over a dozen films from the 1940s including Around the World (1943), Rogues of Sherwood Forest (1950), The Lady and the Bandit (1951), Elephant Walk (1954), The Adventures of Hajii Baba (1954), Phffft! (1954), Hidden Guns (1956), Around the World in Eighty Days (1956), Desk Set (1957), Band of Angels (1957), Gunman’s Walk (1958), Auntie Mame (1958), and The Young Sinner (1965). He was also seen on television in episodes of The Roy Rogers Show, Death Valley Days, Bat Masterson, and The Rebel. HEATH, PERCY Jazz bassist Percy Heath died of bone cancer in Southampton, New York, on April 28, 2005. He was 81. Heath was born in Wilmington, North Carolina, on April 30, 1923, and was raised in Philadelphia. He trained as a pilot during World War II and served in the Army Air corps as a member of the Tuskegee Airmen. He began playing bass after the war, performing at local night spots in Philadelphia. He moved to New York City in 1947 and, in 1950, joined Dizzy Gillespie’s band. Heath joined with pianist John Lewis, vibraphonist Milt Jackson and drummer Kenny Clarke to form the Modern Jazz Quartet in 1952. Clarke was replaced by drummer Connie Kay three years later and that version of the quartet continued to record and perform for the next twenty years. They separated in 1972 and Heath joined with his brothers

Obituaries • 2005

166

Percy Heath

Joseph Hecht

Jimmy and Albert to perform jazz as The Heath Brothers. The Modern Jazz Quartet reunited in the early 1980s, and Heath divided his time performing with the quartet and his brothers. When Heath decided to retire in the mid–1990s, the other members of the Modern Jazz Quartet decided to shut the group down rather than replace him. Heath was preceded in death by the other members of the best known version of the group — Connie Kay in 1994, Milt Jackson in 1999, and John Lewis in 2001. • Los Angeles Times, Apr. 30, 2005, B18; New York Times, Apr. 29, 2005, C13; Time, May 9, 2005, 28; Times (of London), May 4, 2005, 54.

in The Honeymooners with Jackie Gleason in the 1960s. He soon became her manager and, later, her husband. The two appeared often on stage and television. He was also seen in an episode of television’s Eight Is Enough in 1978.

HEATHER, DAVE British television director Dave Heather, who pioneered televised operas in the 1970s, died of a heart attack on April 16, 2005. He was 64. Heather was born in Kent, England, on February 17, 1941. He began working in television in the 1960s as a camera assistant at ATV. He advanced to director in 1966 with the networks Wheel of Fortune series. Heather went ton to help create the children’s show Get This. In 1971 Heather was chosen to direct a series of operas performed at Glyndebourne for broadcast on ITV. He directed televised productions of The Return of Ulysses to His Homeland (1973), Le Nozze di Figaro (1973), Cosi fan Tutte (1975), Verdi’s Falstaff (1976), Don Giovanni (1977), Mozart’s The Magic Flute (1978), Beethoven’s Fidelio (1980), A Midsummer Night’s Dream (1981), The Barber of Seville (1981), The Yeoman of the Guard (1982), The Sorcered (1982), Princess Ida (1982), Patience (1982), Iolanthe (1982), The Gondoliers (1982), and Cox and Box (1982). He also directed the 1986 television series Day to Day, and the 1991 special Lily Savage Life from the Hackney Empire. He also created the popular classical music series Music in Camera, and directed the ITV’s coverage of the funerals of Princess Diana and the Queen Mother. HECHT, JOSEPH Joseph Hecht, the manager and husband of actress Jean Kean, died of a massive stroke at his home in Paradise Cove, California, on December 31, 2005. He was 85. Hecht was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1920. He performed on stage from the 1950s and was also featured in a small role in the 1950 film My Friend Irma Goes West. He met actress Jane Kean while she was starring as Trixie

HEDBERG, MITCH Comedian Mitch Hedberg died of heart failure in Livingston, New Jersey, on March 30, 2005. He was 37. Hedberg was born in St. Paul, Minnesota, on February 24, 1968. He began performing stand-up comedy in the Florida area before moving to Seattle and the Pacific Northwest. He was soon performing on such comedy series as MTV’s Comikaze, A&E’s Comedy on the Road, Comedy central’s Comedy Product, and NBC’s Comedy Showcase. He appeared several times on The Late Show with David Letterman and Late Night with Conan O’Brien. He also appeared in episodes of That ’70s Show, Ed, and the animated Dr. Katz, Professional Therapist. Hedberg also wrote, produced, directed and starred in the independent comedy film Los Enchiladas! in 1999. Hedberg had recently signed a development deal for his own sitcom with Fox. • Los Angeles Times, Apr. 2, 2005, B15; New York Times, Apr. 1, 2005, C13; Variety, Apr. 11, 2005, 59.

Mitch Hedberg

HEDMAN, WERNER Danish adult film director Werner Hedman died in Copenhagen, Den-

167

2005 • Obituaries

mark, on July 26, 2005. Hedman was born in Copenhagen on April 6, 1926. He began working in films as a cinematographer in the late 1940s. He photographed such features as Nalen (1951), Where Mountains Float (1955), and Hidden Fear (1957). He made his directoral debut in the 1960s, and was best known for writing and directing the adult films In the Sign of the Taurus (1974), In the Sign of the Gemini (1975), In the Sign of the Lion (1976), Emmanuelle in Denmark (aka Agent 69 in the Sign of Scorpio (1977), and Agent 69 Jensen in the Sign of Sagittarius (1978).

HELMS, CHET Rock music promoter Chet Helms died of complications from a stroke in San Francisco, California, on June 25, 2005. He was 62. Helms was born in Santa Monica, California, on August 2, 1942. He helped launch the career of rock icon Janis Joplin in the 1960s as the founder and manager of her first band, Big Brother and Holding Company. Helms became known as “the father of The Summer of Love,” producing the first psychedelic rock show at Bill Graham’s Fillmore West in 1967. He was also the owner and manager of the rock venues, the Avalon Ballrooms. Helms appeared in several documentaries about Joplin including Feed Your Head (1997) and Intimate Portrait: Janis Joplin (2000). • Los Angeles Times, June 28, 2005, B10; New York Times, June 28, 2005, A21; Variety, July 11, 2005, 45.

Chet Helms

HENDERSON, SKITCH Pianist Skitch Henderson, who was bandleader for the Tonight Show band in the 1950s and early 1960s, died at his home in New Milford, Connecticut, on October 31, 2005. He was 87. Henderson was born in England on January 27, 1918. He worked as a pianist in vaudeville during the 1930s and went to Hollywood later in the decade. He joined the music department at MGM, and worked with such stars as Bob Hope and Bing Crosby. Henderson was a pilot for bot the Royal Air Force and the United States Army Air Corps during World War II. After the war Henderson worked as musical director for Frank Sinatra. He followed Sinatra to New York, where he served as musical director for the NBC radio shows Lucky Strike Show and The Philco Hour. He soon moved to television, where he appeared with Faye Emerson in

Skitch Henderson

the television series Wonderful Town, U.S.A. and Faye and Skitch in the early 1950s. He became the first bandleader for NBC’s Tonight Show with host Steve Allen in 1954. Henderson remained bandleader for the Tonight Show under subsequent hosts Jack Paar and Johnny Carson before leaving in 1966. He continued to record and perform, and was founder of the New York Poops in 1983, serving as musical director and conductor. He also performed as a guest conductor for orchestras around the world. • Los Angeles Times, Dec. 2, 2005, B9; New York Times, Nov. 3, 2005, C19; People, Nov. 21, 2005, 108; Time, Nov. 14, 2005, 27; Times (of London), Nov. 7, 2005, 59.

HENNING, PAUL Television writer and producer Paul Henning, who created the popular 1960s sit-coms The Beverly Hillbillies and Petticoat Junction, died in a Burbank, California, hospital on March 25, 2005. He was 93. Henning was born in Independence, Missouri, on September 16, 1911. He began working in radio in the 1930s, writing for such series as Fibber McGee and Molly and The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show. He moved to television in the 1950s, where he wrote episodes of such series as The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show, The Dennis Day Show, Where’s Raymond?, The Bob Cummings Show, The Real McCoys, and The Andy Griffith Show. He created The Beverly Hillbillies in 1962, which starred Buddy Ebsen as the patriarch of the Clampett clan who travels to Beverly

Paul Henning

Obituaries • 2005

168

Hills with daughter Elly Mae, nephew Jethro, and mother-in-law Granny after striking oil on Ozark homestead. Henning also wrote the words and music to the theme song, “The Ballad of Jed Clampett.” The Beverly Hillbillies was a popular CBS series throughout the decade until 1971. He also created the spin-off series Petticoat Junction in 1963 starring Bea Benaderet and Edgar Buchanan. This series also featured his daughter, Linda Henning, as one of the three Bradley girls, Betty Jo. He also served as executive producer and assisted in the casting for another spin-off comedy, Green Acres, which starred Eddie Albert and Eva Gabor in 1965. Henning also created the 1971 short-lived adventure series Bearcats! Henning also scripted several films including Lover Come Back (1961) and Bedtime Story (1964), which was remade as Dirty Rotten Scoundrels in 1988. He also produced and wrote the 1981 telefilm sequel The Return of the Beverly Hillbillies. The Clampetts again returned in 1993 with a feature film, The Beverly Hillbillies. • Los Angeles Times, Mar. 26, 2005, B16; New York Times, Mar. 30, 2005, D8; Time, Apr. 4, 2005, 19; Variety, Apr. 4, 2005, 80.

HENRIKSON, MATHIAS Swedish actor Mathias Henrikson died of a heart attack in Stockholm, Sweden, on July 13, 2005. He was 65. Henrikson was born in Stockholm on May 16, 1940, the son of actors Anders Henrikson and Aino Taube. He was featured in numerous films in Sweden from the 1960s including My Love and I (1964), The Vicious Circle (1967), Victor Frankenstein (1977), Love (1980), In the Name of the Law (1986), Hip Hip Hurra! (1987), The Last Contract (1998), and Family Secrets (2001). He also appeared on Swedish television in productions of The Department Store (1987), The Big Leak (1994), Pip-Larssons (1998), and The Marriage of Gustav III (2001).

John Herald

Joan Baez, Linda Ronstadt, and Maria Muldaur. Herald continued to perform as a solo act from the 1970s, and recorded the album Roll on John in 2000. • Los Angeles Times, July 24, 2005, B15; New York Times, July 23, 2005, B20.

HERMAN, GEORGE Television news reporter George Herman died of cancer and heart failure at a Washington, D.C., hospital on February 8, 2005. He was 85. Herman was born in New York City on January 14, 1920. He began his career as a newswriter for CBS radio in 1944, and began appearing on television several years later as a analyst at the 1948 Democrat Convention in Philadelphia. He reported from overseas, covering the Korean War in the early 1950s. Herman became CBS’ White House correspondent during the first term of President Dwight Eisenhower. He became a familiar face on Sunday morning as the host of the television public affairs program Face the Nation from 1969 to 1983. • Los Angeles Times, Feb. 9, 2005, B8; New York Times, Feb. 9, 2005, C19; Time, Feb. 21, 2005, 21.

Mathias Henrikson

HERALD, JOHN Bluegrass singer and guitarist John Herald died of an apparent suicide at his home in West Hurley, New York, on July 18, 2005. He was 65. Herald was born in Manhattan on September 6, 1939. He joined with Eric Weissberg and Bob Yellin to form the bluegrass band the Greenbriar Boys in the late 1950s. They performed and recorded for a decade, and Herald also wrote songs recorded by such artists as

George Herman

HERMAN, JULES Bandleader and musician Jules Herman died of heart failure at his home in West St. Paul, Minnesota, on July 29, 2005. He was 93. He was teaching music in North Dakota when Lawrence Welk invited him to join his orchestra as a trumpet

169

2005 • Obituaries

Jules Herman

Gyula Hernadi

player. He married Lois Best, Welk’s first official Champagne Lady singer, in 1938. Herman joined Griff Williams’ band during World War II and played with Wayne King’s Orchestra. He subsequently formed his own band which he led until 1950. Herman then settled in St. Paul, where he led the house orchestra at the Prom Ballroom for over 30 years. • Los Angeles Times, July 28, 2005, B10; Variety, Aug. 8, 2005, 37.

(1969), Agnus Dei (1970), The Pacifist (1970), Red Psalm (1972), Electra, My Love (1974), Adoption (1975), Requiem for a Revolutionary (1976), Nine Months (1976), Az Erod (aka The Fortress) (1979), Hungarian Rhapsody (1979), Season of Monsters (1987), Jesus Christ’s Horoscope (1988), God Walks Backwards (1991), Blue Danube Waltz (1992), Living on Borrowed Time (1993), Lord’s Lantern in Budapest (1999), Last Supper at the Arabian Gray Horse (2001), and Wake Up, Mate, Don’t You Sleep (2002).

HERMANTIER, R AYMOND French actor Raymond Hermantier died suddenly in Paris on February 11, 2005. He was 81. Hermantier was born in Lyon, France, in 1924. Though primarily known for his roles on stage, Hermantier also appeared in a handful of films during his career including Dawn Devils (1946), Prelude to Glory (1950), Under the Paris Sky (1951), and Clean Slate (1981). He was also an organizer and director of the Theatre Daniel Sorano of Dakar in Senegal.

HESTER , PAUL Australian rock drummer Paul Hester committed suicide by hanging himself from a tree in a park near his home in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, on March 21, 2005. He was 46. Hester was born in Melbourne on January 8, 1959. He joined the rock band Split Enz in 1983, playing on the hit songs “Message to My Girl” and “Strait Old Line.” Split Enz recorded the albums Conflicting Emotions and See Ya Round before breaking up. Hester subsequently joined with singer Neil Finn and bass player Nick Seymour as founding members of the band Crowded House. They recorded several popular songs including “Don’t Dream It’s Over.” He left Crowded House in 1993. Hester appeared in small roles in the films One Night Stand (1984) and The Coca-Cola Kid (1985), and was a performer on the Australian television series Hessie’s Shed and The Mick Molloy Show in the late

Raymond Hermantier

HERNADI, GYULA Hungarian screenwriter Gyula Hernadi died in Budapest, Hungary, on July 20, 2005. He was 78. Hernadi was born in Oroszvar, Hungary, on August 23, 1926. He worked often with director Mikos Jancso from the 1960s, writing such films as The Hopeless Ones (1965), My Way Home (1965), The Valley (1967), The Red and the White (1967), Silence and Cry (1967), Winter Wind (1969), Sparkling Winds

Paul Hester

Obituaries • 2005

170

1990s. • Los Angeles Times, Mar. 29, 2005, B9; New York Times, Mar. 29, 2005, A15; People, Apr. 11, 2005, 81.

HIDALGO, LAURA Argentine actress Laura Hidalgo died in La Jolla, California, on November 18, 2005. She was 78. Hidalgo was born in Besarabia, Romania, on May 1, 1927, and came to Argentina at an early age. She began her career on stage in the 1940s and made her screen debut in 1948’s His Last Fight. She had supporting roles in several films including Five Men and One Girl (1950) and Juna Mondiola (1950), before starring in 1951’s The Orchid. She was a leading Argentine actress throughout the 1950s starring in The Tunnel (1952), Black Ermine (1953), Maria Magdalena (1954), Descent into Hell (1954), El Tren Expreso. (1955), Beyond Oblivion (1956), Las Campanas de Teresa (1957), and La Mafia del Crimen (1958). She subsequently retired from the screen to marry and raise a family. She resided in Mexico for several decades before moving to the United States in 1987.

York and soon teamed with songwriter Anna Sosenko, who helped orchestrate her career. They spent several years in Paris where Hildegarde studied cabaret performing. Often billed as the Incomparable Hildegarde, she was a leading entertainer throughout the 1930s and 1940s. She was noted for such songs as “Darling, Je Vous Aime Beaucoup,” “Lili Marlene,” and “The Trees of Paris.” She also began appearing on television in the 1950s, performing on numerous specials. She also performed with the national tour of Stephen Sondheim’s musical Follies. Hildegarde’s autobiography, Over 50 ... So What!, was published in 1961. She continued to perform at supper clubs well into her 90s. • Los Angeles Times, Aug. 1, 2005, B9; New York Times, July 31, 1005, 31; Time, Aug. 15, 2005, 25; Times (of London), Aug. 1, 2005, 43; Variety, Aug. 8, 2005, 37.

HILDEGARDE Legendary cabaret entertainer Hildegarde died in a New York City hospital on July 29, 2005. She was 99. She was born Hildegarde Loretta Sell in Adell, Wisconsin, on February 1, 1906. She began performing in vaudeville in the late 1920s, working as a piano accompanist. She soon moved to New

HILL, DEBRA Debra Hill, who produced and co-scripted John Carpenter’s landmark 1978 horror film Halloween, died of cancer in Los Angeles on March 7, 2005. She was 54. Hill was born in Haddonfield, New Jersey, on November 10, 1950, and was raised in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She began working in films in the early 1970s as a production assistant on adventure documentaries. She later served as script supervisor on such films as Goodbye, Norma Jean (1976) and Carpenter’s Assault on Precinct 13 (1976). She continued to work with Carpenter, co-writing and producing the first two installments in the long-running Halloween series, chronicling the murder spree of psycho killer Michael Myers. Jamie Lee Curtis starred as the maniac’s primary target in Halloween (1978) and Halloween II (1981). Hill also produced and co-wrote the 1980 horror film The Fog with Carpenter, and produced the science fiction actioner Escape from New York (1981) and the sequel in name only Halloween III: Season of the Witch (1982). She formed an independent production company with Lynda Obst in 1986, and worked with Walt Disney Pictures as a producer on several short films for the Disney theme parks and the 35th Disneyland anniversary for NBC. Her film credits as producer also include The Dead Zone (1983), Clue (1985), Head Office (1985), The Lottery (1987), Adventures in Babysitting (1987), Big Top Pee-wee (1988), Heartbreak Hotel (1988), Gross Anatomy (1989), and

Hildegarde

Debra Hill

Laura Hidalgo

171 The Fisher King (1991). She also produced numerous films for cable television including Attack of the 50 Ft. Woman (1993), Shake, Rattle and Rock! (1994), Reform School Girl (1994), Roadracers (1994), Confessions of a Sorority Girl (1994) and Jailbreakers (1994) which she also scripted, Motorcycle Gang (1994), Runaway Daughters (1994), Girls in Prison (1994), Dragstrip Girl (1994), and Cool and the Crazy (1994). She also directed segments of the television series Monsters and Dream On. Hill reunited with Carpenter as writer and producer for 1996’s Escape from L.A. starring Kurt Russell. She also produced the films Chow Bella (1998) and Crazy in Alabama (1999), and was involved in an upcoming remake of The Fog at the time of her death. • Los Angeles Times, Mar. 7, 2005, B7; New York Times, Mar. 8, 2005, A21; Times (of London), Mar. 10, 2005, 68; Variety, Mar. 14, 2005, 64.

HILLARD, SHIRLEY

Author Shirley Hillard died in Los Angeles on October 4, 2005. She was 70. Hillard was born in Fort Worth, Texas, on August 21, 1935. She was the author of numerous children’s books including One Big Hug and Who’s Not Asleep? She also wrote several plays including the musical There’s No Place Like Hollywood, and scripted the 1994 film Season of Change.

Shirley Hillard

HILLIER, ERWIN British cinematographer Erwin Hillier died in London on January 10, 2005. He was 93. The German-born cinematographer began working in films in Germany in the early 1930s and was an assistant cameraman on Fritz Lang’s classic suspense tale M in 1931. He came to Great Britain later in the decade where he continued to work in films. His numerous credits as cinematographer include Lady from Lisbon (1942), The Silver Fleet (1943), The Butler’s Dilemma (1943), Rhythm Serenade (1943), Welcome, Mr. Washington (1944), A Canterbury Tale (1944), Great Day (1945), I Know Where I’m Going (1945), They Knew Mr. Knight (1946), My Heart Goes Crazy (1946), The October Man (1947), The Mark of Cain (1947), Mr. Perrin and Mr. Traill (1948), The Weaker Sex (1948), Private Angelo (1949), The Interrupted Journey (1949), Shadow of the Eagle (1950), Happy Go Lovely (1951), Young Wives’ Tale (1951), Where’s Charley (1952), Castle in the

2005 • Obituaries

Erwin Hillier

Air (1952), The Woman’s Angle (1952), Father’s Doing Fine (1952), Will Any Gentleman...? (1953), Isn’t Life Wonderful! (1953), The House of the Arrow (1953), Duel in the Jungle (1954), The Dam Busters (1954), Now and Forever (1955), Let’s Be Happy (1957), Casino de Paris (1957), Chase a Crooked Shadow (1957), The Mark of the Hawk (1958), The Naked Earth (1958), Girls at Sea (1958), Shake Hands with the Devil (1959), School for Scoundrels (1960), The Long and the Short and the Tall (1960), The Naked Edge (1961), A Matter of WHO (1961), The Pot Carriers (1962), Go to Blazes (1962), A Boy Ten Feet Tall (1963), Operation Crossbow (1965), Sands of the Kalahari (1965), The Quiller Memorandum (1966), Eye of the Devil (1967), Shoes of the Fisherman (1968), The Valley of Gwangi (1969), and 42:6 — Ben Gurion (1970). • Times (of London), Mar. 18, 2005, 79.

HILTON, DEREK British composer Derek Hilton died in England on July 11, 2005. He was 78. Hilton was born in Whitefield, England, on February 3, 1927. He studied piano from an early age and was leading his own band in his early teens. He performed with various bands from the late 1940s. He began working at Granada Television as a pianist, performing with the Derek Hilton Trio. They were regular performers on the series Sharp at Four and People and Places. He soon began composing scores for many of Granada’s television series including The Corridor People, Nearest and Dearest, The Dustbinmen, Judge Dee,

Derek Hilton

Obituaries • 2005

172

The Lovers, The Last of the Baskets, The Comedians, The Cuckoo Waltz, Leave It to Charlie, The Glamour Girls, and Cribb. Hilton also arranged the them music for the popular soap opera Coronation Street. He remained with Granada for over thirty years before leaving the station. He continued to work freelance, composing scores for several stage productions. • Times (of London), Aug. 12, 2005, 57.

(1983). He also appeared in the tele-films The Lindbergh Kidnapping Case (1976), Dear Lovey Hart: I Am Desperate (1976), Elvis (1979), and The Tenth Month (1979). He was also seen in episodes of Ironside, Kojak, The Rockford Files, Wonder Woman, The Incredible Hulk, Lou Grant, Knots Landing, Simon & Simon, Manimal, 1st & Ten, Dallas, Tour of Duty, and Step by Step.

HINKLEY, DEL Character actor Del Hinkley died on June 11, 2005. He was 74. Hinkley was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, on July 24, 1930. He was featured in the films Coma (1978) and The Survivors

HIRSCHHORN, JOEL Songwriter Joel Hirschhorn died of a heart attack in a Thousand Oaks, California, hospital on September 17, 2005, after suffering a broken shoulder in a fall the previous day. He was 67. Hirschhorn was born in the Bronx, New York, on December 18, 1937. He performed as a singer and pianist in nightclubs and with the rock band the Highlighters early in his career. He teamed with fellow songwriter Al Kasha to write “The Morning After” for the 1973 film The Poseidon Adventure. They received an Academy Award for Best Song for their work, and earned a second Oscar for “We May Never Love Like This Again” from The Towering Inferno in 1974. They were also nominated for Oscars for the original score for Disney’s 1977 animated film Pete’s Dragon, and the title song for Candle on the Water (1977). Hirschhorn’s other film credits include The Fat Spy (1966), The Cheyenne Social Club (1970), Freaky Friday (1976), Hot Lead and Cold Feet (1978), The North Avenue Irregulars (1979), Universe of Energ y (1982), China Cry: A True Story (1990), The Giant of Thunder Mountain (1991), Rescue Me (1993), Hungry for You (1996), Club V.R. (1996), and Cheyenne (1996). He also composed music for such television productions as The Trouble with Tracy (1971), Trapped Beneath the Sea (1974), Someone I Touched (1975), The Runaway Barge (1975), and David Copperfield (1993). He also composed music for the series Kids Inc, Knots Landing, and Three’s a Crowd, penning the lyrics to the theme song “Side by Side.” He and Kasha also received a Tony Award nomination for their score for the 1981 musical Copperfield, and another Tony nomination for songs they added to the 1983 Broadway revival of Seven Brides for Seven Brothers. Hirschhorn and Kasha also wrote several books including If They Ask You, You Can Write a Song (1979), Notes on Broadway: Conversations with the Great Songwriters (1985), and Reaching the Morning After (1986). He also wrote

Del Hinkley

Joel Hirschhorn

HINDS , JUSTIN

Jamaican ska and reggae singer and songwriter Justin Hinds died of lung cancer in Jamaica on May 7, 2005. He was 63. Hinds was born in Steertown, St. Ann, Jamaica, on May 7, 1942. He was lead singer in the group Justin Hinds and the Dominoes, with Dennis Sinclair and Junior Dixon, recording with Duke Reid’s Treasure Isles label in the 1960s. They were best known for the rock stead tune “Carry Go Bring Come” in 1963. They also recorded over 70 other songs including “Jump Out a Frying Pan,” “Baddaration,” “Rub Up Push Up,” “The Higher Monkey Climb,” and “King Samuel.” Hinds retired in the mid–1980s, but had recently joined with the Jamaica All Stars to perform in Paris.

Justin Hinds

173 several books on his own including Rating the Movie Stars for Home Video, TV, Cable (1985) and The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Songwriting (2001), and co-wrote a play, Musical Chairs, with his wife, documentary filmmaker Jennifer Carter Hirschhorn, in 2001. • Los Angeles Times, Sept. 20, 2005, B11; New York Times, Sept. 21, 2005, C18; Times (of London), Oct. 20, 2005, 73; Variety, Sept. 26, 2005, 71.

HLEBCE, ANGELCA Slovenian actress Angelca Hlebce died in Ljubljana, Slovenia, on October 18, 2005. She was 83. Hlebce was born in Strazisce, Slovenia, on May 7, 1922. She was active in films in Yugoslavia from the 1950s, appearing in Kala (1955), X25 Reports (1960), Ballad About a Trumpet and a Cloud (1961), Lucija (1965), Sunny Whirlpool (1968), Red What (1971), Between Fear and Duty (1975), The Call to Spring (1978), Dih (1983), Love (1984), Bumpstone (1985), and Carmen (1995). HODGES, MARGARET Children’s book author Margaret Hodges died of heart disease and complications from Parkinson’s disease at her home in Verona, Pennsylvania, on December 13, 2005. She was 94. She was born Sarah Margaret Moore in Indianapolis, Indiana, in 1911. She wrote over forty children’s books during her career including the 1985 Caldecott Medal winner, Saint George and the Dragon. Her other works include What’s for Lunch, Charley and Merlin and the Making of the King. Hodges also wrote and performed children’s tales for radio and television in the Pittsburgh area, and was featured in the “Tell Me a Story” segments for Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood from the mid–1960s through 1976.

2005 • Obituaries

president of production at Disney, and produced the direct-to-video sequel George of the Jungle 2 in 2003. He joined with two partners to independently finance the low-budget serial killer thriller Saw in 2004, which became a major hit. A sequel, Saw II, followed in 2005 which also proved successful at the box-office. Hoffman was working on several forthcoming horror films including Saw III, Catacombs, and Silence at the time of his death. • Los Angeles Times, Dec. 6, 2005, B10; Variety, Dec. 12, 2005, 67; Times (of London) Feb. 20, 2006, 51.

HOFFMANN, BENNO German actor Benno Hoffmann died in Germany on March 9, 2005. He was 85. Hoffmann was born in Suderbrarup, Germany, on May 30, 1919. He was featured in numerous films and television productions from the 1950s. His film credits include The Barrings (1955), Eva (1958), Two Worlds (1958), Labyrinth (1959), The Cow and I (1959), Tomorrow Is My Turn (1960), The Fair (1960), The Revolt of the Slaves (1961), Destination Death (1961), Escape from East Berlin (1962), Room 13 (1964), The Gentlemen (1965), Whom the Gods Wish to Destroy (1966), The Castle (1968), Beyond Control (1968), No Pawing, Darling (1970), Three Men in the Snow (1974), Lina Braake (1975), Berlinger (1975), and Werner — Eat My Dust!!! (1996). He was also seen in the television productions Intercontinental-Express (1965), Ein Jahr Ohne Sonntag (1969), Im Auftrag von Madame (1972), Es Begann bei Tiffany (1979), Bekenntnisse des Hochstaplers Felix Krull (1982), and Trautes Heim (1990).

HOFFMAN, GREGG Gregg Hoffman, who produced the popular low-budget horror films Saw and Saw II, died in suddenly a Hollywood hospital on December 4, 2005, after having been admitted complaining of neck pain. He was 42. Hoffman was born in Phoenix, Arizona, in 1963. He went to Hollywood in the mid–1980s and began working in films as an assistant at the independent production company PRO Filmworks. He began working at the Walt Disney Co. in 1995, where he worked on the development of the live-action children’s films Inspector Gadget, 101 Dalmatians, and The Parent Trap. He became a senior vice Benno Hoffmann

Gregg Hoffman

HOHN , CAROLA German actress Carola Hohn died at her residence in Munich, Germany, on November 8, 2005. She was 95. Hohn was born in Wesermunde, Germany, on January 30, 1910. She made her film debut in the late 1920s. She appeared in numerous films over the next seventy years including I Sing Myself Into Thy Heart (1934), Charley’s Aunt (1934), Liebeslied (1935), Every Day Isn’t Sunday (1935), The Making of a King (1935), The Royal Waltz (1935), April April! (1935), The Beggar Student (1936), Twice Two in a Four Post Bed (1937), Fridericus (1937), Life Begins Anew (1937), Comrades at Sea (1938), The Green Emperor (1939), Hurrah! I’m a Papa (1939), The Lucky

Obituaries • 2005

174

Carola Hohn

Jan Holden

Seven (1940), Mamma (1941), Beatrice Cenci (1941), Solitudine (1941), Drei Tolle Madels (1943), Leuchtende Schatten (1945), Der Fall Rabanser (1950), Toxi (1952), Love in the Tax Office (1952), The Swap (1952), Eternal Love (1954), I’ll See You at Lake Constance (1956), Viktor and Viktoria (1957), Vertauschtes Leben (1961), Apartmentzauber (1963), Pepe: His Teacher’s Fright (1969), Heart Break (1969), Hurrah, the School Is Burning (1969), Night Crossing (1981), Schloss Konigswald (1988), and The Thistle (1992). Hohn also appeared frequently on German television from the 1960s, starring as Juliane Forwster in the 1969 series Ein Sommer mit Nicole, and was Anna Maerker in the 1987 series Praxis Bulowbogen. She also guest starred in episodes of Derrick.

featured in television productions of Harpers West One (1961), Curtain of Fear (1964), The Loves of Larch Hill (1969), Casanova ’73 (1973), Agony (1979), Oh Happy Band (1980), and Lace II (1985). Her other television credits include episodes of The Vise, The Count of Monte Cristo, O.S.S., Interpol Calling, International Detective, Corrigan Blake, The Avengers, Undermind, The Saint, The Baron, Public Eye, Thirty-Minute Theatre, The Champions, Journey to the Unknown, Father Dear Father, Rings on Their Fingers, Are You Being Served?, and TBag and the Revenge of the T-Set. • Times (of London), Nov. 24, 2005, 76.

HOLDEN, JAMES Actor James Holden, who starred as Clay Baker in the television series Adventures in Paradise in the early 1960s, died in Burbank, California, on January 19, 2005. He was 84. Holden was born in Birmingham, Alabama, on December 12, 1920. He began his film career in the late 1940s, appearing in Fighter Squadron (1948), It’s a Great Feeling (1949), Task Force (1949), The House Across the Street (1949), Sands of Iwo Jima (1949), and Flight Nurse (1954). He was also seen on television in episodes of Campbell Playhouse, Star Tonight, and The Real McCoys. He appeared in Adventures in Paradise from 1960 to 1962. HOLDEN, JAN British stage and film actress Jan Holden died in England on October 11, 2005. She was 74. Holden was born Valerie Jeanne Wilkinson in Southport, England, on May 9, 1931. She began her career on stage in the early 1950s. Holden also made her film debut in 1955, appearing in such features as No Smoking (1955), The Hornet’s Nest (1955), High Flight (1956), Assignment Redhead (1956), the cult science fiction film Fire Maidens from Outer Space (1956), Enemy from Space (aka Quatermass 2) (1957), Storm Over Jamaica (1958), Links of Justice (1958), The Camp on Blood Island (1958), The Whole Truth (1958), Woman Possessed (1959), Top Floor Girl (1959), Escort for Hire (1960), The Stranglers of Bombay (1960), Never Let Go (1960), The Primitives (1962), Work Is a 4-Letter Word (1968), One Brief Summer (1969), Horror House (1969), and The Best House in London (1969). Holden was also

HOLDEN, SCOTT Scott Holden, the son of actor William Holden and Brenda Marshall, died of cancer in San Diego, California, on January 21, 2005. He was 58. Holden was born on May 2, 1946. He appeared in several films in the 1970s with his father including Panhandle 38 (1972), The Revengers (1972), and Breezy (1973). HOLLAND, DAVE Author and western film historian Dave Holland, who was a founder and director of the Lone Pine Film Festival, died of esophageal cancer at his home in Santa Clarita, California, on November 14, 2005. He was 70. Holland was born in Raleigh, North Carolina, on January 22, 1935, and raised in Birmingham, Alabama. He moved to Los Angeles in the late 1950s, where he worked in films as a

Dave Holland

175

2005 • Obituaries

press agent and unit production manager. A fan of westerns of the 1940s, Holland became interested in the Alabama Hills area where many of them were filmed. He wrote the 1990 pictorial guide about the area, On Location in Lone Pine, and later revised the book and produced two videos about the location. He was instrumental in starting the Lone Pine Film Festival in 1990, and served as director of the event from 1991 to 1999. Numerous celebrities have attended the festival over the years including Gregory Peck, Peggy Stewart, and Clayton Moore. Holland also wrote the book From Out of the Past: A Pictorial History of the Lone Ranger in 1989. • Los Angeles Times, Nov. 19, 2005, B16.

HOLLAND , MILTON Drummer Milton Holland died of kidney failure and complications from Alzheimer’s disease in Los Angeles on November 4, 2005. He was 88. Holland was born in Chicago on February 7, 1917. He began his career playing jazz with such artists as Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald, and Benny Carter. Holland was proficient with various exotic percussion instruments and played on numerous films and television soundtracks. He proved Tinker Bell’s twinkling sound in Disney’s Peter Pan, and the tinkle of Samantha’s nose twitch for Bewitched. He also performed on the soundtracks of the films The King and I (1956), West Side Story (1961), and To Kill a Mockingbird (1962).

John Hollis (as Lobot from Star Wars V: The Empire Strikes Back)

dom. Hollis was also featured in several films during his career including the 1967 James Bond spoof Casino Royale, The Dirty Dozen (1967), On the Run (1968), Freelance (1971), Ghost in the Noonday Sun (1973), Captain Kronos — Vampire Hunter (1974), Superman (1978) and Superman II (1980) as a Kryptonian Elder, Aftermath (1980), the 1980 Star Wars film The Empire Strikes Back as Lando’s Aide, Lobot, Flash Gordon (1980), the 1981 James Bond film For Your Eyes Only as Ernst Stavro Blofeld, Superman IV: The Quest for Peace (1987). He was also seen on television in productions of The Day of the Triffids (1981) as Alf, Badger Girl (1984), The Great Kandinsky (1995), and Esther (1999).

HOLM, SVERRE Norwegian actor Sverre Holm died in Larvik, Norway, on March 16, 2005. He was 73. Holm was born in Norway on July 24, 1931. He was best known for his roles as Benny Franzen in the long-running Olsen Gang series of films from the 1970s through the 1990s. Holm appeared in films from the 1950s including Bustenskjold (1958), Surrounded (1960), Kanarifuglen (1973), and Deilig er Fjorden! (1985). He was also seen as Stationmaster Tiedemann on the Sesam Station television series in the 1990s.

Milton Holland

HOLLIS, JOHN British character actor John Hollis died in London on October 18, 2005. He was 74. Hollis appeared frequently on British television from the early 1960s, starring as Kaufman in the science fiction mini-series A for Andromeda (1961) and The Andromeda Breakthrough (1962). He also appeared in television productions of Malatesta (1964), Legend of Death (1965), Detective Waiting (1970), And Whose Side Are You On? (1972), and The Adventures of Don Quixote (1973). He also guest starred in episodes of The Avengers, Crane, The Saint, Espionage, The Wednesday Play, Dixon of Dock Green, Adam Adamant Lives!, Out of the Unknown, Softly Softly, Boy Meets Girl, The Onedin Line, Doctor Who, The Tomorrow People, Blakes 7, Turn on to T-Bag, and T-Bag and the Pearls of Wis-

Sverre Holm

HOLT, JANY French actress Jany Holt died in Paris on October 26, 2005. She was 96. Holt was

Obituaries • 2005

176 star as Kim in the Japanese stage production of Miss Saigon in 1992. She also starred in such musicals as Fiddler on the Roof and The King and I.

HONDA, MINAKO Japanese singer and actress Minako Honda died of acute myelocytic leukemia in a Tokyo hospital on November 6, 2005. She was 38. She was born Minako Kudo on July 31, 1967. She made her debut as a pop singer in 1985 and recorded such hits as “One Way Generation.” He recorded several albums and anime songs, and was also featured in the 1987 film Passenger: Sugisharishi Hibi. Honda was chose to

HOOTKINS, WILLIAM William Hootkins, who made his film debut as rebel fighter pilot Porkins in George Lucas’ science fiction classic Star Wars, died of pancreatic cancer in a Santa Monica, California, hospital on October 23, 2005. He was 57. Hootkins was born in Dallas, Texas, on July 5, 1948. He moved to London after graduating from Princeton University to study at the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Arts. His small role in Star Wars led to numerous other film role. His credits include Twilight’s Last Gleaming (1977), Valentino (1977), The Lady Vanishes (1979), Hanover Street (1979), Hussy (1980), Bad Timing (1980), Flash Gordon (1980), Sphinx (1981), Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981) as Major Eaton, Trail of the Pink Panther (1982), Curse of the Pink Panther (1983), Zina (1985), Water (1985), DreamChild (1985), White Nights (1985), Biggles (1986), Haunted Honeymoon (1986), Superman IV: The Quest for Peace (1987), American Gothic (1988), Crusoe (1989), Batman (1989), Hardware (1990), The Pope Must Die (1991), Hear My Song (1991), The Milky Life (1992), A River Runs Through It (1992), Dust Devil (1992), The Princess and the Goblin (1993) as a voice actor, The NeverEnding Story III (1994), Funny Bones (1995), Death Machine (1995), Gospa (1995), The Island of Dr. Moreau (1996), Rhinoceros Hunting in Budapest (1997), The World, Then the Fireworks (1997), Seizures (1998), Something to Believe In (1998), The Omega Code (1999), Town & Country (2001), The Breed (2001), Blessed (2004), and Dear Wendy (2005). He was also seen on television in productions of Come Back, Little Sheba (1977), Lillie (1978), Clouds of Glory: William and Dorothy (1978), J.M. Barrie and the Lost Boys (1978), Charlie Muffin (1979), Black Carrion (1984), Rocket to the Moon (1986), Paradise Postponed (1986), The Return of Sherlock Holmes (1987), U.S. Marshals: Waco & Rhinehart (1987), The Big Knife (1988), Monkeys (1989), Gummed Labels (1992), Age of Treason (1993), Like Father, Like Santa (1998), and The Magnificent Ambersons (2002). Hootkins starred as Jay in the television series Capital City in 1990. He was also featured in episodes of Tales of the Unexpected, Agony,

Minako Honda

William Hootkins (as Porkins from Star Wars)

Jany Holt

born in Bucharest, Romania, on May 13, 1909. She was a leading actress in French films from the early 1930s, starring in The Green Domino (1935), Abel Gance’s The Life and Loves of Beethoven (1936), Jean Renoir’s Underworld (1936), The Golem (1936), Southern Carrier (1936), L’Alibi (1937), Satan’s Paradise (1938), Rasputin (1938), Sirocco (1938), The Phantom Baron (1943), Angels of the Streets (1943), Farandole (1945), Special Mission (1946), Land Without Stars (1946), Counter Investigation (1947), Runors (1947), Not Guilty (1947), Dr. Laennec (1949), The Gauntlet (1952), and Gervaise (1956). Holt continued to perform in films and on television in character roles. She was featured in the films Hung Up (1968), A Time for Loving (1971), The LeftHanded Woman (1977), Target (1985), Saxo (1987), The Crossing (1988), Cafe au Lait (1993), and Black for Remembrance (1995). She also appeared on television in productions of Adieu mes Quinze Ans (1971), Destins (1973), and Toutes Griffes Dehors (1982).

177 Bret Maverick, Bergerac, Cagney & Lacey, Remington Steele, Philip Marlowe, Private Eye, Taxi, Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime, Whiz Kids, Blackadder II, The New Statesman, Valerie, Poirot, Bergerac, Chancer, The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles, The Tomorrow People, and The West Wing. Hootkins was also a voice actor in the animated versions of Moby Dick (2000), The Miracle Maker (2000), and Hamilton Mattress (2001), and for such video games as Eternal Darkness: Sanity’s Requiem, Evil Dead: A Fistful of Broomstick, and EverQuest II. He also performed frequently on the British stage, most recently appearing as Alfred Hitchcock in Hitchcock Blonde in 2003. His final film appearance was in the forthcoming feature Colour Me Kubrick. • Los Angeles Times, Oct. 30, 2005, B13; Times (of London), Nov. 7, 2005, 59.

HOPKINS, RAND Actor Rand Hopkins died in Pine Lake, Georgia, on January 3, 2005. He was 59. Hopkins was born in Atlanta, Georgia, on February 17, 1945. He appeared in small roles in several films including The People vs. Larry Flynt (1996) as Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, The First of May (1999), Unshackled (2000), and Bobby Jones, Stroke of Genius (2004). He also appeared in the tele-film Against the Wall (1994), and was seen in such series as The Waltons, Quantum Leap, and The Jersey.

2005 • Obituaries

York Times, Oct. 22, 2005, C14; People, Nov. 7, 2005, 98; Time, Oct. 31, 2005, 27; Times (of London), Oct. 24, 2005, 50; Variety, Oct. 31, 2005, 73.

HORNBLOW, LEONORA Novelist Leonora Hornblow died on November 5, 2005. She was 85. She was born Leonora Salmon in New York City on June 3, 1920. She married actor Wayne Morris in 1939 and had a son, Michael, before they separated after 18 months. She married film producer Arthur Hornblow in 1946 and lived with him in Hollywood. She penned her first novel, Memory and Desire (1950), about the film community. A second novel, The Love Seekers, set in New York City, followed in 1958. She authored a children’s book about the Egyptian queen Cleopatra in 1961 and she and her husband collaborated on several subsequent children’s books including Birds Do the Strangest Things (1965) and Prehistoric Monsters Did the Strangest Things (1974). She and Hornblow remained married until his death in 1976.

HORN, SHIRLEY Jazz singer Shirley Horn died in a Cheverly, Maryland, nursing home of complications from breast cancer and diabetes on October 20, 2005. She was 71. Horn was born in Washington, D.C., on May 1, 1934. She learned to play the piano at an early age, and trained in classical music. She began performing jazz in Washington in the early 1950s, forming a jazz trio. She recorded her first album, Embers and Ashes, in 1960. Miles Davis was instrumental in getting her a contract with Mercury Records as a singer, where she recorded such songs as “Loads of Love” in 1962. She continued to perform in the Washington area over the next two decades. She returned to touring and recording in the 1980s, and signed with Verve Music Group in 1986, where she recorded nearly a dozen albums including You Won’t Forget Me (1990) and the Grammy Award winning I Remember Miles (1998). • Los Angeles Times, Oct. 22, 2005, B16; New

Leonora Hornblow (with her husband, Arthur Hornblow)

Shirley Horn

Basil Hoskins

HOSKINS, BASIL British character actor Basil Hoskins died in England on January 17, 2005. He was 75. Hoskins was born in England on June 10, 1929. He was a leading performer on the British stage for nearly half a century, appearing in productions that ranged from high drama to musical comedy. He also per-

Obituaries • 2005

178

formed for five years with the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre. Hoskins appeared in a handful of films during his career including It Started in Paradise (1952), Desert Attack (1958), Flame Over India (1959), and The Millionairess (1960). He starred as Dr. Reginald LaneRussell in the British television series Emergency —Ward 10 in 1963, and appeared in television productions of The Befrienders (1970), Lillie (1978), Lost in London (1985), The Blackheath Poisonings (1992), Heidi (1993), and Cold Comfort Farm (1995). His other television credits include episodes of The Avengers, The Prisoner, The New Avengers, The Professionals, The Return of Sherlock Holmes, and The Upper Hand. Hoskins also appeared as Mr. Bottingham in the 1989 film version of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Edge of Sanity. • Times (of London), Mar. 14, 2005, 52.

HOUSTON, JAMES Writer and artists James A. Houston, whose work brought the culture and art of the Eskimo to an international audience, died in New London, Connecticut, on April 17, 2005. He was 83. Houston was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, on June 12, 1921. He began drawing at an early age and, in 1948, traveled to an Inuit village where he remained for the next 14 years drawing the land and its people. He also discovered the indigenous art of the Eskimo people and was instrumental in gaining international attention to their intricate carvings and drawings. Houston became the first civil administrator of West Baffin Island in the mid–1950s. In 1962 began working as an artist for Steuben, designing artwork for their glass products. He wrote a novel based on his exploits in the Arctic, The White Dawn, in 1971. He adapted his work to film in 1974. He also wrote and illustrated several other works. His memoir, Confessions of an Igloo Dweller, was published in 1996. • Los Angeles Times, Apr. 25, 2005, B9; New York Times, Apr. 22, 2005, B6.

James Houston

HOWELLS, URSULA British actress Ursula Howells died in Petsworth, West Sussex, England, on October 16, 2005. She was 83. Howells was born in London on September 17, 1922, the daughter of British composer and musician Herbert Howells. She began her career on stage while in her teens. She appeared in numerous theatrical productions and made her film

Ursula Howells

debut in 1950’s Flesh and Blood. Howells’ many film credits also include I Believe in You (1952), Young and Willing (1953), The Horse’s Mouth (1953), The Gilded Cage (1954), Handcuffs, London (1955), They Can’t Hang Me (1955), Marriage a la Mode (1955), Track the Man Down (1955), Keep It Clean (1956), The Third Key (1956), Account Rendered (1957), The Fighting Wildcats (1957), Death and the Sky Above (1962), The Sicilians (1963), 80,000 Suspects (1963), Dr. Terror’s House of Horrors (1965), Torture Garden (1967), Assignment K (1968), the 1969 psychological horror film Girly (aka Mumsy, Nanny, Sonny and Girl), Crossplot (1969), Father Dear Father (1972), Time After Time (1985), and The Tichborne Claimant (1998). She also appeared frequently on British television from the 1940s, starring in productions of Frieda (1946), King Lear (1948), Number Three (1953), Gravelhanger (1954), The Voices (1955), The Burning Glass (1956), Joyous Errand (1957), The Madhouse on Castle Street (1963), Present Laughter (1964), The Forsyte Saga (1967), Cousin Bette (1971), Fall of Eagles (1974), The Barchester Chronicles (1982), The Cold Room (1984), Bon Voyage (1985), Miss Marple: A Murder Is Announced (1985), Downtown Lagos (1992), Danielle Steel’s Jewels (1992), A Pinch of Snuff (1994), She’s Out (1995), and A Rather English Marriage (1998). Howells starred as Madame Bersac in the television series Ryan International in 1970, and was Elizabeth Woodfore in 1976’s The Many Wives of Patrick. She starred as Mrs. Gradgrind in Hard Times in 1977, and was Mary Browne Lacey in Something in Disguise in 1982. She also starred as Kitty Cazalet in The Cazalets in 2001. Her other television credits include episodes of Sherlock Holmes, Interpol Calling, Kraft Mystery Theater, Dixon of Dock Green, The Human Jungle, Crane, The Wednesday Thriller, No Hiding Place, The Informer, Man in a Suitcase, Thirty-Minute Theatre, Judge Dee, Special Branch, Upstairs, Downstairs, Bulman, Bergerac, Alleyn Mysteries, The Mixer, Lovejoy, Heartbeat, Dangerfield, and Midsomer Murders. • Times (of London), Nov. 4, 2005, 80.

HUGHES , BILLY , JR. Child actor Billy Hughes, Jr., died on December 20, 2005. He was 57. He was born in Los Angeles on November 28, 1948, the son of stuntman Bill Hughes, Sr. He was featured as a child actor in numerous television show including

179

2005 • Obituaries

Other Animals (1997), The Lent Jewels (2002), and The Hack’s Tail (2004). • New York Times, Apr.24, 2005, 46; Times (of London), Apr. 20, 2005, 59.

Billy Hughes, Jr.

episodes of The Detectives Starring Robert Taylor, The Law and Mr. Jones, Shirley Temple’s Storybook, Lassie, 87th Precinct, Wagon Train, Gunsmoke, General Electric Theater, The Rifleman, Leave It to Beaver, Dr. Kildare, Twilight Zone, and Arrest and Trial. He was also featured in several films including Posse from Hell (1961), Ole Rex (1961), Stakeout! (1962), My Six Loves (1963), and Five Card Stud. Hughes returned to the screen in the 1970s, appearing in Smoke in the Wind (1975), Gone with the West (1975), and Convoy (1978). He was working on writing a screenplay at the time of his death.

HUGHES , DAVID British novelist David Hughes died in London on April 11, 2005. He was 74. Hughes was born in Alton, Hampshire, England, on July 27, 1930. He began his career as an editorial assistant at London Magazine in the 1950s, then worked for a publishing company. He wrote several novels during the decade including Sealed with a Loving Kiss (1959) and The Horsehair Sofa (1961). He married Swedish actress Mai Zetterling in 1958, and the two collaborated on writing several films including Loving Couples (1964), Night Games (1966), Doctor Glas (1968), and The Girls (1968). They also wrote a children’s book and a work on H.G. Wells, The Man Who Invented Tomorrow (1968). He and Zetterling divorced in 1976 and Hughes returned to England and resumed his career as a writer. His later works include The Pork Butcher (1985), The Joke of the Century (1986), Himself and

David Hughes

HULL, SHELLEY Television producer Shelley Hull died of emphysema and complications from pneumonia at his Santa Monica, California, home on February 27, 2005. He was 85. Hull was born in New York City on December 10, 1919, the son of actor Henry Hull, who starred in the 1935 Universal horror classic The Werewolf of London. The younger Hull was a producer on such television series including The Guns of Will Sonnett, Starsky and Hutch, Charlie’s Angels, 7th Heaven, and The Love Boat: The Next Wave. He also produced numerous tele-films including Cricket on the Hearth (1967), The Over-the-Hill Gang (1969), Wake Me When the War Is Over (1969), The Monk (1969), The Pigeon (1969), Carter’s Army (1970), The Love War (1970), Wild Women (1970), The Over-the-Hill Gang Rides Again (1970), Yuma (1971), Five Desperate Women (1971), The Reluctant Heroes (1971), Savages (1974), Death Sentence (1974), Hit Lady (1974), Only with Married Men (1974), The Daughters of Joshua Cabe Return (1975), One of My Wives Is Missing (1976), Death at Love House (1976), The Boy in the Plastic Bubble (1976), Little Ladies of the Night (1977), Return to Fantasy Island (1978), Kate Bliss and the Ticker Tape Kid (1978), Return of the Mod Squad (1979), Murder Can Hurt You (1980), Casino (1980), The Wild Women of Chastity Gulch (1982), Dark Mirror (1984), International Airport (1985), Dark Mansions (1986), Cracked Up (1987), Jailbirds (1991), Grass Roots (1992), and Jane’s House (1994). • Los Angeles Times, Mar. 15, 2005, B9. HUNTER, BOB Environmental activist, writer and broadcaster Bob Hunter died in Canada of prostate cancer on May 2, 2005. He was 63. Hunter was born in St. Boniface, Manitoba, Canada, on October 13, 1941. He began his career as a reporter for the Winnipeg Tribune. He wrote his first novel, Erebus, in 1968, and also wrote ten scripts for the CBC Canadian syndicated television series The Beachcombers in the early 1970s. Hunter was one of the founding members of the international environmental organization Greenpeace in 1972, becoming the group’s first president. He was influential in turning the organization into a major

Bob Hunter

Obituaries • 2005

180

world environmental lobby. Hunter stepped down as president in 1977 to resume working as a writer and television broadcaster. He hosted the print media critique program Papercuts for Toronto’s Citytv in the 1980s, usually appearing on camera in his bathrobe. Hunter’s other books include On the Sky: Zen and the Art of International Freeloading (1988), Occupied Canada (1991), and Red Blood: One (Mostly) White Guy’s Encounters with the Native World (1999). • Los Angeles Times, May 3, 2005, B10; New York Times, May 3, 2005, B8; Time, May 16, 2005, 25; Times (of London), May 4, 2005, 53.

He also wrote the tele-films Columbo: No Time Die (1992), Columbo: Undercover (1994), Ed McBain’s 87th Precinct: Lightning (1995), Ed McBain’s 87th Precinct: Ice (1996), and Ed McBain’s 87th Precinct: Heatwave (1997). McBain also created the character of Florida divorce lawyer Matthew Hope, who appeared in a series of a dozen novels between 1978 and 1998. His later books in the 87th Precinct series include Widows (1991), Mischief (1993), and Money, Money, Money (2001). His 55th and last novel in the series, Fiddlers, was scheduled for publication later in the year. • Los Angeles Times, July 8, 2005, B9; New York Times, July 7, 2005, B10; Time, July 18, 2005, 25; Times (of London), July 8, 2005, 71.

HUNTER, EVAN Evan Hunter, the creator of the 87th Precinct series of police procedural novels under the pseudonym Ed McBain, died of cancer of the larynx at his home in Weston, Connecticut, on July 6, 2005. He was 78. He was born Salvatore Lombino in New York City on October 15, 1926. He began writing in the early 1950s and, as Evan Hunter, received acclaim for his novel about a young schoolteacher, The Blackboard Jungle in 1954. The novel was adapted as a film starring Glenn Ford and Sidney Poitier the following year. His first 87th Precinct novel, Cop Hater, was published in 1956. Cop Hater was adapted to film in 1958, and many of his other works were also filmed including The Mugger (1958), The Pusher (1960), Strangers When We Meet (1960) which he also scripted, The Young Savages (1961) based on his novel A Matter of Conviction, the Japanese film High and Low (1963) based on King’s Ransom, Mister Buddwing (1966), Last Summer (1969), Cry of the Cormoran (1970), Without Apparent Motive (1971), Every Little Crook and Nanny (1972), Fuzz (1972) which he also scripted, Blood Relatives (1978), Walk Proud (1979), Lonely Heart (1981), and Three Blind Mice (2001). As a screenwriter he was best known for his adaptation of Daphne Du Maurier’s short story for Alfred Hitchcock’s classic 1963 film The Birds. His stories were also filmed for television as episodes of Climax!, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, The Kaiser Aluminum Hour, 87th Precinct, Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre, and Ironside. Hunter adapted his novel The Chisholms as a television mini-series in 1979, and scripted the tele-film The Legend of Walks Far Woman (1982) and the mini-series Dream West (1986).

HUSSEY, RUTH Leading actress Ruth Hussey died of complications from appendicitis in a Thousand Oaks, California, nursing home on April 19, 2005. She was 93. Hussey was born in Providence, Rhode Island, on October 30, 1911. She studied drama in college and began her career as a fashion commentator on Providence radio. She subsequently went to New York where she modeled and performed on stage. She was signed to a contract with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer in 1937 when a casting agent saw her in a production of Dead End. She made her film debut in a small part in the 1937 Spencer Tracy film Big City. She appeared in increasingly larger roles in such films as Madame X (1937), Judge Hardy’s Children (1938), Hold That Kiss (1938), Marie Antoinette (1938), Man-Proof (1938), Rich Man, Poor Man (1938), Time Out for Murder (1938), Spring Madness (1938), Honolulu (1939), Within the Law (1939), Maisie (1939), The Women (1939), Blackmail (1939), Fast and Furious (1939), and Another Thin Man (1939) with William Powell and Myrna Loy. Hussey co-starred with Spencer Tracy in the 1940 drama Northwest Passage and earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress for her role as sarcastic photographer Liz Imbrie in 1940’s The Philadelphia Story. Hussey continued to star in such films as Flight Command (1940), Susan and God (1940), Free and Easy (1941), Our Wife (1941), Married Bachelor (1941), H.M. Pulham, Esq. (1941), Pierre of the Plains (1942), Tennessee Johnson (1942) with Van Johnson, Tender Comrade (1943), the 1944 supernatural classic

Evan Hunter

Ruth Hussey

181 The Uninvited with Ray Milland and Gail Russell, Marine Raiders (1944), and Bedside Manner (1945). She starred on Broadway for two years opposite Ralph Bellamy in the hit play State of the Union (1945) before returning to the screen in I, Jane Doe (1948), The Great Gatsby (1949) as athlete Jordan Baker opposite Alan Ladd, Louisa (1950), Mr. Music (1950), That’s My Boy (1951) as Jerry Lewis’ mother, Women of the North Country (1952), Stars and Stripes Forever (1952), The Lady Wants Mink (1953), and The Facts of Life (1960) with Bob Hope and Lucille Ball. Hussey also appeared often on television in the 1950s, guest starring in such series as Pulitzer Prize Playhouse, Lux Video Theatre, Family Theatre, Celanese Theatre, The Ford Television Theatre, General Electric Theater, Studio One, The Elgin Hour, Producers’ Showcase, Climax!, Science Fiction Theater, Shower of Stars, The Christophers, Jane Wyman Presents The Fireside Theatre, Playwrights ’56, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, and Vacation Playhouse. She largely retired from the acting after appearing in an episode of Marcus Welby, M.D. and the 1973 tele-film My Darling Daughter’s Anniversary (1973). She was married to Hollywood talent scout C. Robert Longenecker from 1942 until his death in 2002. • Los Angeles Times, Apr. 21, 2005, B10; New York Times, Apr. 26, 2005, B6; Time, May 2, 2005, 25; Times (of London), Apr. 22, 2005, 68; Variety, Apr. 25, 2005, 69.

HUTCH, WILLIE Songwriter and musician Willie Hutch, who was best known for co-writing the Jackson Five’s hit tune “I’ll Be There,” died in Duncanville, Texas, on September 19, 2005. He was 60. Hutch was born Willie McKinley Hutchinson in Los Angeles on December 6, 1944. He wrote and performed for the Motown label in the 1970s, also co-writing the Jackson Five hits “Got to Be There” and “Never Can Say Goodbye.” He also wrote the songs “Brother’s Gonna Work It Out,” “Slick,” and “California My Way.” Hutch also recorded several albums and composed music for the soundtracks of the blaxploitation films The Mack (1973) and Foxy Brown (1974). Several of his songs were heard in Berry Gordy’s 1985 film The Last Dragon, and his composition “I Choose You” was heard in the 2005 Memphis-based feature Hustle & Flow. • Times (of London), Sept. 27, 2005, 60.

2005 • Obituaries

HUTCHINSON, TOM British film critic Tom Hutchinson died in a London hospital on August 3, 2005. He was 75. Hutchinson wrote for the Picture Guide film magazine before becoming a film critic for the Sunday Telegraph. He also wrote reviews for such publications as The Guardian and Radio Times. Hutchinson wrote a book on actress Marilyn Monroe and a biography of Rod Steiger entitled Rod Steiger: Memoirs of a Friendship. His other books include Horror and Fantasy in the Cinema. Hutchinson also hosted the BBC Radio 2 program Starsound Extra, and a series of films for Southern Television. He continued to work as a film critic, writing a column for the Hampsted and Highgate Express, until shortly before his death. HYDE, MIRIAM Australian composer and pianist Miriam Hyde died in Sydney, Australia, on January 11, 2005. She was 91. Hyde was born to a musical family in Australia on January 15, 1913. She began her studies in Australia and attended the Royal College of Music in London from 1932 to 1935. During her time in London she composed numerous works including two piano concertos that were performed by the London Philharmonic. After returning to Australia in 1936 she composed her best known work, Fantasia on Waltzing Matilda. She composed her Piano Sonata in G minor during World War II, while her husband was a prisoner of war in Germany.

Miriam Hyde

IBANEZ, ROGER Basque actor Roger Ibanez died in Paris on January 17, 2005. He was 73. Ibanez was born in Paris of Spanish Basque parents in 1931. He was a popular performer in French films and television from the 1960s. His numerous film credits include Zita (1968), The Last Train (1973), Mad Enough to Kill (1975), The Red Poster (1976), Judge Fayard Called the Sheriff (1977), What Do You Want, Julie? (1977), The Obscure Object of Desire (1977), The Key Is in the Door (1978), The Red Sweater (1979), The Truth on the Savolta Affair (1979), Nanou (1986), Radio Corbeau (1989), La Source (1991), Homer: Portrait of the Artist as an Old Man (1997), Asfalto (2000), and Life Kills Me (2002). Willie Hutch

ILHAN, ATILLA Turkish novelist and poet Atilla Ilhan died of a heart attack at his home in Istan-

Obituaries • 2005

182

Roger Ibanez

Rolf Illig

bul, Turkey, on October 10, 2005. He was 80. Ilhan was born in Menemen, Turkey, on June 15, 1925. His first volume of poetry, Wall, was published in 1948. He spent several years in France in the early 1950s. After returning to Turkey he worked as a screenwriter on numerous films, often under the pseudonym Ali Kaptanoglu. His film credits include The Lonely Ones’ Quay (1959), Nebahat, the Driver (1960), The Death Curtain (1960), The Female Wolf (1960), The Fury of the Giants (1960), and A Person Named Rifat (1962). Ilhan also wrote numerous poetry collections and the novels Man on the Street (1953), Knife’s Edge (1973), Hyena’s Share (1975), and Absolutely Leman (1980). He adapted his novel The Ordinary Man for the screen in 1995.

(1999), Das Gestohlene Leben (2000), and Tatort— Rattenlinie (2000).

INCI, BILAL Turkish actor Bilal Inci died of a heart attack in Istanbul, Turkey, on October 13, 2005. He was 69. Inci was born in Kozan, Turkey, on September 29, 1936. He appeared in numerous Turkish films from the 1960s including The Cruel Ones (1966), Son Vurgun (1968), I Lost Me Heart to a Turk (1969), The Hungry Wolves (1969), Live Target (1970), Tarkan Viking Kani (1971), Katiller (1971), Hey Amigo (1971), The Return (1972), Eleg y (1972), Baba Kartal (1978), Scene of the Crime: A Tooth for a Tooth (1985), and On Kadin (1987). In recent years he was seen in the Turkish television mini-series Deli Yurek (1999) and Berivan (2002).

Atilla Ilhan

ILLIG, ROLF

German actor Rolf Illig died in Issing am Ammersee, Germany, on February 24, 2005. He was 79. Illig was born in Berlin, Germany, on May 30, 1925. He was featured in the 1964 German science fiction film No Survivors, Please. He also appeared in the films Die Ameisen Kommen (1974), Celeste (1981), The Swing (1983), Alpine Fire (1985), Ariadna (1990), Desire (1992), Transatlantis (1995), 14 Days to Life (1997), Germania (2002), and Schwesternliebe (2003). Illig was also active on stage and appeared in television productions of Martin Luther (1983), Sealed in Salt (1989), Regina on the Ladder to Success (1990), Marienhof (1992), End of Summer (1995), Riding the Storm

Bilal Inci

INCROCCI, AGENORE “AGE ” Italian screenwriter Agenore Incrocci, who often wrote under the pen name Age, died of a heart attack in a Rome hospital on November 15, 2005. He was 91. Incrocci was born in Brescia, Lombardy, Italy, on July 4, 1914. He began working in films as a writer in the late 1940s, often collaborating with fellow scripter Furio Scarpelli. His numerous film credits include The Two Orphans (1947), Toto Looks for an Apartment (1949), Toto Tarzan (1950), Toto the Third Man (1951), Rome-Paris-Rome (1951), Position Wanted (1951), Three Corsairs (1952),

183

2005 • Obituaries

INGERSOLL, MARY AMADEO Actress Mary Amadeo Ingersoll died of breast cancer on August 8, 2005. She was 52. Ingersoll was born on March 10, 1953. She was featured as a reporter in the tele-films Alien Nation: The Enemy Within (1996) and Alien Nation: The Udara Legacy (1997). She was also seen in episodes of such television series as Tracey Takes On... and Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman.

Agenore “Age” Incrocci

Toto and the Women (1952), Toto in Color (1952), Don Lorenzo (1952), At Sword’s Edge (1952), Neapolitans in Milan (1953), Ivan, Son of the White Devil (1953), Captain Phantom (195), Schubert (1954), The Anatomy of Love (1954), House of Ricordi (1954), Toto and Carolina (1955), Con Camillo’s Last Round (1955), Bravissimo (1955), Roman Tales (1955), Time of Vacation (1956), The Band of Honest Men (1956), The Bigamist (1956), It Happened in Rome (1957), March’s Child (1957), Doctor and the Healer (1957), A Tailor’s Maid (1957), Toto, Peppino and the Fanatics (1958), First Love (1958), Big Deal on Madonna Street (1958), The Law Is the Law (1958), The Great War (1959), Fiasco in Milan (1959), Policarpo (1959), Everybody Go Home (1960), The Passionate Thief (1960), Love and Larceny (1960), Divorce — Italian Style (1961), Jail Break (1961), Toto and Peppino Divided in Berlin (1962), March on Rome (1962), Mafioso (1962), The Police Commissioner (1962), The Best of Enemies (1962), The Teacher from Vigevano (1963), Summer Frenzy (1963), Opiate ’67 (1963), Seduced and Abandoned (1964), and Me, Me, Me ... and the Others (1965). Age and Scarpelli shared back to back Oscar nominations for the scripts for Mario Monicelli’s films The Organizer and Casanova 70 in 1965 and 1966. They continued to write such films as Complexes (1965), For Love and Gold (1966), The Good, the Ugly, the Bad (1966), I Married You for Fun (1967), The Witches (1967), The Tiger and the Pussycat (1967), Kill Me with Kisses (1968), Will Our Heroes Be Able to Find Their Friend Who Has Mysteriously Disappeared in Africa? (1968), Caprice Italian Style (1968), Operation Snafu (1970), Brancaleone at the Crusades (1970), Drama of Jealousy (1970), In the Name of the Italian People (1970), Teresa the Thief (1972), Without Family (1972), We Want the Colonels (1973), Come Home and Meet My Wife (1974), We All Loved Each Other So Much (1974), Goodnight, Ladies and Gentlemen (1976), The Sunday Woman (1976), The New Monsters (1977), Double Murder (1978), Hurricane Rosie (1980), The Terrace (1980), Sunday Lovers (1980), Portrait of a Woman, Nude (1981), Spaghetti House (1982), The Taxi Driver (1983), A Joke of Destiny, Lying in Wait Around the Corner Like a Bandit (1983), Good King Dagobert (1984), Madman at War (1985), Big Deal After 20 Years (1987), A Blast of Life (1988), La Pagaille (1991), and Boom (1999). • Variety, Nov. 28, 2005, 73.

Mary Amadeo Ingersoll

IRVING, MARJORIE Australian actress Marjorie Irving died of heart failure in Australia on July 4, 2005. She was 98. Irving was born in England in July of 1907. She began her career on stage as a child and had a career in show business that lasted 90 years. She performed on radio and was featured in Peter Weir’s film Gallipoli with Mel Gibson. ISHII, TERUO Japanese film director Teruo Ishii died of lung cancer in a Tokyo hospital on August 12, 2005. He was 81. Ishii was born Teruo Kitagawa in Tokyo on January 1, 1924. He was best known as the director of the Super Giant science fiction series starring Ken Utsui. These films were re-edited into four features and released to U.S. television in the 1960s. The hero was now known as Starman. The movies included Attack from Space, Evil Brain from Outer Space, Invaders from Space, and Atomic Rulers of the World. Ishii also directed the 18-part series known as Abashiri

Teruo Ishii

Obituaries • 2005

184

Prison starring Ken Takakura from 1965 through the early 1970s, about an attempted prison break. Ishii wrote and directed numerous other films during his career. His credits include Yellow Line (1960), The Flower, the Storm, and the Gang (1961), The G-Men of the Pacific (1962), Boss of the Underworld (1963), Tokyo Gang vs. Hong Kong Gang (1964), The Joy of Torture (1968), Love and Crime (1969), Horror of a Deformed Man (1969), Orgies of Edo (1969), Inferno of Torture (1969), Yakuza Punishment: Lynch (1969), The Tattooed Swordswoman (1970), The Friendly Killer (1970), Female Yakuza Tale: Inquisition and Torture (1973), The Executioner (1974), Revenge! The Killing Fist (1974), The Karate Inferno (1974), The Hit Man (1991), Gensen-Kan Inn (1993), Screwed (1998), Hell (1999), and Blind Beast vs. Dwarf (2001).

I TWO STEP TOO

I Two Step Too, who was one of nine horses that had played the title role in the 2003 Oscar nominated film Seabiscuit, died at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington, Kentucky, on March 7, 2005. He had been euthanized because of a recurring tumor in his nasal cavity. He was 11. I Two Step Too was seen as Seabiscuit in the film’s racing sequences where he would increase his speed to swiftly pass other horses and pull into the lead. He had become a popular attraction at the Horse Park since he arrived there in July of 2003.

David Jackson

tion series Blake’s 7 from 1978 to 1979. He also appeared in television productions of The Eyes Have It (1973), Lord Peter Wimsey: The Nine Tailors (1974), Sky (1976), The Music Shoppe (1981), and Edge of Darkness (1985) as Col. Taffy Lawson.

JACKSON, JAY Television game show host Jay Jackson died on August 16, 2005. He was 86. Jackson was born on November 4, 1918. He was the announcer for the television anthology series The Philco Television Playhouse from 1948. He was host of the popular quiz program Twenty Questions from 1953 to 1955, and emceed the evening version of the game show Tic Tac Dough in 1957. Jackson also appeared as a game show host in an episode of Jackie Gleason’s The Honeymooners in 1956. He also narrated several Laurel and Hardy retrospective films in the 1960s. • Variety, Nov. 14, 2005, 61.

I Two Step Too

JACKSON, DAVID British actor David Jackson died of a heart attack in England on July 25, 2005. He was 71. Jackson was born in England on July 15, 1934. He was active on British television from the early 1960s, appearing in episodes of The Saint, Redcap, The Avengers, Counterstrike, The Liver Birds, The Sweeney, Space: 1999, Cribb, Only Fools and Horses, Minder, and Lovejoy. He also appeared in the 1961 television miniseries Flower of Evil and the 1968 tele-film City 68. Jackson was also featured in several films during his career including 10 Rillington Place (1971), Unman, Wittering and Zigo (1971), Blood from the Mummy’s Tomb (1971), Killer’s Moon (1978), The Big Sleep (1978), and Breakout (1983). He starred as Detective Constable Braithwaite on the television series Z Cars from 1972 to 1978, and was Olag Gan in the popular science fic-

Jay Jackson (right, with Jackie Gleason)

JACKSON, MARY Veteran character actress Mary Jackson, who was best known for her role as Miss Emily Baldwin on television’s The Waltons, died in Hollywood on December 10, 2005. She was 95. Jackson was born in Milford, Michigan, on November 22, 1910. She briefly worked as a school teacher before embarking on an acting career. She was featured on Broadway in such productions as Kiss & Tell, Eastward in Eden, The Flowering Cherry, and The Trial of the Catonsville

185

2005 • Obituaries

Angeles Times, Dec. 15, 2005, B11; Variety, Dec. 19, 2005, 68.

Mary Jackson (left, with Helen Kleeb as the Baldwin sisters from The Waltons)

Nine. She also performed on stage in Chicago and Los Angeles, and appeared frequently on television from the early 1950s. Jackson was seen in episodes of The Philco Television Playhouse, Robert Montgomery Presents, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, General Electric Theater, The Barbara Stanwyck Show, My Three Sons, Route 66, Hazel, Stoney Burke, The Fugitive, The Outer Limits, The Andy Griffith Show, The F.B.I., Please Don’t Eat the Daisies, The Invaders, Insight, The Second Hundred Years, Lancer, Room 222, Mary Tyler Moore, The Name of the Game, Cannon, Barnaby Jones, The Rookies, The Manhunter, The Bionic Woman, The Rockford Files, Hart to Hart, Quincy, Family Ties, Magnum, P.I., The Jeffersons, The Scarecrow and Mrs. King, Highway to Heaven, Stingray, Hill Street Blues, Hunter, and L.A. Law. Jackson made her film debut in a small role in the 1956 drama Friendly Persuasion. She also appeared in the films Targets (1968) with Boris Karloff, Airport (1970) as Sister Felice, Wild Rovers (1971), The Trial of the Catonsville Nine (1972), Terror House (aka The Folks at Red Wolf Inn (1972), Kid Blue (1973), Blume in Love (1973), Our Time (1974), Fun with Dick and Jane (1977) as Jane Fonda’s mother, Audrey Rose (1977), Coming Home (1978), Some Kind of Hero (1982), Big Top Peewee (1988), Skinned Alive (1989), The Exorcist III (1990), Leap of Faith (1992), Ozone (1993), and A Family Thing (1996). Jackson was also seen in the tele-films Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night (1967), The Failing of Raymond (1971), Columbo: Try and Catch Me (1977), Letters from Frank (1979), The Two Lives of Carol Letner (1981), A Small Killing (1981), Between Two Brothers (1982), James Michener’s Space (1985), My Town (1986), Meet the Munceys (1988), The Case of the Hillside Stranglers (1989), and Criminal Behavior (1992). She and Helen Kleeb were featured as the spinster Baldwin sisters on the television drama The Waltons from 1972 to 1981, and she reprised her role as Miss Emily in the tele-films A Wedding on Walton’s Mountain (1982), A Day for Thanks on Walton’s Mountain (1982), A Walton Thanksgiving Reunion (1993), A Walton Wedding (1995), and A Walton Easter (1997). She also starred as Sara Wicks in the drama series Hardcastle and McCormick in 1983 and was Great Grandma Greenwell in the 1990 comedy series Parenthood. • Los

JAFFE , RONA Novelist Rona Jaffe died of cancer in a London hospital while vacationing on December 30, 2005. She was 74. Jaffe was born in Brooklyn, New York, on June 12, 1931. She began her career working at Fawcett Publications, rising to the position of associate editor. She was commissioned by film producer Jerry Wald to write a novel about the trials and tribulations of a quartet of career girls in New York in 1958. The novel, The Best of Everything, became a best seller and was adapted for film the following year. Hope Lange, Diane Baker, Martha Hyer, and Suzy Parker were cast in the lead roles. Jaffe wrote over a dozen other books including the short story collection Mr. Right Is Dead (1965), and the novels The Last Chance (1976), Class Reunion (1979), and The Room-Mating Season (2003). Her novel Mazes and Monsters, about a group of college students who became overly involved in a role-playing game, was adapted as a tele-film in 1982, and starred a young Tom Hanks. • Time, Jan. 9, 2005, 19.

Rona Jaffe

JAMES, ALAN Film producer Alan James died of congestive heart failure in Portland, Oregon, on January 28, 2005. He was 74. James was born in Burbank, Washington, on August 23, 1930. He became involved in films in 1995, financing and producing the docudrama Without Evidence starring Angelina Jolie. He was also producer of the 1999 film Morgan’s Ferry, and 2000’s Lakeboat. James was also a music promoter, financing Mariah Carey and the Dixie Chicks tours in 2000. • Variety, Apr. 11, 2005, 59. JAMES-MOORE , JONATHAN Jonathan James-Moore, the former director of BBC Radio’s Department of Light Entertainment, died in England on November 20, 2005. He was 59. James-Moore was born in England on March 22, 1946. He began his career as a stage manager for theatrical productions in the late 1960s. He went to the BBC in 1978, where he produced comedy series for radio. He became head of Light Entertainment in 1991, where he oversaw the production of such series as Alan Partridge, The League of

Obituaries • 2005

186

Jonathan James-Moore

Susanna Javicoli

Gentlemen, and Goodness Gracious Me. He left the BBC in 1999, but continued to work as an independent producer on such series as The Private World of Kenneth Williams.

(1977), Ecce Bombo (1978), The Days Are Numbered (1979), Action (1980), Blu Cobalto (1986), Body Puzzle (1991), When a Man Loves a Woman (2000), and One Last Kiss (2001). Javicoli also dubbed the performances of such actresses as Isabella Rossellini, Karen Allen, Cindy Lauper, Barbara Hershey, Elizabeth Perkins, Holly Hunter, Bonnie Bedelia, Miranda Richardson, and Michelle Pfeiffer into Italian for release in Italy.

JANEWAY, ELIZABETH Novelist Elizabeth Janeway died at her retirement home in Rye, New York, on January 15, 2005. She was 91. Janeway was born in Brooklyn, New York, on October 7, 1913. She was the author of seven novels from the 1940s including The Walsh Girls (1943) and Daisy Kenyon (1945). Daisy Kenyon was adapted into a film in 1947 starring Joan Crawford. She was also a literary critic for The New York Times and wrote several feminist works in the 1970s including Man’s World, Woman’s Place (1971) and Between Myth and Morning: Women Awakening (1974). She was the widow of presidential adviser Eliot Janeway. • Los Angeles Times, Jan 21, 2005, B9; New York Times, Jan. 16, 2005, 26; Time, Jan. 31, 2005, 21; Times (of London), Mar. 7, 2005, 52.

JAVIER, DELIA SAGUIN Philippine actress Delia Saguin Javier died of cancer at her home in Los Angeles on November 10, 2005. She was 72. Javier was born in Mindanao, Philippines, on May 27, 1933. She worked in films from the 1980s, serving as a set decorator on the films Dr. Heckyl and Mr. Hype (1980), Rambling Rose (1991), and Plain Clothes (1988). She was also production designer for 1983’s Valley Girl. Javier appeared in small roles in several films including Plain Clothes (1988) and Angie (1994). For nearly twenty years Javier also led a program to feed homeless people in downtown Los Angeles, heading Mama D’s Feed the Homeless. JECKO, TIMOTHY Actor Timothy Jecko died of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in Madison, New Jersey, on January 11, 2005. He was 66. Jecko was born in Washington, D.C., on January 24, 1938. A reserve member of the 1956 U.S. Olympic swimming team in Melbourne, he was a film and television actor in the

Elizabeth Janeway

JAVICOLI, SUSANNA Italian actress Susanna Javicoli died of kidney failure in Rome, Italy, on June 18, 2005. She was 50. Javicoli was best known for her role as the gruesomely murdered Sonia in Dario Argento’s horror classic Suspiria (1977). She also appeared in the films La Nottata (1974), Private Vices and Public Virtues (1975), Armaguedon (1977), Pigs Have Wings

Timothy Jecko

187

2005 • Obituaries

1970s and 1980s. He was featured in the films Power (1986) and Surrender (1987), and the tele-films Eleanor and Franklin (1976) and Terrorist on Trial: The United States vs. Salim Ajami (1988). He also appeared in episodes of Hunter, St. Elsewhere, Murder, She Wrote, and Starman.

JELLIFFE, BILL Supporting actor Bill Jelliffe died on July 3, 2005. He was 66. Jelliffe was born on January 11, 1939. He was featured in small roles in the films The Enforcer (1976), Airport ’77 (1977), Serial (1980), Light Blast (1985), and Burglar (1987). He also performed stunts in the films Sleeping with the Enemy (1991) and Shattered (1991). Jelliffe was seen in the telefilms The Last Ride of the Dalton Gang (1979) and Stolen Innocence (1995), and guest starred in episodes of Falcon Crest and Midnight Caller.

Clinton Jencks

Supreme Court. He had difficulty obtaining a job throughout the 1950s, but earned a doctorate degree in economics in the early 1960s. He taught at San Diego State from 1964 until he retired in 1988.

Bill Jelliffe

JENCKS , CLINTON Clinton Jencks, the union organizer who starred in the 1953 classic film Salt of the Earth, died in San Diego, California, on December 14, 2005. He was 87. Jencks was born in Colorado Springs, Colorado, on March 1, 1918. He served in the Army Air Forces in the Pacific during World War II. After the war he worked at a Denver smelter before being assigned by the International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers to organize labor in southern New Mexico. He led a group of largely Latino workers in a strike against the Empire Zinc Co. that began in 1950. The strike lasted for 15 months, but resulted in the workers being granted equal pay to that of white workers, and improved safety conditions and healthcare for the miners. Producer Paul Jarrico and director Herbert Biberman put together a film based on the strike, Salt of the Earth (1953), which starred Jencks as Frank Barnes, a character based on himself. The cast of the film was largely composed of the miners themselves, and also featured blacklisted actor Will Geer and Mexican actress Rosaura Revueltas. The House Committee on Un-American Activities and the Screen Actors Guild organized a largely successful boycott of the film, and Revueltas was deported for her participation in the film. Jencks was sentenced to five years in prison for perjury for accused Communist affiliations, but his conviction was later overturned by the U.S.

JENKINS, ROBIN British novelist John Robin Jenkins died in Toward, Scotland, on February 24, 2005. He was 92. Jenkins was born in Flemington, Lanarkshire, Scotland, on September 11, 1912. He worked as a teacher in Glasgow before World War II and registered as a conscientious objector during the war. He spent the war years working with the Forestry Commission, which served as the basis for his first novel, So Gaily Sings the Lark, in 1950. His later, and best known work, The Cone-Gatherers was also based on this period of his life. He continued to teach and write after the war, becoming a full time writer in 1970. He produced over thirty novels during his career including the novels Happy for the Child, The Changeling, The Thistle and the Grail, Guests of War, and Fergus Lamont. • Times (of London), Feb. 26, 2005, 71.

Robin Jenkins

JENNINGS, PETER Veteran ABC News anchorman Peter Jennings died of lung cancer at his home in New York City on August 7, 2005. He was 67. Jennings was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, on July 29, 1938. He was the son of Charles Jennings, a pioneer Canadian newscaster who later became head of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporations news divi-

Obituaries • 2005

188

Peter Jennings

sion. Peter Jennings had his own radio program in Ottawa by the age of nine. He began reporting the news on radio while in his teens and soon became an anchor at Canadian Television. He was hired by ABC while in the United States covering the Democratic national convention in 1964 for Canada. He began his job as anchor of the ABC evening news in February of 1965. He remained as anchor for three years while critics lambasted him for his inexperience for the job. He became a foreign correspondent with ABC, covering such international stories as the Munich Olympics tragedy when Israeli athletes were held hostage and murdered by Arab terrorists in 1972. Jennings formed the ABC News bureau in Beirut, Lebanon, and was regarded as an expert on the Middle East. He returned as an evening news anchor at ABC’s World News Tonight, working with Frank Reynolds and Max Robinson. Five years later he again took over the anchor desk by himself. ABC had typically lagged behind NBC and CBS in news ratings, but under Jennings the network rose to the top in the mid–1980s. Jennings also was the host of a 2000 television documentary The Search for Jesus, and co-authored the books The Century and In Search of America with Todd Brewster. With NBC’s Tom Brokaw and CBS’s Dan Rather, Jennings was part of the triumvirate that dominated new coverage for two decades. Both Brokaw and Rather announced their retirements within the past year. Jennings announced in April of 2005 that he was suffering from lung cancer and stepped down from his position. • Los Angeles Times, Aug. 8, 2005, A1; New York Times, Aug. 8, 2005, A1; People, Aug. 22, 2005, 62; Time, Aug. 22, 2005, 21; Times (of London), Aug. 9, 2005, 48; Variety, Aug. 15, 2005, 48.

JENNINGS, WILLIAM BRYAN William Bryan Jennings died in Arlington, Texas, on December 19, 2005. He was 86. Jennings was born in Waxahachie, Texas, on October 8, 1919. An attorney in the Dallas–Fort Worth area for many years, Jennings was also active in community theatrical productions. He also appeared as the police officer in the 1966 horror film Manos the Hands of Fate, which gained a cult following years later when aired on Mystery Science Theatre 3000.

William Bryan Jennings (from Manos — The Hands of Fate)

JEPSEN, KLAUS German actor Klaus Jepsen died in Berlin, Germany, on January 16, 2005. He was 68. Jepsen was born in Schleswig, Germany, in 1936. He was a popular radio actor in Germany from the 1970s. He also appeared in several films including Destination Death (1961), The Devil Came from Akasawa (1971), Werwolfe (1973), and Der Umsetzer (1976). Jepsen also appeared in several German television productions and narrated the 2003 film The Castle.

Klaus Jepsen

JOERGER, FRED Fred Joerger, who helped create numerous Disneyland attractions, died at the Motion Picture and Television Country House in Woodland Hills, California, on August 26, 2005. He was 91. Joerger was born in Pekin, Illinois, on December 21, 1913. He moved to Los Angeles in the 1930s, where he worked at Warner Bros. building models of movie sets. He later moved to Disney, where he created miniature models of the sets for such films as 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1954) and Mary Poppins (1964). He was chosen by Walt Disney to be one of the first model makers for Disneyland in 1953, becoming the first Disney “Imagineers.” He helped create such attractions as Sleeping Beauty Castle, the Jungle Cruise, the Matterhorn, Tom Sawyer Island, and Big Thunder Mountain Railroad. Though he retired in 1979, he returned later to assist in the design of Disney’s Epcot

189

Fred Joerger

Center in Florida and Tokyo Disneyland. • Los Angeles Times, Sept. 5, 2005, B13.

2005 • Obituaries

tober 16, 1978, taking the name John Paul II. He became the first non–Italian Pope in over 450 years. John Paul II traveled widely during his first years in office. John Paul II was shot and seriously wounded in an assassination attempt on May 13, 1981. He recovered from his injuries after a long period of convalescence. He aligned himself with Catholic conservatism in his continued opposition to artificial birth control and priestly marriages. He also rejected the doctrine of liberation theology and forbade members of the clergy to hold political office. He served as pope for over 26 years, becoming one of the longest reigning in history. Two of John Paul’s plays were adapted into film. The Jeweller’s Shop was adapted by Jeff Andrus for Michael Anderson’s 1988 film starring Burt Lancaster and Olivia Hussey. Our God’s Brother was filmed in Poland by Krzysztof Zanussi in 1997. • Los Angeles Times, Apr. 3, 2005, A1; New York Times, Apr. 3, 2005, 1; People, Apr. 18, 2005, 54; Time, Apr. 11, 2005, 18.

JOHN PAUL II Pope John Paul II died in the Vatican after a long illness on April 2, 2005. He was 84. He was born Karol Jozef Wojtyla in Ladowice, Poland, on May 18, 1920. He became involved with the theater in his early teens. He was taught by Mieczyslaw Kotlarcyzk, who trained him in the performing style known as “the Living Word,” which emphasized monologues, dialogue and simple sets. Wojtyla acted in Kotlarcyzk’s Amateur University Theatre in Ladowice. He also wrote several plays before the Nazi invasion of Poland limited his theatrical career in the late 1930s. He and Kotlarcyzk co-founded the underground Rhapsodic Theatre during World War II, and Wojtyla remained involved with the group as a sponsor and critic even after becoming a priest in November of 1946. Wojtyla subsequently taught at the Catholic University of Lublin and the Major Seminary of Krakow. He was selected as auxiliary bishop of Lvov in 1958, and was elevated to Archbishop of Krakow in January of 1964. Wojtyla was created a cardinal priest by Pope Paul VI on June 26, 1967. He was considered a moderate reformer and became a symbol of the Roman Catholic Church in Communist-dominated Poland. He participated in the conclave to select a successor to Paul VI in August of 1978. Pope John Paul I died several months later and Wojtyla was elected pope on Oc-

JOHNSON, BRUCE Television producer and writer Bruce Johnson died of heart failure at his home in Encino, California, on September 27, 2005. He was 66. Johnson was born in Piedmont, California, on July 7, 1939. He began working in television in the late 1950s as an intern on The Andy Griffith Show. Johnson spent the next forty years as a writer and producer on such television series as Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C., Arnie, The Doris Day Show, Temperatures Rising, Let’s Switch!, Alice, Mork and Mindy, Webster, All-American Girl, The Home Court, Sparks, The Good News, LateLine, and Tucker. He also produced the tele-films Samson and Delilah (1985) and Burning Bridges (1990).

John Paul II

Johnnie Johnson

JOHNSON, JOHNNIE Rock and roll pianist Johnnie Johnson died at his home in St. Louis, Missouri, on April 13, 2005. He was 80. Johnson was born in Fairmont, West Virginia, on July 28, 1924. He began a long time association with music legend Chuck Berry in the 1950s when he hired Berry to fill in for his band. Johnson played on many of Berry’s hit recordings including “Roll Over Beethoven,” “Brown-Eyed Handsome Man,” and “Maybellene.” It was reputed that Johnson was the inspiration for Berry’s classic tune “Johnny B. Goode.” Rolling Stones musician Keith Richards reunited Johnson with Berry for the 1986 Tay-

Obituaries • 2005

190

lor Hackford film Chuck Berry: Hail! Hail! Rock ’n’ Roll. Johnson also played on Richards’ 1988 solo recording of Talk Is Cheap. He continued to record in the 1990s and occasionally performed with Albert King and Little Richard. Johnson was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2001. • Los Angeles Times, Apr. 14, 2005, B9; New York Times, Apr. 14, 2005, A25; Time, Apr. 25, 2005, 15; Times (of London), Apr. 15, 2005, 75; Variety, Apr. 18, 2005, 44.

JOHNSON, LINDA Actress Linda Leighton, who often performed on screen under the name Linda Johnson, died of congestive heart failure at her home in Monarch Beach, California, on December 26, 2005. She was 88. Leighton was born in Oklahoma City in 1917. She went to Hollywood in the 1940s, where she appeared in films and serials under the names Melinda Leighton, Linda Johnson, and Linda Leighton. She was featured in the films Strike Up the Band (1940), Cowboy Serenade (1942), Code of the Outlaw (1942), The Sundown Kid (1942), Wild Horse Rustlers (1943), The Haunted Mine (1946), That Brennan Girl (1946), Bandits of Dark Canyon (1947), Brick Bradford (1947), Jungle Goddess (1948), Impact (1949), The Threat (1949), Armored Car Robbery (1950), and Where Danger Lives (1950). She starred as Hazel in the first national television soap opera, One Man’s Family. She also appeared on television in episodes of The Lone Ranger, Racket Squad, Fireside Theatre, The Cisco Kid, The Gale Storm Show, The Millionaire, Tales of Wells Fargo, Perry Mason, Kraft Suspense Theatre, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Barnaby Jones, and The Mod Squad. She largely retired from show business in the 1960s but remained a close friend of actress Gale Storm.

Tommy Johnson

Bulan (1990), The Slingshot (1993), Murder at the Savoy (1993), Run for Your Life (1997), Systrar (2000), and Naked (2000). Johnson also appeared in the television productions Inferno (1973), Das Blaue Hotel (1974), Godnatt, Jord (1979), Mordare! Mordare! (1980), Marknadsafton (1982), Korset (1985), Glasmastarna (1986), Gosta Berlings Saga (1986), Trapatronema (1988), Utmaningen (1994), The Zone (1996), and Stormen (1998).

JOINT, ALF British stuntman and actor Alf Joint died in England on July 25, 2005. He was 78. He began his career working in television, performing stunts for such series as Doctor Who, The Prisoner, My Partner, the Ghost, Danger Man, The Avengers, and Dixon of Dock Green. He was a Morlock in George Pal’s 1960 science fiction classic The Time Machine and was Capungo in the 1964 James Bond film Goldfinger with Sean Connery. Joint also performed stunts, and sometimes appeared in small roles, in such films as The Heroes of Telemark (1965), The Sorcerers (1967), Great Catherine (1968), The Conqueror Worm (1968), The Lost Continent (1968), Where Eagles Dare (1968) as Richard Burton’s stunt double, On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (1969), Kelly’s Heroes (1970), Macbeth (1971), Rentadick (1972), S*P*Y*S (1975), Permission to Kill (1975), Russian Roulette (1975), Brannigan (1975), A Bridge Too Far (1976), The Omen (1976), Superman (1978), the 1978 television production of Les Miserables, Money Moovers (1979), Birth of the Beatles (1979), Bear Island

Linda Johnson

JOHNSON, TOMMY Swedish actor Tommy Johnson died in Stockholm, Sweden, on September 21, 2005. He was 73. Johnson was born in Stockholm on December 5, 1931. A star of stage, film, and television in Sweden, Johnson’s many film credits include Girls Without Rooms (1956), Blackjackets (1959), The Bathers (1968), Midsummer Sex (1971), Mondays with Fanny (1977), The Brothers Lionheart (1977), Misfire (1978), Troll Summer (1980), Lucky Devil (1983), Second Dance (1983), Splittring (1984), The Man from Majorca (1984),

Alf Joint

191 (1979), Arabian Adventure (1979), Amin: The Rise and Fall (1980), Superman II (1980), Outland (1981), An American Werewolf in London (1981), Who Pulled the Plug? (1981), the 1982 tele-film version of The Hunchback of Notre Dame, One-Week Bachelors (1982), Star Wars VI: Return of the Jedi (1983), Krull (1983), The Keep (1983), Supergirl (1984), Lifeforce (1985), Lady Jane (1986), the 1986 television mini-series Return to Treasure Island, Shanghai Surprise (1986), Superman IV: The Quest for Peace (1987), Mountains of the Moon (1990), and Clockwork Mice (1995). He also worked in such television series as The Zoo Gang, Spy Trap, The Adventurer, Space: 1999, The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, London’s Burning, Pulaski, Dempsey & Makepeace, Reilly: The Ace of Spies, Doctor Finlay, Cribb, and The Knock. • Times (of London), Aug. 19, 2005, 63.

JOLICOEUR, AUBELIN

Haitian journalist Aubelin Jolicoeur, whose effete manner and unctuous courting of visiting celebrities earned him immortality as the basis for Graham Greene’s Petit Pierre in the 1966 novel The Comedians, died of complications from Parkinson’s disease and prostate cancer in Haiti on February 14, 2005. He was 80. Jolicoeur was born in a cemetery in the southern Haitian town of Jacmel when his mother went into premature labor on April 30, 1924. He studied French and became a journalist in Haiti’s capital, Port-au-Prince. He usually wrote society columns, fawning over jet-setting tourists and celebrities who stayed at Haiti’s Hotel Oloffson during the brutal regimes of President Francoise “Papa Doc” Duvalier and his son, Jean-Claude “Baby Doc” Duvalier. Graham Greene’s literary version of Jolicoeur was portrayed in the film version of The Comedians by Roscoe Lee Browne in 1967. After the collapse of the Duvalier regimes Jolicoeur’s columns took a more political bent until age and failing health curtailed his activities. He spent his final years in the seaside home of an old friend. • New York Times, Mar. 6, 2005, 44; Times (of London), Feb. 26, 2005, 71.

2005 • Obituaries

Chloe Jones

layouts for Playboy and Vanity Fair, and was the Penthouse Pet in April of 1998. Jones appeared in small parts in several television series including Baywatch, Edenquest, Diagnosis Murder, and Showtime’s Full Front Comedy. She also appeared in numerous adult videos, working for Vivid Entertainment Group and New Sensations. Her credits include Virtual Sex with Chloe Jones (2001), Sweetwater (2002), Love Machine (2002), Where the Boys Aren’t 17 (2003), The Low Lifes (2003), Loveless (2003), Inside the Mind of Chloe Jones (2003), In Defense (2003), Air Erotica (2003), Chloe’s Pool Party (2004), and Coming from Behind (2004).

JONES , DISLEY Film production designer Disley Jones died in England on June 4, 2005. He was 79. He was born Clifford Jones in Burton-on-Trent, Staffordshire, England, on January 15, 1926. He began working in the theater in the early 1940s, serving as an assistant to Reginald Woolley, the production designer at the Players’ Theatre in London. Jones designed his first production, Twelfth Night in 1946. He worked on numerous theatrical productions over the next two decades. He designed the 1967 film version of The Mikado, and worked frequently as a film production designer thereafter. His film credits include The Long Day’s Dying (1968), The Italian Job (1969), The Revolutionary (1970), Fright (1971), Murphy’s War (1971), The Spiral Staircase (1975), The Legacy (1978), the 1979

Aubelin Jolicoeur

JONES , CHLOE Adult actress and model Chloe Jones died suddenly at her home in Houston, Texas, on June 4, 2005. She was 29. Jones was born in Texas on June 17, 1975. She worked as a print model in

Disley Jones

Obituaries • 2005

192

tele-film The House on Garibaldi Street, and Killing Heat (1981). • Times (of London), July 12, 2005, 54.

trial films. He received an Academy Award nomination for his documentary short Snow (1963). His other works include Rail (1967) and Locomotion (1975). His final films, made in 2004 under a grant from the Wales Art Council, were A Chair-A-Plane Kwela and A ChairA-Plane Flamenco.

JONES , ELIZABETH ORTON Children’s book author and illustrator Elizabeth Orton Jones died in a Peterborough, New Hampshire, hospital on May 10, 2005. She was 94. Jones was born in Highland Park, Illinois, on June 25, 1910. She studied art in the United States and France and held her first exhibition in the 1930s. Her first children’s book, Ragman of Paris and His Ragamuffins, was published in 1937. She also illustrated the works of other children’s authors and received a Caldecott Medal for her work on Rachel Field’s Prayer for a Child in 1945. She also illustrated the Golden Books version of Little Red Riding Hood in 1948. Her other works include Minnie the Mermaid (1939), Maminka’s Children (1940), Twig (1942), Big Susan (1947), and How Far Is It to Bethelehem? (1955).

JONES, JOE Singer and musician Joe Jones died of complications from heart bypass surgery in a Los Angeles hospital on November 27, 2005. He was 79. Jones was born on August 12, 1926. He was leader of the band the backed B.B. King in the early 1950s. he was best known for singing the 1961 hit “You Talk Too Much.” Jones was also an independent music producer in the 1960s and discovered the Dixie Cups, who sang the hit song “Chapel of Love” in 1964. • Los Angeles Times, Dec. 3, 2005, B16; Times (of London), Jan. 2, 2006, 47.

Elizabeth Orton Jones

Joe Jones

JONES, GEOFFREY Documentary filmmaker Geoffrey Jones died of cancer in England on June 21, 2005. He was 73. Jones was born in London on November 27, 1931. He began making animated film in the mid–1950s, and earned a grant from the British film institute. He took a job as supervisor director of animation at the Shell Film Unit, where he produced the documentary Shell Panorama in 1959. He formed his own company in 1961, making commercials and indus-

JORDAN, TED Actor Ted Jordan, who appeared in the recurring role of freight agent Nathan Burke in the television western series Gunsmoke, died on March 30, 2005. He was 80. Jordan was born in Lancaster, Ohio, in 1924. He began his career in films after World War II, appearing in small roles in such features as Circumstantial Evidence (1945), A Bell for Adano (1945), Behind Green Lights (1946), Dragonwyck (1946), Mother Wore Tights (1947), When My Baby Smiles at Me (1948), The Undercover Man (1949), Slattery’s Hurricane (1949), Miss Grant Takes Richmond (1949), Thieves’ Highway (1949), Tokyo Joe (1949), Tell It to the Judge (1949), Whirlpool (1949), When Willie Comes Marching Home (1950), Francis (1950), A Woman of Distinction (1950), Cargo to Capetown (1950), Kill the Umpire (1950), Sierra (1950), David Harding, Counterspy (1950), Rookie Fireman (1950), Between Midnight and Dawn (1950), Emergency Wedding (1950), Counterspy Meets Scotland Yard (1950), Air Cadet (1951), Bonanza Town (1951), The Las Vegas Story (1952), The Bushwhackers (1952), Hold That Line (1952), Lure of the Wilderness (1952), Francis Goes to West Point (1952), Back to the Front (1952), The Farmer Takes a Wife (1953), The Marshal’s Daughter (1953), The Band Wagon (1953), Miss Sadie Thompson (1953), Beloved Infidel (1959), The Silencers (1966), The Wrecking Crew (1969),

Geoffrey Jones

193

2005 • Obituaries

playing an investigative journalist based on Josephy. He later served as an editor and chief with American Heritage Publishing. He was also the author of over a dozen books, most detailing the struggles of the American Indian of the western frontier. His books include The Patriot Chiefs (1961), The Nez Perce Indians and the Opening of the Northwest (1965), Now That the Buffalo’s Gone (1982), The Civil War in the American West (1991), and the memoir A Walk Toward Oregon (2000). • Los Angeles Times, Oct. 21, 2005, B9; New York Times, Oct. 18, 2005, A25.

Ted Jordan

The $1,000,000 Duck (1971), Walking Tall (1973), and The Apple Dumpling Gang Rides Again (1979). He also appeared in the tele-films The Secret Life of T.K. Dearing (1975) and The Kids Who Knew Too Much (1980). Jordan was featured regularly on Gunsmoke as freight agent Nathan Burke from 1966 to 1975. He also guest starring in episodes of Sky King, The Walter Winchell File, COronado 9, The Andy Griffith Show, Combat!, Branded, Mission: Impossible, The Road West, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, Hondo, The Virginian, The High Chaparral, Land of the Giants, Apple’s Way, Kung Fu, The Blue Knight, How the West Was Won, Eight Is Enough, and The Waltons. Jordan was also the author of a controversial book about Marilyn Monroe entitled Norma Jean: My Secret Life with Marilyn Monroe in which he claims to have had a love affair with the screen legend.

JOUBERT, JACQUELINE French actress and television personality Jacqueline Joubert died in Neuilly-sur-seine, France, on January 8, 2005. He was 83. Joubert was born in Paris on March 29, 1921. She began her career as an actress in the French films Chacun son Tour (1951), Paris Still Sings! (1952), Clara et les Mechants (1958), and Secret Professionel (1959). She was the host of the Eurovision Song Contest in 1959 and 1961. She later worked as an executive at the French public television channel Antenne 2, overseeing entertainment and children’s programs.

JOSEPHY, ALVIN M., JR. Historian Alvin M. Josephy, Jr., who produced numerous books on the American West, died at his home in Greenwich, Connecticut, on October 16, 2005. He was 90. Josephy was born in Woodmere, Long Island, New York, on May 18, 1915. He worked as a journalist for the New York Herald Tribune before World War II, and was a Marine combat correspondent during the war. After the war he went to Hollywood were he wrote several films including Operation Secret (1952), Something for the Birds (1952) and The Captive City (1952) with John Forsythe

JOZEFSON, JACK Character actor Jack Jozefson died of cancer in Indio, California, on November 28, 2005. Jozefson was featured in numerous films from the late 1970s including The Buddy Holly Story (1978), Gas Pump Girls (1979), In ’n Out (1986), W.B.,

Alvin M. Josephy, Jr.

Jack Jozefson

Jacqueline Joubert

Obituaries • 2005

194

Blue and the Bean (1989), Lonely Hearts (1991), The Evil Inside (1993), Almost Dead (1994), Trade Day (2001), Drink That In (2002), Bruce Almighty (2003), Next to Nothing (2004), Vic (2005), Cyxork 7 (2005), Aimee Price (2005), and Circuit Riders (2005). He was also seen in the tele-films A Whale for the Killing (1981), Nightbreaker (1989), Open Window (1991), Sinatra (1992), Baby Brokers (1994), and Runway One (1995). Jozefson’s other television credits include episodes of The Fall Guy, Night Court, Highway to Heaven, The Twilight Zone, L.A. Law, Murder, She Wrote, Parker Lewis Can’t Lose, Father Dowling Mysteries, Hunter, Quantum Leap, NYPD Blue, and Buff y the Vampire Slayer.

JUDITH, DINORAH Mexican actress Dinorah Judith Ross died of complications from cancer at her home in Coral Gables, Florida, on October 21, 2005. She was 57. Judith was born in Mexico City in 1948. She began her career as a ballet and flamenco dancer and made her film debut in the mid–1960s. She appeared in several features including La Maldicion de mi Raza (1965), La Virgen de la Calle (1967), Contrabandistas del Caribe (1968), Antesala de la Silla Electrica (1968), Las Pasiones Infernales (1969), El Fantastico Mundo de los Hippies (1972), and Layendas Macabras de

Dinorah Judith

la Colonia (1974).

JUHL, JERRY Jerry Juhl, a long-time writer and producer associated with the Muppets, died of complications from cancer on September 26, 2005. He was 67. Juhl was born in St. Paul, Minnesota, on July 27, 1938. He was a childhood friend of puppeteer Frank Oz, and began working with Muppet creator Jim Henson in 1961 as a puppeteer on the local Washington, D.C., television program Sam and Friends. He began writing for the Muppets from their beginning with Sesame Street in the late 1960s and was instrumental in the creation of all of the characters. Juhl was head writer for The Muppet Show from 1977 to 1981, and scripted the television specials The Muppets Valentine Show (1974), Emmet Otter’s Jug-Band Christmas (1977), and The Muppets Go Hollywood (1979). He also wrote the feature films The Muppet Movie in 1979, and The Great Muppet Caper (1981). He wrote and produced the 1983

Jerry Juhl (with Kermit the Frog)

Henson series Fraggle Rock and the 1989 series The Jim Henson Hour. He also wrote the feature films The Muppet Christmas Carol (1992), Muppet Treasure Island (1996), and Muppets from Space (1999). • Los Angeles Times, Oct. 6, 2005, B10; New York Times, Oct. 9, 2005, 44; Times (of London), Oct. 14, 2005, 81; Variety, Oct. 17, 2005, 64.

JUHNKE, HARALD German actor and entertainer Harald Juhnke died in Brandenburg, Germany, after a long battle with dementia and alcoholism on April 1, 2005. He was 75. Juhnke was born in Berlin, Germany, on June 10, 1929. He began his career on stage in Germany in the late 1940s. He became a popular film star and television star for the next five decades, appearing in The Dancing Heart (1953), Guitars of Love (1954), The Model Husband (1956), Beneath the Palms on the Blue Sea (1957), The Mad Bomberg (1957), Stage Free for Marika (1958), La Paloma (1959), A Thousand Stars Aglitter (1959), Do Not Send Your Wife to Italy (1960), The Last Witness (1960), Isola Bella (1961), The Testament of Dr. Mabuse (1962), Golden Goddess of Rio Beni (1964), Lausbubengeschichten (1964), Mission Hong Kong (1965), Killer with a Silk Scarf (1966), Pepe: His Teacher’s Fright (1969), Ludwig on the Lookout for a Wife (1969), Hurrah, the School Is Burning (1969), I Wasn’t a Very Good Student Either (1974), Jenseits von Blau (1989), Die Hallo-Sisters (1990), The

Harald Juhnke

195 Parrot (1992), The Emperor’s New Clothes (1994), Back to Square One (1994), and Conversation with the Beast (1996). He also appeared in numerous television series and productions from the 1970s including Sergeant Berry (1974), Cafe Wernicke (1978), Mein Freund Harvey (1985), Harald und Eddi (1987), Der Showmaster (1993), Harry & Sunny (1993), Das Double (1993), Jungle Hospital (1996), Frohliche Chaoten (1998), Die Spesenritter (1999), Jugendsunde (2000), and Zwei Dickkopfe mit Format (2000). During the peak of his career Juhnke was known as the “German Frank Sinatra,” and recorded a popular version of Sinatra’s theme song “My Way.” His later years were marked by declining health and numerous tabloid reports on his failing mental state. • Times (of London), Apr. 16, 2005, 72; Variety, Apr. 11, 2005, 59.

JURICHS, CLAUS

German actor Claus Jurichs died in Meschede, Germany, on March 31, 2005. He was 70. Jurichs was born in Berlin, Germany, on March 28, 1935. He began his career on stage in the early 1950s and made his film debut in 1954’s The Big Test. He also performed often in television in Germany from the 1960s and was a leading voice actor. He dubbed the German language versions of such performers as David Warner in The Omen, Roddy McDowall in Planet of the Apes, Jerry Orbach in Dirty Dancing, and Ken Kercheval in the television series Dallas.

2005 • Obituaries

Erich Kaestner

KALASHNIKOV , LEONID Russian cinematographer Leonid Kalashnikov died in Moscow on November 7, 2005. He was 79. Kalashnikov was born in the Soviet Union on September 19, 1926. He served as director of photography for numerous films from the early 1960s including The Crossing (1961), White Caravan (1963), The Clear Ponds (1965), Anna Karenina (1967), The Red Tent (1969), Yegor Bulychov and Others (1971), The Station Master (1972), One Hundred Days After Childhood (1975), The Last Victim (1975), The Steppe (1977), The Bodyguard (1979), The Theme (1979), With Love Half-and-Half (1979), Easy Money (1981), Valentina (1981), Vassa (1983), Postscript (1983), And Life, and Tears, and Love... (1984), Victory (1984), The Time of the Sons (1986), The Endhouse Mystery (1989), Mother of Jesus (1990), The Cocktail Mirage (1991), The Promised Heavens (1991), The Shroud of Alexander Nevsky (1992), The Nero Passion (1994), Don Quixote Returns (1997), and Invisible Traveller (1998).

Claus Jurichs

KAESTNER, ERICH Oscar-winning camera designer Erich Kaestner died in Penzberg, Germany, on January 31, 2005. He was 93. Kaestner was born in Jena, Germany, in 1911. He moved to Munich in the early 1930s to join the firm of Arnold & Richter, where he co-designed the first hand-held serial reflex film camera, the Arriflex 35, with Arnold Richter. He was Arnold & Richter’s chief design engineer for over half a century, developing the Arriflex 16, which utilized 16mm film and became the camera of choice for documentary filmmakers. Kaestner received scientific and technical awards from the Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in 1973 and 1982, and was given the Gordon E. Sawyer Award for lifetime achievements in the film industry in 1992. • Variety, Feb. 28, 2005, 54.

Leonid Kalashnikov

KALLAY, ILONA Hungarian stage and screen actress Ilona Kallay died in Budapest, Hungary, on July 15, 2005. She was 74. Kallay was born in Miskolc, Hungary, on December 14, 1930. She was featured in numerous films from the late 1950s including Up the Slope (1959), Nem (1965), My Way Home (1965), Jaguar (1967), Lanyarcok Tukorben (1973), Duty Free Marriage

Obituaries • 2005

196

(1980), Eskimo Woman Feel Cold (1984), A LightSensitive Story (1993), Child Murders (1993), and Love Till Last Blood (2002).

sion series Tales from the Crypt, and in several independent films including The Big Bowling Ball. He later left acting to pursue a career as an artist.

KAMBER, BERNIE Film press agent Bernie Kamber died in New York City on May 22, 2005. He was 94. Kamber was born on December 5, 1910. He worked for United Artists in the 1930s, promoting the opening of the studio’s films. He worked as a publicist for stars entertaining U.S. troops during World War II. After the war he continued his career as a publicist for such stars as Kirk Douglas, Rita Hayworth, Clark Gable, Helen Hayes, and William “Hopalong Cassidy” Boyd. He worked for Burt Lancaster’s production company, Hecht-Lancaster, promoting the films Marty, Separate Tables, and Elmer Gantry. Kamber was cast in a small part in the 1960s comedy film The Plot Against Harry, and appeared in Woody Allen’s film Broadway Danny Rose. He worked at Technicolor until his retirement at the age of 90.

KANIEWSKA, MARIA Polish character actress Maria Kaniewska died in Warsaw, Poland, on December 11, 2005. She was 94. Kaniewska was born in Kiev, Russia (now Ukraine), on May 27, 1911. A stage and film actress and director, she was seen in such films as Bright Fields (1947), The Last Stage (1948), The Warsaw Debut (1951), Three Starts (1955), Lost Affections (1957), Winter Twilight (1957), Mr. Anatol’s Hat (1957), Two Hours (1957), King Matthew I (1958), Eve Wants to Sleep (1958), Bad Luck (1960), The Knave of Spades (1960), Encounters in the Dark (1960), Husband of His Wife (1961), Adam’s Two Ribs (1964), Five (1964), God’s Whip (1967), Abel, Your Brother (1970), Man —Woman Wanted (1973), The Refuge (1978), Horizontal Landscape (1978), and Haker (2002). Kaniewska also directed and wrote several films. Her directoral credits include Not Far from Warsaw (1954), Argument About Basia (1959), The Devil from Seventh Grade (1960), Comediants (1962), A Lady from the Window (1964), God’s Whip (1967), The Ring of Princess Ann (1970), and Magical Backyard (1974). She continued to appear on Polish television through the 2000s, starring in productions of Awantura o Basie (1997) and Wielkie Rzeczy: Gra (2000).

Bernie Kamber

KANE, PARKER Actor and model Parker Kane died of complications from AIDS in Los Angeles on February 3, 2005. He was 40. He was born Jeffrey Robbins Kane in Williamsburg, Virginia, on April 7, 1964. He began his career as a model and appeared in ads for Calvin Klein. He soon appeared in a recurring role on the daytime soap opera Another World. Kane also appeared in an episode of the HBO televi-

Maria Kaniewska

KAPLAN, HENRY Television director Henry Kaplan died in New York on September 14, 2005. He was 79. Kaplan was born on September 13, 1926. was director of the daytime soap opera All My Children for over 25 years. He also was a director on the Gothic soap opera Dark Shadows in the 1960s, and the soaps The Doctors and Ryan’s Hope. Kaplan directed the 1962 film The Girl on the Boat, and also many productions for Granada Television in London and stage shows in London’s West End.

Parker Kane

KASHEY, AL Professional wrestler Al Kashey died on July 17, 2005. Kashey was the son of wrestler Abe ‘King Kong’ Kashey. He was 75. Kashey was born on June 7, 1930. He began wrestling in the mid–1950s and held the NWA light heavyweight championship in November of 1957. He also held the NWA Pacific

197

Al Kashey

Northwest tag belts in 1959 while teaming with Nick Kozak. Kashey continued to compete in the ring through the 1980s.

KATZ, STEPHEN Screenwriter Stephen Katz died of prostate cancer in Plano, Texas, on October 18, 2005. He was 59. Katz was born in The Bronx, New York, on July 4, 1946. He moved to Los Angeles in the mid–1970s, where he attended the American Film Institute. He wrote a short film based on Lillian Smith’s 1944 novel Strange Fruit that earned an Academy Award nomination in 1978. He began writing for television in 1980, scripting episodes of Hart to Hart, Knight Rider, The A-Team, Hunter, Magnum P.I., The Bronx Zoo, Hardcastle and McCormick, Friday the 13th: The Series, and L.A. Law. He also wrote the 1990 horror film Satan’s Princess. He was co-scripter of the film The Contract, which was being filmed with Morgan Freeman and John Cusack at the time of his death.

2005 • Obituaries

KAY, GORDON Film producer Gordon Kay died in Woodland Hills, California, on March 8, 2005. He was 88. Kay was born in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, on September 6, 1916. He began his career working at Republic Studios in the late 1930s. He produced numerous films, primarily westerns starring Allan “Rocky” Lane, from the 1940s through the 1960s including The Wild Frontier (1947), Bandits of Dark Canyon (1947), Oklahoma Badlands (1948), The Bold Frontiersman (1948), Carson City Raiders (1948), Marshal of Amarillo (1948), Desperadoes of Dodge City (1948), The Denver Kid (1948), Renegades of Sonora (1948), Sheriff of Wichita (1949), Death Valley Gunfighter (1949), Frontier Investigator (1949), The Wyoming Bandit (1949), Bandit King of Texas (1949), Powder River Rustlers (1949), Navajo Trail Raiders (1949), Gunmen of Abilene (1950), Code of the Silver Sage (1950), Salt Lake Raiders (1950), Covered Wagon Raid (1950), Vigilante Hideout (1950), Frisco Tornado (1950), Rustlers on Horseback (1950), Rough Riders of Durango (1951), Night Riders of Montana (1951), and Wells Fargo Gunmaster (1951). He subsequently moved to Universal Studios where he continued to produce such films as The Unguarded Moment (1956), Man Afraid (1957), Quantez (1957), Day of the Bad Man (1958), Twilight of the Gods (1958) starring Rock Hudson, Voice in the Mirror (1958), The Saga of Hemp Brown (1958), Hell Bent for Leather (1960), Seven Ways from Sundown (1960), Posse from Hell (1961), Six Black Horses (1962), Showdown (1963), He Rides Tall (1964), Bullet for a Badman (1964), Taggart (1964), Fluff y (1965), Gunpoint (1966), and The Young Warriors (1967). • Los Angles Times, Mar. 23, 2005, B11; Variety, Apr. 25, 2005, 69.

Turkish film director and writer Omer Kavur died of cancer at his home in Istanbul, Turkey, on May 12, 2005. He was 60. Kavur was born in Ankara, Turkey, on June 18, 1944. Kavur studied film in Paris and made his directoral debut with 1979’s Yusuf ile Kenan. He was noted for his psychological dramas Desperate Road (1985), Motherland Hotel (1987), The Secret Face (1991), Journey in the Hour Hand (1997), and Encounter (2002).

KAY, KATHIE Scottish big band singer Kathie Kay died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease in a Largs, Ayrshire, Scotland, nursing home on March 8, 2005. She was 86. Kay was born in London in 1918. She sang on The Billy Cotton Band Show on BBC radio during the 1950s. She continued with the show when it moved to television, performing with George Formby, Hughie Greene and Harry Lauder. Kay’s hit songs included “A House with Love in It” and “We Will Make Love.” • Times (of London), Mar. 12, 2005, 81.

Omer Kavur

Kathie Kay

KAVUR , OMER

Obituaries • 2005

198

KEARNEY, CAROLYN Actress Carolyn Kearney died of complications from heart problems in Los Angeles, California, on November 18, 2005. She was 75. Kearney was born in Detroit, Michigan, on August 28, 1930, and raised in New Orleans. She began her career on stage at the Pasadena Playhouse in the 1950s. She was also featured in several cult films during the decade including Hot Rod Girl (1956), Damn Citizen (1958), Young and Wild (1958), and The Thing That Couldn’t Die (1958). Kearney also appeared frequently on television, guest starring in such series as Zane Grey Theater, Buckskin, Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse, Goodyear Theatre, Playhouse 90, The Brothers Brannagan, Michael Shayne, Wanted: Dead or Alive, Stagecoach West, Dr. Kildare, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Frontier Circus, Cain’s Hundred, Thriller, The Dick Powell Show, The Virginian, Empire, Ensign O’Toole, The Eleventh Hour, Bonanza, Route 66, Wagon Train, Ben Casey, Twilight Zone, and Vacation Playhouse. She retired from the screen in the mid–1960s. In later years Kearney became addicted to the prescription drug Xanax after suffering anxiety attacks following a train accident that left her trapped in her compartment. After overcoming the addiction she co-founded Benzodiazepine Anonymous in 1989, a 12-step group to assist others with similar problems.

Carolyn Kearney (with Ed Wynn from Twilight Zone)

KEATOR, DOLORES Dolores Keator died on November 2, 2005. She was 81. Keator was born in New Jersey on February 14, 1924. She was married to Sunglass Hut founder Sandford Ziff. They owned the house used by Strangeways in the 1962 James Bond film Dr. No, and Keator played the small role of Mary, who was shot to death by the Three Blind Mice assassins. Keator also served as a casting assistant in Jamaica for the 1963 film version of Lord of the Flies. KEEN , GEOFFREY British character actor Geoffrey Keen, who was best known for his role as the Minister of Defense in several James Bond films in the 1970s and 1980s, died in London on November 3, 2005. He was 87. Keen was born in London on August 21, 1918, the son of Shakespearean actor Malcolm Keen. He began his career on stage in the 1930s. Keen joined the Royal Army Medical Corps at the outset of

Dolores Keator (from Dr. No)

World War II. During the war he was featured in the 1943 army training film The New Lot directed by Carol Reed. Keen continued his career as an actor after the war, appearing in such films as Riders of the New Forest (1946), Odd Man Out (1957), It’s Hard to Be Good (1948), The Fallen Idol (1948), The Small Back Room (1949), The Third Man (1949) with Orson Welles, Chance of a Lifetime (1950), Treasure Island (1950) as Israel Hands, Seven Days to Noon (1950), High Treason (1951), Green Grows the Rushes (1951), Cry, the Beloved Country (1951), Cheer the Brave (1951), The Clouded Yellow (1951), The Long Memory (1952), His Excellency (1952), Hunted (1952), Lady in the Fog (1952), Malta Story (1953), Genevieve (1953), Angels One Five (1953), Turn the Key Softly (1953), Meet Mr. Lucifer (1953), Face the Music (1954), Rob Roy, the Highland Rogue (1954), The Maggie (1954), Doctor in the House (1954), The Divided Heart (1954), Postmark for Danger (1955), The Glass Tomb (1955), Court Martial (1955), Passage Home (1955), Doctor at Sea (1955), Panic in the Parlor (1956), Loser Takes All (1956), House of Secrets (1956), The Man Who Never Was (1956), The Third Arm (1956), A Town Like Alice (1956), Yield to the Night (1956), Strange Affection (1957), The Birthday Present (1957), The Spanish Gardener (1957), She Played with Fire (1957), Doctor at Large (1957), The Secret Place (1957), Town on Trial (1957), Nowhere to Go (1958), Devil’s Bait (1959), Deadly Record (1959), The Boy and the

Geoffrey Keen

199 Bridge (1959), Horrors of the Black Museum (1959), The Scapegoat (1959), Beyond This Place (1959), The Malpas Mystery (1960), The Dover Road Mystery (1960), Sink the Bismarck! (1960), The Angry Silence (1960), Spare the Rod (1961), The Silent Weapon (1961), Raising the Wind (1961), A Matter of Who (1961), No Love for Johnnie (1961) as the Prime Minister, Return to Sender (1962), Live Now — Pay Later (1962), Lisa (1962), The Spiral Road (1962), The Cracksman (1963), The Mind Benders (1963), Torpedo Bay (1963), The Heroes of Telemark (1965), David Lean’s Doctor Zhivago (1965) as Boris Kurt, Born Free (1966), Berserk! (1968) with Joan Crawford, Taste the Blood of Dracula (1970), Cromwell (1970), Sacco and Vanzetti (1971), Doomwatch (1972), Living Free (1972), No. 1 of the Secret Service (1977), Holocaust 2000 (1977), Licensed to Love and Kill (1979), and Amin: The Rise and Fall (1981). He made his debut as Defense Minister Sir Frederick Gray in 1977’s The Spy Who Loved Me, and reprised his role in the films Moonraker (1979), For Your Eyes Only (1981), Octopussy (1983), A View to a Kill (1985), and his final film, The Living Daylights. Keen was also featured in numerous television productions including The Prince and the Pauper (1962), The Invincible Mr. Disraeli (1963), The Scarecrow of Romney Marsh (1964), QB VII (1974), The Ventures (19785), and Churchill and the Generals (1979). He starred as ruthless oilman Brian Stead in the 1965 television series The Troubleshooters. He also gueststarred in episodes of Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., Presents, The Adventures of Robin Hood, Assignment Foreign Legion, The Invisible Man, The Four Just Men, Kraft Mystery Theater, Z Cars, Man of the World, Zero One, Detective, The Hidden Truth, Dixon of Dock Green in the recurring role of Detective Superintendent Harvey, The Saint, Danger Man, The Man in Room 17, The Persuaders, Return of the Saint, Lady Killers, Cribb, and Strangers. • Times (of London), Nov. 7, 2005, 58.

2005 • Obituaries

Kindl (1972), Felix and Oskar (1980), Tatort— Riedmuller, Vorname Sigi (1986), Der Meister des Jungsten Tages (1990), and Ring of Darkness (1992).

KELLEHER, ED Ed Kelleher, who scripted such 1970s cult schlock horror films as Invasion of the Blood Farmers and Shriek of the Mutilated, died in Fairfax, Virginia, on May 14, 2005. He was 61. Kelleher was born in Queens, New York, on April 17, 1944. He began working for the rock magazine Creem in the early 1970s, writing the movie column under the name Edouard Dauphin. He was also a publicist for CBS records. Kelleher scripted the films Invasion of the Blood Farmers (1972), Shriek of the Mutilated (1974), Prime Evil (1988), Lurkers (1988), and Voodoo Dolls (1990), several of which were adaptations of stories he had co-written with Harriette Vidal. He also wrote the 1990 film Madonna: A Case of Blood Ambition. He adapted his play Stand-Ins for film in 1997. He also co-wrote the plays Space Cadets and Ace of Diamonds with singersongwriter Melanie.

Ed Kelleher

KEHLMANN, MICHAEL Austrian film director Michael Kehlmann died in Vienna, Austria, on December 1, 2005. He was 78. Kehlmann was born in Vienna on September 21, 1927. He wrote and directed numerous films and television productions in Germany from the 1950s. His credits include Kasimir und Karoline (1959), Der Kommissar (1969), Tatort— Munchner

KELLER, JACK Songwriter Jack Keller, who was best known for composing the theme song for the 1960s sit-com Bewitched, died of leukemia in Nashville, Tennessee, on April 1, 2005. He was 68. Keller was born on November 11, 1936. He began his career with Aldon Music, writing with Howard Greenfield the

Michael Kehlmann

Jack Keller

Obituaries • 2005

200

popular songs “Everybody’s Somebody’s Fool,” “My Heart Has a Mind of Its Own,” and “Venus in Blue Jeans.” He and Greenfield worked in television in the 1960s, penning the themes to Bewitched, Gidget, and Here Come the Brides. Keller was also credited as a producer for the Monkees television theme and first album. He also wrote songs for the films Winter A-GoGo (1965) and For Singles Only (1968).

KELLERMAN , LONE Danish actress and singer Lone Kellerman died of cancer in Stubbekobing, Denmark, on April 23, 2005. She was 62. Kellerman was born in Denmark on March 20, 1943. A popular performer, she was seen in several films including Winterborn (1978), Children of the Warriors (1979), Charly & Steffen (1979), Rubber Tarzan (1981), Baby Doll (1988), The Hideaway (1991), Eva (1994), and Flyvende Farmor (2001).

Lone Kellerman

KELLISON, PHIL Special effects artist Phil Kellison died on May 13, 2005. He was 87. Kellison was born on April 11, 1918. He ran the special effects department for Cascade Studios and was responsible for special effects work on numerous television commercials, notably overseeing the animation of the Pillsbury Doughboy and Speedy Alka Seltzer in the 1960s. Kellison also worked on special effects for several films including The Giant Behemoth (1958), Jack, the Giant Killer (1962), and Airplane II: The Sequel (1982). Kellison was also the owner of the original King Kong armature, which he donated to Bob Burns’ movie memorabilia collection. KELLOGG, MARJORIE Author Marjorie Kellogg died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease at her home in Santa Barbara, California, on December 19, 2005. She was 83. Kellogg was born in Santa Barbara on July 17, 1922. She worked as a journalist and social worker before collaborating with Paula Fox on a tele-play for Matinee Theatre in 1950. She was best known for her first novel, 1968’s Tell Me That You Love Me, Junie Moon, about a trio of disabled people who become roommates. Kellogg also wrote the screenplay for the 1970 film version directed by Otto Preminger and starring Liza Minnelli. She subsequently authored the 1972 novel Like the Lion’s Tooth, and worked on the

Marjorie Kellogg

script for the 1975 film Rosebud. She adapted Sylvia Plath’s The Bell Jar for the screen in 1979. Kellogg also wrote several plays including After You’re Gone in 1982. • Los Angeles Times, Jan. 5, 2006, B10.

KELLY, BRIAN Actor Brian Kelly, who starred as Ranger Porter Ricks in the popular aquatic adventure series Flipper on television in the 1960s, died of pneumonia in Voorhees, New Jersey, on February 12, 2005. He was 73. Kelly was born in Detroit, Michigan, on February 14, 1931. He was the son of Harry F. Kelly, who later served as governor of Michigan. The younger Kelly served in the U.S. Marines during the Korean War and began his acting career in the late 1950s. He appeared in episodes of such television series as Panic!, Adventures in Paradise, The Rifleman, and The Beverly Hillbillies. Kelly appeared as Brian in the 1959 detective series 21 Beacon Street, and was Scott Ross in the adventure series Straightaway in 1961. He was best known for his role in Flipper, starring as the widower father of two sons, played by Luke Halpin and Tommy Norden, and their adventures with the dolphin Flipper. Kelly reprised his role in the 1964 feature film based on the series, Flipper’s New Adventure, and continued his underwater action in the 1966 film Around the World Under the Sea. Kelly was also seen in the film Thunder Island (1963), and the spaghetti western Shoot, Gringo ... Shoot! (1968). He was featured in several tele-films in the early 1970s including Berlin

Brian Kelly

201 Affair (1970), Company of Killers (1970), and Drive Hard, Drive Fast (1973). A motorcycle accident in 1970 left Kelly with his right arm and leg paralyzed. He remained active in films as a producer, serving as an executive producer on the 1982 science fiction film Blade Runner. • Los Angeles Times, Feb. 18, 2005, B12; Variety, Feb. 28, 2005, 53.

KELLY, MICHAEL T. Character actor Michael T. Kelly was found dead at his Rockledge, Florida, condominium on December 27, 2005. He was 62. He was born Thomas James Kelly in Cocoa Beach, Florida, in 1943. He was best known for his portrayal of crusty 60 Minutes commentator Andy Rooney in a series of car commercials. Kelly also appeared in small role in several films including Invasion U.S.A (1985), Porky’s Revenge (1985), Dream Trap (1990), and Matinee (1993).

Michael T. Kelly

KELLY, PAUL Radio talk show host Paul Kelly died of injuries he received when his car crashed into a stalled tractor-trailer near Cambria, California, on March 20, 2005. He was 46. Kelly was born on January 16, 1959. He was an actor in the 1990s, appearing in the film The Flintstones (1994), and episodes of NYPD Blue. He subsequently moved to radio where he hosted a talk show on Los Angeles station KVEC.

2005 • Obituaries

KEMMERLING , WARREN J. Character actor Warren J. Kemmerling died in Burbank, California, on January 3, 2005. He was 80. Kemmerling was born in St. Louis, Missouri, on January 4, 1924. He was a familiar face in films and on television from the early 1960s. His numerous film credits include Gun Street (1961), Incident in an Alley (1962), Convicts 4 (1962), Trauma (1962), A Tiger Walks (1964), Navajo Run (1964), The Loved One (1965), Angel’s Flight (1965), The Lawyer (1970), The Cheyenne Social Club (1970), Brother John (1971) with Sidney Poitier, Hit! (1973), 92 in the Shade (1975), Family Plot (1976), Eat My Dust! (1976), Steven Spielberg’s science fiction classic Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977) as Wild Bill, The Bermuda Triangle (1979), The Dark (1979), and in the U.S. version of Godzilla 1985 (1985). Kemmerling was also featured in the tele-films The Meanest Men in the West (1967), Savage (1973), The Execution of Private Slovik (1974), Trapped Beneath the Sea (1974), Raid on Entebbe (1977), the 1978 mini-series King as President Lyndon Johnson, and the Western mini-series How the West Was Won (1978). His numerous television credits also include guest roles in episodes of such series as Black Saddle, Shotgun Slade, The Blue Angels, Two Faces West, One Step Beyond, Lawman, Peter Gunn, The Asphalt Jungle, Perry Mason, Route 66, Gunsmoke, The Twilight Zone, Outlaws, Laramie, Tales of Wells Fargo, Ben Casey, Lawman, Dr. Kildare, The Virginian, Bonanza, The Eleventh Hour, The Jack Benny Program, Destry, I Dream of Jeannie, A Man Called Shenandoah, Laredo, The Monroes, Mission: Impossible, Mannix, Daniel Boone, The Outsider, The Name of the Game, The High Chaparral, McMillan and Wife, Cade’s County, The Rookies, Cannon, Ironside, The Rockford Files, The Waltons, Petrocelli, The Bionic Woman, Kingston: Confidential, Kaz, Shannon, Lou Grant, The A-Team, Murder, She Wrote, and L.A. Law.

Warren J. Kemmerling

Paul Kelly

KENNEDY, GRAHAM Australian actor and television personality Graham Kennedy after a long illness in a nursing home in New South Wales, Australia, on May 25, 2005. He was 71. Kennedy was born St. Kilda, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, on February 15, 1934. He began his career on radio in the 1950s as sidekick to radio personality Nicky Nicholls. He starred in

Obituaries • 2005

202

Graham Kennedy

the popular Australian television variety series In Melbourne Tonight and The Graham Kennedy Show from the late 1950s through the mid–1970s. He also appeared in such films as On the Beach (1959), They’re a Weird Mob (1966), The Box (1975), Don’s Party (1976), The Odd Angry Shot (1979), The Club (1980), The Return of Captain Invincible (1983), Every Home Should Have One (1984), The Killing Fields (1984), Les Patterson Saves the World (1987), and Travelling North (1987). He also hosted the television game show Blankety Blanks in 1977 and Australia’s Funniest Home Video Show in 1990. His other television credits include guest roles in The Love Boat and Five Mile Creek. • Times (of London), May 27, 2005, 75.

KEOGH, BARBARA British character actress Barbara Keogh died in England on October 25, 2005. She was 76. Keogh was born in Cheshire, England, on April 21, 1929. She began her career on the British stage, performing with repertory companies. She also appeared frequently on British television from the late 1950s. She was seen in such television productions as Stand Up, Nigel Barton (1965), Your Name’s Not God, It’s Edgar (1968), Fall of Eagles (1974), Out (1978), Wuthering Heights (1978), The Quatermass Conclusion (1979), Last Video and Testament (1984), Past Caring (1985), Whoops Apocalypse (1986), John Le Carre’s A Perfect Spy (1987), One Last Chance (1990), God on the Rocks (1990), Murder Being Once Done (1991), Dead Ro-

mantic (1992), Brazen Hussies (1996), Jane Eyre (1997), Lost in France (1998), The Secret (2002), Ready When You Are Mr. McGill (2003), and Bloodlines (2005). She starred as Celia Blatchford in the 1965 comedy series The Newcomers, and was Lady Pendleton in the 1979 series Thomas and Sarah. She was also seen as Sally in 1989’s Making Out, and was the Landlady in Bramwell IV in 1998. She played Lilly Mattock in EastEnders from 1998 to 1999, and was Nan Grimley in The Grimleys in 1999. She also starred as the Lady Mayoress in 2000’s Tough Love, and was Margaret in 2005’s Mike Bassett: Manager. Her other television credits include episodes of Dixon of Dock Green, Outbreak of Murder, Z Cars, The Wednesday Play, Public Eye, The First Lady, Softly Softly, The Troubleshooters, Brett, Doctor in Charge, Follyfoot, Open All Hours, Angels, Doctor on the Go, Mind Your Language, Buccaneer, Hammer House of Horror, The Professionals, Hammer House of Mystery and Suspense, Juliet Bravo, Boon, The Bill, Covington Cross, Birds of a Feather, Heartbeat, Joking Apart, Ghostbusters of East Finchley, Jack and Jeremy’s Real Lives, Game On, Hetty Wainthropp Investigates, Highlander, My Family, Spooks, Little Britain, and Doctors. Keogh also appeared in several films during her career including The Virgin Soldiers (1969), A Nice Girl Like Me (1969), The Abominable Dr. Phibes (1971) with Vincent Price, Tai-Pan (1986), Road (1987), Paperhouse (1988), Princess Caraboo (1994), and .327 (2005). • Times (of London), Nov. 24, 2005, 76.

KER , EVELYNE French actress and singer Evelyne Ker died in Paris on June 12, 2005. She was 69. Ker was born in France on May 18, 1936. The began her career on stage, starring in a production of Gigi in Paris in 1955. She also appeared in numerous French films including Wild Fruit (1954), Les Copains du Dimanche (1958), Ramuntcho (1959), Sins of Youth (1959), Love Play (1960), The Big Risk (1960), Janine (1961), The Dance (1962), The Room of Chains (1972), Like a Pot of Strawberries (1974), And Long Live Liberty! (1978), An Adventure for Two (1979), Bolero (1981), To Our Loves (1983), Lie (1993), and Scenes de Lit (1998).

Evelyne Ker

Barbara Keogh

KERSEY, RON Songwriter Ron “Have Mercy” Kersey died in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, after a long illness of complications from pneumonia on Jan-

203

2005 • Obituaries

Ron Kersey

song “Ring of Fire,” died in Mexico of complications from treatment for lung cancer on February 6, 2005. He was 70. Kilgore was born in Chickasha, Oklahoma, on August 9, 1934, and raised in Shreveport, Louisiana. A singer and songwriter, he recorded the country hit “Love Has Made You Beautiful” in 1960. He also wrote the songs “Johnny Reb,” recorded by Johnny Horton in 1959, and “Wolverton Mountain,” a hit for Claude King in 1962. Kilgore co-wrote “Ring of Fire” with June Carter, which became a hit for Johnny Cash in 1963. Kilgore also appeared in small roles in several films including Second Fiddle to a Steel Guitar (1966), Nevada Smith (1966), Five Card Stud (1968), Nashville (1975), the 1979 tele-film Willa, and Coal Miner’s Daughter (1980). • Los Angeles Times, Feb. 8, 2005, B9; Times, of London, Mar. 2, 2005, 77.

uary 25, 2005. He was 55. Kersey was born in Philadelphia in April 7, 1949. He was best known for writing the hit song “Disco Inferno” in 1977 while a member of the musical group The Trammps. The song was heard on soundtrack for the hit film Saturday Night Fever (1979). The Trammps also recorded the songs “Soul Bones,” “Body Contact (Contract),” “That’s Where the Happy People Go,” and “The Night the Lights Went Out” before disbanding in 1980. Kersey was also a leading studio musician who performed on songs with such artists as Teddy Pendergrass, the O’Jays and the Salsoul Orchestra. He also wrote the popular song “Send for Me” for Atlantic Starr. Kersey suffered a stroke while working in Los Angeles in the early 1990s. • Times (of London), Feb. 7, 2005, 52.

KILIAN, MICHAEL Mystery writer Michael Kilian, who wrote the Dick Tracy comic strip, died of a liver ailment on October 26, 2005. He was 66. Kilian was born in Toledo, Ohio, on July 16, 1939, the son of Chicago television pioneer Fred Kilian. He worked as a columnist for the Chicago Tribune from the 1970s. He also wrote 24 novels including the mystery series starring Civil War Pinkerton spy Harrison Raines the started with 2000’s Murder at Manassas, and another series with Greenwich Village art gallery owner Bedford Green the began with The Weeping Woman in 2001. Kilian teamed with cartoonist Richard Locher to work on the Dick Tracy comic strip after the death of Tracy’s creator, Chester Gould, in 1977. • Los Angeles Times, Oct. 29, 2005, B16.

KHAN , NAMIR Actor and teacher Namir Khan was found dead at his Toronto, Ontario, Canada, apartment after a long illness on July 10, 2005. He was 50. Khan was born on January 11, 1955. He was a popular teacher at the University of Toronto, and also appeared in small roles in several films including Roadkill (1989), Samsara (1991), Masala (1991), Highway 61 (1991), Jack of Hearts (1993) which he also wrote, Arrowhead (1994), Dance Me Outside (1995), City of Dark (1997), and Elimination Dance (1998). KILGORE , MERLE Country songwriter Merle Kilgore, who was best known for penning the hit Michael Kilian

KIM MOO-SAENG Korean television actor Kim Moo-Saeng died of pneumonia on April 16, 2005. He was 62. He began his career as a voice actor at Korea’s Tongyang Broadcasting Company. He made his television onscreen debut in 1969, appearing in over 100 productions including Wedding Dress, Trapp of Young, and Save the Last Dance for Me.

Merle Kilgore

KINE, JOHN British television special effects designer John Kine died in Worminghall, Buckinghamshire, England, on January 14, 2005. He was 83. Kine was born in North London, England, on September 20, 1921. He was co-founder with Bernard Wilkie

Obituaries • 2005

204

Kim Moo-Saeng

Brian King

of the BBC’s Visual Effect’s Department, and worked on such productions as The Quatermass Experiment (1953), 1984 (1954), Quatermass II (1955), Quatermass and the Pit (1958), Hands Across the Sky (1960), It’s a Square World (1960), and The Caves of Steel (1964). He was also special effects designer for the 1966 sci-fi film Invasion, and created alien creatures for television productions of Doctor Who, Blake’s Seven, Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, Day of the Triffids, and Red Dwarf. Kine was the author of the book Miniature Scenic Modelling. • Times (of London), Feb. 11, 2005, 67.

ber 20, 2005. He was 80. King was born in Dodge City, Kansas, on May 22, 1925. He made his professional debut with the San Francisco Opera’s production of Carmen, and was noted for his performance in Puccini’s Tosca in Florence in 1961. He worked often with conductor Karl Bohm, performing roles in Fidelio, Die Frau Ohne Schatten, and Ariadne auf Naxos at Austria’s Salzburg Festival. He made his debut with the Metropolitan Opera in 1966, and gave over 100 performances with the Met over the next thirty years. He also performed in the 1970 film version of the opera Fidelio, and appeared in the television productions of Die Tote Stadt (1983), Il Ritorno d’Ulisse in Patria (1985), Ariadne auf Naxos (1988), and Elektra (1989). He retired from performing in 2000. • Los Angeles Times, Nov. 26, 2005, B17; New York Times, Nov. 24, 2005, A31; Times (of London), Nov. 24, 2005, 76.

John Kine

KING, BRIAN Cinematographer and Editor Brian J. King died of heart failure on June 16, 2005. He was 59. King was born in Hartford, Connecticut on September 27, 1945. He worked in television as a cinematographer and camera operator in the 1960s on such series as The American Sportsman and The World of Boating. He also assisted Bob Clampett on restoring his Beany and Cecil cartoons and was editor of the syndicated version of the Adventures of Rin Tin Tin. King was the assistant editor for the 1971 documentary On Any Sunday and was cameraman for Alice Cooper’s Welcome to My Nightmare in 1975. He also edited the 1976 animated feature Bugs Bunny Superstar. • Variety, July 18, 2005, 49. KING , JAMES Operatic tenor James King died of a heart attack in Naples, Florida, on Novem-

James King

KIRCHIN, BASIL British composer and musician Basil Kirchin died in Hull, England, on June 18, 2005. He was 77. Kirchin was born in Blackpool, England, on August 8, 1927, the son of bandleader Ivor Kirchin. Basil began playing drums professionally in 1941, performing with Harry Roy and his Orchestra on the BBC after World War II. He played with the Ted Heath Band later in the decade before joining his father as co-leader of the Kirchin Band. The group specialized in Latin American sounds, recording “Mambo

205

Basil Kirchin

Macoco” (1954), “Mambo Rock” (1955), “Calypso” (1957), and”Rock-A-Conga” (1959). He began writing for films in 1965, scoring the documentary Primitive London and writing the background score for the Dave Clark Five film Having a Wild Weekend (aka Catch Us if You Can). He also scored the Gothic horror film The Shuttered Room (1967), the action thriller Assignment K (1968), The Strange Affair (1968), Negatives (1968), I Start Counting (1969), and Freelance (1971). Kirchin’s best known work was for Robert Fuest’s cult horror film The Abominable Dr. Phibes (1971) starring Vincent Price. He also scored the 1973 horror film The Mutations. Kirchin was also noted for his 1970s musical work World Within Worlds, which included ambient sounds backed by various horned instruments.

2005 • Obituaries

KISHON, EPHRAIM Israeli film writer and director Ephraim Kishon died of a heart attack in Appenzell, Switzerland, on January 29, 2005. He was 80. Kishon was born in Budapest, Hungary, on August 23, 1924. He survived the Nazi concentration camps during World War II to become a leading comic writer and satirist. His play, Not a Word to Morgenstein, was adapted for film in 1963, and Kishon wrote and directed the films Sallah (1964), which was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Foreign Film, and Ervinka (1967). He also received an Oscar nomination for the 1970 film The Policeman. His other films include The Big Dig (1970), The Going Up of David Lev (1971), The Fox in the Chicken Coop (1978), and the tele-films Der Trauschein and Zieh den Stecker Raus, das Wasser Kocht (1986). • Los Angeles Times, Feb. 1, 2005, B9; New York Times, Jan. 31, 2005, B8; Times (of London), Feb. 2, 2005, 54; Variety, Feb. 7, 2005, 92.

KIRSCHENBAUER, KAREN Actress Karen Kirschenbauer died of a heart attack at her home in Middleburg, Virginia, on May 6, 2005. Kirschenbauer began acting late life after raising a family. She appeared in numerous commercials and was featured in several films including The Exorcist III (1990), He Said, She Said (1991), Sommersby (1993), and The Jackal (1997). She was also seen in the tele-films Scattered Dreams (1993), Vanishing Son (1994), A Burning Passion: The Margaret Mitchell Story (1994), Amy & Isabelle (2001), and The Locket (2002), and in episodes of Unsolved Mysteries, America’s Most Wanted, Homicide: Life on the Street, Dawson’s Creek, and The Wire.

KISIMOV, ASEN Bulgarian actor Asen Kisimov died suddenly in Blagoevgrad, Bulgaria, on July 13, 2005. He was 69. Kisimov was born in Plovdiv, Bulgaria, on May 3, 1936. He was a popular film star for nearly fifty years, appearing in such features as Item One (1956), Years of Love (1957), The Lindens of Stublen (1960), Be Happy, Ani! (1961), The Last Round (1961), Captive Flock (1962), Thirteen Days (1964), The Kindest Person I Know (1973), And the Day Came (1973),

Karen Kirschenbauer

Asen Kisimov

Ephraim Kishon

Obituaries • 2005

206

Life or Death (1974), To Eat the Apple (1976), People from Afar (1977), Gunpowder (1977), A Unique Morning (1978), Warmth (1978), Something Out of Nothing (1979), A Journey (1980), The Warning (1982), I’ve Never Killed a Man (1983), Someone at the Door (1987), Eve on the Third Floor (1987), Monday Morning (1988), Running Dogs (1989), The Bronze Vixen (1991), and Ad Libitus 2: A Recitative of the Envious Man (2000).

KISLINGER, IVANA Argentine actress Ivana Kislinger died of cancer in California on December 15, 2005. She was 73. Kislinger was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on March 27, 1932. She won the title of Miss Argentina in 1954 and subsequently embarked on a career in films. She was seen in several films in Argentina including La Noche de Venus (1955), El Tango en Paris (1956), Enigma de Mujer (1956), and C’e un Sentiero nel Cielo (1957). She also appeared in several films in Europe and the United States including The Naked Maja (1959) and What Did You Do in the War, Daddy? (1966). She subsequently retired from the screen.

(1963), Ovi (1965), Hot Cat? (1968), The Brothers (1969), and A Night on the Shore of Sea (1981).

KLASS, PHILIP Philip Klass, a leading investigator of UFO phenomena, died on August 9, 2005. He was 85. Klass was born in Des Moines, Iowa, on November 8, 1919. He was an aviation engineer at General Electric until the early 1950s when he joined the staff of the magazine Aviation Week and Space Technolog y. Klass first became involved with flying saucers while investigating a report of an extraterrestrial landing in Socorro, New Mexico, in 1966. His meticulous investigations led him to dismiss the incident as a hoax. He remained actively involved in Ufology becoming a leading debunker of most sightings and phenomena. He wrote several books on the subject including UFOs Explained (1975) and The Real Roswell Crashed-Saucer Coverup (1997). • New York Times, Aug. 12, 2005, A17; Times (of London), Sept. 12, 2005, 58.

Philip Klass

KIVIKOSKI, ERKKO Finnish film director and writer Erkko Kivikoski died in Turku, Finland, on August 11, 2005. He was 69. Kivikoski was born in Iisalmi, Finland, on July 2, 1936. He helmed such films as EPX-503 (1962), Tovi (1963), This Summer at Five

KLUBA, HENRYK Polish film director and actor Henryk Kluba died in Konin, Poland, on June 11, 2005. He was 74. Kluba was born in Przystajnia, Poland, on January 9, 1931. He began directing films in the 1950s, helming such features as Proces (1957), Salvation (1957), Two from the Big River (1958), The Knave of Spades (1960), One Thousand Talars (1960), Skinny and Others (1967), Warsaw Sketches (1970), Five

Erkko Kivikoski

Henryk Kluba

Ivana Kislinger

207

2005 • Obituaries

and a Half of Pale Joe (1971), The Sun Rises Once a Day (1972), A Story in Red (1974), The Scatterbrain of St. Cross Mountains (1978), and The Star Wormwood (1988). Kluba also appeared in small roles in films from the late 1950s including Eve Wants to Sleep (1958), Two Men and a Wardrobe (1958), Mr. Anatol’s Inspection (1959), When Angels Fall (1959), One Thousand Talars (1960), Mammals (1962), Walkover (1965), The Sun Rises Once a Day (1972), A Jungle Book of Regulations (1974), The Birthday (1980), and My Name Is Jurek (2000).

KNIGHT, BAKER Songwriter Baker Knight, who was best known for writing Ricky Nelson’s hit song “Lonesome Town,” died at his home in Birmingham, Alabama, on October 12, 2005. He was 72. He was born in Los Angeles in 1935. He learned to play the guitar while serving in the US Air Force. Knight was leader of the rock band Baker Knight and the Knightmares in the mid–1950s. He met Ricky Nelson later in the decade and began a career as a songwriter. His hit songs include “I Got A Feeling,” “Somewhere There’s A Someone,” and “The Wonder Of You,” which was a hit for Elvis Presley in 1970. He wrote nearly 1000 songs during his career which ended in the mid–1980s when he developed severe agoraphobia. • Los Angeles Times, Oct. 15, 2005, B15; New York Times, Oct. 18, 2005, A25.

Keith Knudsen

KNUTSON, BARBARA Children’s books author and illustrator Barbara Knutson died of a rare autoimmune deficiency disease in St. Paul, Minnesota, on May 7, 2005. Knutson was born in South Africa to American missionary parents in 1959. She came to the United States at the age of 12. She was best known for her retelling and illustrating of African folk tales. He earned the Minnesota Book Award for How the Guinea Fowl Got Its Spots: A Swahili Tale of Friendship (1991) and Sungura and Leopard: A Swahili Trickster Tale (1994). Her other works include Why the Crab Has No Head (1987) and Love and Roast Chicken: A Trickster Tale from Andes Mountains (2004). Knutson also illustrated the works of other authors including Linda Lowery’s Day of the Dead and Trish Marx’s Hanna’s Cold Winter.

Baker Knight

KNUDSEN, KEITH Drummer Keith Knudsen, a member of the Doobie Brothers from the mid–1970s, died of pneumonia in a Kentfield, California, hospital on February 8, 2005. He was 56. Knudsen was born in Lamars, Iowa on February 18, 1948. He joined with the Doobie Brothers as their drummer in 1974 and remained with the band until their 1982 farewell tour. Knudsen played with the Doobie Brothers on many of their top hits in the 1970s, including “Taking It to the Streets,” “Black Water,” and “Minute by Minute.” He subsequently joined with band mate John McFee in the country rock band Southern Pacific. He returned to the Doobies in 1993 and continued to record and perform with them throughout his life. • Los Angeles Times, Feb. 9, 2005, B9; New York Times, Feb. 10, 2005, C17; People, Feb. 28, 2005, 101; Times (of London), Jan. 22, 2005, 56.

Barbara Knutson

KODET, JIRI Czech stage and film star Jiri Kodet died in Prague on June 25, 2005. He was 67. Kodet was born in Prague, Czechoslovakia, on December 6, 1937. A leading performer for over fifty years, he was seen in such films Messenger of Dawn (1950), Awakening (1959), Romeo, Juliet and Darkness (1960), Pochodne (1960), Higher Principle (1960), Something Different (1963), Crime at the Girls School (1965), Closely Watched Trains (1966), Hotel for Strangers (1967), All Good Citizens (1968), Morgiana (1972), The Day That Shook the World (1975), The Apple Game (1976), The

Obituaries • 2005

208

Jiri Kodet

Tanju Korel

Blue Planet (1977), Prefab Story (1979), Run Waiter Run (1980), The Medal (1970), Just Whistle a Little (1980), How the World Is Losing Poets (1981), Fenix (1981), The Death of a Talented Cobbler (1982), Dissolved and Effused (1984), Zatah (1985), Papilio (1986), The Jester and the Queen (1987), How Poets Are Enjoying Their Lives (1987), Accumulator 1 (1994), The Button-Pushers (1997), Cosy Dens (1999), the Oscar-nominated foreign film Divided We Fall (2000), and Sentiment (2003).

Kezban (1970), Soum Cemberi (1970), Kara Leke (1970), Kahramanlar (1975), The Usage (1978), and Celik Mezar (1983). He also appeared in many Turkish television productions in recent years including Vasiyet (2001) and Zeybek Atesi (2002).

KORAL, ALEV Turkish actress Alev Koral died in Istanbul, Turkey, of complications from Alzheimer’s disease on July 17, 2005. She was 73. Koral was a leading actress in Turkey in the 1950s and 1960s. Originally billed as Alev Elmas, she appeared in such films as Murder on the Third Floor (1954), If a Woman Loves... (1955), Murder Night (1963), Vur Gozunun Ustune (1964), and Hak Yolunda Hazreti Yahya (1965).

KOSSLYN, JACK Character actor Jack Kosslyn died of complications from a stroke in the Motion Picture Television Fund hospital in Calabassas, California, on June 24, 2005. He was 84. Kosslyn was born on December 28, 1920. He began appearing in films in the 1950s, and was featured in The Devil’s Hairpin (1957), The Amazing Colossal Man (1957), Attack of the Puppet People (1958), War of the Colossal Beast (1958), Earth vs. the Spider (1958), Maracaibo (1958), Cash McCall (1960), and The Magic Sword (1962) as the Ogre. Kosslyn was a casting director and dialogue coach for Clint Eastwood’s Malpaso Productions for several years. He worked on, and appeared in small roles, in Play Misty for Me (1971), High Plains Drifter (1973), Breezy (1973), Magnum Force (1973), and The Eiger Sanction (1975). He was also seen in the films Empire of the Ants (1977), Didn’t You Hear... (1983), Vendetta (1986), and Echos of Enlightenment (2001). He was also featured in the tele-films The Death of Richie (1977) and Blind Ambition (1979). His other television credits include episodes of Surfside 6, Ben Casey, Rawhide, Hawaii Five-O, Emergency!, Charlie’s Angels, Baretta, Voyagers!, Dynasty, Scarecrow and Mrs. King, Cagney & Lacey, and

Alev Koral

KOREL, TANJU Veteran Turkish actor Tanju Korel died in Turkey on September 21, 2005. He was 61. Korel was born in Istanbul, Turkey, on October 10, 1943. He was a leading actor in Turkish films from the 1960s. His numerous credits include The Bandit (1966), Kamali Zeybegin Intikami (1967), Nuri Bey Mafiaya Karsi (1968), Dev Adam (1968), Yuvvam Yikilmasin (1969), Kara Efe (1969), Hayat Kurbani (1969), Yanik

Jack Kosslyn

209

2005 • Obituaries

Cheers. Kosslyn was also a drama coach for over forty years, teaching classes at his own studio in Hollywood. • Variety, July 25, 2005, 55.

KOSSOFF , DAVID British character actor David Kossoff died of liver cancer in England on March 23, 2005. He was 85. Kossoff was born in London on November 24, 1919. He starred as the Sheriff of Nottingham in the British television version of Robin Hood in 1953, and was hen-pecked husband Alf Larkins in the comedy series The Larkins in 1958. He later starred as Marcus Lieberman in the 1963 series A Little Big Business. Kossoff also appeared in numerous films curing his career including The Good Beginning (1952), The Angel Who Pawned Her Harp (1954), The Young Lover (1954), Svengali (1954), The Woman for Joe (1955), Now and Forever (1955), I Am a Camera (1955), A Kid for Two Farthings (1955), Portrait in Smoke (1956), House of Secrets (1956), Who Done It? (1956), 1984 (1956), The Bespoke Overcoat (1956), The Iron Petticoat (1956), Innocent Sinners (1958), Count Five and Die (1958), Indiscreet (1958), The Journey (1959), Jet Storm (1959), and The House of the Seven Hawks (1959). Kossoff starred as Professor Kokintz in the 1959 British satire The Mouse That Roared with Peter Sellers and the 1963 sequel The Mouse on the Moon. He continued to appear in such films as Inn for Trouble (1960), Conspiracy of Hearts (1960), The Two Faces of Dr. Jekyll (1960), Freud (1962), Ring of Treason (1963), Summer Holiday (1963), The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes (1970), Three for All (1974), The Omega Connection (1979), and Staggered (1994). He was also seen in the 1989 tele-film Young Charlie Chapin, and appeared in episodes of Interpol Calling, The Saint, Espionage, and Lovejoy. • Times (of London), Mar. 24, 2005, 66.

Andras Kozak

Thousand Days (1967), The Red and the White (1967), Silence and Cry (1967), The Girl (1968), The Confrontation (1969), Winter Wind (1969), Temperate Zone (1970), Face (1970), The Agitators (1971), Sons of Fire (1974), Blindfold (1975), Mrs. Dery Where Are You? (1975), Season of Monsters (1987), Never, Nowhere, to No-One! (1988), Jesus Christ’s Hororscope (1988), After All (1990), God Walks Backwards (1991), Blue Danube Waltz (1992), and Blue Box (1993). Kozak also starred in the Hungarian television series Little Town from 1993 to 2000.

KRACHMALNICK, SAMUEL Conductor Samuel Krachmalnick died of a heart attack in Burbank, California, on April 1, 2005. He was 79. Krachmalnick was born on January 9, 1926. He studied with Leonard Bernstein in the 1950s and earned a Tony nomination as musical director for Bernstein’s musical production of Candide on Broadway in 1957. He also conducted productions for the American Ballet Theater and the New York City Opera. Krachmalnick came to Los Angeles to serve as director of the University of California Symphony in 1978. He directed numerous concerts, opera and other productions there until his retirement in 1991. Krachmalnick was also seen in the 1980 comedy film Die Laughing and appeared as a conductor in the 1992 film Brain Donors. • Los Angeles Times, Apr. 10, 2005, B14.

David Kossoff

KOZAK, ANDRAS Hungarian actor Andras Kozak died in Budapest, Hungary, on February 24, 2005. He was 62. Kozak was born in Vencsello, Hungary, on February 23, 1943. He was leading actor in Hungarian films from the early 1960s, noted particularly for his roles in films from director Mikos Jancso. Kozak’s numerous film credits include Current (1963), My Way Home (1964), The Hopeless Ones (1965), WaterNymph on the Signet Ring (1965), Father (1966), Ten

Samuel Krachmalnick

KRANITZ, LAJOS Hungarian actor Lajos Kranitz died in Hungary on August 1, 2005. He was 62.

Obituaries • 2005

210

Lajos Kranitz

Kranitz was born in Budapest, Hungary, on February 9, 1943. He was featured in numerous films from the early 1970s including The Stud Farm (1978), The Fortress (1979), Helter-Skelter (1974), Diary for My Children (1984), Whooping Cough (1987), Mills of Hell (1987), Winning Ticket (2003), and Ebed (2005). He also performed often on Hungarian television and dubbed numerous English-language productions into Hungarian, including Larry Hagman in Dallas.

KRASSOVSKA, NATHALIE Ballerina Nathalie Krassovska died in a Dallas, Texas, hospital of complications from surgery on February 8, 2005. She was 86. Krassovska was born in Petrograd, Russia, on June 1, 1918. She was trained for the ballet in Paris and joined Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo in 1935. She danced in numerous productions including The Snow Maiden, Swan Lake, The Nutcracker, and Giselle. she also danced in several films including The Gay Parisian (1941) and Spanish Fiesta (1942), but turned down a movie contract from David O. Selznick to continue with ballet. Krassovska joined the London Festival ballet in 1950, and performed throughout Europe over the next decade. She became a United States citizen in 1964 and formed the Ballet Jeunesse of Dallas where she taught and choreographed ballet productions for young people. • Los Angeles Times, Feb. 17, 2005, B11; New York Times, Feb. 11, 2005, C14; Times (of London), Mar. 26, 2005, 73.

Nathalie Krassovska

KRESKI, CHRIS Chris Kreski, who was head writer for the World Wrestling Entertainment television programs for several years, died of cancer on May 9, 2005. He was 42. Kreski was born on July 31, 1962. He was a writer for the 1987 television series Remote Control and the cartoon series Beavis and Butt-Head before becoming head writer for The Daily Show with Jon Stewart. He was brought in to the WWE by Vince McMahon in 1999 when Vince Russo left the company for the competition. Kreski wrote for the WWE Smackdown! and WWE Raw Is War series until being replaced by McMahon’s daughter Stephanie in 2002. The WWE experienced one of its most successful periods during Kreski’s tenure there. He was also co-authored several books with William Shatner including Star Trek Memories (1993), Star Trek Movie Memories (1994), and Get a Life (1999), and co-authored Growing Up Brady: I Was a Teenage Greg with Barry Williams in 1992. He also wrote the books Life Lessons from Xena, Warrior Princess: A Guide to Happiness, Success and Body Armor (1998) and Perfect I’m Not: Boomer on Beer, Brawls, Backaches, and Baseball (2003) with David Wells. KRUGER, OTTILIE Actress Ottilie Kruger Laybourne died of pancreatic cancer in Los Angeles on May 12, 2005. She was 78. She was born on November 20, 1926, the daughter of actor Otto Kruger and actress Sue MacManamy. She performed often on the Broadway stage in the 1940s and 1950s. She made her Broadway debut in a 1944 production of I Remember Mama, which also featured Marlon Brando. She was also seen in productions of A Joy Forever and The Pursuit of Happiness. She was also featured with her father in two plays, Little A and Time for Elizabeth. KRUPA , KID Guitarist Kid Krupa, who played for three years with the punk rock group the Revillos, died of complications from diabetes as reported by Revillos’ drummer Rocky Rhythm on March 16, 2005. He was 41. Krupa joined the Revillos as a guitarist in 1980 at the age of 17, and performed with the band on the albums Rev Up and Attack. He left the band in 1983 to form his own group, and played as a session musician which such artists as Roger Daltry, Bonnie Tyler, and Tim Finn. He reunited with the Revillos on a tour of Japan in 1994, and helped produce the 1996 live album, Totally Alive.

Kid Krupa

211 KUZMINSKI, ZBIGNIEW Polish film director Zbigniew Kuzminski died in Gdansk, Poland, on March 12, 2005. He was 83. Kuzminski was born in Bydgoszcz, Poland, on November 4, 1921. He began working in films as an assistant director in the late 1940s on the films Border Street (1949), First Start (1951), and Five from the Barska Street (1954). Kuzminski soon began directing films, including The Lonely House (1950), The Case of Pilot Maresz (1956), Warmia (1958), Coloured Stockings (1960), Silent Traces (1961), Another Shore (1962), My Second Marriage (1964), The Gang (1965), The Descent to Hell (1966), A Crazy Night (1967), Heaven on Earth (1970), Top Agent (1972), A Short Life (1976), A Hundred Horses to a Hundred Shores (1979), Crab and Joanna (1981), Environs of a Quiet Sea (1982), Closer to the Sky Every Day (1983), The Republic of Hope (1986), On the Banks of the Niemen (1987), Between (1987), and Desperation (1988). KWESKIN, SAM Veteran comic book artist Sam Kweskin died on June 23, 2005. He was 81. Kweskin was born in Chicago, Illinois, on February 24, 1924. He began working for Atlas Comics (which evolved into Marvel Comics) in 1952, drawing for such publications as Adventures into Terror and Wild Western. He left Atlas in 1957 to work as a graphic artist for advertising and commercials. He returned to comics in 1972, drawing such characters as Daredevil, Dr. Strange, and Sub-Mariner for Marvel, often under the name Irv Wesley. He worked with creator Bill Everett on the Sub-Mariner comic, which was canceled before Kweskin could replace the ailing Everett on the book. He again left comics to return to advertising.

2005 • Obituaries

Jussi Kylatasku

born on April 2, 1942. He appeared frequently in films and television from the early 1970s. His film credits include Santee (1973), Devil Times Five (1974), Mr. Majestyk (1974), Bound for Glory (1976), The Wackiest Wagon Train in the West (1976), Baker’s Hawk (1976), Final Chapter: Walking Tall (1977), A Force of One (1979), Day of the Assassin (1979), Ruckus (1981), The Avenging (1982), Deadly Stranger (1988), Spirit of the Eagle (1989), W.B., Blue and the Beran (1989), and Cellblock Sisters: Banished Behind Bars (1995). He was also seen in the tele-films The Police Story (1973), Attack on Terror: The FBI vs. the Ku Klux Klan (1975), The Deadly Triangle (1977), The Hunted Lady (1977), Crisis in Sun Valley (1978), Desperate Women (1978), Return of the Mod Squad (1979), Beulah Land (1980), The Return of Frank Cannon (1980):, Don’t Look Back: The Story of Leroy “Satchel” Paige (1981), Cry for the Strangers (1982), and A Summer to Remember (1985). Lacher starred as Arlo Pritchard in the television series Cade’s County from 1971 to 1972. He was Deputy Hubbel Martin in the series Nakia in 1974, and was Detective Will Carson in Joe Forrester from 1975 to 1976. His other television credits include episodes of Ghost Story, The Rookies, The Streets of San Francisco, Dusty’s Trail, Police Story, S.W.A.T., City of Angels, Charlie’s Angels, The Bionic Woman, Barnaby Jones, Starsky and Hutch, The Rockford Files, The White Shadow, Hagen, Eischied, Stone, Quincy, The Dukes of Hazzard, CHiPs, The Waltons, The Incredible Hulk, Simon & Simon, Father Mur-

Sam Kweskin

KYLATASKU, JUSSI Finnish writer and poet Jussi Kylatasku died in Porvoo, Finland, after a long illness on January 8, 2005. He was 61. Kylatasku was born in Tampere, Finland, on June 19, 1943. He began writing in the 1960s, authoring numerous novels, plays, and radio scripts over the next three decades. Several of his works were adapted to film including When the Heavens Fell (1972), One Man’s War (1973), Loma (1976), Petos (1988), Have a Good Trip (1988), and The White Woman (1989). LACHER, TAYLOR Character actor Taylor Lacher died on June 21, 2005. He was 63. Lacher was

Taylor Lacher

Obituaries • 2005

212

phy, Little House on the Prairie, T.J. Hooker, Knight Rider, Manimal, Lottery!, Masquerade, Dynasty, Airwolf, The A-Team, and Knots Landing.

LAFFERTY, PERRY Television producer and director Perry Lafferty died of prostate cancer at his home in Century City, California, on August 25, 2005. He was 87. Lafferty was born in Davenport, Iowa, on October 3, 1917. He began his career in radio in New York in the early 1940s. He served in the U.S. Army Air Force during World War II, and began working in television after the war. During the 1950s he directed episodes of such series as Robert Montgomery Presents, Studio One, General Electric Theater, Rawhide, and The Twilight Zone. He was producer of the variety series Kay Kyser’s Kollege of Musical Knowledge and The Danny Kaye Show. During the 1970s Lafferty served as head of West Coast programming at CBS, where he was instrumental in the airing of such series as All in the Family, M*A*S*H, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, and The Waltons. Lafferty was also executive producer of the 1977 television series Big Hawaii, and a producer for the tele-film Danger in Paradise (1977). He went to NBC in 1979 as senior vice president of West Coast Programs and was executive in charges of the network’s tele-films and mini-series in the 1980s. He was also executive producer for the tele-films An Early Frost (1985), Maybe Baby (1988), and Murder C.O.D. (1990). He began writing mystery novels following his retirement from television. His novels include Jablonski of L.A. (1991) and The Downing of Flight Six Heavy (1992). His survivors include his daughter, actress Marcy Lafferty. • Los Angeles Times, Sept. 9, 2005, B8; New York Times, Sept. 18, 2005, 34; Variety, Sept. 12, 2005, 81.

Derek Lamb

(1973), The Bead Game (1977) which also earned him an Oscar nomination, The Psychic Parrot (1977), Why Me? (1978), The National Scream (1980), The Sweater (1980), The Tender Tale of Cinderella Penguin (1981), Five Billion Years (1981), The Old Lady’s Camping Trip (1983), Narcissus (1983), Karate Kids (1990), and Goldtooth (1996). Lamb produced programming for the Children’s Television Workshop and PBS from 1972 to 1976, and served as executive producer of the National Film Board’s English Animation Studio in Montreal from 1976 to 1982. He worked with Eugene Fedorenko to create the animated opening titles based on designed by Edward Gorey for the PBS series Mystery! He and Fedorenko also produced stop-frame animation sequences for Skyward, the 1985 IMAX documentary. Lamb was also involved in the development of the Emmy Award–winning animated series for preschoolers, Peep and the Big Wide World, in the late 1990s. • Los Angeles Times, Nov. 16, 2005, B9; New York Times, Nov. 22, 2005, B9. LAMBERT, GAVIN Screenwriter Gavin Lambert died of pulmonary fibrosis at a Los Angeles hospital on July 17, 2005. He was 80. Lambert was born in Sussex, England, on July 23, 1924. He began his writing career scripting commercials in the early 1940s. He also wrote short stories and film criticism. He and future director Lindsay Anderson founded the film journal Sequence in 1948. He later served as editor of the film journal Sight and Sound from 1950 to 1956. He

Perry Lafferty

LAMB, DEREK Canadian animator and producer Derek Lamb, who earned an Academy Award for his 1979 animated short film Every Child, died of cancer at a friend’s home in Poulsbo, Washington, on November 5, 2005. He was 69. Lamb was born in Bromley, Kent, England, on June 30, 1936. He began his career as a writer and animator with the National Film Board in the late 1950s. Lamb was involved in the production of such animated shorts as The Great Two Robbery (1963), I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly (1964), The Shepherd (1970), The Last Cartoon Man

Gavin Lambert

213 also wrote and directed the 1954 film Another Sky. Lambert moved to Hollywood soon after where he served as personal assistant to director Nicholas Ray. He scripted Ray’s 1957 film Bitter Victory, and worked on the scripts for Ray’s The True Story of Jesse James, and Bigger Than Life. He also published a collection of short stories about Hollywood, The Slide Area: Scenes of Hollywood Life, in 1959. Lambert earned an Academy Award nomination for his adaptation of D.H. Lawrence’s Sons and Lovers in 1960. The following year he adapted Tennessee Williams’ The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone for the screen. Lambert scripted the 1965 film version of his novel Inside Daisy Clover, about the mental problems of a teen film star, played by Natalie Wood. He wrote additional dialogue for the 1971 psychological thriller Whoever Slew Auntie Roo?, and scripted the 1973 film Interval. He garnered a second Oscar nomination for his script for the 1977 drama I Never Promised You a Rose Garden. He also wrote several tele-films including Second Serve (1986), Sweet Bird of Youth (1989), and Dead On the Money (1991). In his later years, Lambert concentrated on writing biographies of such film figures as Norma Shearer, Nazimova, George Cukor, and Lindsay Anderson. His most recent works were 2004’s biography Natalie Wood: A Life and The Ivan Moffat File: Life Among the Beautiful and Damned in London, Paris, New York, and Hollywood. • Los Angeles Times, July 19, 2005, B10; New York Times, July 19, 2005, B7; Time, Aug. 1, 2005, 19; Times (of London), July 21, 2005, 60; Variety, July 25, 2005, 55.

LAMBERTS, HEATH Canadian comic actor Heath Lamberts died of complications from prostate and throat cancer in a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, hospital on February 22, 2005. He was 63. Lamberts was born in Toronto, Canada, on December 15, 1941. He began his career on stage in Canada in the 1960s, performing with the Stratford Festival and the Shaw Festival. He received acclaim for his roles in such theatrical productions as Cyrano de Bergerac and Beauty and the Beast. Lamberts was also seen in the films A Great Big Thing (1968), To Kill a Clown (1972), Nothing Personal (1980), Utilities (1981), Where’s Pete (1986), White Light (1991), Sam & Me (1991), Change of Heart (1992), Ordinary Magic (1993), and Tom and Huck (1995). He also appeared on television in productions of Dick

Heath Lamberts

2005 • Obituaries

Francis’ Blood Sport (1989), Back to the Beanstalk (1990) as the Giant, Johann’s Gift to Christmas (1991), The First Circle (1991), The Trial of Red Riding Hood (1992), Club Land (2001), By Jeeves (2001), and Whitewash: The Clarence Brandley Story (2002). His other television credits include episodes of Street Legal, E.N.G., Road to Avonlea, The Mighty Jungle, Law & Order, TekWar, More Tales of the City, Eerie, Indiana: The Other Dimension, and Remember WENN. • Variety, Mar. 7, 2005, 62.

LAMONT, ADELE Actress and dancer Adele Thompson, who performed under the stage name of Adele Lamont on stage, film and television, died in California on November 24, 2005. She was 75. She was born on August 7, 1930. She studied at the Actors’ Studio in New York under Stella Adler, and appeared with Robert Culp in the Off-Broadway production of He Who Gets Slapped. She also appeared on Broadway in productions of Blood Wedding and Cole Porter’s Out of This World. Lamont was a featured singer with Xavier Cugat’s band, and performed in nightclubs as half of the Christian and Lamont dance team. She starred as model Doris Powell in the cult horror film The Brain That Wouldn’t Die in 1962, whose torso was selected by Jason Evers to become the host of his bodiless fiancée. Lamont was also seen on television in episodes of The Tall Man and The Phil Silvers Show.

Adele Lamont

LAMOTTA, VIKKI Vikki LaMotta, the exwife of legendary boxer Jake LaMotta, died in a Boca Raton, Florida, hospital on January 25, 2005, several months after undergoing open-heart surgery. She was 75. She was born Beverly “Vikki” Thailer on January 23, 1930, in the Bronx, New York. She married LaMotta while in her teens and had three children with the boxer. The boxer had difficulty adjusting to his subsequent retirement, and she left him at the age of 26 as their relationship deteriorated. Their story was filmed by director Martin Scorcese as Raging Bull in 1980, with Robert De Niro as Jake LaMotta and Cathy Moriarty as Vikki. She assisted Moriarty with her performance in the film and publicity from the filming led to an offer for her to appear nude in a Playboy pictorial the following year. The 51-year-old beauty accepted the offer to show that “life doesn’t end at 30.”

Obituaries • 2005

214

Vikki LaMotta

She later appeared in numerous local commercials and personal appearances, and lent her name to a cosmetics line. • Los Angeles Times, Feb. 3, 2005, B9; New York Times, Feb. 3, 2005, A25; Time, Feb. 14, 2005, 19.

(1934), Love Time (1934), Music in the Air (1934), Bonnie Scotland (1935), White Hunter (1936), The Country Doctor (1936), Every Saturday Night (1936), Captain January (1936) with Shirley Temple, The Road to Glory (1936), Nancy Steele Is Missing! (1937), Wee Willie Winkie (1937), Ali Baba Goes to Town (1937), International Settlement (1938), One Wild Night (1938), Meet the Girls (1938), Zenobia (1939), Forged Passport (1939), For Love or Money (1939), Captain Fury (1939), Inside Information (1939), Convicted Woman (1940), Isle of Destiny (1940), Red Head (1941), The Deadly Game (1941), Too Many Women (1942), Footlight Serenade (1942), City of Silent Men (1942), Flesh and Fantasy (1943), Stage Door Canteen (1943), Up in Arms (1944), Three of a Kind (1944), and Lighthouse (1947). Her marriage to reputed mobster Johnny Roselli damaged her career and she largely retired from the screen in the mid–1940s. She made several appearances on television in the 1950s, guest-starring in episodes of Fireside Theatre and The Detectives Starring Robert Taylor.

LANE, SHARYN Films actress and producer Sharyn Lane died of pancreatic cancer in Los Angeles on March 7, 2005. She was 55. She was born in Queens, New York, on April 15, 1949. She was married to television producer Ron Leavitt in the 1990s, and starred as Winnie in his short-lived television series Vinnie & Bobby in 1992. She also appeared on television in episodes of Married ... with Children, Parker Lewis Can’t Lose, and LA Law. Lane produced the 2000 film version of Del Shores’ Sordid Lives, also appearing in the film in a small role. She also produced several theatrical plays including The Trials and Tribulations of a Trailer Trash Housewife. June Lang

LANGEVIN, BOB “LEGS ” Professional wrestler Bob “Legs” Langevin died on October 8, 2005. He was 91. Langevin was born Florian Langevin in Magog, Quebec, Canada, on October 13, 1913. He began training as a wrestler in the 1930s and competed on the Canadian circuit. Over the next three decades Langevin usually competed as a villain. He had bouts against

Sharyn Lane

LANG, JUNE Actress June Lang died in Valley Village, California, on May 16, 2005. She was 90. Lang was born Winifred June Vlasek in Minneapolis Minnesota, on May 5, 1915. She began her film career in the early 1930s under the name June Vlasek. She was featured in the films Chandu the Magician (1932), I Loved You Wednesday (1933), and The Man Who Dared (1933). She continued her career as June Lang, appearing in Now I’ll Tell (1934), She Learned About Sailors

Bob Langevin

215 such wrestling legends as Lou Thesz, Killer Kowalski, Jim Londos, Yvon Robert, and boxing champion Joe Louis. He also served as trainer and manager of wrestling champion Edouard Carpentier. A bout with cancer in the 1960s ended Langevin career in the ring. He subsequently worked as a wrestling promoter in Canada.

LANGFORD, FRANCES Singer and actress Frances Langford died at her home in Jensen Beach, Florida, on July 11, 2005. She was 91. Langford was born in Lakeland, Florida, on April 4, 1914. She began her career as a singer on local Tampa radio where she was heard by Rudy Vallee. She joined his radio variety show in 1931 and soon was starring in her own radio series. During the 1930s and 1940s she broadcast often on such programs as The Spartan Hour, Hollywood Hotel, Bob Hope Show, and The Drene Show. During World War II she accompanied Bob Hope on many of his tours to entertain the troops. She became known as the “Sweetheart of the Fighting Fronts.” She also appeared nearly thirty films during her career including The Subway Symphony (1932), Every Night at Eight (1935) where she performed what became her trademark song, “I’m in the Mood for Love,” Broadway Melody of 1936 (1935), Collegiate (1936), Palm Springs (1936), Born to Dance (1936), Hit Parade of 1937 (1937), Hollywood Hotel (1937), Dreaming Out Loud (1940), Too Many Girls (1940), Hit Parade of 1941 (1940), Swing It Soldier (1941), All American Co-Ed (1941), Mississippi Gambler (1942), Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942), Cowboy in Manhattan (1943), This Is the Army (1943), Never a Dull Moment (1943), Career Girl (1944), Dixie Jamboree (1944), Girl Rush (1944), Tropical Moon (1945), Some Day When the Clouds Roll By (1945), A Dream Came True (1945), Radio Stars on Parade (1945), People Are Funny (1946), The Bamboo Blonde (1946), Beat the Band (1947), Deputy Marshal (1949), Purple Heart Diary (1951), and The Glenn Miller Story (1953). She was also an accomplished comedienne, noted for her comedy sketches with Don Ameche as The Bickersons. She and Ameche co-hosted the prime time variety series Star Time from 1950 to 1951, and the daytime show The Frances Langford–Don Ameche Show from 1951 to 1952. Langford also guest-starred on the variety series The Jackie Gleason Show, The Bob Hope Show, The Perry

2005 • Obituaries

Como Show, and The DuPont Show of the Week. She also starred in the prime time specials Frances Langford Presents (1959) and The Frances Langford Show (1960). She was married to actor Jon Hall from 1938 until their divorce in 1955. She subsequently married outboard motor magnate Ralph Evinrude several months later and largely retired to Florida by the end of the decade. She was widowed with Evinrude’s death in May of 1986. She married Harold Stuart, a former assistant secretary of the Air Force in Harry Truman’s administration, in November of 1994, and he survives her. • Los Angeles Times, July 12, 2005, B8; New York Times, July 12, 2005, A19; Time, Sept. 25, 2005, 19; Times (of London), July 30, 2005, 71; Variety, July 18, 2005, 48.

LANZA, TONY Professional wrestler and photographer Tony Lanza died of injuries he received in a fall in the bathroom at his home in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, on January 20, 2005. He was 84. Lanza was born in Montreal on July 7, 1920. He was an amateur boxer and wrestler in the 1930s. After World War II Lanza began participating in body-building events. He also began taking photographs for Weider Publications, taking numerous bodybuilding and physique photographs for their magazines. Lanza also took many photographers of wrestling greats that appeared in magazines in the 1950s and 1960s. He competed in the ring for several decades, often wrestling in Montreal under a mask and such names as The Strangler, The Black Mask, The Hooded Terror and The Black Devil. He also competed in numerous promotions in the United States, including California and St. Louis, before his retirement from the ring in 1973.

Tony Lanza

Frances Langford

LARCH, JOHN Veteran actor John Larch died in Woodland Hills, California, on October 16, 2005. He was 83. Larch was born in Salem Massachusetts, on October 4, 1922. He was featured in nearly fifty films from the early 1950s including Bitter Creek (1954), Tight Spot (1955), Seven Angry Men (1955), Five Against the House (1955), The Naked Street (1955), The Phenix City Story (1955), The Killer Is Loose (1956), Behind the High Wall (1956), Seven Men from Now (1956), Man from Del Rio (1956), Written on the Wind (1956), Gun for a Coward (1956), Quantez (1957), Man in the Shadow (1957), The Careless Years (1957), From Hell to

Obituaries • 2005

216

Texas (1958), The Saga of Hemp Brown (1958), Hell to Eternity (1960), How the West Was Won (1962), Miracle of the White Stallions (1963) as General Patton, The Wrecking Crew (1969), Hail, Hero! (1969), The Great Bank Robbery (1969), Cannon for Cordoba (1970), Move (1970), Play Misty for Me (1971), Dirty Harry (1971), Santee (1973), Framed (1975), The Amityville Horror (1979), and Airplane II: The Sequel (1982). He was also seen in the tele-films The City (1971), Women in Chains (1972), Magic Carpet (1972), Winter Kill (1974), The Chadwick Family (1974), Bad Ronald (1974), The Desperate Miles (1975), Ellery Queen (1975), Future Cop (1976), Collision Course: Truman vs. MacArthur (1976), The Critical List (1978), A Fire in the Sky (1978), and the 1988 mini-series War and Remembrance. Larch was featured as Deputy District Attorney Jerry Miller in the 1963 television series Arrest and Trial, and was Captain Ben Foster in the 1965 series Convoy. He appeared as Arlen and Atticus Ward in the series Dallas in 1990. Larch’s other television credits include episodes of Dragnet, Gunsmoke, You Are There, Zane Grey Theater, Broken Arrow, The Restless Gun, Jefferson Drum, Wagon Train, The Texan, Have Gun Will Travel, Wanted: Dead or Alive, Rawhide, Texas John Slaughter, The Rough Riders, Black Saddle, Bat Masterson, Yancy Derringer, Riverboat, Bonanza, Wichita Town, Tales of Wells Fargo, The Twilight Zone, Adventures in Paradise, Law of the Plainsman, Laramie, Johnny Ringo, Outlaws, The Deputy, The Rifleman, Ben Casey, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Naked City, The Virginian, The Untouchables, Stoney Burke, Dr. Kildare, The Fugitive, The F.B.I., Felony Squad, The Invaders, Ironside, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Daniel Boone, Hawaii Five-O, Mission: Impossible, The Young Lawyers, Alias Smith and Jones, Owen Marshall: Counselor at Law, Nanny and the Professor, The Smith Family, Cannon, Madigan, Police Story, The Streets of San Francisco, Hawkins, Bronk, Charlie’s Angels, Big Hawaii, Vega$, Quincy, Lou Grant, Little House on the Prairie, The Dukes of Hazzard, Dynasty, and Simon & Simon. • Times (of London), Oct. 20, 2005, 76.

John Larch

LAREDO, RUTH Classical pianist Ruth Laredo died of cancer at her apartment in New York City on May 25, 2005. She was 67. She was born Ruth Meckler in Detroit, Michigan, on November 20, 1937.

Ruth Laredo

She was trained by Rudolf Serkin at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia before her marriage to violinist Jaime Laredo in the early 1960s. She made her orchestral debut in 1962 with the American Symphony Orchestra at Carnegie Hall under Leopold Stokowski. She made her New York Philharmonic debut under Pierre Boulez in 1974. She was best known for her recorded sets of the works of Russian composers Rachmaninoff and Scriabin in the 1970s. She made her first solo recital at Carnegie Hall in 1981 and performed her last concert at the Metropolitan Museum of Art shortly before her death. • Los Angeles Times, May 28, 2005, B21; New York Times, May 27, 2005, C15.

LARNER, STEVAN Cinematographer Stevan Larner died of complications from an accident at his vineyard near Solvang, California, on November 6, 2005. He was 75. Larner was born in New York City on February 6, 1930. He served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War, and attended film school in Paris after his discharge. He worked as a documentary and newsreel cameraman for several years, covering the Algerian war of independence. He also made documentary films for the U.S. Information Agency, earning an Academy Award nomination for 1969’s A Few Notes on Our Food Problem. He served as cinematographer for numerous films from the early 1970s including The Student Nurses (1970), The Night God Screamed (1971), Steelyard Blues (1973), Badlands (1973), Pipe Dreams (1976), Gray Lady Down (1978), The Buddy Holly Story (1978), Almost Summer (1978), Double Take (1979), Goldengirl (1979), Caddyshack (1980), Twilight Zone: The Movie (1983), House Made of Dawn (1987), The Beans of Eg ypt, Maine (1994), and Partners in Crime (2000). He was also cinematographer for the tele-films The Greatest Gift (1974), The Gun (1974), The Godchild (1974), Let’s Switch! (1975), Someone I Touched (1975), Guilty or Innocent: The Sam Sheppard Murder Case (1975), The Keegans (1976), Roots (1977), Curse of the Black Widow (1977), Young Joe, the Forgotten Kennedy (1977), Standing Tall (1978), True Grit: A Further Adventure (1978), Long Journey Back (1979), High Midnight (1979), A Rumor of War (1980), Fighting Back: The Story of Rocky Bleier (1980), Thornwell (1981), Kent State (1981), The Choice (1981), World War III (1982), Rehearsal for Murder (1982), This Is Kate Bennett...

217 (1982), Take Your Best Shot (1982), The Winds of War (1983), Happy Endings (1983), The Face of Rage (1983), V: The Final Battle (1984), Anatomy of an Illness (1984), The Mystic Warrior (1984), Fatal Vision (1984), Guilty Conscience (1985), North and South (1985), Circle of Violence: A Family Drama (1986), Convicted: A Mother’s Story (1987), Inherit the Wind (1988), Divided We Stand (1988), Dance ’Til Dawn (1988), Crazy from the Heart (1991), ...And Then She Was Gone (1991), Honor Thy Mother (1992), They’ve Taken Our Children: The Chowchilla Kidnapping (1993), Deadly Family Secrets (1995), A Season in Purgatory (1996), Murder, She Wrote: South by Southwest (1997), and Heartless (1997). Larner also worked on several television series including Beauty and the Beast and Studio 5–8. • Variety, Nov. 21, 2005, 73.

LATIFF, BAT

Malaysian former child star Bat Latiff died of complications from diabetes and heart disease in Malaysia on May 2, 2005. He was 53. Latiff was a leading child actor in Asia in the late 1950s, earning the Best Male Child Actor award at the 1960 Asian Film Festival. He was best known for his role in 1959’s Nujum Pak Belalang. Latiff later became a choreographer and was the founder of the Bat Latiff Dancers.

Bat Latiff

LATTUADA, ALBERTO Italian film director Alberto Lattuada died at his country home outside of Rome on July 3, 2005. He was 90. Lattuada was born in Milan, Italy, on November 13, 1914, the son of composer Felice Lattuada. He trained as an architect before entering film as an assistant director to Mario Soldati on the film Old-Fashioned World. Lattuada directed his first film, Giacomo the Idealist, the following year. He went on to make the films The Arrow (1945), The Bandit (1946), Flesh Will Surrender (1947), Without Pity (1948), and The Mill on the Po (1948). He co-directed the 1950 film Variety Lights with Federico Fellini. Lattuada directed and wrote numerous other features including Anna (1951), She Wolf (1952), The Overcoat (1952) based on a Gogol short-story, Love in the City (1953), Riviera (1954), Guendalina (1956), Tempest (1958) with Silvana Mangano, Sweet Deceptions (1960) with Catherine Spaak, Rita (1960), Unexpected (1961), Mafioso (1962), The Steppe (1962), The Mandrake (1965), the spy comedy Matchless (1966), Don Juan in

2005 • Obituaries

Alberto Lattuada

Sicily (1967), Fraulein Doktor (1969), Come Have Coffee with Us (1971), White Sister (1972), I Did It (1973), Bambina (1974), Dog’s Heart (1975), Oh Serafina (1976), Stay as You Are (1978) with Nastassja Kinski and Marcello Mastroianni, The Cricket (1980), Portrait of a Nude Woman (1981), and A Thorn in the Heart (1987). He also directed the tele-films Christopher Columbus (1985) and Fratelli (1988). During his career he also appeared in cameo roles in several films including Variety Lights (1950), A Hero of Our Times (1955), Oh Serafina (1976), Stay As You Are (1978), and The Bull (1994) which marked the end of his career in films. Lattuada was married to actress Carla De Poggio from the 1940s. • New York Times, July 16, 2005, C14; Times (of London), July 8, 2005, 72; Variety, July 11, 2005, 44.

LAUDADIO, FRANCISCO Italian film director Francisco Laudadio died after a long illness in Bologna, Italy, on April 6, 2005. He was 55. Laudadio was born in Mola di Bari, Italy, on January 2, 1950. He made his directoral debut with the 1982 film Grog. He also directed the films Made on Measure (1984), Goodbye to Enrico Berlinguer (1984), and Topo Galileo (1987). Laudadio wrote and directed the films La Riffa (1991) and Persone Perbene (1992), and also worked in television on such series as Il Mastino. He was working on his final film, Mrs., shortly before his death.

Francisco Laudadio

LAURENCE, PAULA Stage and screen actress Paula Laurence died in a New York City hospital of

Obituaries • 2005

218 Das Phantom von Bonn (1997), Campus (1998), Ninas Geschichte (2002), Solino (2002), Hamlet X (2003), Pustefix (2003), and Head-On (2004). He was also a frequent performer on television, appearing in productions of Ice Age (1975), Berlin Alexanderplatz (1980), Der Bastard (1989), Die Staatskanzlei (1989), Kollege Otto (1991), Dicke Freunde (1995) as East German Communist leader Erich Honecker, Ferkel Fritz (1997), Der Laden (1998), Abgehauen (1998), Hostage Flight to Paradise (1998), Das Gestohlene Leben (2000), Rote Glut (2000), Die Stunde der Offiziere (2003), Der Fall Gehring (2003), and Die Fremde Frau (2004), and episodes of Derrick, Der Alte, Balko, Siska, and Tatort. • Variety, Apr. 11, 2005, 59.

Paula Laurence

complications from a broken hip on October 29, 2005. She was 89. Laurence was born in Brooklyn, New York, on January 25, 1916. She began her career on stage, appearing in Orson Welles’ Federal Theatre Project production of Horse Eats Hats in 1937. She also starred as Helen of Troy in Welles’ production of Dr. Faustus. She was a leading performer on the New York stage from the 1940s, appearing in Broadway productions of Junior Miss (1941), Something for the Boys (1943), One Touch of Venus (1943), Cyrano de Bergerac (1946), and Ivanov (1966). She also starred as Carlotta Ivanova in a television production of The Cherry Orchard in 1959, and was Hannah Stokes in the Gothic daytime soap opera Dark Shadows in 1970. Laurence was also featured in several films during her career including Firepower (1979), Crossing Delancey (1988), and For Love or Money (1993), and guest starred in an episode of television’s Law & Order in 1994. • Variety, Nov. 28, 2005, 73.

LAWRENCE , JERRY Radio and television quiz show host and announcer Jerry Lawrence died in Los Angeles, on September 24, 2005. He was 93. Lawrence was born in Rochester, New York, on December 18, 1911. He began his career in radio in the 1930s in New York City. He was host of the music and interview program Moonlight Savings Time, and was announcer for The Frank Sinatra Show in 1944. He went to Los Angeles in 1945, where he hosted The Spade Cooley Show. Lawrence developed several local quiz programs for radio including Play Marco. He also served as the announcer for the television game show Truth or Consequences with host Jack Bailey from 1954 to 1955. Lawrence also appeared in small roles in several films including The Hitch-Hiker (1953) and X-15 (1961), and guest starred on television’s Dragnet and The Donna Reed Show.

LAUSE, HERMANN German actor Hermann Lause died of cancer in a Hamburg, Germany, hospital on March 28, 2005. He was 66. Lause was born in Meppen, Germany, on February 7, 1939. He was a leading stage performer in Germany from the early 1970s. Lause was also seen in numerous films including On the Move (1978), Fabian (1980), Nach Mitternacht (1981), Der Mann im Pyjama (1981), The Roaring Fifties (1983), Super (1984), The Summer of the Hawk (1988), Wings of Fame (1990), Schtonk! (1992), North Curve (1993), Jerry Lawrence

Hermann Lause

LAWRENCE, JUNE Actress and singer June Lawrence died at her Greenwich Village, New York, home on August 5, 2005. She was 90. Lawrence was born in Bozeman, Montana, in 1915, and was raised in Mount Vernon, Washington. She studied acting in her teens and began appearing in theater in New York in the early 1930s. she was seen in Broadway productions of Oklahoma!, Where’s Charley, and Inside U.S.A. . She also appeared in the 1944 Columbia film Sailor’s Holiday. Lawrence married sculptor and architect Tony Smith in 1943, with playwright Tennessee Williams as their best man. She was reputed to have been an inspiration for Williams’ character of Blanche Dubois in the

219 play Streetcar Named Desire. She was also the subject of a painting by Smith’s friend, artist Jackson Pollock. Lawrence performed as an opera singer in Germany in the early 1950s, singing the role of Electra in a production of Idomeneo in 1951 at the Salzburg festival. Tony Smith died in 1980 and Lawrence resumed her acting career in the avant-garde theater. • New York Times, Aug. 22, 2005, B7.

LAWRENCE, MARC Veteran character actor Marc Lawrence died at his home in Palm Springs, California, on November 27, 2005. He was 95. Lawrence was born Max Goldsmith in the Bronx, New York, on February 17, 1910. He began performing on stage in New York in the early 1930s where he became friends with fellow actor John Garfield. With a pockmarked face and dark eyes Lawrence was usually cast in villainous roles after making his film debut in 1932’s If I Had a Million. Lawrence was featured in hundreds of films over the next seventy years. His numerous credits include Gambling Ship (1933), Her First Mate (1933), Lady for a Day (1933), White Woman (1933), Straight Is the Way (1934), Death on the Diamond (1934), Million Dollar Baby (1934), Strangers All (1935), G Men (1935), Go into Your Dance (1935), Men of the Hour (1935), After the Dance (1935), The Arizonian (1935), Don’t Bet on Blondes (1935), Little Big Shot (1935), Dr. Socrates (1935), Three Kids and a Queen (1935), Road Gang (1936), Don’t Gamble with Love (1936), Love on a Bet (1936), The Robin Hood of El Dorado (1936), Desire (1936), Under Two Flags (1936), Counterfeit (1936), Trapped by Television (1936), The Final Hour (1936), Blackmailer (1936), The Cowboy Star (1936), Night Waitress (1936), What Price Vengeance? (1936), Racketeers in Exile (1937), Motor Madness (1937), I Promise to Pay (1937), Criminals of the Air (1937), A Dangerous Adventure (1937), San Quentin (1937), Charlie Chan on Broadway (1937), Life Begins with Love (1937), Counsel for Crime (1937), Murder in Greenwich Village (1937), The Shadow (1937), Penitentiary (1938), Who Killed Gail Preston? (1938), Squadron of Honor (1938), Convicted (1938), I Am the Law (1938), The Spider’s Web (1938), Adventure in Sahara (1938), While New York Sleeps (1938), Charlie Chan in Honolulu (1938), Think First (1939), Homicide Bureau (1939), There’s That

Marc Lawrence

2005 • Obituaries

Woman Again (1939), The Lone Wolf Spy Hunt (1939), Sergeant Madden (1939), Romance of the Redwoods (1939), Code of the Streets (1939), Blind Alley (1939), S.O.S. Tidal Wave (1939), Ex-Champ (1939), The Housekeeper’s Daughter (1939), Dusty Be My Destiny (1939), Beware Spooks! (1939), Invisible Stripes (1939), Johnny Apollo (1940), Love, Honor and Oh Baby! (1940), The Man Who Talked Too Much (1940), The Golden Fleecing (1940), The Great Profile (1940), Charlie Chan at the Wax Museum (1940), Brigham Young (1940), A Dangerous Game (1941), Tall, Dark and Handsome (1941), The Monster and the Girl (1941), The Man Who Lost Himself (1941), Blossoms in the Dust (1941), The Shepherd of the Hills (1941), Lady Scarface (1941), Hold That Ghost! (1941), Sundown (1941), Public Enemies (1941), Nazi Agent (1942), Yokel Boy (1942), This Gun for Hire (1942), Call of the Canyon (1942), ’Neath Brooklyn Bridge (1942), Eyes of the Underworld (1943), Calaboose (1943), The Ox-Bow Incident (1943), Hit the Ice (1943), Submarine Alert (1943), Tampico (1944), Rainbow Island (1944), The Princess and the Pirate (1944), Dillinger (1945), Flame of the Barbary Coast (1945), Don’t Fence Me In (1945), Club Havana (1945), Life with Blondie (1945), Blonde Alibi (1946), The Virginian (1946), Cloak and Dagger (1946), Yankee Fakir (1947), Joe Palooka in the Knockout (1947), Unconquered (1947), The Captain from Castile (1947), I Walk Alone (1948), Key Largo (1948), Out of the Storm (1948), Jigsaw (1949), Calamity Jane and Sam Bass (1949), Tough Assignment (1949), Abbott and Costello in the Foreign Legion (1950), Black Hand (1950), The Asphalt Jungle (1950), The Desert Hawk (1950), Hurricane Island (1951), and My Favorite Spy (1951). Lawrence’s career in Hollywood ended in the early 1950s when revelations that he had briefly been a member of the Communist party in the 1930s surfaced. Lawrence was subpoenaed by the House Un-American Activities Committee and reluctantly named other party members from his past. Subjected to the Hollywood Blacklist, Lawrence and his family moved to Italy where he continued to appear in such films as Vacation with a Gangster (1951), Three Corsairs (1952), Tormento del Passato (1952), Noi Peccatori (1952), Legione Straniera (1952), Jolanda, the Daughter of the Black Corsair (1952), Brothers of Italy (1952), Girls Marked Danger (1953), The Funniest Show on Earth (1953), Ballata Tragica (1954), Suor Maria (1955), New Moon (1955), La Catena dell’Odio (1955), Helen of Troy (1956), and Kill Her Gently (1957). He returned to Hollywood in 1959, where he worked as a director for such television series as Maverick, Lawman, Rawhide, and 77 Sunset Strip. Lawrence returned to the screen as a crime boss in the 1963 action film Johnny Cool. He also produced, directed and scripted the 1965 feature Nightmare in the Sun starring Ursula Andress and John Derek. Lawrence continued to appear in such films as Due Mafiosi Contro Al Capone (1966), Johnny Tiger (1966), Savage Pampas (1966), Custer of the West (1967), King of Kong Island (1968), Krakatoa, East of Java (1969), The Five Man Army (1969), Pursuit of Treasure (1970), Dream No Evil (1970), The Kremlin Letter (1970), and the 1971 James Bond film Diamonds Are Forever as a henchman who tosses Lana Wood’s char-

Obituaries • 2005

220

acter, Plenty O’Toole, from a high-rise hotel room into a swimming pool. Lawrence produced, directed, wrote, and co-starred with his daughter, Toni Lawrence, in the 1972 horror film Daddy’s Deadly Darling (aka The Pigs and The Strange Exorcism of Lynn Hart). He continued to appear in such films as Frasier, the Sensuous Lion (1973), The Man with the Golden Gun (1974), Marathon Man (1976), A Piece of the Action (1977), Foul Play (1978), Revenge of the Pink Panther (1978), Goin’ Coconuts (1978), Hot Stuff (1979), Swap Meet (1979), Cataclysm (1980), Super Fuzz (1980), Cat and Dog (1982), Night Train to Terror (1985), The Big Easy (1987), Blood Red (1989), Ruby (1992), Newsies (1992), Four Rooms (1995), From Dusk Till Dawn (1996), End of Days (1999), The Shipping News (2001), and his final, Looney Tunes: Back in Action (2003) as an Acme Vice President. Lawrence was also seen in the tele-films Honor Thy Father (1973), Switch (1975), Terror at Alcatraz (1982), Donor (1990), and Gotti (1996) as crime boss Carlo Gambino. His other television credits include episodes of Wagon Train, Playhouse 90, The Rifleman, Peter Gunn, M Squad, Tightrope, Johnny Staccato, The Detectives Starring Robert Taylor, The Untouchables, Zane Grey Theater, Bronco, Richard Diamond, Private Detective, The Deputy, Lawman, Whispering Smith, Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre, Petticoat Junction, Mister Ed, The Rat Patrol, Mannix, Bonanza, Here’s Lucy, The Doris Day Show, Nichols, McCloud, Switch, The Rookies, Baretta, CHiPs, Wonder Woman, The Dukes of Hazzard, Star Trek: The Next Generation, ER, and Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. Lawrence wrote an autobiography, Long Time No See: Confessions of a Hollywood Gangster, which was released in 1991. Lawrence was married to writer Fanya Foss for 53 years until her death in 1995. • Los Angeles Times, Dec. 1, 2005, B10; New York Times, Dec. 3, 2005, C14; Times (of London), Dec. 14, 2005, 61; Variety, Dec. 5, 2005, 65.

LAWTON, HARRY Author Harry W. Lawton died in Dana Point, California, following a long illness on November 20, 2005. He was 77. Lawton was born on December 3, 1927. He was the author of the 1960 Willie Boy: A Desert Manhunt, about the hunt for an American Indian charged with killing his girlfriend’s father in 1909. The book served as the inspiration for the 1969 film, Tell Them Willie Boy Is Here, starring Robert Redford and Robert Blake. • Los Angeles Times, Dec. 5, 2005, B9; New York Times, Dec. 7, 2005, B10.

John Laxdal

2005. He was 41. Layne was born in Lynchburg, Virginia, on December 29, 1963. He had worked in films and television for the past several years, appearing in small roles in the films Anger Management, Spider-Man II, and Starsky and Hutch. He also appeared in episodes of Just Shoot Me, The West Wing, Judging Amy, and Will & Grace.

LEAVITT, NORMAN Character actor Norman Leavitt died on December 11, 2005. He was 92. Leavitt was born in Lansing, Michigan, on December 1, 1913. He was featured in numerous films from the 1940s including The Spider Woman Strikes Back (1946), The Harvey Girls (1946), Idea Girl (1946), The Hoodlum Saint (1946), Two Sisters from Boston (1946), The Runaround (1946), The Unfinished Dance (1947), Daisy Kenyon (1947), If Winter Comes (1947), The Big Clock (1948), Best Man Wins (1948), A Foreign Affair (1948), The Walls of Jericho (1948), Music Man (1948), The Luck of the Irish (1948), The Three Musketeers (1948), That Wonderful Urge (1948), Yellow Sky (1949), Slattery’s Hurricane (1949), The Reckless Moment (1949), The Inspector General (1949), Mule Train (1950), A Woman of Distinction (1950), Side Street (1950), The Flame and the Arrow (1950), The Return of Jesse James (1950), Harvey (1950), The Killer That Stalked New York (1950), California Passage (1950), Vengeance Valley (1951), The Red Badge of Courage (1951), M (1951), Show Boat (1951), Comin’ Round the Mountain (1951), Mr. Belvedere Rings

LAXDAL, JON Icelandic actor and director Jon Laxdal died in Kaiserstuhl, Switzerland, on May 15, 2005. He was 71. Laxdal was born in Isafjorour, Iceland, on June 7, 1933. He spent much of his career performing and directing stage productions. He also appeared in several films including Brekkukotsannal (1972) and The Polar Bear King (1991), and the television series Nirgendwo ist Poenichen (1980) and Engels & Consorten (1986). Laxdal became a citizen of Switzerland in 1994. LAYNE, CHUCK Actor Chuck Layne died of complications from AIDS in Los Angeles on April 14,

Norman Leavitt

221 the Bell (1951), The Lady and the Bandit (1951), Drums in the Deep South (1951), Elopement (1951), The Bushwhackers (1952), For Men Only (1952), Deadline — U.S.A. (1952), Mutiny (1952), The Merry Widow (1952), O. Henry’s Full House (1952), Stars and Stripes Forever (1952), The Stooge (1953), Off Limits (1953), The Blue Gardenia (1953), Ride, Vaquero! (1953), Hannah Lee (1953), The Moonlighter (1953), Combat Squad (1953), The Long, Long Trailer (1954), Living It Up (1954), The Kentuckian (1955), Kismet (1955), It’s a Dog’s Life (1955), Inside Detroit (1956), Fury at Gunsight Pass (1956), When Gangland Strikes (1956), The Ten Commandments (1956), Friendly Persuasion (1956), Stagecoach to Fury (1956), The Brass Legend (1956), The Quiet Gun (1957), Fury at Showdown (1957), God Is My Partner (1957), The Girl in the Gold Stockings (1957), Rockabilly Baby (1957), Teenage Monster (1958), Live Fast, Die Young (1958), The Sheepman (1958), The Left Handed Gun (1958), The Rookie (1960), Elmer Gantry (1960), Young Jesse James (1960), Cinderfella (1960), Swingin’ Along (1961), Saintly Sinners (1962), The Three Stooges in Orbit (1962), Period of Adjustment (1962), Billie Rose’s Jumbo (1962), Showdown (1963), Summer Magic (1963), The Patsy (1964), Looking for Love (1964), McHale’s Navy Joins the Air Force (1965), Boy, Did I Get a Wrong Number! (1966), The Marriage of a Young Stockbroker (1971), and The Day of the Locust (1975). Leavitt also appeared frequently on television, guest starring in episodes of The Roy Rogers Show, Stories of the Century, Soldiers of Fortune, The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin, The Ford Television Theatre, General Electric Theater, Studio 57, The Silent Service, Navy Log, Casey Jones, Flight, State Trooper, December Bride, The Texan, Trackdown, Peter Gunn, Men into Space, One Step Beyond, The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour, Leave It to Beaver, M Squad, Shirley Temple’s Storybook, The Brothers Brannagan, Checkmate, The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp, Gunslinger, Stagecoach West, Whispering Smith, Tales of Wells Fargo, Dennis the Menace, Frontier Circus, The Bob Cummings Show, Boris Karloff ’s Thriller, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, The Lucy Show, Laramie, Gunsmoke, The Andy Griffith Show, Perry Mason, The Rifleman, The Wide Country, Wagon Train, Kraft Suspense Theatre, Rawhide, The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, The Twilight Zone, Mister Ed, Burke’s Law, The Addams Family, Green Acres, The Beverly Hillbillies, Petticoat Junction, The Green Hornet, Laredo, Man from U.N.C.L.E, Bonanza, Lost in Space, The Big Valley, Cimarron Strip, The Guns of Will Sonnett, Wild Wild West, Daniel Boone, The Virginian, Alias Smith and Jones, Mayberry R.F.D., Longstreet, Kung Fu, and Quincy. Leavitt retired from the screen in the mid– 1970s.

LEDOGOROV , IGOR Russian actor Igor Ledogorov died in Hamilton, New Zealand, on February 10, 2005. He was 72. Ledogorov was born in Moscow, Russia, on May 9, 1932. He appeared in numerous films from the early 1970s including The Ballad of Bering and His Friends (1970), Teenagers in Space (1974), The Legend of Till Ullenspiegel (1976), A Portrait with Rain (1977), Front Beyond the Front Line (1977), The Late Berry (1978), The Path of the Golden Beasts

2005 • Obituaries

Igor Ledogorov

(1979), Poem of Wings (1979), The Smoke of the Home Country (1980), They Were Actors (1981), the science fiction film To the Stars By Hard Ways (1981), About Oddities of Love (1983), God, Let Me Die... (1988), and the 1997 television mini-series The Hunting Season.

LEDOUX, CHRIS Country singer and songwriter Chris LeDoux died after a long battle with liver cancer on March 9, 2005. He was 56. LeDoux was born in Biloxi, Mississippi, on October 2, 1948, and was raised in Austin, Texas. He was a leading rodeo competitor in the 1970s, earning the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association title of world champion bareback rider in 1976. LeDoux also began writing and recording music, forming his own label, Lucky Man Music, in 1973. He recorded over twenty albums which were primarily marketed to rodeo audiences including Old Cowboy Heroes, Rodeo Songs, and Wild and Wooly. LeDoux signed with Capitol Records in the early 1990s, releasing the popular albums Western Underground and Whatcha Gonna Do With a Cowboy. LeDoux had a hit record with the latter album’s title track, which also featured the vocals of Garth Brooks. LeDoux also collaborated with such artists as Toby Keith and Jon Bon Jovi. • Los Angeles Times, Mar. 10, 2005, B10; New York Times, Mar. 11, 2005, A21; People, Mar. 28, 2005, 107.

Chris LeDoux

Obituaries • 2005

222

LEDOUX, MATHIAS French film and television director Mathias Ledoux died in a Paris hospital after a long illness on March 11, 2005. He was 51. He directed many documentaries and concert films including The Three Tenors, Paris 1998 (1998). He also directed the 2000 feature film Across the Road, and the 2003 mystery film Three Blind Mice. Ledoux’s other credits include the tele-films Chaplin Today: A Woman of Paris (2003), Monica: Irresistible (2003), and Claude Berri, le Dernie Nabab (2003).

Lee Eun-Joo

Mathias Ledoux

LEE, DAN Canadian animator Dan Lee died of lung cancer in a Berkeley, California, hospital, on January 15, 2005. He was 35. Lee began working on cartoons and television commercials at Kennedy Cartoons in Toronto and Colossal Pictures in San Francisco. He joined Pixar as a sketch artist, character designer and animator in 1996. He worked on such animated films as A Bug’s Life (1998), A Toy Story 2 (1999), Monsters, Inc. (2002), and 2003’s Finding Nemo, designing the title character. • Los Angeles Times, Feb. 3, 2005, B9; Variety, Feb. 14, 2005, 55.

Gunsan, South Korea, on November 16, 1980. She was best known for her roles as the suicidal mistress in the 2004 Korean film The Scarlet Letter. She had previously appeared in the films If It Snows on Christmas (1998), Virgin Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors (2000), Bloody Beach (2000), Bungee Jumping of Their Own (2001), Friends and Lover (2002), Unborn but Forgotten (2002), Garden of Heaven (2003), Au Revoir, UFO (2004), and Tae Guk Gi: The Brotherhood of War (2004). • Variety, Mar. 7, 2005, 62.

LEE, GORDON “PORKY” Gordon Lee, the child actor who played Spanky’s chubby kid brother, Porky, in the Our Gang comedy shorts in the 1930s, died of complications from lung and brain cancer in a Minneapolis, Minnesota, nursing home on October 16, 2005. He was 71. Lee was born Eugene Lee in Fort Worth, Texas, on October 25, 1933. He was cast in Hal Roach’s Our Gang comedies because of his resemblance to Spanky McFarland. Porky, who popularized the catchphrase “otay,” appeared in many of the shorts between 1935 and 1939, often teaming with Bill “Buckwheat” Thomas against the older Spanky and Alfalfa. Lee was seen in the shorts Little Sinner (1935), Our Gang Follies of 1936 (1935), The Pinch Singer (1936), Divot Diggers (1936), Second Childhood (1936), Bored of Education (1936), Two Too Young (1936), Pay as You Exit (1936), Spooky Hooky (1936), General Spanky (1936), Reunion in Rhythm (1937), Glove Taps (1937),

Dan Lee

LEE EUN -JOO South Korean actress Lee Eun-joo was found dead at her Seongnam, South Korea, apartment after committing suicide by hanging on February 22, 2005. She was 24. Lee was born in

Gordon “Porky” Lee

223 Hearts Are Thumps (1937), Rushin’ Ballet (1937), Three Smart Boys (1937), Roamin’ Holiday (1937), Night ’n Gales (1937), Fishy Tales (1937), Framing Youth (1937), The Pigskin Palooka (1937), Mail and Female (1937), Our Gang Follies of 1938 (1937), Bear Facts (1938), Three Men in a Tub (1938), Came the Brawn (1938), Feed ’Em and Weep (1938), The Awful Tooth (1938), Hide and Shriek (1938), The Little Ranger (1938), Party Fever (1938), Aladdin’s Lantern (1938), Men in Fright (1938), Football Romeo (1938), Canned Fishing (1938), Practical Jokers (1938), Alfalfa’s Aunt (1939), Tiny Troubles (1939), Duel Personalities (1939), Clown Princes (1939), Cousin Wilbur (1939), Joy Scouts (1939), Dog Daze (1939), Auto Antics (1939). The Our Gang shorts became known as The Little Rascals when the began appearing on television in the 1950s. Lee worked as a schoolteacher during most of his adult career, and moved to Minnesota after retiring. • Los Angeles Times, Oct. 23, 2005, B14; New York Times, Oct. 22, 2005, C14; People, Nov. 7, 2005, 98.

LEE, TAMARA Adult film actress Tamara Lee died of complications from AIDS in Whittier, California, on February 3, 2005. She was 35. Lee was born on July 30, 1969. She starred in numerous adult films in the late 1980s and early 1990s including Foolish Pleasures (1988), Torrid House (1989), Secret Cravings (1989), One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Breast (1989), Open House (1989), Live In, Love In (1989), The Invisible Girl (1989), Hotel Paradise (1989), Hard at Work (1989), Cat on a Hot Sin Roof (1989), Born for Porn (1989), Bazooka County 2 (1989), Sex Kittens (1990), New Girls in Town (1990), National Poontang’s Summer Vacation (1990), Haunted Passions (1990), Wild Goose Chase (1991), and Soft Bodies, Curves Ahead (1993). She left films to concentrate on her tours as a dancer at topless clubs.

2005 • Obituaries

Rene Le Hanaff

dale (1934), Port of Shadows (1938), Marcel Carne’s Daybreak (1939), Beating Heart (1940), Who Killed Santa Claus? (1941), Mlle. Desiree (1942), Women Without Names (1949), The Doctor of Stalingrad (1958), Twelve Hours by the Clock (1959), Love Play (1960), and Lafayette (1962). Le Hanaff also directed a dozen films in the 1930s and 1940s including Precious Fools (1937), L’Amant de Borneo (1942), Colonel Chabert (1943), St. Val’s Mystery (1945), Hoboes in Paradise (1946), and Scandale (1948).

LEHMAN, ERNEST Oscar-nominated screenwriter Ernest Lehman died of a heart attack in Los Angeles on July 2, 2005. He was 89. Lehman was born in Manhattan on December 8, 1915, and raised in Woodmere, New York. He graduated from New York’s City College and began writing fiction for popular magazines in the 1930s. Lehman also worked as an assistant to a Broadway gossip columnist in the late 1930s. This experience formed the backdrop for his 1950 novella Tell Me About It Tomorrow. The story was adapted for the 1957 film Sweet Smell of Success starring Burt Lancaster and Tony Curtis, with a script by Lehman and Clifford Odets. He also scripted the films The Inside Story (1948), Executive Suite (1954), and Sabrina (1954) which earned him an Oscar nomination. Lehman adapted the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical The King and I for the screen in 1956, and scripted the 1956 film Somebody Up There Likes Me. He earned another

Tamara Lee

LE HANAFF, RENE French film director and editor Rene Le Hanaff died in Belley, Ain, France, on January 5, 2005. He was 102. Le Hanaff was born in Saigon, French Indochina (now Vietnam), to French parents in 1902. He began working in films in France in the early sound period, editing Rene Claire’s comedies Under the Roofs of Paris (1930), Liberty for Us (1931), and July 13 (1933). He also edited such films as Le Scan-

Ernest Lehman

Obituaries • 2005

224

Academy Award nomination for scripting Alfred Hitchcock’s 1959 thriller North by Northwest. He also wrote the 1960 film From the Terrace, and was again nominated for an Oscar for adapting the hit Broadway musical West Side Story for the screen in 1961. He scripted 1963’s The Prize and the hit musical film The Sound of Music starring Julie Andrews in 1965. Lehman wrote and produced the films Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf ? which earned him Oscar nominations for best script and best picture, and for best picture nominee Hello, Dolly! in 1969. Lehman produced, directed and scripted the 1972 adaptation of Philip Roth’s novel Portnoy’s Complaint. He also wrote Family Plot (1976) and Black Sunday (1977). Lehman’s novel The French Atlantic Affair was adapted as a television mini-series in 1979. He also wrote the novel Farewell Performance (1982), and a collection of essays, Screening Sickness and Other Tales of Tinsel Town (1982). He served as president of the Writers Guild West from 1983 to 1985. • Los Angeles Times, July 6, 2005, B10; New York Times, July 6, 2005, C15; Time, July 18, 2005, 25; Times (of London), July 7, 2005, 60; Variety, July 11, 2005, 44.

LEIGH-HUNT, RONALD British character actor Ronald Leigh-Hunt died in England on September 12, 2005. He was 88. Leigh-Hunt was born in London on October 5, 1916. He began his career on stage before making his film debut in Blackout in 1950. He was also featured in the films Tread Softly (1952), Flannelfoot (1952), Colonel March Investigates (1952), Paul Temple Returns (1952), The Broken Horseshoe (1953), Three Steps to the Gallows (1954), Shadow of a Man (1954), Tiger by the Tail (1955), Hi-Jack (1956), Assignment Redhead (1956), The League of Gentlemen (1959), Piccadilly Third Stop (1960), The Hand (1960), Sink the Bismarck! (1960), Oscar Wilde (1960), A Coming-Out Party (1961), We Joined the Navy (1962), The Survivor (1962), The Invisible Asset (1963), Zoo Baby (1964), Seventy Deadly Pills (1964), The Third Secret (1964), The Liquidator (1965), Curse of the Voodoo (1965), Where the Bullets Fly (1966), Khartoum (1966), Hostile Witness (1968), Clegg (1969), Universal Soldier (1971), Le Mans (1971), Baxter! (1973), Mohammed, Messenger of God (1976), The Omen (1976), and Who Is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe? (1978). Leigh-Hunt starred as King

Ronald Leigh-Hunt

Arthur in the 1956 television series The Adventures of Sir Lancelot, and was B.J. Thornton in the 1964 series Crossroads. He was Colonel Buchan in the series Freewheelers in the late 1960s and early 1970s, and was Bishop in Emmerdale Farm in 1980. Leigh-Hunt also appeared in the tele-films Melody of Hate (1976), Ike (1979), Lord Peter Wimsey (1987), Poor Little Rich Girl: The Barbara Hutton Story (1987), and the 1992 adaptation of Frankenstein as Alphonse. His other television credits include episodes of Colonel March of Scotland Yard, The Vise, White Hunter, Sword of Freedom, The New Adventures of Charlie Chan, O.S.S., William Tell, Ivanhoe, Interpol Calling, Four Just Men, The Pursuers, Ghost Squad, Danger Man, The Avengers, Sir Francis Drake, Z Cars as Assistant Chief Constable Harrison, The Saint, The Human Jungle, Detective, Thorndyke, The Saint, The Third Man, The Wednesday Thriller, The Troubleshooters, Redcap, Softly Softly, The Informer, Dixon of Dock Green, Doctor Who, Out of the Unknown, Department S, Special Branch, Van der Valk, Oil Strike North, Warship, The Professionals, Blakes 7, The Enigma Files, Citizen Smith, Minder, Airline, Remington Steele, and One Foot in the Grave. • Times (of London), Sept. 24, 2005, 76.

LEIGHTON, LINDA see JOHNSON, LINDA LEIGHTON, WARNER Film and television editor Warner E. Leighton died in Cambria, California, on March 20, 2005. He was 74. Leighton was born on July 31, 1930. He began his career working as a sound editor in the 1958 Cinerama production of South Seas Adventure. He subsequently moved to television, where he edited the animated cartoons The Flintstones, The Secret Squirrel Show, Space Ghost, Shazzan!, Moby Dick and the Mighty Mightor, The Fantastic Four, and Birdman and the Galaxy Trio. He also edited the animated features Hey There, It’s Yogi Bear (1964) and The Man Called Flintstone (1966). He worked on several films for action director H.B. Halicki including the original Gone in 60 Seconds (1974), The Junkman (1982), and Deadline Auto Theft (1983). Leighton’s other credits include the films The American Dreamer (1971), Wolf Lake (1978), C.H.O.M.P.S. (1979), and The Trouble with Spies (1987), and the tele-film Shootout in a One-Dog Town (1974) and Louis L’Amour’s Down the Long Hills (1986). He also edited the Burt Kennedy Western tele-films Once Upon a Texas Train (1988) and Where the Hell’s That Gold?!!? (1988). Leighton subsequently returned to sound editing, working on Robert Townsend’s Hollywood Shuffle (1987), and the tele-films The Last Innocent Man (1987) and Third Degree Burn (1989). He retired to Durango, Colorado, in the late 1980s. • Variety, Apr. 11, 2005, 59. LEITERMAN, RICHARD Canadian cinematographer Richard Leiterman died in Vancouver, Canada, on July 14, 2005. He was 70. Leiterman worked in films from the early 1960s, serving as director of photography for numerous features, documentaries, and television productions. Leiterman’s film credits include The Field Day (1963), Running Away Backwards (1964), High School (1968), The World of One in Five

225

2005 • Obituaries

Richard Leiterman

Tina Leiu

(1969), A Married Couple (1969), Goin’ Down the Road (1970), Rip-Off (1971), Wedding in White (1972), Hamlet (1973), Cavendish Country (1973), Catskinner Keen (1973), Between Friends (1973), Van’s Camp (1974), Thunderbirds in China (1974), Teenage Psycho Killer (1975), Who Has Seen the Wind (1977), Four Portraits (1978) which he also directed, Wild Horse Hank (1979), I, Maureen (1980), Utilities (1981), Surfacing (1981), Ticket to Heaven (1981), Silence of the North (1981), Hail Columbia! (1982), Gulfstream (1982), Mother Lode (1982), Change of Heart (1984), My American Cousin (1985), Rad (1986), And Then You Die (1987), Watchers (1988), State Park (1990), Cadence (1990), Change of Heart (1992), Pocahontas: The Legend (1995), The Ex (1997), Epicenter (2000), and Right Hook: A Tall Tail (2004). Leiterman was also cinematographer for the television productions Cougar (1984), He’s Fired, She’s Hired (1984), Striker’s Mountain (1985), Stone Fox (1987), Bluffing It (1987), Higher Ground (1988), The Squamish Five (1988), The People Across The Lake (1988), Dead Reckoning (1990), Stephen King’s It (1990), And the Sea Will Tell (1991), Blackmail (1991), A Mother’s Justice (1991), City Boy (1992), The Comrades of Summer (1992), To Grandmother’s House We Go (1992), A Killer Among Friends (1992), Without a Kiss Goodbye (1993), Double, Double, Toil and Trouble (1993), No Child of Mine (1993), Witness to the Execution (1994), Don’t Talk to Strangers (1994), The Disappearance of Vonnie (1994), How the West Was Fun (1994), A Christmas Romance (1994), The Cold Heart of a Killer (1996), When Friendship Kills (1996), She Woke Up Pregnant (1996), Talk to Me (1996), Country Justice (1997), In the Arms of Danger (1997), The Alibi (1997), The Right Connections (1997), Cold Squad (1998), Nobody Lives Forever (1998), The Spree (1998), Greener Fields (1998), Hayley Wagner, Star (1999), At the Mercy of a Stranger (1999), and Popcorn with Maple Syrup (2004).

Kickboxing Academy (1997), Devil and Angel (1997), Hell Mountain (1998), and Dark Confessions (1998). She starred as Jenny, the host, in the 2002 television series Hotel Erotica. Billed as Tina Wiseman, she starred in the 2005 film Hey DJ and recorded several dance tracks for the film.

LEIU, TINA

Samoan actress Tina Leiu died of pulmonary edema in Freeport, Bahamas, on February 20, 2005. She was 29. Leiu was born in Honolulu, Hawaii, on September 26, 1975. She began singing and performing professionally in the mid–1990s and was featured in numerous commercial and print ads. She also appeared in the independent films Miami (1997),

LENART, ERNEST German actor Ernest Lenart died in Germany on January 6, 2005. He was 92. He performed on the German stage in the 1930s before fleeing the Nazi regime and settling in the United States. He continued to work as a stage actor and made several appearances in films. His film credits include Target Unknown (1951), Dear Mother, I’m All Right (1972), Seaside, Dusk (2000), and Walk on Water (2004). He also appeared in the 1976 television miniseries 21 Hours at Munich, the 1983 mini-series Wagner, and an episode of the television series Millennium.

Ernest Lenart

LE PERSON, PAUL French actor Paul Le Person died in Paris on August 8, 2005. He was 74. Le Person was born in Argenteul, France, on February 10, 1931. He was a leading performer on the French stage and appeared in over 100 films from the early 1960s. His numerous film credits include A Matter of Resistance (1966), Diamond Safari (1966), A Man and a Woman (1966), Idiot in Paris (1967), Alexander (1967),

Obituaries • 2005

226

Paul Le Person

The Thief of Paris (1967), Pillaged (1967), The Return of Monte Cristo (1968), The Crook (1970), A Loser (1971), One Is Always Too Good to Women (1972), Mont-Dragon (1971), The Troubles of Alfred (1972), The Tall Blond Man with One Black Shoe (1972), The Last Train (1973), Violins at the Ball (1974), The Phantom of Liberty (1974), The Return of the Tall Blond Man with One Black Shoe (1974), Show Business (1975), Hothead (1979), The Proud Ones (1980), The Wings of the Dove (1981), Neige (1981), The Judge (1984), The Twin (1984), Monsieur de Pourceaugnac (1985), Douce France (1986), L’Autrichienne (1990), The Elegant Criminal (1990), The Last Season (1991), Amour, Amor (1992), The Ebony White Man (1992), Bernie (1996), The Creator (1999), Officer’s Ward (2001), and Viper in the Fist (2004). He was also a frequent performer on French television, starring in the series La Malle de Hambourg (1972), Les Chemins de Pierre (1972), and Bonjour Paris (1976), and television productions of Tartuffe (1971), Les Thibault (1972), Salavin (1975), Le Gentleman des Antipodes (1976), Adios (1976), Take Me to the Ritz (1977), L’Epreuve (1980), Les Mysteres de Paris (1980), Docteur Teyran (1980), Livingstone (1981), Marcheloup (1982), Paris-Saint-Lazare (1982), Manipulations (1984), Les Copains de la Marne (1985), L’Or Noir de Lornac (1987), Talleyrand ou Les Lions de la Revanche (1989), Le Retour d’ Arsene Lupin (1989), Herlock Sholmes s’en Mele (1994), Le Tabatiere de l’Empereur (1995), Le Masque de Jade (1995), Miracle a l’Eldorado (1997), Le Blanc et le Rouge (2000), and L’Evangile selon Aime (2005).

LERRO, ROCCO Italian stuntman and actor Rocco Lerro died in Italy on August 21, 2005. Lerro worked as a stuntman on numerous films from the late 1960s. He appeared in small roles or performed stunt work in such films as Between God, the Devil and a Winchester (1968), Have a Good Funeral, My Friend ... Sartana Will Pay (1970), Heads I Kill You, Tails You’re Dead! They Call Me Hallalujah (1971), Sting of the West (1972), And They Smelled the Strange, Exciting, Dangerous Scent of Dollars (1973), The Citizen Rebels (1974), Watch Out, We’re Mad (1974), The Loves and Times of Scaramouche (1975), Crime Busters (1976), Django Rides Again (1976), Cipolla Colt (1976), The Con Artists (1976), Drug Street (1977), Counterfeit Commandos (1977), The Cynic, the Rat and the Fist (1977), Emanu-

Rocco Lerro (left, with director Enzo Castellari and actor Fabio Testa)

elle and the Girls of Madame Claude (1978), The Humanoid (1979), The Shark Hunter (1979), From Corleone to Brooklyn (1979), The House by the Edge of the Lake (1979), Dr. Butcher, M.D. (1980), Day of the Cobra (1980), 1990: The Bronx Warriors (1982), Atilla (1982), The Raiders of Atlantis (1983), Hercules (1983), Deadly Impact (1984), Taureg: The Desert Warrior (1984), Light Blast (1985), Brothers in Blood (1986), The Secret of the Sahara (1987), and Leviathan (1989).

LESBERG, JACK Jazz bassist Jack Lesberg died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease at the Lillian Booth Actor’s Home in Englewood, New Jersey, on September 17, 2005. He was 85. Lesberg was born in Boston, Massachusetts, on February 14, 1920. He played in numerous local clubs from the 1930s and was a survivor the fire at the Cocoanut Grove nightclub there that killed nearly 500 people in 1942. Lesberg moved to New York in 1943, where he performed with such artists as Eddie Condon, Benny Goodman, and Earl “Fatha” Hines. He began playing with Louis Armstrong’s orchestra in the late 1940s, and toured with the Armstrong All Stars. He also performed with the New York City Symphony Orchestra under Leonard Bernstein. Lesberg was heard on the soundtracks for several films including Funny Girl (1968), Silent Movie (1976), and Everyone Says I Love You (1996). • Los Angeles Times, Oct. 6, 2005, B11; New York Times, Oct. 5, 2005, B10; Times (of London), Oct. 13, 2005, 70.

Jack Lesberg (right, with Jack Teagarden)

227 LESHAY, JEROME Television producer and director Jerome Leshay died of respirator failure in Los Angeles on December 8, 2005. He was 79. Leshay was born in New York City on February 28, 1926. He began his career in television at CBS, where he worked on such series as The Judy Garland Show, The Jack Benny Show, The George Gobel Show, Playhouse 90, and Art Linkletter’s House Party. Leshay was also assistant director for the 1970 drama A Storm in Summer starring Peter Ustinov. He produced the British television series Let There Be Love in the 1970s, and directed episodes of Fernwood 2Night, America 2Night, and the daytime soap opera The Days of Our Lives. Leshay was also a composer whose songs include “The Sands of Time” and “Nice Girls Don’t Stay for Breakfast.” He was a director for NBC Studios in Burbank during the 1980s before his retirement in 1990. • Variety, Jan. 2, 2006, 36. LESSER, JULIAN “BUD” Film producer Julian “Bud” Lesser died of cancer in Rancho Mirage, California, on March 22, 2005. He was 90. He was born in San Francisco, California, on January 18, 1915, the son of producer Sol Lesser. The younger Lesser was an assistant producer on his father’s 1948 film Tarzan and the Mermaids, and produced several films in the 1940s and 1950s including Michael O’Halloran (1948), Massacre River (1949), Whispering Smith Vs. Scotland Yard (1951), Jungle Headhunters (1951), Death of an Angel (1952), and The Saint’s Girl Friday (1953). He also produced the 1956 television series Bold Journey. • Los Angeles Times, Mar. 24, 2005, B11.

2005 • Obituaries

was a voice performer in the 1970 tele-film Santa Claus Is Comin’ to Town. Health problems forced her retirement from the voice field in the 1970s.

LEVENTHAL , HAROLD Folk music promoter and producer Harold Leventhal died at a New York City hospital on October 4, 2005. He was 86. Leventhal was born in Ellenville, New York, on May 24, 1919. He began working as a music promoter in the 1950s, showcasing the Weavers and Woody Guthrie. He also promoted Bob Dylan’s early concerts, and worked with Arlo Guthrie, Pete Seeger, Johnny Cash, Joan Baez, Harry Belafonte, Peter, Paul and Mary, and the Mamas and the Papas. He was an associate producer for Arlo Guthrie’s 1969 film Alice’s Restaurant, and produced the 1976 Oscar-nominated film biography of Woody Guthrie, Bound for Glory. He was also producer of the documentaries The Weavers: Wasn’t That a Time (1982), Woody Guthrie: Hard Travelin’ (1984), and We Shall Overcome (1989). Leventhal earned a Grammy Award for producing the 1989 album Folkways: A Vision Shared — A Tribute to Woody Guthrie and Leadbelly. • Los Angeles Times, Oct. 7, 2005, B11; New York Times, Oct. 6, 2005, B10; Time, Oct. 17, 2005, 27; Times (of London), Oct. 7, 2005, 77.

LESTER , ROBIE Singer and actress Robie Lester died of cancer in a Burbank, California, hospital on June 14, 2005. She was 75. Lester worked as a Disneyland Story Reader on Disney’s seven-inch book and record sets for seven years. She performed on numerous recordings including the title song of the 1964 film The Three Lives of Thomasina, and the Sandpipers’ hit recording, “Guantanamera,” in 1966. She was the voice of Polly Plum in the 1963 cartoon series The Funny Company, and was a voice performer in the series Famous Adventures of Mr. Magoo and Devlin. She was the singing voice for Eva Gabor for the Disney films The Aristocats (1970) and The Rescuers (1977), and

LEVEY, STAN Jazz drummer Stan Levey died of complications from surgery for jaw cancer in a Van Nuys, California, hospital on April 19, 2005. He was

Robie Lester

Stan Levey

Harold Leventhal

Obituaries • 2005

228

79. Levey was born on April 5, 1926. He began performing with Dizzy Gillespie’s band in Philadelphia in the early 1940s. He later moved to New York where he performed with Oscar Pettiford. Levey also played in bands headed by Woody Herman and Benny Goodman, and spent two years with Stan Kenton’s orchestra in the early 1950s. He settled in Los Angeles in 1954, where he worked as a studio musician on numerous albums, and film and television soundtracks. • Los Angeles Times, Apr. 22, 2005, B9; New York Times, May 15, 2005, 35; Times (of London), Apr. 27, 2005, 65.

LEVI -TANAI , SARA Israeli choreographer Sara Levi-Tanai died in a Ramat Gan, Israel, hospital on October 3, 2005. She was 94. She was born in Jerusalem in 1911. She worked as a music teacher and organized holiday pageants during World War II. She began training Jewish refugees from Yemen later in the decade and formed the Sara Levi-Tanai company in 1949. The company soon became known as the Inbal Dance Theater, which toured Europe and the United States in the 1950s. The troupe incorporated Yemenite rituals and folk customs in its performances. She continued to lead Inbal until 1991, when her frequent quarrels with political officials led to her ouster as artistic director. Levi-Tanai continued her career as a teacher and lecturer and her notable works, including Yemenite Wedding and The Story of Ruth, were often staged. • New York Times, Oct. 6, 2005, B10.

Sara Levi-Tanai

Mariana Levy

LEWINE, RICHARD Television producer and Broadway composer Richard Lewine died in New York City on May 19, 2005. He was 94. Lewine was born on July 28, 1920. He composed music for Broadway productions dating back to the 1930s including The Fireman’s Flame (1937), Naughty Naught ’00 (1939), Make Mine Manhattan (1948), and The Girls Against the Boys (1959). Lewine also produced the 1959 Broadway play Look to the Lillies. He joined CBS as vice-president in charge of color in 1957, producing Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Cinderella with Julie Andrews. He also produced television productions of Aladdin and several specials featuring Noel Coward including Together with Music, Blithe Spirit, and This Happy Breed. He also produced the network’s The Young People’s Concerts with Leonard Bernstein. Lewine became an independent producer in the early 1960s, and produced the ABC music series Hootenanny in 1963. He earned an Emmy Award for producing Barbra Streisand’s first television special My Name Is Barbra in 1965. His other television productions include 1965’s The Dangerous Christmas of Robin Hood starring Liza Minnelli, Rick Nelson’s On the Flipside and the musical tribute Rodgers and Hart Today. Lewine was also the author of the reference work The Encyclopedia of Theater Music: A Comprehensive Listing of More Than 4,000 Songs from Broadway and Hollywood. • Los Angeles Times, May 25, 2005, B14; New York Times, May 26, 2005, C18; Variety, May 30, 2005, 44.

LEVY, MARIANA Mexican television actress Mariana Levy died of a heart attack on a Mexico City street when an assailant attempted to steal her watch. She was 39. Levy was born in Mexico City on April 22, 1965, the daughter of news personality Talina Fernandez. She began her career as a singer in the 1980s and soon became a leading actress on Mexican television. She appeared in numerous series including Vivir Enamorada (1982), Martin Garatuza (1986), En Came Propia (1991), La Ultima Esperanza (1995), Leonela (1997), La Casa en la Playa (2000), Nuestra Casa (2002), and Amor Real (2003). She also appeared in several films including Rapunsell (1986), Sonata de Luna (1992), and Loving Ghosts (1994). Richard Lewine

229 LEWIS , LEONARD British television producer and director Leonard Lewis died in England on December 2, 2005. He was 78. Lewis was born in Tottenham, North London, on November 29, 1927. He began his career in the theater before joining the BBC in 1957. He worked with BBC Scotland until coming to London in 1963, where he directed such series as Z Cars, Softly Softly, Barlow at Large, and Adam Adamant Lives!. He also produced and directed the 1973 miniseries Jack the Ripper and the 1976 series Where the Boat Comes In. He moved to Yorkshire Television in 1979 where he produced the historical drama series Flamards. He also worked freelance, producing The Good Companions, EastEnders, and Rockliffe’s Babies, and directing productions of The Wilde Alliance (1978), Tales of the Unexpected (1979), Juliet Bravo (1980), The Good Companions (1980), The Chinese Detective (1981), The Prisoner of Zenda (1984), Brat Farrar (1986), and The Franchise Affair (1988). LICHFIELD, EARL OF Lord Lichfield, England’s photographic chronicler of the Swinging 60s and official photographer of the wedding of Prince Charles and Lady Diana in 1981, died of complications of a stroke in a London hospital on November 11, 2005. He was born Thomas Patrick John Anson on April 25, 1939. His mother, Princess Anne of Denmark, was the first cousin of Queen Elizabeth. He inherited the title of Lord Lichfield, becoming the 5th Earl after the death of his grandfather in 1960. He had an avid interest in photography from an early age and began working for Life and Queen magazines in the early 1960s. He was noted for numerous portraits of such celebrities as Mick Jagger, Roman Polanski, Margaret Thatcher, and Duke and Duchess of Windsor. He also photographed scantily clad models for calenders and did fashion photography for Vogue. Lichfield produced many photographic albums including The Most Beautiful Women (1981), A Royal Album (1982), and Hot Foot to Zabriskie Point (1985). His autobiography, Not the Whole Truth, was published in 1986. • Los Angeles Times, Nov. 12, 2005, B17; New York Times, Nov. 12, 2005, A13; Time, Nov. 21, 2005, 27; Times (of London), Nov. 12, 2005, 75.

2005 • Obituaries

LI-LI LI Veteran Chinese actress Li-li Li died in Beijing, China, on August 7, 2005. She was 90. Lili Li was born Qian Zhenzhen in Zhejiang, China, on June 2, 1915. She made her film debut at the age of 11 in a small role in The Hidden Hero of Yan Mountains (1926). She moved to Shanghai in 1927 and trained as a dancer. She was a leading actress in Chinese films in the 1930s, appearing in Volcano in the Blood (1932), Small Toys (1933), Daybreak (1933), The Big Road (1934), The Wolf Hill (1936), and Fight to the Last (1938). After her film career ended she became a teacher at the Beijing Film Academy.

Li-Li Li

LINDERT, CHRISTOPH German actor Christoph Lindert died in Germany on August 28, 2005. He was 67. Lindert was born in Dortmund, Germany, on July 10, 1938. He was a leading actor in film and television in Germany from the 1970s. Lindert appeared in the films The Willi Busch Report (1979), The Edge of Darkness (1983), Der Schlaf der Vernunft (1984), Making Contact (1985), Justiz (1993), and FotoSynthese (2005). He also appeared in television productions of Spare Parts (1979), Barriers (19870), Stella (1982), Tatort— Der Pott (1989), Die Schnelle Gerdi (1989), Todiches Alibi (1997), and Der Gerade Weg (1999).

Christoph Lindert Earl of Lichfield

LINDTNER, LOTHAR Norwegian actor Lothar Lindtner died in Bergen, Norway, on April 14,

Obituaries • 2005

230

Lothar Lindtner

Reggie “The Crusher” Lisowski

2005. He was 87. Lindtner was born in Bergen on July 22, 1917. He made his debut on stage at the age of eight in 1925. He performed primarily on the Norwegian stage from the 1930s, appearing with the Trondelag Theater. He also appeared in a handful of films during his career including The Stranger (1951), Millionaer for en Aften (1960), Hans Nielsen Hauge (1961), Bussen (1961), Exit (1970), The Witch Hunt (1981), and Kalle Och Anglama (1993). He also starred as Hjalmar Mjelde in the television series Offshore from 1999 to 2000.

tle while serving in the U.S. Army during World War II. He made his professional wrestling debut in November of 1949. He wrestled from the 1950s through the 1980s, often teaming with Dick the Bruiser. He captured championships throughout the United States and Canada. He defeated Verne Gagne for the AWA Title in July of 1963, but lost the belt back to Gagne in a rematch later in the month. He again won the AWA belt over Gagne in November of 1963, but Gagne reclaimed the belt the following month. Crusher teamed with Dick the Bruiser to capture the AWA World Tag Title from Ivan and Karol Kalmikoff in August of 1963. They were defeated for the belt by Verne Gagne and Moose Evans in February of 1964. They reclaimed the title later in the month and held the belts until their defeat by Larry Hennig and Harley Race in January of 1965. He teamed with Verne Gagne to take the belts back from Hennig and Race in July of 1965, but they lost a rematch the following month. Crusher defeated Mad Dog Vachon for the AWA Title in August of 1965. He was defeated by Vachon for the championship in November of 1965. Crusher reteamed with Dick the Bruiser for another successful championship bid against Hennig and Race in May of 1966. They lost the belts in a rematch in January of 1967. They held the WWA Tag Team Title several times in 1967. They were again AWA champions following their defeat of Mitsu Arakawa and Dr. Moto in December of 1968. They were defeated for the belts by Mad Dog and Butcher Vachon in August of 1969. Crusher replaced the late Hercules Cortez as Red Bastien’s partner in August of 1971, and they remained AWA World Tag Team champions until their defeat by Nick Bockwinkel and Ray Stevens in January of 1972. Crusher teamed with Billy Robinson in July of 1974 to beat Bockwinkel and Stevens for the title, but lost the rematch in October of 1974. Crusher again paired with Dick the Bruiser to beat Bockwinkel and Stevens in August of 1975. They held the belts until their defeat by Blackjack Lanza and Bobby Duncum in July of 1976. Crusher teamed with Tommy Rich to briefly hold the NWA Georgia Tag Team Title in September of 1979. Crusher made his final successful bid for the AWA tag belts with Baron Von Raschke in May of 1984, defeating Jerry Blackwell and Ken Patera for the belts. They relinquished the

LISKI, PAAVO Finnish actor Paavo Liski died in Helsinki, Finland, on November 8, 2005. He was 66. Liski was born in Vuoksela, Finland, on July 4, 1939. He was active in films from the late 1970s, appearing in such features as Poet and Muse (1978), The Unknown Soldier (1985), Petos (1988), The Champion (1992), Aapo (1994), Good Deeds (1997), Gold Fever in Lapland (1999), Puu Kulkee (2000), The Life of Aleksis Kivi (2002), Sibelius (2003), Joensuun Elli (2004), and Shadow of the Eagle (2005).

Paavo Liski

LISOWSKI , REGGIE “THE CRUSHER ” Reggie Lisowski, who was one of professional wrestling’s greatest brawlers, the Crusher, died of complications from surgery to remove a brain tumor in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on October 22, 2005. He was 79. Lisowski was born on July 11, 1926. He learned to wres-

231

2005 • Obituaries

title to the Road Warriors in August of 1984. Crusher suffered from a heart attack in September of 1991, but recovered. • Los Angeles Times, Nov. 1, 2005, B9.

LITTLE MILTON Blues signer and musician Little Milton Campbell died of complications from a stroke in a Memphis, Tennessee, hospital, on August 4, 2005. He was 70. He was born James Milton Campbell in Inverness, Mississippi, on September 7, 1934. The son of a musician, Big Milton Campbell, he learned guitar at an early age. He was discovered by Ike Turner in the 1950s, who sent him to Sam Phillips at Sun Records. His early songs didn’t produce any hits, but he had a popular success with “I’m a Lonely Man” in 1958. His combination of R&B, blues and soul, led to other hits in the 1960s including “We’re Gonna Make It,” “Who’s Cheating Who,” “Grits Ain’t Groceries,” and “Feel So Bad.” He signed with Stax Records in 1971, and performed at the Wattstax concert in Los Angeles in 1972. He also recorded “Walking the Back Streets and Cryin’“ and “That’s What Love Will Make You Do” before the label went bankrupt in 1976. He continued to record under the Malaco label in the 1980s, producing over a dozen albums including the 2000 Grammy Award nominee Welcome to Little Milton. • Los Angeles Times, Aug. 6, 2005, B16; New York Times, Aug. 5, 2005, B7; Times (of London), Aug. 9, 2005, 48; Variety, Aug. 15, 2005, 48.

Goffredo Lombardo

Gustavo Lombardo, the founder of Titanus Films, and silent film star Leda Gys. He succeeded his father as head of Titanus and also produced numerous films in the 1950s and 1960s. His film credits include Africa Under the Seas (1953), The Naked Maja (1959), Rocco and His Brothers (1960), The Angel Wore Red (1960), The Golden Arrow (1962), Family Diary (1962), The Last Days of Sodom and Gomorrah (1962), Arturo’s Island (1962), The Four Days of Naples (1962), The Shortest Day (1962), The Fiances (1963), Luchino Visconti’s The Leopard (1963), Tiko and the Shark (1964), and Malamondo (1964). Lombardo worked primarily in television from the 1980s, producing such television productions as Maria: Daughter of Her Son (2000) and Anna (2000). • Times (of London), Mar. 18, 2005, 79; Variety, Feb. 14, 2005, 55.

LOPES DIAS, EMMY Dutch television actress Emmy Lopes Dias died in Laren, the Netherlands, on March 25, 2005. She was 85. Lopez Dias was born in Hilversum, the Netherlands, on August 4, 1919. She was a familiar face on Dutch television from the 1950s, starring in numerous series including Swiebertje (1955), De Kleine Waarheid (1970), Q en Q (1974), and Spanning in Slagharen (1988). Little Milton

LOHIKOSKI, ARMAND Finnish film director Armand Lohikoski died in Helsinki, Finland, on March 20, 2005. He was 93. Lohikoski was born in Astoria, Oregon, on January 3, 1912. He began his career as an actor in the early 1940s, appearing in several Finnish films including Synnin Puumerkki (1942) and Varjoja Kannaksella (1943). Lohikoski began directing and writing films with 1953’s Me Tulemme Taas. He was best known for directing over ten films the series of Pekka at Patka comedies in the 1950s starring Esa Pakarinen and Masa Niemi. He also directed documentaries and shorts through the 1960s. LOMBARDO, GOFFREDO

Italian film producer Goffredo Lombardo died in a hospital in Rome on February 2, 2005. He was 84. Lombardo was born in Naples, Italy, on May 15, 1920. He was the son of

Emmy Lopes Dias

LOPEZ , MARGA Argentine-born Mexican actress Marga Lopez died of complications from a heart attack in a Mexico City hospital on July 4, 2005. She

Obituaries • 2005

232

Marga Lopez

was 81. She was born Catalina Margarita Lopez Ramos in San Miguel, Argentina, on June 21, 1924, and came to Mexico in her teens. She became a leading actress in Mexican cinema in the 1940s, appearing in such films as Mama Ines (1946), Las Colegialas (1946), Los Tres Garcia (1947), Soledad (1947), Midnight (1949), Callejera (1949), Love for Love (1950), Arrabalera (1951), Tres Hombres en mi Vida (1952), Un Rincon Cerca del Cielo (1952), Mi Adorada Clementina (1953), A Doll’s House (154), The Delivery (1954), After the Storm (1955), Arm in Arm Down the Street (1956), The Third Word (1956), Boy’s Town (1957), Beneath the Sky of Mexico (1958), My Wife Understands Me (1959), Nazarin (1959), My Mother Is Guilty (1960), Behind the Clouds (1962), When It Finishes the Night (1964), Sinful (1965), Time to Die (1966), Youth Without Law (1966), Crown of Tears (1968), Agony to Be a Mother (1969), Mothers’ Day (1969), and The Book of Stone (1969). She continued to appear often in films and television productions in character roles during her later career. She was seen in the films The Professor (1971), Rosario (1971), Dona Macabra (1972), La Carcel de Laredo (1985), and Reclusorio (1997), and in such television series as El Juramento, Anoranza, Alondra, The Bonds of Love, The Privilege of Loving, La Casa en la Playa, Carita de Angel, Aventuras en el Tiempo, El Manantial, and 2003’s Bajo la Misma Piel. • Times (of London), July 19, 2005, 2005, 48; Variety, July 18, 2005, 48.

LORING, ANN Actress Ann Loring died of complications from a stroke in New York City on July 10, 2005. She was 91. Loring was born in New York City on January 17, 1914. She appeared in several films in the 1930s including The Robin Hood of El Dorado (1936) and Absolute Quiet (1936). She performed on numerous radio productions and was featured in an episode of the television science fiction series Tales of Tomorrow in 1951. Loring starred as Tammy Forrest in the daytime soap opera Love of Life from 1956 to 1970. She earned Emmy Awards for her work in the series in 1961, 1962, and 1963. • Variety, July 18, 2005, 48. LORING, RICHARD Songwriter Richard Loring died of cancer in a Los Angeles hospital on August 28, 2005. He was 88. Loring was born in Chicago, Illinois, on July 23, 1917. He began his career at NBC

Ann Loring (with Robert Allen from television’s Tales of Tomorrow)

before joining the music depart at Paramount. Loring was co-writer of the popular 1940s song “Deacon Jones.” He later moved to Universal where he was a voice coach for such actors as Rock Hudson and Burt Lancaster. Often working with lyricist Diane Lampert, he wrote songs for several films including the animated Snow Queen (1957), The Perfect Furlough (1958), Operation Petticoat (1959), The Wild and the Innocent (1959), and Disney’s Toby Tyler (1960). Loring also wrote the theme song for William Castle’s 1959 horror film House on Haunted Hill. • Los Angeles Times, Sept. 8, 2005, B8; Variety, Sept. 12, 2005, 81.

Richard Loring

LOUDERMILK, SHERMAN Film and television art director Sherman Loudermilk died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease in an Escondido, California, convalescent home on April 30, 2005. He was 92. Loudermilk was born in Leon, Texas, on October 4, 1912. He moved to California in 1934 where he studied art. He served as a marine combat artist during World War II. After the war he began working in television as an art director for the local KTLA television station, building sets for early television productions. In the late 1940s Loudermilk also took an on air role at the station, hosting a Western children’s show as Cowboy Slim. Loudermilk was art director for the game show The Newlywed Game in the 1960s. He also worked

233

2005 • Obituaries

Sherman Loudermilk

Klara Luchko

on the films Moving Violation (1976) and One on One (1977), and the tele-films Love Is Not Enough (1978), The Last Convertible (1979), and The Secret War of Jackie’s Girls (1980). His other television credits include the series Centennial (1978), Galactica 1980, Simon & Simon, and The A-Team.

popular film star from the late 1940s and was featured in such movies as Three Encounters (1948), The Young Guard (1948), Cossacks of the Kuban (1949), Miners of the Don (1950), Vashili’s Return (1952), Hostile Whirlwinds (1953), A Big Family (1954), Close to Us (1957), Life in Your Hands (1959), A Snowy Fairy Tale (1959), Four Winds of Heaven (1962), State Offender (1964), Year as Long as Life (1965), The Mistaken (1966), Dream of an Uncle (1966), The Loves of Liszt (1970), Country House (1973), Gnev (1974), There, Beyond the Horizon (1975), Don’t Leave Your Lovers (1979), The Casket of Maria Medici (1980), Carnival (1981), Before We Part (1984), A Game Called Death, Or The Intruder (1991), Am I Guilty... (1992), Eyes (1992), and Solnechny Udar (2003). She also starred in numerous television productions including We, the Undersigned (1981), Investigator by Profession (1982), Return of Budulai (1985), The Unlike (1985), and Voydi v Kazhdyy Dom (1990).

LOZANO , MARIO Argentine actor Mario Lozano died in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on November 30, 2005. He was 91. Lozano was born in Buenos Aires on December 13, 1913. He appeared in numerous films from the late 1940s including La Dama del Collar (1948), Maria de los Angeles (1948), Mercado Negro (1953), The Sacred Call (1954), Descent into Hell (1954), La Noche de Venus (1955), Baccara (1955), El Dinero de Dios (1959), La Potranca (1960), El Asalto (1960), La Calesita (1963), Un Sueno y Nada Mas (1964), The Escaped (1964), Savage Pampas (1966), Muhair (1968), Amalio Reyes, un Hombre (1970), Los Drogadictos (1979), The Unpredictable Guy (1980), The South (1988), Martin Fierro (1989), Gatica, el Mono (1993), A Shadow You Soon Will Be (1994), and The Call of the Oboe (1998).

LUDWIG, IRVING Disney film executive Irving Ludwig died at his home in Santa Monica, California, on November 26, 2005. He was 95. Ludwig was born in Lutck, Russia, on November 3, 1910, and came to the United States in 1920. He began working as an usher at the Rivole Theatre in the late 1920s and rose to become manager of the theater. He began working for the Walt Disney Co. in 1940 and was instrumental in managing the distribution of the animated classic Fantasia. Ludwig also helped launch such Dis-

Mario Lozano

LUCHKO, KLARA Leading Russian actress Klara Luchko died in Moscow on March 26, 2005. She was 79. Luchko was born in Chutovo, Ukraine (then part of the Soviet Union) on July 1, 1925. She was a

Irving Ludwig

Obituaries • 2005

234

ney features as The Absent Minded Professor, The Shagg y Dog, The Parent Trap, Mary Poppins, and The Love Bug. He was also instrumental in the creation of Disney’s distribution company, Buena Vista, serving as president from 1959 until his retirement in 1980. • Variety, Dec. 5, 2005, 65.

LUFT, SID Film producer Sid Luft, who was married to Judy Garland, died of a heart attack in Santa Monica, California, on September 15, 2005. He was 89. Luft was born in New York City on November 2, 1915. He produced several films in the late 1940s including Kilroy Was Here (1947) and French Leave (1948). Luft became involved with Judy Garland after she had been released from her MGM contract in 1950 and her career was on the decline. He and Garland married in 1952, and he produced her comeback film, A Star Is Born, in 1954. Garland earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Actress for her role opposite James Mason. Luft also produced television specials for Ms. Garland on General Electric Theater and Ford Star Jubilee in the 1950s. Luft and Garland had two children during their marriage, singer Lorna and Joey. The couple were often separated during their turbulent 13-year marriage, which ended in divorce in 1965. Luft later married Patti Hemingway in 1970, which also ended in divorce. He married actress Camille Keaton in 1993. • Los Angeles Times, Sept. 17, 2005, B17; New York Times, Sept. 17, 2005, A16; People, Oct. 3, 2005; 89; Times (of London), Sept. 21, 2005, 68; Variety, Sept. 26, 2005, 71.

Tamara Lund

Sommarflickan became a television series in 1976. Lundgren also wrote the Swedish television mini-series Bombi Bitt and Me (1968), Frida och Hennes Van (1970), Pojken med Guldbyxoma (1975), Skanska Mord (1986), and Torntuppen (1996). His novel Dubbelspel was adapted as the film Capricciosa in 2003.

Max Lundgren

LUNN, NINA Socialite and former film starlet Nina Lunn Black died of congestive heart failure at her home in Washington, D.C., on March 1, 2005. She was 80. Lunn was born in Wheeling, West Virginia, on March 15, 1924. She had a brief film career in the 1940s, Sid Luft (with Judy Garland)

LUND, TAMARA Finnish singer and actress Tamara Lund died of cancer in Turku, Finland, on July 21, 2005. She was 64. Lund was born in Turku on January 6, 1941. A leading operetta singer, Lund performed often in Germany during her career. She was featured in several films including Kun Tuomi Kukkii (1962), Paamaja (1970), Rosemaries Tochter (1976), Casanova (1981), and Victoria and Her Hussar (1982). LUNDGREN , MAX Swedish novelist and screenwriter Max Lundgren died in Sweden on May 27, 2005. He was 68. Lundgren was born in Landskrona, Sweden, on March 22, 1937. He adapted his novel A Stranger Came by Train for film in 1974 and his novel

Nina Lunn

235 appearing in the 1947 George S. Kaufman comedy The Senator Was Indiscreet. She had a small role in the drama film Up in Central Park the following year. She also worked as Kaufman’s assistant for several years. Lunn became a leading hostess and social figure in Washington in the 1950s and 1960s. She subsequently lived in Palm Springs, Florida, and Scottsdale, Arizona, before her return to Washington in 1992.

LUPINO, RICHARD Actor and writer Richard Lupino died on non–Hodgkin’s lymphoma in New York City on February 19, 2005. He was 75. He was the son of actor Wallace Lupino and cousin of famed actress and director Ida Lupino. Richard Lupino was born in New York City in on October 29, 1929, and raised in England. He attended the London Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. He made his film debut as a child actor in 1940’s Just William. He later appeared in such films as That Forsyte Woman (1949), Kim (1950), Royal Wedding (1951), Rhapsody (1954), Strategic Air Command (1955), The Marauders (1955), Never So Few (1959), and Midnight Lace (1960). He also performed often on stage, appearing in numerous regional productions and on Broadway in such plays as Home Is the Hero, Sherlock Holmes, Conduct Unbecoming, and Amadeus. He also appeared on television in episodes of The 20th Century–Fox Hour, Four Star Playhouse, Shirley Temple’s Storybook, One Step Beyond, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, The Twilight Zone, Swamp Fox, Thriller, Storyboard, The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, The New Phil Silvers Show, The Lux Video Theatre, The Great Adventure, Spyforce, Boney, Over There, Number 96, Three Men of the City, and Ryan. • New York Times, Mar. 10, 2005, A25.

2005 • Obituaries

LUX, EVA Adult actress Eva Lux died in Los Angeles of a drug overdose on September 18, 2005. She was 32. Lux was born Felicia Blake on May 3, 1973. She was a fetish model and was featured in numerous adult films over the past several years including Doctor’s Orders and Teacher’s Pet.

Eva Lux

LUX, LILLIAN Yiddish actress and singer Lillian Lux died of congestive heart failure in a Manhattan hospital on June 11, 2005. She was 86. She was born Lillian Lukashefsky in Brooklyn, New York, on June 20, 1918. She began performing with the Yiddish Art Theater as a child. She met actor Pesach Burstein in 1935 and went on tour with him in South America. The two were married in 1938. She and Burstein performed throughout the world, notably in the operetta A Village Wedding. The couple also performed with their two children as the Four Bursteins. They were the subject of a 2002 documentary, The Komediant, which was narrated by Lux. She also starred in the stage production, The Megilla of Itzik Manger, a musical version of the Biblical tale of the Book of Esther, which was performed on Broadway in a Yiddish-English production in 1968. She continued to perform on stage after her husband’s death in 1986. • Los Angeles Times, June 17, 2005, B10; New York Times, June 15, 2005, C20.

Richard Lupino

LUTHER, BARBARA Author Barbara Luther died of pneumonia in an Annandale, Maryland, health facility on August 27, 2005. She was 94. Luther was born in Newport, Rhode Island, on July 6, 1911. She moved to Washington, D.C., in the late 1940s, where she was active in the Democratic Party. Luther was also a writer and poet. Her short story, Moonwalk, which was originally published in Ladies Home Journal, was adapted for film as A Ticklish Affair with Shirley Jones and Gigi Young in 1963.

Lillian Lux

Obituaries • 2005

236

LYKES , JOHN Character actor John Lykes died on February 19, 2005. He was 59. Lykes was born on June 2, 1945. The burly, bald performer was seen in such films as Prime Risk (1984), Beyond the Doors (1984), Moving Violations (1985), and Tapeheads (1988). He was also featured in episodes of such television series as Alice, Night Court, Fame, Hunter, Murder, She Wrote, Good Grief, MacGyver, and Home Improvement.

Moura Lympany

Times, Apr. 6, 2005, C20; Times (of London), Mar. 31, 2005, 58.

John Lykes

LYMBURN , GEORGE George Lymburn, a bomber pilot and prisoner of war during World War II who became a film and television actor, died of complications from cancer and a stroke in a Oakland, California, retirement home on April 7, 2005. He was 81. Lymburn was born in Boston, Massachusetts, on October 20, 1923. He joined the Army Air Force during World War II, and commanded a B-24 bomber. Lymburn’s plane was shot down over Berlin in March of 1944 and he remained a prisoner of war in Germany for over a year. After his return to the United States he studied acting and appeared on television in episodes of Playhouse 90, The Fugitive, and Bewitched. He also worked in community theater in Southern California as an actor, director, and producer. He also produced and directed numerous educations and corporate films. Lymburn authored a book, That’s My B-24! and produced a video, Just Trying to Stay Alive, about his experiences during the war. He also worked as an extra in several films including The Natural, Mrs. Doubtfire, Basic Instinct, and The Rock, where he was a double for Sean Connery. LYMPANY, MOURA British concert pianist Moura Lympany died in Menton, France, on March 28, 2005. She was 88. She was born Mary Gertrude Johnstone in Saltash, Cornwall, England, on August 18, 1916. She began playing the piano at an early age and made her concert debut under conductor Basil Cameron at the age of 12. She continued to study in Vienna and London, and began an international concert career after World War II. She was noted for her interpretations and recordings of such composers as Rachmaninoff, Khachaturian, Alan Rawsthorne, and Cyril Scott. Lympany continued her career through her life. She authored her autobiography in 1991. • New York

LYNDS , DENNIS Mystery writer Dennis Lynds died of septic shock brought on by bowel necrosis and multiorgan failure in a San Francisco hospital on August 19, 2005. He was 81. Lynds was born in St. Louis, Missouri, on January 15, 1924. A chemist, he edited several technical publications for the chemical industry from the late 1940s. He began writing mystery and detective stories in the early 1960s. He was soon hired by Belmont Books to ghost-write eight novels in Walter Gibson’s pulp hero series The Shadow. Lynds, under the pen name Michael Collins, created the hard-boiled one-armed detective Dan Fortune, who was the hero of over twenty of his novels from 1965’s Act of Fear through 2000’s Fortune’s World. The series earned the author an Edgar Award in 1968. Lynds then used the name of William Arden to author industrial espionage thrillers and entries in the juvenile series Alfred Hitchcock and the Three Investigators. He also created private eye Paul Shaw under the name Mark Sadler. Writing as John Crowe, he also created a series of mysteries set in the fictional Buena Vista County in California. Other pseudonyms he wrote under included John Douglas, Carl Dekker, and Walter Dallas. Lynds also wrote adaptations of the television series Alfred Hitchcock Presents and Man from U.N.C.L.E., and authored the novelization of the tele-film Charlie Chan

Dennis Lynds

237

2005 • Obituaries

Returns in 1974. He also wrote numerous books in the Nick Carter series, and such notable novels as Triple Cross (1976), White Death (1985), Mercenary Mountain (1986), and Blood of the Falcon (1987). • Los Angeles Times, Aug. 25, 2005, B10; New York Times, Aug. 24, 2005, C16.

MACCLOY, JUNE Actress and singer June MacCloy died in Sonoma, California, on May 25, 2005. She was 95. She was born in Sturgis, Michigan, on June 2, 1909. She began her career on the New York stage performing in George White’s ninth Scandals in 1928. She appeared in several vaudeville shows before signing a career with Paramount Pictures to make short films. She made her film debut in United Artists’ Reaching for the Moon (1930) with Bebe Daniels and Douglas Fairbanks, Sr. She also appeared in the films June Moon (1931) with Jack Oakie and The Big Gamble (1931). MacCloy also appeared in numerous short films in the early 1930s including several of The Gay Girls comedy shorts, which starred Marion Shilling and Gertrude Short and some of which were directed by scandalized comedian Roscoe “Fatty” Arbuckle under the name William Goodrich. They included June First (1931), Take ’Em & Shake ’Em (1931), Easy to Get (1931), Only Men Wanted (1932), Gigolettes (1932), and Niagara Falls (1932). She also appeared in the shorts Laugh It Off (1932), Foolish Forties (1932), and Good Morning, Eve (1934) with Leon Erroll. She subsequently returned to New York, where she performed in Florenz Ziegfeld’s last production, Hot-Cha in 1932. She was briefly married to trumpeter Otts Whiteman in the 1930s before resuming her film career in 1940’s Glamour for Sale. She made her final film performance in 1940’s Go West as Groucho Marx’s seductress Lulubelle. She then retired from acting after her marriage to architect Neal Wendell Butler. She is survived by her two children, Newton and Neala Butler. • Los Angeles Times, May 15, 2005, B14; Variety, May 23, 2005, 52.

Gilbert Mack

vaudeville and was heard on radio in such series as Inner Sanctum and Dick Tracy. He also appeared on Broadway in the 1944 production of Bell for Adano, and was featured as the frog footman in the Hallmark Hall of Fame television version of Alice in Wonderland in 1955. He also appeared in episodes of Naked City and Car 54, Where Are You? Mack was the voice of Johnny Jupiter in the 1950s children’s television series. He was also the voice of Mr. Pompus in the Japanese animated series Astro Boy in the early 1960s. Mack’s voice was also heard in dubbed versions of several Godzilla films and the animated Gigantor in the 1960s.

MACNAIR, SUSAN Film and stage producer Susan MacNair died after a long illness on August 31, 2005. She was 65. MacNair was born on December 2, 1939. She earned a Tony Award for producing the 1978 Broadway musical Ballroom. She also produced the Broadway plays Social Security (1986) and Death and the Maiden (1992). She worked as an assistant to director Mike Nichols on the films Heartburn (1986) and Working Girl (1988). She was an associate producer on Nichols films Postcards from the Edge (1990) and Regarding Henry (1991). • Variety, Oct. 3, 2005, 76. MACQUARRIE, MELANIE MORSE Canadian actress Melanie Morse MacQuarrie died of a heart attack in Montague, Prince Edward Island, Canada, on February 1, 2005. She was 59. She was born in London

June MacCloy (with Groucho Marx)

MACK, GILBERT Actor Gilbert Mack, who began his career on the vaudeville stage and radio and became a leading voice actor in films and cartoons, died on December 5, 2005. He was 93. Mack was born on November 3, 1912. He performed in New York in

Melanie Morse MacQuarrie

Obituaries • 2005

238

on June 13, 1945, the daughter of actors Barry Morse and Sydney Sturgess. She accompanied her family when they emigrated to Canada in 1951, and performed with her parents and brother, Hayward Morse, in numerous theatrical and television productions. She appeared in a 1952 television production of Noises in the Nursery, and performed on stage in Peter Pan and Much Ado About Nothing. Morse attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London, and joined the faculty of the Ryerson University drama department in Toronto in the early 1970s. She appeared in several films including Prom Night (1980) and Murder by Phone (1982), and guest starred in the Canadian television series Street Legal in 1988.

MADISON, BRITNEY Adult film actress Britney Madison was killed in an automobile accident in Las Vegas, Nevada, on April 30, 2005. She was 21. Madison was born Stacey Pfeiffer in Las Vegas on March 22, 1984. She had worked in the adult film industry for the past several years, appearing in numerous productions including Just Over 18 9 (2003), Teen Calender Girls (2004), Real College Girls 12 (2004), Proud to Be a Baby Doll (2004), and Built for Filth (2005).

Magni was born in Milan on July 28, 1906. She began her career on stage in the 1920s, appearing in numerous productions. She was also seen in several films including Paprika (1932), Il Presidente della Ba, Ce, Cre, Mi. (1933), The Song of the Sun (1934), The Serpent’s Fang (1935), Lo Smemorato (1936), and The Teacher from Vigevano (1963).

MAHIPAL Veteran Indian Hindi actor Mahipal Bhandari died of cardiac arrest at his home near Churchgate, India, on May 15, 2005. He was 85. Mahipal was born in Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India, on November 24, 1919. He began performing on stage as a child. He appeared in numerous films from the 1940s including Nazrana (1942), Mali (1944), Banwasi (1948), Jai Mahalaxmi (1951), Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp (1952), Lal Pari (1954), Ali Baba and the 40 Thieves (1954), Mast Qalandar (1955), Aan Baan (1956), Dr. Z (1959), Zabak (1961), Kan Men Bhagwan (1963), Brave Bhimsen (1964), Ram Bharat Milan (1965), Rani Aur Lalpari (1975), Do Chehere (1977), and Razia Sultan (1983). He had suffered from heart problems for the past decade, having undergone bypass surgery in 1995. • Variety, May 23, 2005, 52.

Mahipal Britney Madison

Italian actress Eva Magni died in Milan, Italy, on February 11, 2005. She was 98.

MAKI, PAUL Japanese comedian Paul Maki leaped to his death from his ninth-floor Tokyo apartment on April 22, 2005. He was 63. Maki was born

Eva Magni

Paul Maki

MAGNI, EVA

239 Kazumichi Hanzawa in Japan on June 2, 1941. He was a popular comic actor in Japan from the 1980s, appearing in several films including Tattoo Art (1982), AHomansu (1986), Fusen (1990), and Private Lessons II (1993).

MALHOTRA, HARMESH Indian film director and producer Harmesh Malhotra died of cardiac arrest in Mumbai, India, on November 22, 2005. He was 69. Malhotra was born in Agra, Uttar Pradesh, India, on June 14, 1936. He directed numerous films from the 1960s including Beti (1969), Lafange (1975), Phaansi (1978), Choron Ki Baraat (1980), Raaz (1981), Poonam (1981), Nagina (1986), Sherni (1988), Amiri Garibi (1990), Banjaran (1991), Paapi Devata (1995), Kismat (1995), Delhe Raja (1998), and Khullam Khulla Pyaar Karen (2005).

Harmesh Malhotra

2005 • Obituaries

the 1975 film Fore Play and the 1980 tele-film The Heartbreak Winner. He was best known as the director of Sylvester Stallone’s 1981 action film Nighthawks and Steven Seagal’s 1990 thriller Hard to Kill. Malmuth also directed the films The Man Who Wasn’t There (1983), Where Are the Children? (1986), and Pentathalon (1994). He also directed episodes of the new Twilight Zone and Beauty and the Beast for television. Malmuth also appeared in small roles in several films, notably as the ring announcer in The Karate Kid (1983) and The Karate Kid, Part II (1986). He was also seen in the films The Man Who Wasn’t There (1983), Where Are the Children? (1986), Happy New Year (1987), Lean on Me (1989), and Pentathlon (1994). • Variety, July 11, 2005, 46.

MALTEN, FEE German actress Fee Malten died in Los Angeles on December 31, 2006. She was 94. Malten was born in Berlin, Germany, on December 2, 1911. She began her career as Felicitas Malten in films produced in Germany by Universum Film AG (UFA). She was seen in such films as At the Edge of the World (1927), Die Frau im Schrank (1927), The Mystic Mirror (1928), Whirl of Youth (1928), Diary of a Coquette (1929), A Tango for You (1930), Fake Field Marshal (1930), Die Frau— Die Nachtigall (1931), Express 13 (1931), and The Soaring Maiden (1931). She came to the United States in the late 1930s where she continued her film career in Hollywood. Malten was seen in Foreign Agent (1941), Hitler — Dead or Alive (1942), The Seventh Cross (1944), Arch of Triumph (1948), Sealed Verdict (1948), and Young Bess (1953). She subsequently retired from the screen, but continued to perform at charity events through the 1970s.

MALMUTH, BRUCE Film director Bruce Malmuth died of esophageal cancer in a Los Angeles hospital on June 28, 2005. He was 71. Malmuth was born in Brooklyn, New York, on February 4, 1934. He began making documentary films while serving in the U.S. Army. After his discharge he worked as director for the New York Yankee baseball games for a New York radio station. He directed a number of Clio Award– winning commercials for such products as Excedrin and Fresca before making his film debut. He directed

Fee Malten

Bruce Malmuth

MALTINE, OVO German transvestite performer Ovo Maltine died of lymph cancer and complications from AIDS in Berlin, Germany on February 8, 2005. He was 38. He was born Christoph Josten in Rech an der Ahr, Germany on April 16, 1966. He was a leading stage and cabaret performer from the 1990s and appeared in several films such as I Am My Own Woman (1992), Neurosia — Fifty Years of Perversion (1995), Queens Don’t Cry (2002), and Phooey, Rosa (2002). Maltine was also a leading AIDS activist involved in German politics.

Obituaries • 2005

240

Ovo Maltine

Robert Manitopyes

MANGELSDORF , ALBERT German jazz trombonist and bandleader Albert Mangelsdorf died after a long illness in Frankfurt, Germany, on July 25, 2005. He was 76. Mangelsdorf was born in Frankfurt on September 5, 1928. He learned jazz from his older brother, Emil, in the underground Frankfurt Hot Club during World War II when jazz was banned by the Nazi regime. After the war Mangelsdorf played the violin and guitar in several big bands before learning the trombone in the late 1940s. He performed with Hans Koller’s New Jazz Stars in the early 1950s, and began recording under his own name in 1955. He made his United States debut in Marshal Brown’s international band at the 1958 Newport Festival. He continued to perform and record throughout the world, joining with such artists as Ravi Shankar and John Lewis. • Times (of London), Aug. 1, 2005, 43.

MANNING, PAUL Television writer and producer Paul Manning died of colorectal cancer at his home in Sherman Oaks, California, on January 2, 2005. He was 45. Manning was born in Madison, Wisconsin, on December 3, 1959. He was a story consultant for the L.A. Law television series in the 1980s. He was one of the original writers and supervising producers for the series ER for the first three seasons. He earned an Emmy Award for his work on the series. He subsequently moved to Warner Bros. Manning served as an executive consultant for the 2004 series Clubhouse. MANNINO, FRANCO Italian film composer Franco Mannino died of complications from surgery in a Rome hospital on February 1, 2005. He was 80. Mannino was born in Palermo, Sicily, Italy, on April 24, 1924. He composed numerous musical works during his career including over 100 film scores. Mannino worked with such directors as Luchino Visconti, John Huston, and Mario Bava, scoring the films Beat the Devil (1953), Empty Eyes (1953), The Wayward Wife (1953), Woman of Rome (1954), Riccardo Freda’s I Vampiri (aka The Devil’s Commandment) (1957), Morgan, the Pirate (1961), Seven Swords for the King (1962), Seven Seas to Calais (1962), Gold for the Caesars (1963), The Ghost (1963), Live in Four Dimensions (1964), Hercules, Prisoner of Evil (1964), The Revolt of the Seven (1964), Mademoiselle de Maupin (1966), Identikit (1974), Con-

Albret Mangelsdorf

MANITOPYES , ROBERT Canadian actor Robert Manitopyes died suddenly in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, on January 16, 2005. He was 34. Manitopyes was born in Canada on November 29, 1970. He began performing on stage while in college and made his television debut in 2001. He appeared in small roles in episodes of Stargate SG-1 and Da Vinci’s Inquest, and appeared in the 2004 mini-series Human Cargo. Manitopyes was also seen in the films The Core (2003) and Are We There Yet? (2005).

Franco Mannino

241 versation Piece (1974), The Innocent (1976), A Man on His Knees (1978), A Simple Heart (1978), and Murder Syndrome (1981).

MAPP, JIM Character actor Jim Mapp died of complications from a stroke in Pomona, California, on November 16, 2005. He was 81. Mapp was born in Jonesboro, Georgia, on August 20, 1924. He was active in films and television from the early 1970s. Mapp was featured in the films Trick Baby (1973), Enemy Mine (1985), Kandyland (1987), Homer and Eddie (1989), Secret Agent Double-O Soul (1990), Life Stinks (1991), Speed (1994), No More Baths (1998), and Dance with Me (1998). He also appeared on television in episodes of Hill Street Blues, Frank’s Place, The Fresh Prince of BelAir, The Wayans Bros., Hangin’ with Mr. Cooper, ER, Clueless, and The District.

Jim Mapp

2005 • Obituaries

band in 1975, remaining as featured soloist with the group until Rich’s death in 1987. • Los Angeles Times, Sept. 29, 2005, B10; New York Times, Sept. 30, 2005, C16; Times (of London), Oct. 5, 2005, 72.

MARIN, RUSS Character actor Russ Marin died on March 6, 2005. He was 70. Marin was born on May 1, 1934. He appeared in numerous film and television productions from the early 1970s. His film credits include Kansas City Bomber (1972), Slaughter’s Big Rip-Off (1973), If You Don’t Stop It ... You’ll Go Blind!!! (1975), Capone (1975), Lifeguard (1976), An Enemy of the People (1978), The Dark (1979), Seed of Innocence (1980), Mommie Dearest (1981), The Sword and the Sorcerer (1982), Body Double (1984), Stitches (1985), and Deadly Friend (1986). He also appeared in the tele-films Harold Robbins’ 79 Park Avenue (1977), The Critical List (1978), From Here to Eternity (1979), The Ordeal of Patty Hearst (1979), Fast Friends (1979), She’s Dressed to Kill (1979), The Five of Me (1981) Golden Gate (1981), The Ratings Game (1984), Wes Craven’s Chiller (1985), Tales from the Hollywood Hills: The Old Reliable (1988), and Runaway Father (1991). Marin also guest-starred in episodes of Mannix, The Most Deadly Game, Bonanza, Search, Banacek, Planet of the Apes, Isis, Kojak, The Streets of San Francisco, Little House on the Prairie, Wonder Woman, The Waltons, Starsky and Hutch, Battlestar Galactica, Lou Grant, Archie Bunker’s Place, Bret Maverick, Falcon Crest in the recurring role of Dr. Cook, Hart to Hart, Trauma Center, Fame, Cheers, Night Court, The Twilight Zone, Highway to Heaven, Starman, L.A. Law, Murder, She Wrote, and Doogie Houser, M.D. Marin largely retired from the screen in the early 1990s.

MARCUS , S TEVE Jazz saxophonist Steve Marcus died at his home in New Hope, Pennsylvania, on September 25, 2005. He was 66. Marcus was born on September 18, 1939. He played tenor and soprano saxophone with such artists as Herbie Mann, Woody Herman, and Stan Kenton. Marcus was an innovator of the blending of jazz and rock into a music form that became known as fusion. Marcus headed several bands himself, and recorded several albums in the late 1960s including Tomorrow Never Knows, Count’s Rock Band, and The Lord’s Prayer. He joined Buddy Rich’s jazz

Russ Marin

Steve Marcus

MARLEN, TRUDE German actress Trude Marlen, one of the last surviving stars of pre–World War II German cinema, died in Vienna, Austria, on June 9, 2005. She was 92. Marlen was born in Graz, Austria, on November 7, 1912. She was a leading star in films from the 1930s, appearing in such features as Love Conquers (1934), Playing with Fire (1934), Matrimonial Strike (1935), The Unrecognized Man of the World (1936), A Hoax (1936), The Favorite of the Empress (1936), Sherlock Holmes (1937), Romance (1937),

Obituaries • 2005

242 Shadow of a Doubt (1995), Dead Man’s Gun (1997), Principal Takes a Holiday (1998), The Inspectors 2: A Shred of Evidence (2000), Deadlocked (2000), They Nest (2000), Love Lessons (2000), Video Voyeur: The Susan Wilson Story (2002), and The Secret Life of Zoey (2002). Marsh also starred as Ken Larsen in the 1960 television series Cariboo Country. His numerous television credits also include guest roles in such series as MacGyver, Wiseguy, Mom P.I., Nightmare Cafe, Highlander, The Commish, The X Files, The Outer Limits, Sliders, Poltergeist: The Legacy, Maybe It’s Me, Two, First Wave, Seven Days, Da Vinci’s Inquest, Cold Squad, The Chris Isaak Show, and The Dead Zone.

Trude Marlen

Bachelor’s Paradise (1939), I Am Sebastian Ott (1939), Operetta (1940), Trip Into Adventure (1943), Leckerbissen (1948), and I and My Wife (1953). She made a few rare appearances in films from the 1960s in Whispering in the Hayloft (1967) and Borderline (1988). She was the widow of German actor Wolf Albach-Retty.

MARSH, WALTER Character actor Walter Marsh died on September 17, 2005. He was 83. Marsh appeared in numerous films from the 1960s including The Trap (1966), A Name for Evil (1973), Malone (1987), Shoot to Kill (1988), Distant Thunder (1988), Immediate Family (1989), Pure Luck (1991), Bingo (1991), Knight Moves (1992), Unforgiven (1992), Gunfighter’s Moon (1995), Dangerous Intentions (1995), Exquisite Tenderness (1995), Man of the House (1995), and Here’s to Life! (2000). He was also featured in such tele-films as Ski Life to Death (1978), Huckleberry Finn and His Friends (1979), A Piano for Mrs. Cimino (1982), Packin’ It In (1983), Blackout (1985), Hands of a Stranger (1987), Assault and Matrimony (1987), Deep Dark Secrets (1987), Nightmare at Bitter Creek (1998), Matinee (1990), The Girl from Mars (1991), Diagnosis Murder (1992), To Grandmother’s House We Go (1992), Heads (1993), The Amy Fisher Story (1993), Morning Glory (1993), Whose Child Is This? The War for Baby Jessica (1993), A Stranger in the Mirror (1993), Snowbound: The Jim and Jennifer Stolpa Story (1994), One More Mountain (1994), Sin & Redemption (1994), Jack Reed: One of Our Own (1995),

Walter Marsh

MARSHAK, ROBERT Photographer Robert Marshak died of pancreatic cancer in Topanga, California, on February 14, 2005. He was 53. Marshak was born in New York City on April 19, 1951. He began working as a photographer in the 1970s, taking photos for numerous Broadway productions including Les Miserables and The Phantom of the Opera. He began working with film director John Sayles as a still photographer in 1983. He also worked with such directors as Steven Soderbergh, Rob Cohen and James Brooks. Marshak was a still photographer on the sets of such films as The Brother from Another Planet (1984), Forever, Lulu (1987), Matewan (1897), Call Me (1988), Eight Men Out (1988), Her Alibi (1989), Miss Firecracker (1989), Navy SEALS (1990), Green Card (1990), Queens Logic (1991), Out for Justice (1991), Thousand Pieces of Gold (1991), Dogfight (1991), City of Hope (1991), The Gun in Betty Lou’s Handbag (1992), Passion Fish (1992), That Night (1992), Naked in New York (1993), Striking Distance (1993), Fresh (1994), Terminal Velocity (1994), Barcelona (1994), Roommates (1995), Mad Love (1995), White Man’s Burden (1995), Home for the Holidays (1995), The Arrival (1996), Bad Day on the Block (1997), Nothing to Lose (1997), Money Talks (1997), The Red Violin (1998), Rush Hour (1998), No Code of Conduct (1998), The Big Brass Ring (1999), The Limey (1999), Erin Brockovich (2000), Traffic (2000), The Fast and the Furious (2001), Good Advice (2001), Ocean’s Eleven (2001), Full Frontal (2002), xXx (2002), Solaris (2002), Something’s Gotta Give (2003), Mona Lisa Smile (2003), Silver City (2004), Ocean’s Twelve (2004), and Spanglish (2004). • Variety, Mar. 14, 2005, 54. MARSHALL, JAY Magician and ventriloquist Jay Marshall died of a heart attack in a Chicago hospital on May 10, 2005. He was 85. Marshall was born in Abington, Massachusetts, on August 29, 1919. He studied magic and ventriloquism as a young boy and embarked on a career in show business on the vaudeville stage. Marshall often performed with a ventriloquist’s dummy named Henry before being called upon to entertain troops in the Pacific with the USO during World War II. Tiring of carrying Henry to a series of remote locations, Marshall outfitted his left hand in a white glove and rabbit ears and dubbed him Lefty. With an occasional assist from his other hand, Righty, Marshall continued to entertain audiences over the next six decades. He appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show over

243

2005 • Obituaries

tempt (1981), Peacetime in Paris (1981), The Living Dead Girl (1982), Until September (1984), I Hate Actors (1986), Eye of the Widow (1989), The French Revolution (1989), Mister Frost (1990), Fifi Martingale (2001), and The American (2004).

Jay Marshall

a dozen times and was the first entertainer to open for Frank Sinatra in the Las Vegas debut. Marshall was also a historian of stage magic and author of several books, and was the dean of the Society of American Magicians. • Los Angeles Times, May 14, 2005, B19; New York Times, May 13, 2005, C13; Time, May 23, 2005, 25; Times (of London), May 18, 2005, 62; Variety, May 23, 2005, 52.

MARSHALL , MIKE Actor Mike Marshall died of cancer in a hospital in Caen, Normandy, France, on June 2, 2005. He was 60. Marshall was born in Los Angeles on September 13, 1944, the son of actor and producer William Marshall and French actress Michele Morgan. He began his film career in a small role in the 1961 science fiction film produced by his father, The Phantom Planet. He appeared in nearly fifty films in both the United States and France over the next forty years. His film credits include Friend of the Family (1964), The Two Orphans (1965), Fortuna (1966), Is Paris Burning? (1966), Don’t Look Now —We’re Being Shot At (1966), The Sweet Sins of Sexy Susan (1967), Death Rides Along (1967), I’ll Sell My Skin Dearly (1968), Dirty Dolls in Kathmandu (1969), HelloGoodbye (1970), Some Too Quiet Gentlemen (1973), The Edifying and Joyous Story of Colinot (1973), A Little Romance (1978), the 1979 James Bond film Moonraker, Lady Oscar (1980), Alistair MacLean’s The Hostage Tower (1980, Umbrella Coup (1990), Assassination At-

MARTELL, GREGG Character actor Gregg Martell died of complications from Parkinson’s disease in Los Angeles on September 22, 2005. He was 87. Martell was born in Chicago, Illinois, on May 23, 1918. The burly actor appeared frequently in films from the late 1940s, including credits in Kiss of Death (1947), The Red Menace (1949), The Story of Molly X (1949), Undertow (1949), Borderline (1950), Ma and Pa Kettle Go to Town (1950), I Was a Shoplifter (1950), Sierra (1950), Winchester ’73 (1950), South Sea Sinner (1950), Shakedown (1950), Under the Gun (1950), Double Crossbones (1950), Leave It to the Marines (1951), Affair in Trinidad (1952), The World in His Arms (1952), Stars and Stripes Forever (1952), The Glory Brigade (1953), Devil’s Canyon (1953), Masterson of Kansas (1954), Big House, U.S.A. (1955), Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956), Between Heaven and Hell (1956), This Could Be the Night (1957), Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957), Don’t Go Near the Water (1957), Space Master X-7 (1958), The Brothers Karamazov (1958), Tonka (1958), Alaska Passage (1959), Return of the Fly (1959), Blue Denim (1959), Dinosaurus! (1960) as the Caveman, Cage of Evil (1960), Swingin’ Along (1961), Valley of the Dragons (1961), The Sergeant Was a Lady (1961), The Three Stooges Meet Hercules (1962), The Cincinnati Kid (1965), and A Patch of Blue (1965). He was also seen often on television in episodes of such series as Superman, The Restless Gun, Bonanza, Law of the Plainsman, Rawhide, Wild Wild West, The Addams Family, The Virginian, It Takes a Thief, and Mission: Impossible.

Gregg Martell (as a caveman from Dinosaurus!)

Mike Marshall

MARTIN, BARNEY Character actor Barney Martin, who was best known for his recurring role as Jerry Seinfeld’s father, Morty, on the television sit-com Seinfeld in the 1990s, died of cancer in Los Angeles on March 21, 2005. He was 82. Martin was born in New York City on March 3, 1923. He served in the U.S. Air Force as a pilot during World War II and became a

Obituaries • 2005

244

Barney Martin

Jimmy Martin

New York City policeman after the war. He began his acting career on stage in the 1950s, appearing in Broadway productions of South Pacific and Chicago. Martin appeared in over a dozen films during his career including The Wrong Man (1956), Love with the Proper Stranger (1963), The Producers (1968), Charly (1968), Twinky (1969), Movie Movie (1978), Hot Stuff (1979), Arthur (1981) and Arthur 2: On the Rocks (1988) as Liza Minelli’s father, Deadly Weapon (1989), Pucker Up and Bark Like a Dog (1990), and Hero (1992). He was also seen in the tele-films It Happened One Christmas (1977), McGurk (1979), This Year’s Blonde (1980), Moviola: The Silent Lovers (1980), For Love or Money (1984), Killer in the Mirror (1986), Splash, Too (1988), Us (1991), and I Married a Monster (1998). Martin was a regularly performer on the television variety series Kraft Music Hall Presents the Dave King Show in 1959, and was featured as Jack Terwilliger in The Tony Randall Show in 1976. He also appeared as Horace Batterson in the short-lived series Number 96 in 1980 and was Napa in the 1983 comedy series Zorro and Son. Martin was Ray in the 1990 series Sydney and replaced actor Phil Bruns as Jerry’s dad in the second season of Seinfeld in 1991, and remained a recurring character until the series finale in 1998. His numerous television credits also include episodes of True Story, Car 54, Where Are You, The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, The Odd Couple, Happy Days, Mrs. Columbo, Hart to Hart, Barney Miller, Archie Bunker’s Place, Benson, Trapper John, M.D., At Ease, Hill Street Blues, Night Court, St. Elsewhere, Diff ’rent Strokes, the new Twilight Zone, Scarecrow and Mrs. King, Punky Brewster, Hotel, Highway to Heaven, Murder, She Wrote, 21 Jump Street, Mama’s Family, Murphy Brown, The Golden Girls, Life Goes On in a recurring role as Stan Baker, Full House, Sisters, The Wonder Years, The Wayans Bros., George & Leo, and Promised Land. • Los Angeles Times, Mar. 24, 2005, B10; New York Times, Mar. 25, 2005, B11; People, Apr. 11, 2005, 81; Variety, Mar. 28, 2005, 57.

Grass Boys in 1949, helping produce what became known as bluegrass’s “high lonesome sound.” Martin sang with Monroe’s group on such classics as “The Little Girl and the Dreadful Snake,” “I’ll Meet You in Church Sunday Morning,” and “Uncle Pen.” In the early 1950s he recorded such songs as “She’s a Cute Thing,” “Chalk Up Another One,” and “Save It! Save It!” with the Osborne Brothers. He formed his own band, The Sunny Mountain Boys, in 1955, and they performed on the WJR Barn Dance in Detroit, Michigan, for several years. Over the next decade he and the Sunny Mountain Boys recorded such popular tunes as “Freeborn Man,” “20/20 Vision,” “Hit Parade of Love,” and “Sunny Side of the Mountain.” He also performed with the Louisiana Hayride in Shreveport, Louisiana, for several years and the WWVA Wheeling Jamboree in the early 1960s. Martin also performed as a guest artist on numerous Grand Ole Opry shows. He recorded with the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band in the 1970s, performing on the hit album Will the Circle Be Unbroken. Martin continued to perform throughout his life and he was the subject of a 2003 documentary film, King of Bluegrass: The Life and Times of Jimmy Martin. • Los Angeles Times, May 16, 2005, B9; New York Times, May 17, 2005, D8; Times (of London), July 19, 2005, 48.

MARTIN, JIMMY Bluegrass singer and musician Jimmy Martin died of bladder cancer in a Nashville, Tennessee, hospice on May 15, 2005. He was 77. Martin was born in Sneedville, Tennessee, on August 10, 1927. He began performing with Bill Monroe’s Blue

MARTINEZ, LINDA Composer and musician Linda Martinez committed suicide in Los Angeles on

Linda Martinez

245

2005 • Obituaries

May 19, 2005. She was 29. Martinez was born in Orange County, California, in 1976. She was a child prodigy on the piano and performed with such jazz artists as Wynton Marsalis, Ernie Watts, and Phil Woods. She attended the University of Southern California and joined The Keenen Ivory Wayans Show as a keyboardist after her graduation. She began touring with Destiny’s Child in 2000, and composed scores for several films including Lives of the Pharaohs (2001) and Catching Kringle (2004). She also composed for several music programs on the History Channel including Bomber Benn, The XY Factor, and Muhammad, God’s Prophet. She also worked as an orchestrator on the Steven Spielberg’s 2002 television mini-series Taken.

MARTINO, DONALD Pulitzer Prize–winning modernist composer Donald Martino died of complications from diabetes and cardiac arrest while traveling on a cruise to Antigua in the Caribbean on December 8, 2005. He was 74. Martino was born in Plainfield, New Jersey, on May 16, 1931. He studied music from an early age and earned a Master of Fine Arts degree from Princeton in 1954. He then spent two years studying in Italy with composer Luigi Dallapiccola. He became a leading teacher and composer, with notable works including Notturno, a short chamber work that earned him the Pulitzer Prize for Music in 1974, and Fantasies and Impromptus (1981), a work for piano divided into nine movements. He taught music at Harvard University from 1983 until his retirement in 1993 to work full time as a composer. • Los Angeles Times, Dec. 16, 2005, B13; New York Times, Dec. 12, 2005, A24.

Jack Mathis

ing the course of his research and interviews, which included gaining access to the studio’s film library and files, the project grew to over 450 pages. The lavishly bound and illustrated result, Valley of the Cliff hangers, which provided extensive information about each of the studios’ 66 serials, was released in 1975. The book soon became a highly prized collectors’ item. Mathis produced Valley of the Cliff hangers Supplement in 1995. He also wrote and published the first two volumes of a trilogy, Republic Confidential: The Players in 1992 and Republic Confidential: The Studio in 1999. He was had nearly completed the third volume, Republic Confidential: The Films, at the time of his death. • Los Angeles Times, Oct. 24, 2005, B9.

MATSUMURA, TATSUO Japanese character actor Tatsuo Matsumura died of heart failure in a Tokyo hospital on June 18, 2005. He was 90. Matsumura was born in Kanagawa, Japan, on December 18, 1914. Matsumura began his career in a theatrical troupe before moving to films and television in the late 1950s. He was featured in such films as The Secret of the Telegian (1960), The Twilight Story (1960), The Human Vapor (1960), Eternity of Love (1961), The Diplomat’s Mansion (1961), Challenge to Live (1961), Blood on the Sea (1961), The Crimson Sky (1962), Irresponsible Era of Japan (1962), King Kong vs. Godzilla (1962), Young Season (1962), My Hobo (1962), Sensation Seekers (1963), The Miad Story (1963), Army Nakano School: Dragon #3

Donald Martino

MATHIS, JACK Jack Mathis, the advertising executive who was the author of several landmark volumes on Republic Pictures, died at his home in South Barrington, Illinois, on October 13, 2005. He was 73. Mathis was born on November 27, 1931. He was the founder of Jack Mathis Advertising in Chicago in 1956, which specialized in industrial advertising. Mathis had been a fan of the Republic serials and westerns as a child in the 1930s and 1940s and began revisiting them in the 1960s by way of 16-millimeter film. He decided produce a series of brochures about the serials, but dur-

Tatsuo Matsumura

Obituaries • 2005

246

Directive (1967), The Private Police (1967), Zatoichi’s Spurting Blood Road (1967), Broken Swords (1969), Bravo, Young Guy (1970), and Dodes’ka-den (1970). He was best known for his role as Ryuzo Kuruma, an uncle of Tora-san in the popular film series It’s Tough Being a Man from 1972 to 1974, including Tora-san’s Dear Old Home (1972), Tora-san’s Dream-Come-True (1972), Tora-san’s Forget Me Not (1973), Tora-san Loves an Artist (1973), and Tora-san’s Lovesick (1974). His other film credits include Ordinary Darkness (1972), Guillotine Island (1977), Foster Daddy, Tora! (1980), Suspicion (1982), Children on the Island (1987), War and Youth (1991), My Sons (1991), Not Yet (1993), 47 Ronin (1994), and When the Rain Lifts (1999). He also appeared on television in the series Alumni Reunion in 1993, and the tele-film Hiroshima as Prime Minister Suzuki in 1995.

MATSUSUKE, ONOE, VI

Leading Japanese Kabuki actor Onoe Matsusuke, VI, died of cancer in a Tokyo hospital on December 26, 2005. He was 59. He was born Shinichi Inoue in Japan on July 13, 1946. He made his debut as a Kabuki performer under the name Onoe Rokuya in 1954, appearing in productions of Genji Monogatari and Nanbanji Monzen with the Kabukiza. He also starred in the television drama series Akado Suzunosuke as a child. He took the stage name of Onoe Shokaku II in May of 1971, and became known as Onoe Matsusuke VI in May of 1990. He starred in such Kabuki dramas as Yoshinobu Inochi Goi, Meiboku Sendai Hagi, and Koharu Nagi Okitsu Shiranami.

Monty Matthews

sequently reformed without the Matthews brothers and were later inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame.

MATTSON , DENVER Stuntman Denver Mattson died in Los Angeles on September 24, 2005. He was 68. Mattson was born on July 12, 1937. He began working in television in the 1960s, working as a stuntman in the Irwin Allen science fiction series Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, The Time Tunnel, and Land of the Giants. He also was a stuntman for the series Star Trek, Wild Wild West, Little House on the Prairie, and Walker, Texas Ranger. He was performed stunts and appeared in small roles in such films as Flareup (1969), Conquest of the Planet of the Apes (1972), The Poseidon Adventure (1972), Battle for the Planet of the Apes (1973), Cleopatra Jones (1973), Earthquake (1974), The Towering Inferno (1974), The Master Gunfighter (1975), The Hindenburg (1975), Death Weekend (1976), Mr. Billion (1977), The Domino Principle (1977), Movie Movie (1978), 1941 (1979), The Main Event (1979), Under the Rainbow (1981), Aces Go Places (1982), John Carpenter’s The Thing (1982), My Favorite Year (1982), Aces Go Places II (1983), Bad Boys (1983), Police Academy (1984), Avenging Angel (1985), Choke Canyon (1986), Raw Deal (1986), Tough Guys (1986), Critters (1986), Maximum Overdrive (1986), Slam Dance (1987), The Monster Squad (1987), Cop (1988), Far North (1988), Cat Chaser (1989), Mobsters (1991), Sleepwalkers (1992), Unlawful

Onoe Matsusuke, VI

MATTHEWS, MONTY Gospel singer Monty Matthews, who was a founding member of the Jordanaires vocal group, died in a Springfield, Missouri, nursing home on April 5, 2005. He was 77. He was born Warren Matthews in Pulaski, Kentucky, on August 25, 1927. He began performing with his brothers as the Matthews Brothers Quartet and also played with the Foggy River Boys. He teamed with his brother, Bill Matthews, and singers Culley Holt and Bob Hubbard to form the Jordanaires in 1948. They performed with Red Foley in Nashville for several years before returning to Missouri in the early 1950s. The Jordanaires sub-

Denver Mattson

247 Entry (1992), Universal Soldier (1992), Joshua Tree (1993), Sister Act 2: Back in the Habit (1993), Wagons East (1994), Stuart Saves His Family (1995), Set It Off (1996), Lethal Weapon 4 (1998), and The Adventures of Rocky and Bullwinkle (2000). Mattson also worked on several tele-films including Lost Flight (1969), Stunt Seven (1979), Case Closed (1988), The Courtyard (1995), Hard Time (1998), Hard Time: The Premonition (1999), and Hard Time: Hostage Hotel (1999).

MAUFETTE, GUY Canadian actor, director and radio announcer Guy Maufette died in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, on June 29, 2005. He was 90. Maufette was born in Montreal in 1915. He worked with CBC Radio, Canada’s French network, from 1936 until his retirement in the 1970s. Maufette was also seen in several films including Le Pere Chopin (1945), Le Cure de Village (1949), Lights of My City (1950), and Fugitive from Montreal (1950).

2005 • Obituaries

Ashton including the Red Queen in Checkmate, Odette in Swan Lake, Swanilda in Coppelia, and Princess Aurora in The Sleeping Beauty. She starred with fellow Sadler’s Wells ballerinas Margot Fonteyn and Moria Shearer in Ashton’s 1946 neo–Classical ballet Symphonic Variations. A knee injury led her to withdraw from active ballet in 1952, though she continued to appear in mime and character roles with Sadler’s Wells (which became the Royal Ballet in 1956), until her retirement in 1982. She also was a leading dance instructor with the ballet from 1954 until 1977. • Los Angeles Times, June 16, 2005, B10; New York Times, June 11, 2005, B7.

MAY, PAMELA British ballerina Pamela May died in London on June 6, 2005. She was 88. She was born Doris May in San Fernando, Trinidad, on May 30, 1917. She was trained by Ninette de Valois and made her professional debut with the Sadler’s Wells Ballet (then called the Vic-Wells Ballet) in 1934. She appeared on film in the 1934 ballet Lily of Killarney (aka Bride of the Lake). May performed in numerous productions choreographed by de Valois and Frederick

MAYO, VIRGINIA Virginia Mayo, the lovely blonde leading lady in films from the 1940s, died of complications of pneumonia and heart failure in a Thousand Oaks, California, nursing home on January 17, 2005. She was 84. Mayo was born in St. Louis, Missouri, on November 30, 1920. She began her career in films as a chorus girl in the films Follies Girl (1943) and Up in Arms (1944), but soon moved to leading lady status. Mayo continued to appear in such films as Jack London (1943), Seven Days Ashore (1944), The Princess and the Pirate (1944) with Bob Hope, Wonder Man (1945) with Danny Kaye, The Kid from Brooklyn (1946), The Best Years of Our Lives (1946), Out of the Blue (1947), The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (1947), Smart Girls Don’t Talk (1948), A Song Is Born (1948), Flaxy Martin (1949), Colorado Territory (1949), The Girl from Jones Beach (1949) with Ronald Reagan, White Heat (1949) with James Cagney, Red Light (1949), Always Leave Them Laughing (1949), Backfire (1950), The Flame and the Arrow (1950), The West Point Story (1950), Captain Horatio Hornblower (1951), Along the Great Divide (1951), Painting the Clouds with Sunshine (1951), She’s Working Her Way Through College (1952) again with Reagan, The Iron Mistress (1952), She’s Back on Broadway (1953), South Sea Woman (1953), Devil’s Canyon (1953), King Richard and the Crusaders (1954), The Silver Chalice (1954), Pearl of the South Pacific (1955), Great Day in the Morning (1956), The Proud Ones (1956), Congo Crossing (1956), The Big Land (1957), The Story of Mankind (1957) as Cleopatra, The Tall Stranger (1957), Fort Dobbs (1958), Westbound (1959), Jet Over the Atlantic (1960), Revolt of the Mercenaries (1960), Young Fury (1965), Castle of Evil (1966),

Pamela May

Virginia Mayo

Guy Maufette

Obituaries • 2005

248

Fort Utah (1967), Fugitive Lovers (1975), Won Ton Ton, the Dog Who Saved Hollywood (1976), French Quarter (1977), The Haunted (1979), Evil Spirits (1990), Midnight Witness (1993), and The Man Next Door (1997). Mayo also appeared on television in episodes of Wagon Train, Letter to Loretta, Lux Playhouse, Burke’s Law, The Outsider, Rod Serling’s Night Gallery, Police Story, Murder, She Wrote, Remington Steele, The Naked Truth, and the daytime soap opera Santa Barbara. • Los Angeles Times, Jan. 18, 2005, B10; New York Times, Jan. 18, 2005, A18; Time, Jan. 31, 2005, 21; Times (of London), Jan. 19, 2005, 57; Variety, Jan. 24, 2005, 55.

MAYURI Indian Tamil actress Mayuri was found dead of suicide by hanging at her home in India on June 15, 2005. She had left a note saying “I have lost faith in life.” She was 22. Mayuri had appeared in films for several years, with such Tamil language credits as Kumbakonam Gopalu (1998), the 2003 horror slasher film Whistle, Manmadan (2004), and 7/G Rainbow Colony (2004). She also appeared in some Malayalam and Kannada language films.

(1996), and The Butcher Boy (1997). She was also set decorator for the tele-films The Unexpected Mrs. Pollifax (1999), Yesterday’s Children (2000), David Copperfield (2000), and The Magnificent Ambersons (2002).

MCAVOY, ALEX Scottish actor Alex McAvoy died in Glasgow on June 16, 2005. He was 78. McAvoy was best known for his role as deckhand Sunny Jim in the popular television series The Vital Spark from 1965 to 1975. The late actor Roddy McMillan starred in the series as Para Handy. McAvoy also appeared as the Teacher in the 1982 cult film Pink Floyd The Wall. His other film credits include Country Dance (1970), Venus Peter (1989), and Strictly Sinatra (2001). He also appeared in television productions of Did You See Una? (1967), The Haggard Falcon (1974), and Oliver Twist (1999). His other television credits include episodes of Suspense, Z Cars, Menace, Dad’s Army, The Standard, and Minder.

Alex McAvoy (from Pink Floyd’s The Wall )

Mayuri

MCAVIN, JOSIE Irish film set decorator Josie McAvin died in Monkstown, Ireland, on January 26, 2005. She was 85. She worked as a stage manager and set designer in the 1950s and began working in films later in the decade. Her numerous film credits include Shake Hands with the Devil (1959), The Night Fighters (1960), The Mark (1961), Tom Jones (1963) for which she earned her first of three Oscar nominations, Psyche ’59 (1964), The Seventh Dawn (1964), The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965) garnering another Academy Award nomination, A Man for All Seasons (1966), The Sailor from Gibraltar (1967), Hannibal Brooks (1969), A Walk with Love and Death (1969), Wuthering Heights (1970), Ryan’s Daughter (1970), Inserts (1975), Brannigan (1975), Silver Bears (1978), Cry of the Innocent (1980), Heaven’s Gate (1980), Educating Rita (1983), The Dresser (1983), Cal (1984), Sydney Pollack’s Out of Africa (1985) which earned her an Academy Award, Eat the Peach (1987), The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne (1987), John Huston’s The Dead (1987), Lionheart (1987), Da (1988), Diary of a Madman (1990), Hello Stranger (1992), Far and Away (1992), Michael Collins

MCAVOY, EDWARD T. Film and television art director Edward T. McAvoy died in Temple City, California, on May 4, 2005. He was 55. McAvoy was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, on July 23, 1949. He began working in films as a scenic artist for such features as The Towering Inferno (1974), Young Frankenstein (1974), All the President’s Men (1976), Blade Runner (1982), Always (1989), and A Midnight Clear (1992). He served as assistant art director for Arachnophobia

Edward T. McAvoy

249 (1990), The Rocketeer (1991), Honey I Blew Up the Kid (1992), The Distinguished Gentleman (1992), Last Action Hero (1995), and Outbreak (1995). He moved up to art director for Airheads (1994), The Rock (1996), and Con Air (1997). McAvoy also served as production designer for the films Wild Things (1998), Office Space (1999), Whatever It Takes (2000), Ghost World (2000), Sorority Boys (2002), The United States of Leland (2003), Deliver Us from Eva (2003), Monster (2003), and The Prize Winner of Defiance Ohio (2005). He also was production designer for the tele-films Lansky (1999), and the series Push, Nevada, Nip/Tuck, and The D.A. • Los Angeles Times, May 23, 2005, 53.

MCBAIN, ED see HUNTER, EVAN MCCABE , J OHN John McCabe, a film scholar and authority on the works of Laurel and Hardy, died of congestive heart failure in a Petoskey, Michigan, hospital on September 27, 2005. He was 84. McCabe was born in Detroit, Michigan, on November 14, 1920. A Shakespearean scholar and longtime professor at Lake Superior State University in Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, McCabe published the landmark work Mr. Laurel and Mr. Hardy in 1961. Several years later he founded the long running fan association dedicated to the comics, The Sons of the Desert. The group, that grew to over 200 chapters worldwide, was instrumental in the continued interest in Laurel and Hardy’s works. His other works about the duo include The Comedy World of Stan Laurel, Laurel and Hardy, and Babe: The Life of Oliver Hardy. McCabe also cowrote James Cagney’s autobiography, Cagney by Cagney, in 1976, and authored the biographies, George M. Cohan: The Man Who Owned Broadway (1973), Charlie Chaplin (1978), and Cagney (1997). McCabe was married to ballet teacher Vija Valda Zarina from 1958 until her death in the early 1980s. He subsequently married Rosina Lawrence, the leading lady in the Laurel and Hardy film Way Out West, whom he had met at a Sons of the Desert convention. They were together for a decade until her death in 1997.

2005 • Obituaries

82. McCallister was born in Los Angeles on April 17, 1923. He studied acting, singing and dancing from early childhood and made his film debut in a small role in 1936’s Romeo and Juliet. He was featured in numerous films over the next decade including Let’s Sing Again (1936), Internes Can’t Take Money (1937), Stella Dallas (1937), Souls at Sea (1937), Make a Wish (1937), The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1938), Judge Hardy’s Children (1938), Lord Jeff (1938), That Certain Age (1938), Little Tough Guys in Society (1938), The Spirit of Culver (1939), Confessions of a Nazi Spy (1939), Angels Wash Their Faces (1939), Babes in Arms (1939), First Love (1939), Joe and Ethel Turp Call on the President (1939), High School (1940), Susan and God (1940), Henry Aldrich for President (1941), That Other Woman (1942), Dangerously They Live (1942), Always in My Heart (1942), Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942), Spy Ship (1942), Night in New Orleans (1942), Gentleman Jim (1942), Quiet Please: Murder (1942), The Meanest Man in the World (1943), and Over My Dead Body (1943). His performance as California Jack Gilman in 1943’s Stage Door Canteen brought him larger roles, often playing quiet young men from the country. He continued to appear in such films as Home in Indiana (1944), Winged Victory (1944), The Red House (1947) with Edward G. Robinson, Thunder in the Valley (1947), Scudda Hoo! Scudda Hay! (1948), The Big Cat (1949), The Story of Seabiscuit (1949) as jockey Ted Knowles, The Boy from Indiana (1950), A Yank in Korea (1951), Montana Territory (1952), and Combat Squad (1953). He also guest starred in several television series in the 1950s including Suspense, Lux Video Theatre, Tales of Tomorrow, Ford Television Theatre, Schlitz Playhouse of Stars, and The Rebel. McCallister retired from films in the 1950s to become a successful real estate investor. • Los Angeles Times, June 18, 2005, B18; New York Times, June 22, 2005, A17; Variety, June 20, 2005, 44.

Lon McCallister

John McCabe

MCCALLISTER , LON Lon McCallister, a leading juvenile actor from the 1930s, died of heart failure in Lake Tahoe, California, on June 11, 2005. He was

MCCALMAN , MACON Character actor Macon “Sonny” McCalman died of complications from a series of strokes at his home in Memphis, Tennessee, on November 29, 2005. He was 72. McCalman began his career on the local stage in Memphis before making his film debut as Deputy Queen in the 1972 feature Deliverance. He went on to appear in numerous

Obituaries • 2005

250 MCCANN, ROBERT Make-up artist and hair stylist Robert McCann was found dead at his New York apartment on June 12, 2005. He was 47. He did makeup for the films Deadly Advice (1993), Trainspotting (1996), When Saturday Comes (1996), The Leading Man (1996), Stanley Kubrick’s Eyes Wide Shut (1999), and Mission: Impossible II (2000), and for the television productions of Lorna Doone (1990), Double Vision (1992), Hamish Macbeth (1995), and Truth or Dare (1996). McCann worked frequently with Nicole Kidman for the past five years as her makeup artist on the films The Others (2001), Dogville (2003), The Human Stain (2003), Cold Mountain (2003), The Stepford Wives (2004), and Birth (2004). He was also Jodie Foster’s makeup artist for the 2002 film Panic Room.

Macon McCalman

films including Lipstick (1976), Smokey and the Bandit (1977), Comes a Horseman (1978), The Concorde: Airport ’79 (1979), The Last Word (1980), The Incredible Shrinking Woman (1981), Dead and Buried (1981), Carbon Copy (1981), Rollover (1981), Timerider (1982), Honkytonk Man (1982), Fleshburn (1984), The Falcon and the Snowman (1985), Marie (1985), Cold Feet (1989), Valentino Returns (1989), Doc Hollywood (1991), Fried Green Tomatoes (1991), Falling Down (1993), The Client (1994), A Walk in the Clouds (1995), and Rosewood (1997). He also appeared in numerous tele-films including The Last of Mrs. Lincoln (1976), Captains and the Kings (1976), Roots (1977), The Strange Possession of Mrs. Oliver (1977), The New Maverick (1978), Harold Robbins’ The Pirate (1978), A Question of Love (1979), Friendly Fire (1979), The Ultimate Impostor (1979), Topper (1979), The Sky Is Gray (1980), Callie & Son (1981), Splendor in the Grass (1981), Life of the Party: The Story of Beatrice (1982), Kenny Rogers as The Gambler: The Adventure Continues (1983), The Winter of Our Discontent (1983), The Red-Light Sting (1984), Our Family Honor (1985), A Winner Never Quits (1986), The Deliberate Stranger (1986), Independence (1987), The Town Bully (1988), Jesse (1988), Separate But Equal (1991), Frankenstein: The College Years (1991), Scattered Dreams (1993), Murder Between Friends (1994), A Perry Mason Mystery: The Case of the Grimacing Governor (1994), and See Jane Run (1995). McCalman starred as Mayor Fletcher in the television comedy series Best of the West in 1981. His other television credits include episodes of The Invisible Man, Starsky and Hutch, Emergency!, Harry O, Kojak, The Jeffersons, Maude, Barnaby Jones, The Bob Newhart Snow, Wonder Woman, Three’s Company, The Waltons, Hart to Hart, Soap, Lou Grant, Diff ’rent Strokes, Cheers, Remington Steele, Gloria, Emerald Point N.A.S., St. Elsewhere, Newhart, Knight Rider, Family Ties, The Wizard, The Bronx Zoo, Dallas, Murder, She Wrote, Hunter, L.A. Law, Designing Women, Perfect Strangers, Paradise, The Young Riders, Mancuso, FBI, The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, The Wonder Years, Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman, The Adventures of Brisco County Jr., Sisters, Goode Behavior, and Sparks. McCalman retired to his home in Memphis after suffering a heart attack in 1997.

MCCARTHY, EUGENE J. Eugene J. McCarthy, the former U.S. Senator from Minnesota who ran for president as an opponent of the Vietnam War in 1968, died in his sleep of complications from Parkinson’s disease at an assisted living home in Woodville, Virginia, on December 10, 2005. He was 89. McCarthy was born in Watkins, Minnesota, on March 29, 1916. He was a teacher before turning to politics in the late 1940s. He was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives as a Democrat in 1948, and was elected to the Senate ten years later. An outspoken opponent of the War in Vietnam, McCarthy challenged incumbent president Lyndon B. Johnson in the New Hampshire primary. His strong showing in the primary resulted in Johnson’s subsequent withdrawal from the race. The turbulent election year saw the entry of Sen. Robert F. Kennedy into the race, and his assassination several months later. Vice-President Hubert Humphrey ultimately defeated McCarthy for the Democratic nomination, and was himself defeated by Republican Richard Nixon in the general election. McCarthy left the Senate in 1970 but remained an active participant in national politics. He ran for the presidency several more times, both for the Democratic nomination and as an independent, in 1972, 1976, 1988, and 1992. McCarthy was also noted as a poet and essayist whose works include The Limits of Power: America’s Role in the World (1967), The Year of the People: (1969), A Political Bestiary (1979) with James J. Kilpatrick, Up Til Now:

Eugene J. McCarthy

251 A Memoir (1987), Eugene J. McCarthy: Selected Poems (1997), 1968; War and Democracy (2000), Hard Years: Antidotes to Authoritarians (2001), and Parting Shots from My Brittle Brow: Reflections on American Politics and Life (2005). He also played himself in the 1984 nuclear television drama Countdown to Looking Glass. • Los Angeles Times, Dec. 11, 2005, A1; New York Times, Dec. 11, 2005, 1; Times (of London), Dec. 12, 2005, 50.

2005 • Obituaries

lawyer, he was a regular performer on Australia’s ABC radio, and was moderator of the World Series Debating competition on television in the 1990s. He also guest starred in an episode of The Fat in 2003.

MCCOMAS, CAMPBELL Australian entertainer Campbell McComas died of leukemia in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, on January 8, 2005. He was 52. McComas was born in Melbourne on May 2, 1952. He was known for his impersonations, creating nearly 2000 characters during his career. A former

MCCORMICK, PAT Comic actor and writer Pat McCormick died of complications from a stroke at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital in Woodland Hills, California, on July 29, 2005. He was 78. McCormick was born in Lakewood, Ohio, on June 30, 1927. A graduate of Harvard University, he left Harvard Law School after a year to work in advertising in New York City in the early 1950s. He soon began writing comedy sketches for such comedians as Jonathan Winters, Henny Youngman, and Phyllis Diller. He also developed a stand-up comedy routine with partner Marc London. McCormick began writing full-time for The Jack Paar Show. During his career he also wrote television material for Danny Kaye, Red Skelton, and Merv Griffin, and scripted episodes of Get Smart. He was a frequent sketch performer on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, and appeared often on Candid Camera and The Gong Show. McCormick was a regular performer on the television comedy variety series The Don Rickles Show from 1968 to 1969, and appeared regularly on The New Bill Cosby Show variety series from 1972 to 1973. He was featured as Col. Mound in the western comedy series Gun Shy in 1983. He also guest-starred in episodes of The Bob Newhart Show, Sanford and Son, Laverne & Shirley, The Love Boat, Trapper John, M.D., the Faerie Tale Theatre version of The Princess and the Pea, Pryor’s Place, The Golden Girls, Cop Rock, and Grace Under Fire. McCormick was featured as Big Enos Burdette in Burt Reynolds’ action comedy films Smokey and the Bandit (1977), Smokey and the Bandit II (1980), and Smokey and the Bandit Part 3 (1983). He also appeared in the films The Phynx (1970), If You Don’t Stop It ... You’ll Go Blind!!! (1975), Buffalo Bill and the Indians, or Sitting Bull’s History Lesson (1976) as President Grover Cleveland, The Shagg y D.A. (1976), A Wedding (1978), Hot Stuff (1979), Scavenger Hunt (1979), The Gong Show Movie (1980), Mel Brooks’ History of the World: Part I (1981), Under the Rainbow (1981) which he also scripted, Bombs Away (1985), Doin’ Time (1985), Rented Lips (1988), Scrooged

Campbell McComas

Pat McCormick

MCCARTY, CLIFFORD Film reference book writer Clifford McCarty died of emphysema at his home in Topanga, California, on August 13, 2005. He was 76. McCarty was born on June 13, 1929. He was a leading authority on film music and the author of the 1953 reference work Film Composers in America. He was also the author of the books Bogey: The Films of Humphrey Bogart (1965) and Published Screenplays: A Checklist (1971), and co-author of The Films of Errol Flynn (1969) and The Films of Frank Sinatra (1971). McCarty also wrote articles for such magazines as Film and TV Music, Down Beat, and Films in Review.

Clifford McCarty

Obituaries • 2005

252

(1988), Nerds of a Feather (1990), Chinatown Connection (1990), and Ted and Venus (1991). McCormick was also seen in the tele-films Mr. Horn (1979), Rooster (1982), The Jerk, Too (1984), and Neil Simon’s Broadway Bound (1992). McCormick was forced to retire after suffering a paralytic stroke in 1998 that left him partially paralyzed and affected his speech. • Los Angeles Times, July 30, 2005, B16; New York Times, Aug. 2, 2005, C15; People, Aug. 15, 2005, 79; Times (of London), Aug. 26, 2005, 74; Variety, Aug. 8, 2005, 37.

MCELMURRAY, CHARLES Animator Charles McElmurray died in Santa Rosa, California, on December 5, 2005. He was 84. McElmurry was born in Iowa in 1921. He began his career at Disney Studioes in the early 1940s. Later in the decade he worked for several independent animation studios. He was an artist for the 1956 animated short Your Safety First and worked on a Mister Magoo cartoon. He was also graphic designer for 1969’s A Boy Named Charlie Brown.

Charles McElmurray

MCEWAN, COLIN Australian actor and comedian Colin McEwan died of cancer in a Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia, hospital on August 21, 2005. He was 64. McEwan performed often on Australian radio and television, starring as Ocker Ramsay in the 1967 series Hey You, and as Miser Meanie and Fester Fumble in the children’s series Adventure Island in 1967.

He starred as Detective Cullen in the 1973 police series Ryan. He was a regular performer in the comedy series The Naked Vicar Show from 1977 to 1978, and was Bob Bulpitt in Kingswood Country from 1979 to 1984. He also appeared in the series And the Big Men Fly (1974), The Rise and Fall of Wellington Boots (1975), and Sam’s Luck (1980), and was Nick in 1983’s Brass Monkeys. He was also featured in television productions of The Last Bastion (1984), A Fortunate Life (1985), Tudawali (1987), The Boardroom (1988), Zucker (1989), Jackaroo (1990), and Day of the Roses (1998). McEwan’s other television credits include guest roles in the series The Long Arm, Homicide, Matlock Police, Division 4, and Bluey. He was also seen in several films during his career including The Great Gold Swindle (1984), Melvin, Son of Alvin (1984), Fran (1985), Nuclear Conspiracy (1986), and Daisy and Simon (1988).

MCGRORY , MATTHEW Matthew McGrory, the seven foot + actor who was featured as Karl the Giant in Tim Burton’s 2003 film Big Fish, died of natural causes at his home in Los Angeles on August 9, 2005. He was 32. McGrory was born in West Chester, Pennsylvania, on May 17, 1973. He first became involved in show business as a recurring guest on Howard Sten’s radio show in the 1990s. McGrory, who wore a size 29∂ shoe, was an imposing presence in several films including The Dead Hate the Living! (2000), Bubble Boy (2001), Men in Black II (2002), Rob Zombie’s House of 1000 Corpses (2003) and the sequel The Devil’s Rejects (2005) as Tiny Firefly, Big Time (2004), Planet of the Pitts (2004), Constantine (2005), and ShadowBox (2005). He also appeared as an Ogre in several episodes of Charmed, and guest-starred in episodes of Malcolm in the Middle and Carnivale. He was involved in the production of Andre: Heart of the Giant, a film about professional wrestler and actor Andre the Giant, at the time of his death. • Los Angeles Times, Aug. 11, 2005, B11; New York Times, Aug. 15, 2005, B7; People, Aug. 29, 2005, 115; Times (of London), Sept. 7, 2005, 62; Variety, Aug. 22, 2005, 42.

Matthew McGrory

Colin McEwan

MCGUIRE , MELANIE Actress Melanie McGuire died in Los Angeles on March 3, 2005. She was 42. McGuire was born on February 8, 1963. She

253

2005 • Obituaries

starred as Suzi Uzi in the 2001 low-budget horror film Deadly Scavengers.

MCHARG, ALISTAIR Scottish singer Alistair “Scotty” McHarg died in Adelaide, Australia, on April 17, 2005. He was 79. McHarg was born in Ayr, Scotland, on August 10, 1925. He began playing the piano and singing during World War II, performing at music halls around the country. He was called to military service in 1945 and entertained the British troops with his singing. McHarg was cast in Wesley Ruggles’ 1946 musical film London Town. He performed six songs for the film, but most of his performance was cut from the final version of the film. He remained a popular performer on the British stage and television before retiring to Australia in recent years. MCKIBBON, AL

Jazz bassist Al McKibbon died on July 29, 2005, in Los Angeles. He was 86. McKibbon was born in Chicago on January 1, 1919. He began performing in local clubs at an early age and joined Lucky Millinder’s band in Detroit as a bassist in the early 1940s. After several years McKibbon signed on with Dizzy Gillespie’s big band. During the 1950s he played with George Shearing, introducing an AfroCuban rhythm to Shearing’s beat. Later in the decade he joined with Cal Tjader recording and playing Latin jazz. From the 1960s he worked primarily as a studio musician and was a member of the CBS and NBC orchestras. He recorded his first album as a group leader at the age of 80 in 1999. • Los Angeles Times, July 30, 2005, B16; New York Times, Aug. 6, 2005, C16; Times (of London), Aug. 5, 2005, 62.

Al McKibbon

MCLEAN, CLIVE Adult film director and photographer Clive McLean died of cancer on March 29, 2005. He was 60. McLean was born on October 27, 1944. He was a leading photographer for Larry Flynt’s Hustler magazine for nearly 30 years. McLean also directed numerous videos in Hustler’s Barely Legal series from 1999, and also directed adult videos in the Young Girls’ Fantasies, Campus Confessions, and Hot Showers series. He was also the subject of the American Movie Classic’s television show The AMC Project: I Want to Be Clive McLean.

Clive McLean

MCLEAN, MICHAEL LEE Film casting director Michael Lee McLean died of cancer in Los Angeles on May 14, 2005. He was 63. McLean was born on December 19, 1941. He began working in films in the 1960s, assisting in the casting department on such features as The Sound of Music (1965), The Boston Strangler (1968), Hard Contract (1969), Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969), Patton (1970), Myra Breckinridge (1970, Vanishing Point (1971), The War Between Men and Women (1972), and Return to Macon County (1975). McLean served as casting director for numerous telefilms including The Nativity (1978), The Girls in the Office (1979), The Ordeal of Patty Hearst (1979), Mirror, Mirror (1979), When She Was Bad ... (1979), Make Me an Offer (1980), Angel on My Shoulder (1980), The Golden Moment: An Olympic Love Story (1980), Casino (1980), Marilyn: The Untold Story (1980), American Dream (1981), She’s in the Army Now (1981), The Violation of Sarah McDavid (1981), Scruples (1981), Cagney & Lacey (1981), Sizzle (1981), Thou Shalt Not Kill (1982), Portrait of a Showgirl (1982), Having It All (1982), Women of San Quentin (1983), My Mother’s Secret Life (1984), George Washington (1984), Victims for Victims: The Theresa Saldana Story (1984), Stark (1985), Lady Blue (1985), Beverly Hills Madam (1986), The Return of Mickey Spillane’s Mike Hammer (1986), and Police Story: The Freeway Killings (1987). He was also casting director for the films Hurricane (1979), Love at First Bite (1979), Rocky II (1979), The Baltimore Bullet (1980), Flash Gordon (1980), King of the Mountain (1981), Yellowbeard (1983), The Osterman Weekend (1983), Highlander (1986), and Best Seller (1987). McLean also served as a personal manager for such stars as Dennis Hopper, Paul Reubens, and John Phillips, and was instrumental in launching the Hollywood careers of such Australian stars as Nicole Kidman, Naomi Watts, Peta Wilson, and Jack Thompson. • Variety, July 18, 2005, 49. MCNULTY, FAITH Author Faith McNulty died after a long illness in Providence, Rhode Island, on April 20, 2005. She was 86. McNulty began her career as a journalist and reporter, working with The New York Daily News, Life magazine, and Audubon magazine. She was best known for his 1980 bestseller The

Obituaries • 2005

254 and manager. • Los Angeles Times, Sept. 11, 2005, B14; Variety, Sept. 12, 2005, 81.

Faith McNulty

Burning Bed, which brought national attention to the problem of domestic violence. Her novel was adapted as a 1985 tele-film starring Farrah Fawcett as the wife who was acquitted of self-defense after setting afire her abusive husband’s bed while he slept. McNulty also wrote several children’s books including How to Dig a Hole to the Other Side of the World. • Los Angeles Times, Apr. 17, 2005, B14; New York Times, Apr. 17, 2005, 31.

MCQUEENEY , PATRICIA Patricia McQueeney, the long-time manager of actor Harrison Ford, died following a short illness in a Santa Monica, California, on September 4, 2005. She was 77. She was born Patricia Noonan in Bridgeport, Connecticut, on September 16, 1927. She married actor Robert McQueeney at the age of 17, and the couple had three children. They were divorced after twelve years and she began working as a model under the name Patricia Scott. She was a commercial spokesperson on television for such companies as Revlon and Eastman Kodak. In the late 1950s she joined Dave Garroway on the Today show, where she did interviews and features until 1964. She subsequently moved to California where she continued her career as a commercial actress. She began her own talent management company, McQueeney Management Inc., in 1970. Her early clients included Ford, Candy Clark, Cindy Williams, Teri Garr, and Frederic Forrest. As Harrison Ford’s career expanded she limited her firm to represent him exclusively as his talent agent

MEDIN, HARRIET WHITE Veteran character actress Harriet White Medin died after a long illness on May 20, 2005. She was 91. She was born in Somerville, Massachusetts, on March 14, 1914. She began her career on stage and performed with the USO during World War II. After the war she relocated to Italy, where she appeared in the films Paisan (1946), Genoveffa di Brabante (1947), Rapture (1950), Quo Vadis (1951), Ha da Veni ... Don Calogero! (1952), La Dolce Vita (19060), Riccardo Freda’s The Horrible Dr. Hichcock (1962), The Eye of the Needle (1963), Freda’s The Ghost (1963), Black Sabbath (1963), Mario Bava’s The Whip and the Body (aka What!) (1963) and Blood and Black Lace (1964), Your Turn to Die (1967), and The Murder Clinic (1967). She also worked as a dialogue coach on many films shot in Italy including Stranger on the Prowl (1951), Solomon and Sheba (1959), and It Happened in Athens (1962), and was coach and personal assistant to actress Gina Lollobrigida for many years. White returned to the United States and settled in California in the late 1960s. She continued her acting career, appearing in the films Squares (1972), John Landis’ Schlock (1973) under the pseudonym Enrica Blankey, George Romero’s Hungry Wives (aka Season of the Witch) (1973) as the Narrator, Death Race 2000 (1975) as President Thomasina Paine, The Bermuda Triangle (1979), Blood Beach (1981), The Terminator (1984), The Witches of Eastwick (1987), The Killing Time (1987), Daddy’s Boys (1988), All I Want for Christmas (1991), The Night Before Christmas (1994), and Things to Do in Denver When You’re Dead (1995). She also appeared in the tele-films The Tenth Month (1979), Murder Can Hurt You (1980), Baby M (1988), False Arrest (1991), and Those Secrets (1992). She starred as the older Jessie in the 1991 television series My Life and Times, and guest starred in episodes of Bonanza, The Doris Day Show, The Colbys, Hunter, Quantum Leap, Who’s the Boss?, thirtysomething, The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, Northern Exposure, and JAG.

Harriet White Medin

Patricia McQueeney

MEEHAN, TONY British rock musician Tony Meehan, who was a member of the 1960s group the

255

2005 • Obituaries

was 85. Melis was born in Havana, Cuba, on February 27, 1920. He began playing the piano at an early age and came to the United States at the age of 16. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II, and was conductor and musical arranger for the USO band. He met Jack Paar while in the army and joined him on the CBS Morning Show as his orchestra conductor. He remained with Paar at the CBS Afternoon Show and The Tonight Show. Melis also recorded numerous songs during his career and worked with such artists as Frank Sinatra and Tito Puente. He also appeared as himself in the 1958 film Senior Prom. • Los Angeles Times, Apr. 21, 2005, B11; New York Times, Apr. 18, 2005, B8; Time, May 2, 2005, 25.

MELIS, JOSE Musician and bandleader Jose Melis died in Sun City, Arizona, on April 7, 2005. He

MENDOZA-NAVA, JAIME Bolivian composer Jaime Mendoza-Nava died in Los Angeles on May 31, 2005. He was 79. Mendoza-Nava was born in La Paz, Bolivia, in 1925. He began his musical training at an early age and was considered a child prodigy. He studied at such institutions as New Yorks’ Juilliard School of Music, the Sorbonne in Paris, and the Royal Conservatory in Madrid. He conducted orchestras in Madrid and Lima before becoming music director and conductor of the Bolivian National Symphony Orchestra. Mendoza-Nava came to the United States in the 1950s where he joined Walt Disney Studios’ music department. He composed scores for such Disney television productions as The Mickey Mouse Club and Zorro. He subsequently became music director for United Productions of America, before heading an independent film post production company. Mendoza-Nava composed scores for numerous film and television productions over the next four decades. His film credits include many low-budget exploitation films and include The Quick and the Dead (1963), Marine Battleground (1963), No Man’s Land (1964), Handle with Care (1964), The Glass Cage (1964), Shell Shock (1964), Ballad of a Gunfighter (1964), Summer Children (1965), Angel’s Flight (1965), Org y of the Dead (1965), The Black Klansman (1966), The Talisman (1966), The Hostage (1967), High, Wild and Free (1968), Fever Heat (1968), Single Room Furnished (1968), Haiku (1969), The Female Bunch (1969), The Cut-Throats (1969), The House Near the Prado (1969), The Witchmaker (1969), The Undercover Scandals of Henry VIII (1970), The Savage Wild

Jose Melis

Jaime Mendoza-Nava

Tony Meehan (right, with Jet Harris, Hank Marvin, and Bruce Welch of the Shadows)

Shadows, died on November 28, 2005, of head injuries he received in a fall at his home in London. He was 62. Meehan was born in Hampstead, England, on March 2, 1943. He began playing drums as a child and was playing in dance bands while in his teens. He joined Cliff Richard’s band, the Drifters, in 1959. The group soon became known as the Shadows, and were heard on such hits as “Living Doll,” “Travellin’ Light,” “The Young Ones,” and “Please Don’t Tease.” He also appeared with Richard and the band in several films including Espresso Bongo (1960), The Young Ones (1961), and Just for Fun (1963). The Shadows began recording independently in the 1960, recording such hits as “Apache,” “Man of Mystery,” “The Stranger,” “KonTiki,” and “Frightened City.” He left the Shadows in 1961 to become a producer at Decca Records. He returned to recording in 1963, joining former Shadows bandmate Jet Harris on such hits as “Diamonds,” “Scarlett O’Hara,” and “Applejack.” He and Harris broke up after Harris was seriously injured in an automobile accident later in the year and he recorded the song “Song of Mexico” as the Tony Meehan Combo in 1964. He subsequently returned to producing, and was instrumental in writing and arranging Roger Daltrey’s 1977 album One of the Boys. • Times (of London), Nov. 30, 2005, 61.

Obituaries • 2005

256

(1970), The Hard Road (1970), Brother, Cry for Me (1970), The Wild Scene (1970), The Midnight Graduate (1970), We, a Family (1971), Blood Legacy (1971), The Brotherhood of Satan (1971), Aegis-Orts (1973), Starbird and Sweet William (1973), The Legend of Bogg y Creek (1973), A Man for Hanging (1973), Thunder County (1974), Promise of Love (1974), Grave of the Vampire (1974), Garden of the Dead (1974), Adventure in Ventana (1974), Tears of Happiness (1974), Bootleggers (1974), The House on Skull Mountain (1974), Sons of Sassoun (1975), The Great Lester Boggs (1975), House of Terror (aka Scream Bloody Murder) (1975), Smoke in the Wind (1975), Aloha, Bobby and Rose (1975), A Boy and His Dog (1975), Mysteries from Beyond Earth (1975), The Town That Dreaded Sundown (1976), Creature from Black Lake (1976), The Winds of Autumn (1976), Mule Feathers (1977), Rip-Off (1977), Father Kino: Padre on Horseback (1977), The Shadow of Chikara (1977), Jailbait Babysitter (1978), The Boys in Company C (1978), Grayeagle (1978), Death Force (1978), The Norseman (1978), Vampire Hookers (1979), The Evictors (1979), The Legend of Alfred Packer (1980), Psycho from Texas (1981), 40 Days of Musa Dagh (1982), Mauseoleum (1983), and Terror in the Swamp (aka Nutriaman: The Copasaw Creature) (1985). • Los Angeles Times, June 16, 2005, B10; Variety, June 27, 2005, 80.

MERCER, JANE British film researcher Jane Mercer died of cancer in England on November 11, 2005. She was 63. Mercer was born in Pretoria, South Africa, on November 11, 1942. She began working as a textbook editor before taking a job with Reader’s Digest in the research department. Her interests in film led to a job with the British Film Institute in 1970. She also worked as a film critic for the BBC and authored the 1975 book Great Lovers of the Movies (from Valentino to Redford and McQueen). From the 1980s Mercer served as a researcher for various television programs including Arthur C. Clarke’s Mysterious World and Clive James’ Fame in the Twentieth Century (1993). She began working with the Federation of Commercial Audiovisual Libraries International Ltd., becoming chairman, from 2000 to 2005, of the organization that represented the world’s archive libraries of film footage.

MERCHANT, ISMAIL Indian filmmaker who teamed with James Ivory to produce a host of classic costume dramas, died in a London hospital of complications from surgery for abdominal ulcers on May 25, 2005. He was 68. Merchant was born Noormohamed Abdul Rahman in Bombay, India, on December 25, 1936. He was educated in the United States, attending New York University, where he received a degree in business administration. He produced his first film, The Creation of Woman, in 1960 and it was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Foreign Film. Merchant met documentary film producer James Ivory on route to the Cannes Film Festival in 1961 and the two decided to team up and make English-language films for India. They had mixed success with such films as The Householder (1963), Shakespeare-Wallah (1965), The Guru (1969), Bombay Talkie (1970), and the television production Adventures of a Brown Man in Search of Civilization (1972). They subsequently returned to the United States where they produced the allegorical Savages (1972), and 1975’s The Wild Party, based on events leading up to the trial of Roscoe ‘Fatty’ Arbuckle. Merchant-Ivory also produced Helen, Queen of the Nautch Girls (1973), Mahatma and the Mad Boy (1974) which Merchant directed, Autobiography of a Princess (1975), Sweet Sounds (1976), Roseland (1977), and Hullabaloo Over Georgie and Bonnie’s Pictures (1978). They produced their first period piece costume drama, adapting Henry James The Europeans for film in 1979. This was fallowed by Jane Austen in Manhattan (1980) and Quartet (1981). They were joined by Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, who adapted her Booker Prize–winning novel Heat and Dust for the screen in 1983. They also produced acclaimed adaptations of Henry James’ The Bostonians (1982) and The Golden Bowl (2000), E.M. Forster’s A Room with a View (1985), Maurice (1989), and Howards End (1992), and Kazuo Ishiguro’s The Remains of the Day. A Room with a View, Howards End, and The Remains of the Day all earned Oscar nominations for Best Picture. Merchant-Ivory’s other film credits include My Little Girl (1986), Sweet Lorraine (1987), The Perfect Murder (1988), The Deceivers (1988), Slaves of New York (1989), Mr. & Mrs. Bridge (1990), The Ballad of the Sad Cafe (1991), Street Musicians of Bombay (1994), Feast of July (1995), Jefferson in Paris

Jane Mercer Ismail Merchant

257 (1995), Surviving Picasso (1996), The Tree (1998), Side Streets (1998), A Soldier’s Daughter Never Cries (1998), Cotton Mary (1999) which Merchant also directed, Refuge (2002), Merci Docteur Rey (2002), Le Divorce (2003), and Heights (2004). They had several films in production at the time of Merchant’s death including The White Countess and The Goddess starring Tina Turner. • Los Angeles Times, May 26, 2005, B12; New York Times, May 26, 2005, C18; People, June 13, 2005, 115; Time, June 6, 2005, 25; Times (of London), May 26, 2005, 67; Variety, May 30, 2005, 44.

MERRIMAN, RANDY Radio and television broadcaster Randy Merriman died of pneumonia in Boca Raton, Florida, on October 27, 2005. He was 93. Merriman was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on December 1, 1911. He began his show business career performing with the circus and on the vaudeville stage. He began working in radio in the early 1940s, hosting the Minnesota radio program Tavern Trouper. He soon worked with Bob Hope on USO shows entertaining the troops during World War II. Merriman returned to radio after the war, hosting the early television quiz show Fun for Your Money. He also hosted the early network television quiz show The Big Payoff with Bess Meyerson in the early 1950s. He returned to Minnesota in 1957, where he hosted such local radio and television productions as Honest to Goodness and Fan in the Stands.

2005 • Obituaries

John starred as the globe-trotting redhead in a 1976 unsold television pilot, Brenda Starr. Another film version was released in 1989, starring Brooke Shields as Brenda and Timothy Dalton as Basil St. John. Messick also illustrated the Perry Mason comic strip in the early 1950s. She handed over the Brenda Starr strip to artist Ramona Fradon and writer Linda Sutter in the early 1980s. Artist June Brigman and writer Mary Schmich have worked on the strip, which remains a popular comic, since 1985. She later created a panel comic strip, Granny Glamour, for the local weekly Oakmont Gardens Magazine, which she illustrated until a stroke in 1998 forced her retirement. • Los Angeles Times, Apr. 8, 2005, B10; New York Times, Apr. 8, 2005, A25; People, Apr. 25, 2005, 91; Time, Apr. 18, 2005, 26.

Dale Messick

Randy Merriman

METHLING, SVEN Danish film director Sven Methling died in Copenhagen, Denmark, on August 7, 2005. He was 86. Methling was born in Denmark on September 20, 1918. He was a leading film director in Denmark for over fifty years. He began working in films in the early 1940s, directing Magic Lighter (1946), Kriminalsagen Tove Andersen (1953), Operation Camel (1960), Sorte Shara (1961), The Girl and the Press Photographer (1963), South of Tana River (1963), Pretty Boy and Rosa (1967), I Love Blue (1968), The Key to Paradise (1970), 1001 Danish Delights (1972), The Family with 1000 Children (1972), Three Angels and Five Lions

MESSICK, DALE Dale Messick, who created the long-running comic strip Brenda Starr, Reporter, died after a long illness in Penngrove, California, on April 5, 2005. She was 98. She was born Dalia Messick in South Bend, Indiana, on April 11, 1906. She began her career in the 1930s drawing for greeting card companies. Brenda Starr began running as a Sunday newspaper comic in The Chicago Tribune in June of 1940. A daily cartoon strip followed five years later. The intrepid reporter was one of the first females to star in an adventure strip. She maintained a three decade long romance with eye-patched mystery man Basil St. John, which culminated in the couples comic-strip marriage in 1976. Joan Woodbury starred in the 1945 film version of the strip, Brenda Starr, Reporter, and Jill St.

Sven Methling

Obituaries • 2005

258

(1982), The Crumbs (1991), The Crumbs 2 (1992), The Rascal (1994), and The Crumbs 3: Dad’s Bright Idea (1994).

MEYLER , FINTAN Actress Fintan Meyler died of cancer in San Jose, California, on July 23, 2005. She was 75. Meyler was born in Ireland on December 14, 1929. The lovely brunette studied drama at the Gate Theatre in Dublin. She came to the United States after winning a beauty contest in Ireland. Meyler settled in Los Angeles where she did some stage work before making her television debut in an episode of Matinee Theater in the mid–1950s. She continued to appear in episodes of such series as Gunsmoke, Trackdown, Have Gun —Will Travel, State Trooper, Sugarfoot, The Donna Reed Show, Perry Mason, Peter Gunn, Wagon Train, Zorro, One Step Beyond, The Rebel, Adventures in Paradise, Hotel de Paree, Bonanza, Thriller with Boris Karloff, Alcoa Premiere, and Emergency! She was also featured in several films including The Abductors (1957), Zero Hour! (1957), and Showdown at Boot Hill (1958). Meyer retired from the screen in the early 1960s after the birth of her children. • Variety, Aug. 22, 2005, 42.

67. Mgcina was born in Germiston, South Africa, on May 9, 1938. She was a leading performer on the South African stage from the early 1960s. She starred in the jazz opera King Kong in 1960, and starred in both leading roles in The Journey of Poppie Nongena, also composing and directing the musical score. Mgcina was also seen in several films including Dingaka (1965), Cry Freedom (1987), A Dry White Season (1989), A Good Man in Africa (1994), and Zulu Love Letter (2004).

MICHELOT, PIERRE French jazz musician Pierre Michelot died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease in Paris on July 3, 2005. He was 77. Michelot was born in Saint Denis, France, on March 3, 1928. He trained as a classical pianist before taking up the bass while in his teens. He performed concerts to entertain U.S. troops stationed in Paris after World War II. Michelot performed with such jazz artists as Stan Getz, Django Reinhardt, Dizzy Gillespie, and Kenny Clarke in the 1950s. He also was music arranger for Chet Baker while he was in Paris in 1956 and 1957. Michelot played with Miles Davis on the soundtrack of Louis Malle’s film thriller Elevator to the Gallows in 1958. He performed with the jazz trio HUM for many years. He was also heard on the soundtracks for the films Beau Pere (1981) and Scarlet Fever (1983). Michelot also appeared in Bertrand Tavernier’s 1986 film ’Round Midnight, and was seen in The Housekeeper in 2002.

Fintan Meyler

MGCINA, SOPHIE THOKO South African singer and actress Sophie Thoko Mgcina died in South Africa of a heart attack on December 2, 2005. She was

Sophie Thoko Mgcina

Pierre Michelot

MILANI, FRANCISCO Brazilian actor Francisco Milani died of cancer in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on August 13, 2005. He was 68. Milani was born in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on November 19, 1936. He began his career in the 1950s, appearing on Brazilian radio and television. A popular comedian, he was also active in Brazilian politics. A military coup took over the government of Brazil in 1964 and Milani’s career also suffered as a result. He was able to resume his career as an en