Obituaries in the Performing Arts, 2010

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Obituaries in the Performing Arts, 2010

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Obituaries in the Performing Arts, 2010

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Obituaries in the Performing Arts, 2010 by

HARRIS M. LENTZ III

McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers Jefferson, North Carolina, and London

Front cover, clockwise from top left: Barbara Billingsley, Tom Bosley, Peter Graves, Tony Curtis

ISSN 1087-9617

/

ISBN-13: 978-0-7864-4175-4

softcover : 50# alkaline paper

©2011 Harris M. Lentz, III. All rights reserved No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying or recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Manufactured in the United States of America

McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers Box 611, Jefferson, North Carolina 28640 www.mcfarlandpub.com

This book is dedicated to my mother Helene Zollo Lentz (1923–2010), and to the memory of those other friends and family lost during 2010— Eanes Lobianco, William Cockroft, Rose Robilio, Barbara Yomtob, Ken Wilburn, Louise Robilio LaFont and Richard Devon, Helen Talbot, Charles B. Pierce, Bob Hoy, Glenn Shadix, Kevin McCarthy, Danny Morton, Johnny Sheffield, James MacArthur, Fred Foy

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Britt, Jordan Lacina, Brett Fleming, John Beck, Polly Sharp, Zia Lane, Tammy Lambdin, Scotty Scheno, Pierre, Jennifer Millsap, Chad Green, Verlinda Hennings, Michael Huggins, Rebecca Crook, Emily Kraninger, Jason Kennedy, Steve Tines, Josh Cleary, Sean and Amber Hart, Kira Christensen, Heather Rich, Steve Montgomery, Keith Prince, Laura Crofcheck, Richie Cohen and my friends at Bubba’s Ale House & Grille, Ali Meyer, Clint Isenhower, Kristen Williams, Kristen Persons, Kayla Marie Hugel, Christina Hogan, Rachel Warf, Stephanie Godman, Cassie Bizzle, Jamie Bromley, Cindy Weaver, Brad Jackson, Jim Stafford, Glenna Scott, Bill Marchese, Devon Barnes, Traci C. Bowles, Rebecca Mitchell, Erin Smith, Mike and Lynn Gehl, Katelyn Pearce, Ashley Essary, Jason “the Doctor” Heath, Angelia Daniels, Rick Filka, Louise Roberts, the fine folks at J. Alexanders, Hadley’s, and Old Whitten Tavern, Mike Robilio and my friends at Sidecar, the Memphis Film Festival, Ray Grier of the Ellendale Post Office, my friends with the Memphis Team Trivia Leagues at Hooters Wolfchase and East End Grill, the gang at Classic Horror Film Board, Tommy Gattas, James Gattas, Emma Brown, the University of Memphis Library and the Memphis, Shelby County, and Bartlett public libraries.

I greatly appreciate the invaluable assistance of my friend and co-conspirator Carla Clark. Special thanks also go to my sister, Nikki Walker, and to Bob King at Classic Images, for granting permission to use information from my columns. Also, thanks to Tom Weaver, Fred Davis, John Beifuss, Ray Neilson, John Whyborn, Boyd Magers at Western Clippings, Larry Tauber, Andrew “Captain Comics” Smith, Jimmy Walker, Tony Pruitt, Greg Bridges, Bobby Mathews, Kent Nelson, George and Leona Alsup, Betty Alsup, Toni Cerritto, Lois Donnelly, Tina Motroni, Dale Warren, Andrew Clark, Aarin Prichard, Dr. Mark Heffington, Timmy Bell, Anne Taylor, Andy Branham, John Nelson, Richard Allynwood, Frank de Azpillaga, Irv Jacobs, Bill Warren, Bob Cuneo, Alun Jones, Marty Baumann, Joe Caviolo, John Hiestand, Rusty White, Russ Blatt of Life in Legacy, the folks at VoyForums: Celebrity Obits (especially Chronicler, Peggy, Rocket, Loren, Greg, Buckeye, Danny, Doc Rock, Darren, Francesca, Geazer, Teller, Kathy, Ed Tracey, James, John, Kristian, Loretta, Micki, Davis S., and Missy-Jo), Joy Martin, Denise Tansil, Blaine Lester, Louis and Carol Baird, Carlin and Renee Stuart, Maggie Hernandez, Dia Barbee, Dave Ramsey, Ray and Judy Herring, Don and Elaine Kerley, Wally Traylor, Jennifer Eggleston, Lance Freemon, Darryl and Amy Wheeler, Grace Garcia Dixon, Daniel Dixon, Kevin

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Acknowledgments vi Author’s Note viii Introduction ix Reference Bibliography xiii The 2010 Obituaries

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AUTHOR’S NOTE HELENE ZOLLO LENTZ , accordionist, toe dancer, businesswoman, film fan, and my mother, died of pneumonia and complications from surgery at a Memphis, Tennessee, hospital on June 7, 2010. She was 86. Helene was born in Memphis on August 7, 1923, the daughter of Dominic and Mary Zollo. She studied dance and accordion as a child, and performed frequently on the local stage and radio in the 1930s. She was a graduate of St. Agnes Academy in Memphis in 1940. Helene worked at her family’s Diamond Ice Cream Company during World War II while her husband Harris Lentz, Jr., served as a paratrooper in Europe. After the war, she and her husband continued to operate the ice cream company and raise a family. Helene began working as a bookkeeper with the Fred P. Gattas Company following the death of her husband and sale of the ice cream factory in 1974. She continued to work with the Gattas family, serving as an accountant and office manager with James Gattas Jewelry until her death. She was an elegant and wonderful lady who never met a stranger, and could make a trek to the post office or the grocery store a festive event. She reveled in watching old films and television shows (which weren’t so old when she first saw them). She was an avid attendee of the Memphis Film Festival and the MidSouthCon for over 20 years, where she delighted in hobnobbing with old cowboy stars and Klingons alike. She left an indelible impression on

Helene Lentz (right, with Shorty the Werewolf )

the film stars and fellow fans she met. On several occasions at film fests, while taking a rare moment to rest in a convenient chair, she would look up to see a small line forming around her, with fans thumbing through 8 ¥ 10s and wondering which of the stars she was. When I first began writing for the original Famous Monsters of Filmland in the 1970s, Forry Ackerman would frequently call to discuss a story. Most of the time, his call would come when I wasn’t home, and he and my mother would have long conversations. I came to believe Forry was intentionally calling when I wasn’t there so he could talk to my mom. I largely owe whatever success I have achieved as a writer and a human being to her guidance, inspiration, and support.

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INTRODUCTION This book provides a single source that notes the deaths of all major, and many minor, figures in the fields of film, television, cartoons, theatre, music and popular literature throughout the world. The obituaries contain pertinent details of deaths including date, place and cause, of more than 1250 celebrities. Biographical information and career highlights and achievements are also provided. I have also included a complete- as-possible filmography for U.S. film and television performers. Both print and online resources used are listed below and in the bibliography. A photograph has been included for the majority of the individuals included. The year 2010 saw the passing of such notable celebrities as Airplane! and Naked Gun star Leslie Nielsen; Easy Rider director and star Dennis Hopper; Diff ’rent Stokes diminutive star Gary Coleman; leading man Tony Curtis; television talk show icon Art Linkletter; Oscar-winning actress Patricia Neal; and Oscar nominees Jill Clayburgh and Jean Simmons. Many familiar faces from television passed on including Leave It to Beaver matriarch Barbara Billingsley; Happy Days patriarch Tom Bosley; I Spy star Robert Culp; Designing Women star Dixie Carter; Charlie’s Angels voice and Dynasty star John Forsythe; Mission: Impossible star Peter Graves; Bonanza’s Adam Cartwright, Pernell Roberts; TV’s Daniel Boone and Davy Crockett, Fess Parker; The Golden Girls’ Blanche Devereaux, Rue McClanahan; Hawaii 5-0’s Danno, James MacArthur; Growing Pains sidekick Andrew Koenig; Maude’s husband Harold Gould; Manimal star Simon MacCorkindale; Benson’s secretary Caroline McWilliams; Barney Miller’s Sgt. Arthur Dietrich, Steve Landesberg; and The Roaring 20s femme fatale Dorothy Provine. The silver screen lost such luminaries as British

actress Lynn Redgrave and her older brother, Corin Redgrave; Invasion of the Body Snatchers star Kevin McCarthy; Tarzan’s Boy Johnny Sheffield; Poltergeist’s diminutive psychic Zelda Rubinstein; Beetlejuice’s Otho, Glenn Shadix; Hammer horror films leading lady Ingrid Pitt; and Gloria Stuart, whose career spanned from leading lady in 1933’s The Invisible Man, to an Oscar nomination as old Rose in 1997’s Titanic. The world of music lost legendary singers Eddie Fisher and Lena Horne; soul singers Solomon Burke and Teddy Pendergrass; heavy metal rocker Ronnie James Dio; vocalist Kathryn Grayson; jazz singer and actress Abbey Lincoln; Sing Along with Mitch host Mitch Miller; country music star Jimmy Dean; opera singers Cesare Siepi, Joan Sutherland, and Blanche Thebom; gospel singer Albertina Walker; Kiss manager Bill Aucoin; iconoclast musician Captain Beefheart; and Agathe von Trapp, the real life eldest daughter from The Sound of Music. The voices were also stilled of singer and songwriter Bobby Charles (“See You Later, Alligator”), Box Tops lead singer Alex Chilton (“The Letter”), country singer Hank Cochran (“I Fall to Pieces”), rockabilly singer Dale Hawkins (“Susie-Q”), Little Feat drummer Richie Hayward (“Dixie Chicken”), songwriter Bobby Hebb (“Sunny”), and soul singer Teena Marie (“Lovergirl”). Other passings of 2010 include literary lions J.D. Salinger of Catcher in the Rye fame and Love Story scribe Erich Segal; composer Jerry Bock and playwright Joseph Stein, who shared a Pulitzer Prize for the Tony Award–winning musical Fiddler on the Roof and who died in quick succession; soap opera stars Helen Wagner (As the World Turns’ Nancy Hughes), James Mitchell (All My Children’s Palmer

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Obituaries • 2010 Cortlandt), and Frances Reid (Days of Our Lives’ Alice Horton); silent screen stars Doris Eaton, Dorothy Janis, and Baby Marie Osborne; Wizard of Oz Munchkins Meinhardt Raabe (the coroner) and Olga Nardone (of the Lullaby League); New York Yankees colorful owner George Steinbrenner and fractal geometrician Benoit Mandelbrot; television journalists Edwin Newman and Daniel Schorr; ATeam and The Rockford Files creator Stephen J. Cannell and Police Story and Police Woman creator David Gerber; Lone Ranger announcer Fred Foy and Hopalong Cassidy’s widow Grace Bradley Boyd; football player turned sportscaster Don Meredith and football player turned actor Merlin Olsen from Little House on the Prairie; Enter the Dragon leading lady Ahna Capri and An Officer and a Gentleman femme fatale Lisa Blount; Errol Flynn’s teenage lover Beverly Aadland and John Wayne’s leading lady Adele Mara; Penthouse founder Bob Guccione, Playboy Playmates Jennifer Lyn Jackson and Allison Parks, and adult film performers Juliet “Aunt Peg” Anderson, Jamie Gillis, and John Leslie; Bonanza creator David Dortort and Twilight Zone logo designer Joseph Messerli; Goldfinger gangster Martin Benson and James Bond film scriptwriter Tom Mankewicz; comedian Greg Giraldo and mime Lorene Yarnell; Eddie Carroll, the voice of Jiminy Crickett, and Peter Fernandez, the voice of Speed Racer; Rebel Without a Cause alumni Corey Allen and Steffi Sidney; England’s 1949 Alice in Wonderland Carol Marsh; British mystery writer Dick Francis and the creators of Father Dowling (Ralph McInerny), Spenser (Robert B. Parker), Modesty Blaise (Peter O’Donnell), and The Wombles (Elisabeth Beresford). The Howdy Doody Show lost its creator, Edward Kean, and frequent voice performer Allen Swift. Other passings include Pokey and Gumby creator Art Clokey, and voice performers Billie Mae Richards (Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer), Christopher Shea (Linus in the Charlie Brown animated specials), and Pat Stevens (Scooby-Doo’s Velma). Two young actresses who starred as Rhett Butler and Scarlett O’Hara’s child, Bonnie Blue, in the 1939 classic Gone with the Wind died — Phyllis Douglas, who portrayed Bonnie at 3, and Cammie King, who was the slightly older incarnation of the Butlers’ daughter. Other child stars who passed on include Gypsy Rose Lee’s sister, June Havoc, who went from vaudeville as Baby June to a film career

x as an adult; Shirley Bell, radio’s Little Orphan Annie; 1980s juvenile star Corey Haim; Shirley Mills, who starred as Ruthie Joad in 1940’s The Grapes of Wrath; Sky King’s niece Penny (Gloria Winters); TV’s National Velvet Lori Martin; Our Gang star Dorothy de Borba; James Aubrey, who starred as Ralph in 1963’s Lord of the Flies; and Polish child actor Lech Kaczynski, who rose to become his country’s president. Other passings include veteran character actors Graham Crowden, James Gammon, Richard Devon, Maury Chaykin, Christopher Cazenove, John Crawford, Joe Mantell, Lionel Jeffries, Robert Ellenstein, Bill Erwin, Bruno Cremer, George DiCenzo, Peter Haskell, Bernard Kates, Sandy Kenyon, Neva Patterson, Per Oscarsson, Johnny Seven, and EuroWestern stars Angelo Infanti, Peter Martell, Aldo Sambrell, and Virgilio Teixeira. Leading figures from behind the camera are also found within, including Pink Panther director Blake Edwards; Bonnie and Clyde director Arthur Penn; Hammer horror film director Roy Ward Baker; Italian film producer Dino de Laurentiis; The Empire Strikes Back director Irvin Kershner; The Poseidon Adventure director Ronald Neame; documentary filmmaker David L. Wolper; Oscarnominated screenwriter Irving Ravetch; British director Clive Donner; and French New Wave pioneers Claude Chabrol and Eric Rohmer. Cult filmdom’s losses include Grave of the Vampire and Dracula’s Dog star Michael Pataki; French horror film pioneer Jean Rollin of Les Grapes de la Mort; I Drink Your Blood director David Durston; Blacula’s leading lady, Vonetta McGee; Carnival of Souls screenwriter John Clifford; Legend of Bogg y Creek filmmaker Charles B. Pierce; Chris Udvarnoky, one of the twins from 1972’s The Other; The Hideous Sun Demon producer Robin Kirkman; The Fiend and Nightbeast star Don Leifert; Chucky puppeteer Van Snowden from the early Child’s Play films; From Beyond ’s Dr. Pretorius, Ted Sorel; British model and Peeping Tom victim Pamela Green; Freddy Kreuger’s mom, Nan Martin; Braindead ’s Mum, Elizabeth Moody; and I Dismember Mama screenwriter William Norton. Veteran fantasy artist Frank Frazetta, Flash Gordon artist Al Williamson, Anthro creator Howard Post, comic book artist and editor Dick Giordano, Harvey Pekar, creator of the autobiographical comic series American Splendor, and science fiction writers James Hogan, William Tenn, and Dumarest of Terra creator E.C. Tubb are also found within.

xi Reality television saw the passing of Deadliest Catch captain Phil Harris, The Bachelorette’s unsuccessful suitor Julien Hug, and anorexic model Isabelle Caro. Sports entertainment lost wrestling champs Jack Brisco, Edouard Carpentier, and Gene Kiniski, and other ring heroes and villains including Lance Cade, Chris Kanyon, Mike “Bastion Booger” Shaw, Luna Vachon, Giant Gonzalez, Tony “Ludvig Borga” Halme, King Curtis Iaukea, Angelo Poffo, and Jerry Valiant. We also lost four-legged friends Enzo, who took over from his father to portray the Crane family Jack Russell Terrier Eddie from Frasier and Miss Ellie, who had the dubious honor of being crowned 2009’s World’s Ugliest Dog; and the eight-tentacled celebrity Paul, the World Cup predicting octopus. I have been writing obituaries of film personalities for more than 30 years, beginning with a column in Forry Ackerman’s Famous Monsters of Filmland in the late 1970s. Many of the film obituaries in this work are taken from my monthly column in Classic Images (P.O. Box 809, Muscatine, IA

2010 • Obituaries 52761), a newspaper devoted to classic films and their performers. I have also been writing obituaries for the Famous Monsters of Filmland website since mid–2009 (http://www.famousmonstersoffilm land.com/category/obits-by-harris-lentz-iii/). Information on the passing of the individuals found in this volume has been gathered from a myriad of sources. Primary sources include The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, Times (of London), The Washington Post, Variety, Time, People, TV Guide and Newsweek. Other sources include Boyd Mager’s Western Clippings, The Memphis Commercial Appeal, The Hollywood Reporter, The (Manchester) Guardian, The Comics Buyer’s Guide, Locus, Pro Wrestling Torch, Psychotronic Video, The Comics Journal and Facts on File. Several sources on the Internet have also been helpful, including Voyager Forums Barbara’s Obits and Memorials (hosted by Chronicler) (http://www.voy.com/221392/), Life in Legacy (http://www.lifeinlegacy.com/), Entertainment Insiders (http://www.einsiders.com/), and the Internet Movie Database, Ltd. (http://www.imdb. com/ ).

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REFERENCE BIBLIOGRAPHY Books The Academy Players Directory. Beverly Hills, CA: Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, 1978– 2007. The American Film Institute Catalog: Feature Films, 1931–40. Patricia King Hanson, ed. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993. The American Film Institute Catalog of Motion Pictures Produced in the United States: Feature Films, 1911–20. Patricia King Hanson, ed. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988. American Film Institute Catalog of Motion Pictures Produced in the United States: Feature Films, 1921–30. Kenneth W. Munden, ed. New York: R.R. Bowker, 1971. American Film Institute Catalog of Motion Pictures Produced in the United States: Feature Films, 1961–70. Richard P. Krafsur, ed. New York: R.R. Bowker, 1976. Brooks, Tim. The Complete Directory of Prime Time TV Stars. New York: Ballantine, 1987. Brown, Les. The New York Times Encyclopedia of Television. New York: Times, 1977. Bushnell, Brooks. Directors and Their Films: A Comprehensive Reference, 1985 –1990. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1993. Chilton, John. Who’s Who of Jazz. Philadelphia: Chilton, 1972. Contemporary Authors. Detroit: Gale Research, various editions. DeLong, Thomas A. Radio Stars: An Illustrated Biographical Dictionary of 953 Performers, 1920 –1960. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1996. Dimmitt, Richard Bertrand. An Actor Guide to the Talkies. Two vols. Metuchen, NJ: Scarecrow, 1967. Erickson, Hal. Television Cartoon Shows: An Illustrated Encyclopedia, 1949 –1993. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1995. Fetrow, Alan G. Feature Films, 1940 –1949: A United States Filmography. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1994.

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_____. Feature Films, 1950 –1959: A United States Filmography. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1999. _____. Sound Films, 1927–1939: A United States Filmography. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1992. Finch, Yolande. Finchy. New York: Wyndham, 1981. Fischer, Dennis. Horror Films Directors, 1931–1990. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1991. Hunter, Allan, ed. Chambers Concise Encyclopedia of Film and Television. New York: W&R Chambers, 1991. Katz, Ephraim. The Film Encyclopedia, 2d ed. New York: HarperPerennial, 1994. Malloy, Alex G., ed. Comic Book Artists. Radnor, PA: Wallace-Homestead, 1993. Maltin, Leonard, ed. Movie and Video Guide 1995. New York: Signet, 1994. Marill, Alvin H. Movies Made for Television. Westport, CT: Arlington House, 1980. Mathis, Jack. Republican Confidential, Vol. 2: The Players. Barrington, IL: Jack Mathis Advertising, 1992. McNeil, Alex. Total Television. New York : Penguin, 1996. Monaco, James. Who’s Who in American Film Now. New York: Zoetrope, 1988. Nash, Jay Robert, and Stanley Ralph Ross. The Motion Picture Guide. 10 vols. Chicago: Cinebooks, 1985. Nowlan, Robert A., and Gwendolyn Wright Nowlan. The Films of the Eighties: A Complete, Qualitative Filmography to Over 3400 Feature-Length English Language Films, Theatrical and Video-Only, Released Between January 1, 1980, and December 31, 1989. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1991. Oliviero, Jeffrey. Motion Picture Players’ Credits: Worldwide Performers of 1967 Through 1980 with Filmographies of Their Entire Careers, 1905 –1983. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1991. Parish, James Robert. Actors’ Television Credits 1950 – 1972. Metuchen, NJ: Scarecrow, 1973. _____. Film Actors Guide: Western Europe. Metuchen, NJ: Scarecrow, 1977. Ragan, David. Who’s Who in Hollywood, 1900 –1976. New Rochelle, NY: Arlington House, 1976.

Obituaries • 2010 Rovin, Jeff. The Fabulous Fantasy Films. South Brunswick, NJ: A.S. Barnes, 1977. Terrace, Vincent. Encyclopedia of Television Series, Pilots and Specials, 1937–1973. New York: Zoetrope, 1986. _____. Encyclopedia of Television Series, Pilots and Specials, 1974 –1984. New York: Zoetrope, 1986. Walker, John, ed. Halliwell’s Filmgoer’s and Video Viewer’s Companion, 10th ed. New York: HarperPerennial, 1993. Watson, Elena M. Television Horror Movie Hosts: 68 Vampires, Mad Scientists and Other Denizens of the Late Night Airwaves Examined and Interviewed. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1991. Weaver, Tom. Attack of the Monster Movie Makers: Interviews with 20 Genre Giants. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1994. _____. Eye on Science Fiction: 20 Interviews with Classic SF and Horror Filmmakers. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2003. _____. I Was a Monster Movie Maker: Conversations with 22 SF and Horror Filmmakers. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2001. _____. Interviews with B Science Fiction and Horror Movie Makers: Writers, Producers, Directors, Actors, Moguls and Makeup. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1988. _____. It Came from Weaver Five: Interviews with 20 Zany, Glib and Earnest Moviemakers in the SF and Horror Traditions of the Thirties, Forties, Fifties and Sixties. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1994. _____. Monsters, Mutants and Heavenly Creatures: Confessions of 14 Classic Sci-Fi/Horrormeisters. Baltimore: Midnight Marquee Press, 1996. _____. Science Fiction and Fantasy Film Flashbacks: Conversations with 24 Actors, Writers, Producers and Directors from the Golden Age. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1998. _____. Science Fiction Stars and Horror Heroes: Interviews with Actors, Directors, Producers and Writers of the 1940s Through the 1960s. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1991. _____. They Fought in the Creature Features: Interviews with 23 Classic Horror, Science Fiction and Serial Stars. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1994. Who’s Who in the World. Chicago: Marquis Who’s Who, various editions. Willis, John, ed. Screen World. New York: Crown, 1958– 2001.

Internet NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS Arizona Central: www.azcentral.com/ BBC News: http://news.bbc.co.uk/ Commercial Appeal (Memphis, TN): www.commercial appeal.com/ Guardian Unlimited: www.guardian.co.uk/ Hollywood Reporter: www.hollywoodreporter.com/hr/ index.jsp The Independent: http://news.independent.co.uk/ International Herald Tribune: www.iht.com/

xiv Los Angeles Times: www.latimes.com/ The Nation: www.nationmultimedia.com/ New York Times: www.nytimes.com/ Online Newspapers: www.onlinenewspapers.com/ Playbill: www.playbill.com/news/ La Repubblica: http://www.repubblica.it/ RTE Entertainment: www.rte.ie/ Seattle Post-Intelligencer: http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/ The Stage: www.thestage.co.uk/ Der Standard: http://derstandard.at/ Star Tribune (Minneapolis–St. Paul, MN): www.startri bune.com/ Telegraph: www.telegraph.co.uk/ Time: www.time.com/ Times of India: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/ TimesOnline: www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/ Variety: www.variety.com/ Xinhua News: http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/ Yonhap News: http://english.yonhapnews.co.kr/

OTHER SITES alt.obituaries: http://groups.google.com/group/alt.obit uaries/ Barbara’s Obits & Memorials (Chronicler): www.voy. com/221392/ Bruisermania: http://bruisermania.com/ Caratteristi e Protagonisti Della Commedia Italina Anni ’70 e ’80: www.caratteristi.it/ Caskets on Parade: http://daggy.name/cop/index.htm Cauliflower Alley Club: www.caulifloweralleyclub.org/ Celebrity Deathwatch: http://slick.org/deathwatch/ mailarchive/maillist.html Celebrity Remembrances (Peggy): www.voy.com/221 475/ Classic Horror Film Board: http://monsterkidclassichor rorforum.yuku.com/ Dead People Server: http://dpsinfo.com/dps/ Dead Porn Stars: www.rame.net/faq/deadporn/ Dead Rock Stars Club: http://thedeadrock starsclub. com/ Entertainment Insiders: www.einsiders.com/ Famous Monsters: www.famousmonstersoffilmland. com/ Find a Grave: www.findagrave.com/ Gary Will: Deceased Pro Wrestlers: www.garywill.com/ wrestling/decwres.htm Internet Movie Database: www.imdb.com/ Last Link on the Left — http://lastlinkontheleft.com/ finalcredits.html Legacy.com: http://legacy.com/NS/ Life in Legacy: www.lifeinlegacy.com/ Memphis Film Festival: www.memphis filmfestival. com/ 1WrestlingLegends: www.1wrestlinglegends.com/ Outpost Gallifrey: http://gallifreyone.com/ Shadow Cabaret: www.shadowcabaret.com/ Social Security Death Index: http://ssdi.rootsweb.an cestry.com/cgi-bin/ssdi.cgi Toonopedia: www.toonopedia.com/index.htm Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/ Young Hollywood Hall of Fame: www.younghollywood hof.com/

OBITUARIES IN THE PERFORMING ARTS, 2010 AADLAND, BEVERLY Beverly Aadland, the teen-age girl-friend and Cuban Rebel Girls leading lady of actor Errol Flynn, died of complications from diabetes and congestive heart failure in Lancaster, California, on January 5, 2010. She was 67. Aadland was born in Hollywood on September 16, 1942. She began her career in show business as a child and appeared in a small role in the 1951 film version of Death of a Salesman. She was also featured as a dancer in the films South Pacific (1958), Too Much, Too Soon (1958), and Marjorie Morningstar (1958). Swashbuckling film star and notorious womanizer Errol Flynn met Aadland on the Warner Bros. lot in 1957 and began a torrid affair with her when she was 15. They traveled around the globe together for Aron Abrams

working in films with his brother, Ian, for Dino De Laurentiis. He was soon writing for television scripting episodes of the series Fired Up, Maggie, and Big Wolf on Campus. He also wrote the tele-films Bunk Bed Brothers (1996) and I’m in Hell (2007). Abrams served as a writer and producer for the sitcoms 3rd Rock from the Sun, Grounded for Life, the animated King of the Hill, Everybody Hates Chris, and Glenn Martin DDS. He was a consulting producer on the upcoming Fox sitcom Bob’s Burger.

ABRAMSON, BERNIE Cinematographer Bernie Abramson died in California on August 14, 2010. He was 86. Abramson was born in Los Angeles on November 3, 1923, and studied photography in his youth. He served in the U.S. Navy as an aerial cameraman during World War II and began working as a still photographer in films after the war. He shot stills for the 1959 Marilyn Monroe comedy Some Like It Hot and became a favored photographer for Frank Sinatra’s “Rat Pack” on the films Ocean’s Eleven (1960) and Sergeants 3 (1962). Abramson

Beverly Aadland

the next two years, and she appeared with him in his final film, Cuban Rebel Girls, in 1959. She was also seen on television in episodes of You Bet Your Life and The Red Skelton Show. Her relationship with Flynn became widely known when he died of a heart attack in her company in Vancouver, Canada, in 1959. The following year Aadland was again in the news when her latest boyfriend was shot to death at her home when the two struggled over a gun. Only 17, she spent the next year as a ward of the court. She subsequently resumed her career as a dancer and singer on the East Coast. Her mother, Florence Aadland, wrote a 1961 book about the affair with Flynn entitled The Big Love. Beverly returned to California by the mid–1960s and had two unsuccessful marriages. She was working as a cocktail waitress when she met auto parts salesman Ronald Risher. The two married later in the decade and settled in Palmdale in the early 1970s.

ABRAMS, ARON Television writer and producer Aron Abrams died suddenly while vacationing on Hawaii’s Big Island on December 25, 2010. He was 50. Abrams was raised in Emerson, New Jersey, and began

Bernie Abramson

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Obituaries • 2010 was also still photographer for such films as The Alamo (1960), Donovan’s Reef (1963), Cleopatra (1963), The Sandpipers (1965), Deathwatch (1966), The Last of the Secret Agents? (1966), The War Wagon (1967), In Cold Blood (1967), The Wicked Dreams of Paula Schultz (1968), The Killing of Sister George (1968), The Wild Bunch (1969), The Great Bank Robbery (1969), Which Way to the Front? (1970), Five Easy Pieces (1970), There Was a Crooked Man… (1970), Flap (1970), George Lucas’ THX 1138 (1971), Drive, He Said (1971), The Steagle (1971), The Omega Man (1971), Dirty Harry (1971), Play It Again, Sam (1972), Last of the Red Hot Lovers (1972), Up the Sandbox (1972), and McQ (1974). He served as an uncredited second unit photographer on the films Against a Crooked Sky (1975), All the President’s Men (1976), and Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979). Abramson was cinematographer on the films Pony Express Rider (1976), Mikey and Nicky (1976), and Baker’s Hawk (1976), and the tele-films It Happened at Lakewood Manor (1977) and What Really Happened to the Class of ’65? (1977). He also worked on the television series Sierra and Mobile One, and the 1975 tele-film The Art of the Crime. He was director of photography for the 1988 television mini-series War and Remembrance, and the films One Eyed Faces (1997), Deadly Delusions (1999), Ghost Rock (2004), and Lethal (2005).

ACHARYA, MANISH Indian filmmaker Manish Acharya died of a brain hemorrhage after falling from a horse in Matheran, India, on December 4, 2010. He was

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Trent Acid

Boyz. He and Kashmere debuted with the Ring of Honor in 2002, where they held the tag team championship. Acid feuded with Homicide in ROH and Pro Wrestling Unplugged in 2004. He also competed with Juggalo Championship Wrestling and Pro Wrestling Syndicate. He was arrested for possession of heroin and other drug charges in April of 2010 and was facing a prison sentence at the time of his death.

ADA THE DOG Ada the Dog, the Miniature Schnauzer who starred as Colin in the British television series Spaced, died in Essex, England, on April 22, 2010.

Ada the Dog Manish Acharya

40. Acharya studied film at New York University and produced, directed and scripted the comedy film Loins of Punjab Presents for his graduation piece in 2007. Acharya also did voiceover work for the 2008 puppet film Sita Sings the Blues and was featured in 2009’s Luck by Chance.

ACID, TRENT Wrestler Michael Verdi, who competed in Ring of Honor (ROH) and independent promotions as Trent Acid, was found dead at his home in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, of a suspected drug overdose on June 18, 2010. He was 29. Verdi was born Philadelphia on November 12, 1980. He began his ring career with Combat Zone Wrestling in 1999 where he soon teamed with Johnny Kashmere as The Backseat

She was 13. Ada was owned and trained by Barbara Gash. She appeared with Simon Pegg, Jessica Stevenson, and Nick Frost in the sit-com Spaced from 1999 to 2001.

ADAMS, MIKE Stuntman Mike Adams died of complications from a stroke in a Newhall, California, hospital on April 18, 2010. He was 60. Adams was born on March 22, 1950. He was raised on a cattle ranch and performed on the rodeo circuit in his youth. He began working in films and television as a stuntman in the mid–1970s. Adams performed stunt work and occasionally appeared in small roles in such films as The Manitou (1978), Prophecy (1979), The Concorde … Airport ’79 (1979), Borderline (1980), Under the Rainbow (1981), The Legend of the Lone Ranger (1981) as Ranger Palmer, The Sword and the Sorcerer (1982), Norman Loves Rose (1982),

3

2010 • Obituaries ADAMS, SHEILA K. Actress and playwright Sheila K. Adams died of leukemia in a Manhattan, New York, hospital on April 18, 2010. She was 59. Adams was born in Omaha, Nebraska, on June 24, 1950. She began her career on stage as Fredrika Armfeldt in the original Broadway production of A Little Night Music in 1973. She also starred as Milly Owens in William Inge’s Summer Brave on Broadway in 1975. She was featured in the 1981 tele-film The Gentleman Bandit (1981) and appeared as a deputy in the 1983 sequel Psycho II. She was also seen in the 2006 film Fast Track. Adams also published several plays, including Dog Story and Force Majeure.

Mike Adams

WarGames (1983), Spacehunter: Adventures in the Forbidden Zone (1983), Bachelor Party (1984), Roadhouse 66 (1984), Rhinestone (1984), Commando (1985), Pale Rider (1985), Mask (1985), Year of the Dragon (1985), My Science Project (1985), Avenging Angel (1985), Blue City (1986), Nobody’s Fool (1986), Ratboy (1986), A Fine Mess (1986), Raw Deal (1986), Disorderlies (1987), No Way Out (1987), Barfly (1987), Shy People (1987), Nadine (1987), P.K. and the Kid (1987), Little Nikita (1988), Red Heat (1988), The Dead Pool (1988), Split Decisions (1988), K-9 (1989), Blind Fury (1989), Big Man on Campus (1989), Mr. Destiny (1990), Problem Child (1990), RoboCop 2 (1990), Bloodmoon (1990), David Lynch’s Wild at Heart (1990), Cold Dog Soup (1990), City Slickers (1991), Out for Justice (1991), Under Siege (1992), Sneakers (1992), Out on a Limb (1992), Deep Cover (1992), Thunderheart (1992), Redheads (1992), Wayne’s World (1992), Coneheads (1993), In the Line of Fire (1993), House of Cards (1993), RoboCop 3 (1993), Geronimo: An American Legend (1993), The Program (1993), Lassie (1994), Separate Lives (1995), Major Payne (1995), Cover Me (1995), Wild Bill (1995) Set It Off (1996), Fox Hunt (1996), Kansas City (1996), Chameleon (1996), Best Men (1997), Vegas Vacation (1997), Mighty Joe Young (1998), The Waterboy (1998), The Gingerbread Man (1998), The Replacement Killers (1998), Magnolia (1999), The Replacements (2000), The Adventures of Rocky & Bullwinkle (2000), What Planet Are You From? (2000), Ocean’s Eleven (2001), Stealing Harvard (2002), Punch-Drunk Love (2002), Shattered Lies (2002), Catch Me If You Can (2002), Bad Santa (2003), Timeline (2003), 50 First Dates (2004), Black Dawn (2005), Herbie Fully Loaded (2005), Kicking & Screaming (2005), The Astronaut Farmer (2006), Pineapple Express (2008), and Dark Moon Rising (2009). He worked as stunt coordinator for the NBC soap opera Days of Our Lives for more than twenty years from the mid–1980s. Adams also worked on the tele-films Charleston (1979), The Last Innocent Man (1987), Percy & Thunder (1993), Favorite Deadly Sins (1995), The Bachelor’s Baby (1996), Louis L’Amour’s Shaughnessy the Iron Marshal (1996), and Live from Baghdad (2002), and the series Shelley Duvall’s Tall Tales & Legends, Magnum, P.I., and Highway to Heaven. He was a past president of the Stuntmen’s Association of Motion Pictures.

ADAMS, TONI Wrestling valet and manager Toni Adams, who worked with her husband Gentleman Chris Adams in an in-ring feud with Steve Austin and Adams’ former wife Jeannie Clark, died of complications from surgery after a long illness in a Louisville, Kentucky, hospital on June 24, 2010. She was 45. She was born Toni Lea Collins in Freer, Texas, on August 19, 1964. She began working in wrestling as a production assistant at Fritz Von Erich’s World Class promotion in 1984. She married wrestling star Chris Adams several years later and made occasional appearances with World Class. She was her husband’s manager with World Class and Global in the late 1980s. She became a leading figure in the clash between Adams, his protege Steve Austin, and ex-wife Jeannie Clark in the USWA in 1990. The two couples participated in numerous mixed-tag battles throughout the year. Toni and Chris’ homelife proved as

Toni Adams

volatile as their ring feuds, and they divorced soon after their clashes with Austin-Clarke ended. Toni returned to the USWA in 1993 as Brian Christopher’s manager, Nanny Simpson, where she feuded with Rockin’ Robin, Miss Texas, and Dirty White Girl. She briefly resurfaced as valet to Iceman King Parsons during his feud with Chris Adams in Global Wrestling before retiring from the ring in 1994.

ADKINS, GUY Stage actor Guy Adkins died of colon cancer at his apartment in Chicago on May 12, 2010. He was 41. Adkins was born in Lansing, Michigan, on October 3, 1968. He moved to Chicago in the early 1990s after graduating from the University of Wisconsin. He became a leading performer on the local stage

Obituaries • 2010

4 Mary Poppins (1964), and My Fair Lady (1964). He performed frequently on the cruise ship circuit from the 1950s and appeared with pop orchestras in Florida later in his career. Adler wrote his autobiography, Living from Hand to Mouth, in 2005.

AGUABELLA, FRANCISCO Afro-Cuban percussionist Francisco Aguabella died of cancer in Los Angeles on May 7, 2010. He was 84. Aguabella was born in Matanzas, Cuba, on October 10, 1925. He left Cuba in the 1950s to tour with Katherine Dunham’s dance troupe and appeared in the band in the 1954 film Mambo with Shelley Winters. He performed Latin jazz and salsa in Guy Adkins

there, starring in productions of A Funny Thing Happened…, Oklahoma!, The Taming of the Shrew, The Return of Martin Guerre, and the national tour of the revival of Sweet Charity with Molly Ringwald. Adkins also appeared on television in episodes of Kings and 30 Rock, and was featured in the forthcoming independent film The David Dance (2010).

ADLER, JERRY Harmonica player Jerry Adler died of prostate cancer in Ellenton, Florida, on March 13, 2010. He was 91. He was born Hilliard Gerald Adler in Baltimore, Maryland, on October 30, 1918. He followed in the footsteps of his older brother Larry, also a harmonica virtuoso. He won a local talent competition at age 13 and was soon with Paul Whiteman’s orchestra. He served in the Army Air Corps entertainment unit during World War II. Adler appeared in Moss Hart’s Broadway musical Winged Victory and was featured in the 1944 film version. He also toured the Pacific with a small entertainment unit during the war. He worked frequently in Hollywood from the early 1940s and instructed Jimmy Stewart on how to play the harmonica for the 1941 film Pot o’ Gold. He also worked with Van Johnson on 1947’s The Romance of Rosy Ridge and was featured onscreen for a solo in the campfire scene in the 1953 film The Juggler with Kirk Douglas. Adler was also featured on the soundtracks of such films as High Noon (1952), Shane (1953), The James Dean Story (1957), The Alamo (1960),

Jerry Adler

Francisco Aguabella

the United States in the 1940s and 1950s and toured throughout Europe and South America. He played with the Jorge Santana Latin rock band Malo in the 1970s and taught Afro-Cuban drumming at UCLA. Aguabella was featured in the 1995 documentary Sworn to the Drum and another documentary about his life and music was in production at the time of his death.

AIELLO, DANNY, III Stuntman Danny Aiello III, the son of character actor Danny Aiello, died of pancreatic cancer in Hillsdale, New Jersey, on May 1, 2010. He was 53. He was born in The Bronx, New York, on January 27, 1957. The younger Aiello began his career in films in the late 1970s, appearing in the small role of Baldie in the 1979 cult classic The Wanderers. He worked on numerous films as a stuntman and stunt coordinator over the next 30 years. His many credits include the films Fighting Back (1982), Amityville II: The Possession (1982), Splash (1984), The Natural (1984), Rappin’ (1985), Key Exchange (1985), Legal Eagles (1986), Playing for Keeps (1986), The Squeeze (1987), Outrageous Fortune (1987), The Secret of My Succe$s (1987), Matewan (1987), Return to Salem’s Lot (1987), China Girl (1987), Orphans (1987), Deadly Illusion (1987), Good Morning, Vietnam (1987), The In Crowd (1988), Shakedown (1988), White Hot (1988), Big Business (1988), Spike of Bensonhurst (1988), Last Rites (1988), The January Man (1989), New York Stories (1989), The Dream Team (1989), See No Evil, Hear No Evil (1989), Bloodhounds of Broadway (1989), Spike Lee’s Do the Right Thing (1989) as his father’s stunt double, The Lemon Sisters (1989), Blue Steel (1989), Ghostbusters II (1989), Lock Up (1989), Heart of Dixie (1989), Family

5 Business (1989), State of Grace (1990), Loose Cannons (1990), Miller’s Crossing (1990), Tune in Tomorrow (1990), Jacob’s Ladder (1990), New Jack City (1991), The Hard Way (1991), Hudson Hawk (1991), Ricochet (1991), 29th Street (1991), The Last Boy Scout (1991), Ruby (1992), Mac (1992), Whispers in the Dark (1992), Scent of a Woman (1992), Hoffa (1992), The Pickle (1993), The Saint of Fort Washington (1993), Mr. Wonderful (1993), Nell (1994), Just Cause (1995), Die Hard: With a Vengeance (1995), Jaded (1996), The Spitfire Grill (1996), Diabolique (1996), Jungle 2 Jungle (1997), A Simple Wish (1997), Cop Land (1997), Two Girls and a Guy (1997), Lolita (1997), Woo (1998), Coyote Ugly (2000), Dinner Rush (2000), Double Whammy (2001), What’s the Worst That Could Happen? (2001), Kate & Leopold (2001), Empire (2002), Bad Company (2002), Igby Goes Down (2002), Stuart Little 2 (2002), [email protected] (2002), I’m with Lucy (2002), City by the Sea (2002), In America (2002), Catch Me if You Can (2002), The Hours (2002), Nola (2003), Uptown Girls (2003), 21 Grams (2003), The Warrior Class (2004), Spartan (2004), Stateside (2004), Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004), 13 Going on 30 (2004), New York Minute (2004), Ladder 49 (2004), The Forgotten (2004), The Paw (2005), The Devil Wears Prada (2006), Shooter (2007), Reign Over Me (2007), The Invasion (2007), Death in Love (2008), Meet Dave (2008), Sex and the City (2008), Laylat El-Baby Doll (2008), Burn After Reading (2008), Duplicity (2009), 12 Rounds (2009), The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3 (2009), Rob Zombie’s Halloween II (2009), The Box (2009), Sex and the City 2 (2010), and Salt (2010). He also did stunt work on the tele-films Hostage (1988), True Blue (1989), Perfect Witness (1989), The Bride in Black (1990), Tribeca Stories (1992), Citizen Cohn (1992), Denis Leary’s Merry F#%$in’ Christmas (2005), and Fort Pit (2007), and the series H.E.L.P., Stephen King’s Golden Years, Crime Story, The Untouchables, Law & Order, Law & Order: Criminal Intent, The Job, Sex and the City, Angels in America, Tribeca, Falcone, Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, Six Degrees, Dirty Sexy Money, Dirty Dancing: The Time of Your Life, Cashmere Mafia, the soap operas One Life to Live and All My Children, Life on Mars, Castle, Cupid, Royal Pains, Rescue Me, The Beautiful Life: TBL, and How to Make It in America. Aiello also directed episodes of the television series The Untouchables and Dellaventura, and was sec-

Danny Aiello, III

2010 • Obituaries ond unit director for H.E.L.P., The Watcher, Sex and the City, and Rescue Me. He directed his father in the 1999 film 18 Shades of Dust, about the final hours in the life of a hitman.

AKBAR, SKANDOR Jim Wehba, who was better known as villainous pro wrestler and manager Skandor Akbar, died of cancer in Garland, Texas, on August 19, 2010. He was 75. Jimmy Saied Wehba was born in Vernon, Texas, on September 29, 1934. He began his career in the ring in 1963 wrestling under such names as Wildman Wehba, Mighty Jim, and Prince Emir. He

Skandor Akbar

changed his name to Skandor Akbar several years later and made his mark both teaming and feuding with Danny Hodge. He held regional NWA tag team titles with Hodge on several occasions and also teamed for tag championships with Ox Baker, Buddy Colt, and Rocket Monroe. He also had a notable feud with Armand Hussein, competing for the NWA Mid-American Heavyweight Championship in the mid–1970s. He was best known for his role as the turban clad General Skandor Akbar, the leader of the villainous wrestling faction Devastation, Inc., in Fritz Von Erich’s World Class Wrestling and Global Wrestling and Bill Watts’ Universal Wrestling Federation in the 1980s. He managed such wrestlers as Steve Austin, Mick “Cactus Jack” Foley, Kamala the Ugandan Giant, Abdullah the Butcher, One Man Gang, Brickhouse Brown, King Kong Bundy, and Greg Valentine in Devastation’s battles against the Von Erichs, Eric Embry, and others. Though he largely retired in the 1990s, he continued to make frequent appearances on the independent circuit, trained aspiring wrestlers, and was a popular guest at wrestling fan gatherings.

ALAN, RAY English ventriloquist Ray Alan, who was best known for his monocled puppet Lord Charles on the BBC television program The Good Old Days in the 1960s, died suddenly in Reigate, Surrey, England, on May 24, 2010. He was 79. Alan was born in Greenwich, London, England, on September 18, 1930. He began his stage career at an early age doing magic acts and ventriloquism. He created the upper-crust puppet Lord Charles in the 1960s, and the duo became a popular act on British television. Alan had his own television show, Tich and Quackers, in the late 1960s and

Obituaries • 2010 early 1970s, with the dummies Tich, a young schoolboy, and his pet duck, Quackers. He also created the puppet Ali Cat for the 1977 HTV series Magic Circle. He wrote for other television series including Morecambe and Wise,

Ray Alan (with his dummy, Lord Charles)

6 film Heaven’s Gate, which proved a costly disaster, largely ended Albeck’s career at United Artists. He was briefly bumped from president to chairman, before resigning from the company in early 1981. He retired from the film industry to raise blue spruce trees on the Albeck Family Christmas Tree Farm in New Jersey.

ALEXANDRE, MANUEL Spanish actor Manuel Alexandre died in Madrid, Spain, on October 12, 2010. He was 92. Alexandre was born in Madrid on November 11, 1917. He studied law before embarking on a career as an actor and made his theatrical debut in 1945. He soon began appearing in such films as Love Charm (1947), Welcome Mr. Marshall! (1953), Nobody Will Know (1953), Comicos (1954), Happy Easter (1954), Age of Infidelity (1955), The Rocket from Calabuch (1956), El Malvado Carabel (1956), The Lovemaker (1956), Honeymoon (1956), The Tenant (1957), Miracles of Thursday (1957), La Venganza (1958), La Vida por Delante (1958), The Inveterate Bachelor (1958), Sonatas (1959), There Is Someone Behind the Door (1960), Amor Bajo Cero (1960), Solo para Hombres (1960), 091 Policía al Habla (1960), Placido

The Two Ronnies, and Bootsie and Snudge. He was a guest on numerous variety and game show including Celebrity Squares, Give Us a Clue, Family Fortunes, 3 –2-1, Bullseye, The Bob Monkhouse Show, The Des O’Connor Show, and Blue Peter. He continued to perform on the variety stage until shortly before his death.

ALBECK, ANDY Film executive Andreas “Andy” Albeck, who served as president of United Artist Studios in the late 1970s, died of heart failure in a New York City hospital on September 29, 2010. He was 89. Albeck was born in Vladivsotok, Russia, on September 25, 1921, and was raised in Japan. He began working in films as a sales representative for Columbia Pictures in the Dutch East Indies in 1939, and later worked for EagleLion Films. He joined United Artists in 1951 when they acquired Eagle-Lion. He rose through the ranks to become president of the broadcasting division and senior vice president of operations. Albeck was chosen to head the studio in 1979 and oversaw production of such hits as The French Lieutenant’s Woman, Woody Allen’s Manhattan, Martin Scorsese’s Raging Bull, and films in the Rocky and James Bond series. The 1980 Michael Cimino

Andy Albeck

Manuel Alexandre

(1961), Zorro the Avenger (1962), Vampiresas 1930 (1962), Accidente 703 (1962), Three Fables of Love (1962), Atraco a las Tres (1962), The Sadistic Baron Von Klaus (1962), El Senor de La Salle (1964), Los Palomos (1964), El Salario del Crimen (1964), Crucero de Verano (1964), La Muerte Silba un Blues (1964), Assassination in Rome (1965), Un Beso en el Puerto (1966), I’ll Kill Him and Return Alone (1967), Love in Flight (1967), Un Adulterio Decente (1969), Cuatro Noches de Boda (1969), Furnished Studio 2.P. (1969), Long Live the Bride and Groom (1970), The Wind’s Fierce (1970), Ligue Story (1972), El Vikingo (1972), Don Quixote Rides Again (1973), Jenaro el de los 14 (1974), Tocata y Fuga de Lolita (1974), The New Spaniards (1974), Ambiciosa (1976), Vote for Gundisalvo (1977), Foul Play (1977), The Days of the Past (1978), La Boda del Senor Cura (1979), Children’s War (1980), The Black Hand (1980), …And the Third Year, He Resuscitated (1980), La Segunda Guerra de los Ninos (1981), Black Jack (1981), Hooray for Divorce! (1982), El Cabezota (1982), Parchís Entra en Accion (1983), Year of Enlightment (1986), El Bosque Animado (1987), Sinatra (1988), The Sea and the Weather (1989), La Fuente de la Edad (1991), Off-

7 sides (1991), Una Mujer Bajo la Lluvia (1992), Tocando Fondo (1993), Madregilda (1993), On Earth as It Is in Heaven (1995), Adios, Tiburon (1996), El Angel de la Guarda (1996), La Duquesa Roja (1997), The Return of El Coyote (1998), Paris-Timbuktu (1999), Miserable Life (2000), Lazaro de Tormes (2001), Don Quixote, Knight Errant (2002), Two Tough Guys (2003), Franky Banderas (2004), Swindled (2004), Elsa y Fred (2005), Doghead (2006), Do I Know You? (2007), Pretextos (2008), and Campamento Flipy (2010). Alexandre also appeared frequently on Spanish television from the 1950s, with notable roles in Las Palmeras de Carton as Dionisio on 1977, and 1980’s Fortunata y Jacinta as Estupina. He also appeared in the series Curro Jimenez, Sonatas, Brigada Central, Don Quijote de la Mancha, Farmacia de Guardia, Serie Negra, La Regenta, 7 Vidas, Raquel Busca su Sitio, Hospital Central, and Herederos. He starred as Arsenio “El Anticuario” in the television series Los Ladrones van a la Oficina from 1993 to 1996 and was Don Guillermo in the series Senor Alcalde in 1998. He was featured as Francisco Franco in the 2008 television production of 20-N: Los Ultimos Dias de Franco.

ALF, JOHNNY Brazilian musician and composer Alfredo Jos da Silva, who was known as Johnny Alf, died of prostate cancer in Santo Andre, Brazil, on

Johnny Alf

March 4, 2010. He was 80. He was born in Vila Isabel, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on May 19, 1929. He began playing the piano from an early age and was performing in nightclubs in Rio while in his teens. He was considered one of the fathers of the bossa nova and recorded his first single, “Falsetto,” in 1952. He also recorded such hits as “Eu e a Brisa” (“Me and the Breeze”), “Ilusao a Toa” (“Carefree Illusion”), “Ceu e Mar” (“Sky and Sea”), “O Tempo e o Vento” (“Time and the Wind”), and “Rapaz de Bem” (“Well-Intentioned Guy”). He left Rio in the 1960s to teach music as a conservator in Sao Paulo, but continued to record on occasion. He released the CD Olhos Negros (Black Eyes) in 1990.

ALLEN, COREY Actor and director Corey Allen, who starred as the ill-fated Buzz Gunderson, who perishes in a chicken race against James Dean’s character in the 1955 film classic Rebel Without a Cause, died in Hollywood on June 27, 2010. He was 75. Allen was

2010 • Obituaries

Corey Allen (from Rebel Without a Cause)

born in Cleveland, Ohio, on June 29, 1934. He attended UCLA, where he studied film and appeared in the Oscar-winning short A Time Out of War in 1954. He appeared frequently on the Los Angeles stage, appeared in small roles in the films The Mad Magician (1954) with Vincent Price, The Bridges at Toko-Ri (1954), and The Night of the Hunter (1955). His role in Rebel Without a Cause led to such subsequent films as The Shadow on the Window (1957), The Big Caper (1957), Darby’s Rangers (1958), Juvenile Jungle (1958), Party Girl (1958), Private Property (1960), Key Witness (1960), Sweet Bird of Youth (1962), and The Chapman Report (1962). Allen was also seen frequently on television in the 1950s and 1960s, appearing in episodes of Medic, Dragnet, Stories of the Century, The Loretta Young Show, Casablanca, Crusader, Telephone Time, Studio 57, The Millionaire, West Point, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, The Restless Gun, Gunsmoke, Trackdown, State Trooper, Have Gun—Will Travel, Studio One, Behind Closed Doors, Rawhide, Men into Space, Lock Up, Dan Raven, Hawaiian Eye, Sea Hunt, The Rebel, Lawman, 87th Precinct, Perry Mason, The Dakotas, Bonanza, Suspense, Dr. Kildare, Combat!, The Loner, My Friend Tony, and Police Woman. He also was a founder and director for the Freeway Circuit Theater and helmed numerous productions on the Los Angeles stage. He was directing for television by the late 1960s and largely abandoned his onscreen career for a role behind the camera. He directed several films including The Erotic Adventures of Pinoc-

Corey Allen (older)

Obituaries • 2010 chio (1971), Thunder and Lightning (1977), and Avalanche (1978). He worked frequently in television, helming the tele-films See the Man Run (1971), Cry Rape (1973), Yesterday’s Child (1977), Stone (1979), The Man in the Santa Claus Suit (1979), The Return of Frank Cannon (1980), The Murder of Sherlock Holmes (1984), Brass (1985), Beverly Hills Cowgirl Blues (1985), I-Man (1986), The Last Fling (1987), Destination America (1987), The Ann Jillian Story (1988), Moment of Truth: Stalking Back (1993), The Visit (1994), The Search (1994), Men Who Hate Women & the Women Who Love Them (1994), The Journey (1994), and The Hero (1994). His numerous television credits also include episodes of The New People, Then Came Bronson, Mannix, The High Chaparral, Ironside, Hawaii Five-0, Cannon, The Streets of San Francisco, Barnaby Jones, The Family Holvak, Kate McShane, Bronk, Executive Suite, The Quest, Police Woman, Police Story, Quincy, Trapper John, M.D., The Rockford Files, Stone, Lobo, McClain’s Law, Capitol, Chicago Story, Tucker’s Witch, Gavilan, T.J. Hooker, Simon & Simon, The Powers of Matthew Star, Whiz Kids, Matt Houston, Scarecrow and Mrs. King, Leg Men, Hill Street Blues which earned him an Emmy Award in 1983, The Paper Chase, Jessie, Murder, She Wrote, Code Name: Foxfire, Otherworld, Dallas, J.J. Starbuck, Magnum, P.I., Sonny Spoon, Supercarrier, The New Lassie, Unsub, CBS Summer Playhouse, Hunter, FBI: The Untold Stories, Star Trek: The Next Generation including the 1987 pilot episode “Encounter at Farpoint,” Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, and The Cosby Mysteries. Allen also taught acting and directing courses at the Actors Workshop, Margie Haber Studio, and Columbia University.

8 Allen edited Robert Wise’s 1959 film noir classic Odds Against Tomorrow. She continued to cut such films as The Fisherman and His Soul (1961), The Hustler (1961), America, America (1963), Arthur Penn’s Bonnie and Clyde (1967), Rachel, Rachel (1968), Alice’s Restaurant (1969), Little Big Man (1970), Slaughterhouse-Five (1972), Visions of Eight (1973), Serpico (1973), and Night Moves (1975). She was nominated for an Oscar for editing 1975’s Dog Day Afternoon. Allen also served as an editor on The Missouri Breaks (1976), Slap Shot (1977), The Wiz (1978), Warren Beatty’s Reds (1981) which earned her another Academy Award nomination, Harry & Son (1984), Mike’s Murder (1984), The Breakfast Club (1985), Off Beat (1986), Robert Redford’s The Milagro Beanfield War (1988), Let It Ride (1989), Henry & June (1990), and The Addams Family (1991). She worked as an executive at Warner Bros. during much of the 1990s, overseeing pre- and post-production for numerous films. She returned to editing with Wonder Boys in 2000, earning another Oscar nod. Her later film credits include John Q (2002), The Final Cut (2004), Have Dreams, Will Travel (2007), and Fireflies in the Garden (2008). Allen appeared onscreen in the documentaries Easy Riders, Raging Bulls: How the Sex, Drugs and Rock ’n’ Roll Generation Saved Hollywood (2003) and The Cutting Edge: The Magic of Movie Editing (2004). Survivors include her husband of 63 years, documentary producer and writer Stephen Fleischman.

ALLEN, DEDE Film editor Dede Allen, who earned Academy Award nominations for her work on the films Dog Day Afternoon, Reds, and Wonder Boys, died of complications from a stroke at her home in Los Angeles on April 18, 2010. She was 86. She was born Dorothea Corothers Allen in Cincinnati, Ohio, on December 3, 1923. She began working at Columbia Pictures as a messenger and was soon working as an assistant sound effects editor. She trained under Carl Lerner as an editor in the 1940s and cut commercials in New York. She served as an editor on the 1948 film Because of Eve and the 1958 sci-fi film Terror from the Year 5000.

ALLEN, “NIGHTMARE” TED Professional wrestler Ted Allen, who was best known as one of the masked Nightmares in the early 1980s, died of a heart attack in Cartersville, Georgia, on August 19, 2010. He was 54. He was born Ted Lipscomb in Cartersville, Georgia, on November 17, 1955. He began working in wrestling as a ring announcer while in his teens and was competing in the ring by the mid–1970s. He wrestled with the Georgia promotion under the names Ted Atlas and Ted Allen before teaming with Danny Davis as the hooded heel duo The Nightmares in 1981. Davis left Atlanta after several months and paired with Ken Wayne as The Nightmares in other promotions. Allen continued to compete under a mask, becoming MX-1 for Stampede Wrestling in Canada and the Power Ranger for Jim Cornette’s Smoky Mountain Wrestling. He later toured the independent circuit as Nightmare Ted Allen. He ran

Dede Allen

Nightmare Ted Allen

9 the Peach State Wrestling promotion in Rome, Georgia, from 1989 to 1991, and was also instrumental in training such future stars as Arn Anderson, Ray “the Big Bossman” Traylor, Scotty Riggs, and Bull Buchanan.

ALPHA, JENNY French Martinique actress and singer Jenny Alpha died in Paris on September 8, 2010. She was 100. She was born in Fort-de-France, Martinique, on April 22, 1910. She moved to Paris in 1929 where she embarked on a career in theater. She became

Jenny Alpha

2010 • Obituaries mermelodie (1944), Heidesommer (1945), and Die Andere (aka The Other) (1949). She was featured as Nicoline Pratt in the 1954 film Meines Vaters Pferde. She appeared on television in productions of Der Ungebetene Gast (1954), Die Gerechten (1959), Das Abschiedsgeschenk (1962), Amouren (1964), Karl Sand (1964), Die Brucke von Estaban (1964), Die Schlussel (1965), Der Sudenbock (1965), Olivia (1965), Pontius Pilatus (1966), Quadrille (1966), Tagebucher (1967), Lord Arthur Saviles Verbrechen (1967), Bel Ami (1968), Ein Charleston fur Lady Mac’Beth (1969), Bischof Ketteler (1969), Kommissariat IX (1974), Die Pressische Heirat (1974), Gedankenketten (1979), and Scharf aufs Leben (2000), and episodes of Onkel Silas, Schicht in Weiss, and Tatort. She was best known as a leading dubbing performer, providing the German voice for Ingrid Bergman in Murder on the Orient Express, Lily Tomlin in All of Me, Janet Leigh in The Fog, and Angela Lansbury in television’s Murder, She Wrote.

AMANDOLA, VITTORIO Italian actor Vittorio Amandola died in Rome, Italy, on July 22, 2010. He was 57. Amandola was born in Perugia, Italy, on November 4, 1952. He began his career in films in the late 1970s and was featured in Belli e Brutti Ridono Tutti (1979), Farewell Moscow (1987), Il Volpone (1988), Appuntamento a Liverpool (1988), Queen of Hearts (1989), Tempo di Uc-

a popular performer on the French stage, appearing in hundreds of productions. She also appeared in several films later in her career including En l’Autre Bord (1978), Le Fils Puni (1980), Reveillon Chez Bob (1984), Folie Ordinaire d’une Fille de Cham (1986), La Vieille Quimboiseuse et le Majordome (1987), Karukera au Bout de la Nuit (1988), The Secret of Sarah Tombelaine (1991), The Absence (1993), Black for Remembrance (1995), Le Bleu des Villes (1999), and Monsieur Etienne (2005). She performed on television in productions of Bolivar et le Congres de Panama (1979), Le Voleur d’Enfants (1981), and Mountain of Diamonds (1991).

ALTRICHTER, DAGMAR German actress Dagmar Altrichter died in Ludersdorf, Germany, on July 20, 2010. She was 85. Altrichter was born in Berlin on September 20, 1924. She trained as an actress in Berlin, where she performed on stage. She began her film career in the early 1940s, appearing in Eine Kleine Som-

Dagmar Altrichter

Vittorio Amandola

cidere (1989), Il Branco (1994), The Monster (1994), Acquario (1996), Vite Strozzate (1996), Farfalle (1997), Il Prezzo (2000), Gioco con la Morte (2001), The Last Kiss (2001), Witches to the North (2001), Ciao America (2002), Involtini Primavera (2002), La Rivincita (2002), Tartarughe sul Dorso (2005), Three on the Road (2006), and Napoleon and Me (2006). He also appeared frequently on Italian television in such productions as Mino (1986), La Piovra 4 (1989), Requiem for Voice and Piano (1991), A Season of Giants (1991), Jute City (1991), Agatha Christie’s Poirot (1993), La Voce del Cuore (1995), Un Giorno Fortunato (1997), Ama il Tuo Nemico (1999), Mary Magdalene (2000), Meucci (2005), Rome (2005), Le Ragazze di San Frediano (2007), Ho Sposato Uno Sbirro (2008), Pane e Liberta (2009), and Il Commissario Rex (2010). He was also noted as a leading dubbing actor, providing the Italian voice to The Simpsons’ Mr. Smithers and Disney’s Goofy.

Obituaries • 2010 AMOS, SHEILA Television editor Sheila Amos died of leukemia in a Kingston, New York, hospital on July 11, 2010. She was 63. Amos was born in Merrick, New York, on July 27, 1946. She moved to Los Angeles

Sheila Amos

in the mid–1970s and embarked on a career as an editor. She earned Emmy Award nominations for her work on Cheers in 1991 and Mad About You in 1995. She also edited episodes of such series as Roc, Hearts Afire, Ladies Man, The Fighting Fitzgeralds, and Frasier. Amos edited the 2005 feature The Thing About My Folks starring Paul Reiser and Peter Falk, before moving to Woodstock, New York, where she reviewed films for the Woodstock Film Festival.

ANDERSON, ALEX Alex Anderson, co-creator of the popular Rocky and Bullwinkle cartoons, died at his home in Carmel, California, on October 22, 2010. He was 90. Anderson was born in Berkeley, California, in 1910. He attended the University of California at Berkeley and the California School of Fine Arts in San Francisco. He began working in cartoons for his uncle, Paul Terry, at Terrytoons in 1938. Anderson served in the U.S. Navy during World War II and returned to Terrytoons after the war. He left the studio to team with Jay Ward to produce cartoons for television in the late 1940s. They formed Television Arts Productions and created the first cartoon series for television, Crusader Rabbit. Filmed in

Alex Anderson

10 black and white with limited animation, nearly 200 episodes aired on NBC and in syndication in the early 1950s. Anderson also created the cartoons Dudley-DoRight, about a well-intentioned Canadian Mountie, and Rocky and Bullwinkle, featuring an erudite flying squirrel and his moose buddy. He later worked in advertising for such clients as Berkeley Farms, Skippy Peanut Butter, and Smucker’s.

ANDERSON, JULIET Adult film actress Juliet Anderson, who was frequently known as Aunt Peg because of her mature roles in porn, died of complications from Crohn’s disease at her home in Berkeley, California, on January 11, 2010. She was 71. She was born Judith Carr in Burbank, California, on July 23, 1938. She traveled the world during her youth, working in various occupations. She appeared in small roles in the exploitation films International Smorgas-Broad (1965) and The Beast That Killed Women (1965). She began appearing in adult features a decade later and was billed under such names as Judy Carr, Judy Callin, Judy Fallbrook, Ruby Sapphire, and Alice Rigby. She was best known as Juliet Anderson and as her onscreen persona of a sexually insa-

Juliet Anderson

tiable older woman, Aunt Peg. Her film credits include KSEX (1976), Hot Lunch (1978), Bad Company (1978), The Tender Trap (1978), Caught in the Act (1978), Pretty Peaches (1978), Tangerine (1979), The Perfect Gift (1979), Summer Heat (1979), Shoppe of Temptations (1979), Inside Desiree Cousteau (1979), The Gypsy Ball (1980), Carnal Highways (1980), Randy (1980), Body Candy (1980), Taboo (1980), Aunt Peg (1980), Co-Ed Fever (1980), Talk Dirty to Me (1980), A Girl’s Best Friend (1981), the Swedish Erotica series (1981), Undulations (1981), All the King’s Ladies (1981) which she also directed, Physical (1981), Outlaw Ladies (1981), Skin on Skin (1981), Beyond Your Wildest Dreams (1981), Vista Valley P.T.A. (1981), Aunt Peg’s Fulfillment (1981), Manhattan Mistress (1981), 8 to 4 (1981), Aunt Peg Goes Hollywood (1981), Object of Desire (1982), Purely Physical (1972), The Mistress (1982), Dixie Ray Hollywood Star (1983), Coffee, Tea or Me (1983), San Fernando Valley Girls (1983), Fox Holes (1983) as Dr. Honeybottoms, Fantasex Island (1984), Real People (1984), Insatiable II (aka Hell on Heels) (1984), and Hot Ones (1984). She directed the 1984 feature Educating

11 Nina starring Nina Hartley and left the adult film business soon after over a dispute with the producers on editing the film. She was later seen on the 1988 video release Tattoo Vampire (1988). She worked as a relationship counselor, massage therapist, and operated a bed and breakfast before returning to adult films in the mid– 1990s. She produced and directed Ageless Desire (1999) and appeared on screen with her current partner in a hardcore video about the sex-life of several over–50 couples.

ANDERSON, PAUL Film and television editor Paul Anderson died of cancer in Saugus, California, on March 8, 2010. He was 49. Anderson was born on April 19, 1960. He began his career in the early 1980s as an assistant editor on the television productions This Is Elvis (1981), Hollywood: The Gift of Laughter (1982), Act of Vengeance (1986), Chance of Lifetime (1991), Hart to Hart: Crimes of the Hart (1994), and Hart to Hart: Home Is Where the Hart Is (1994). He was also an assistant editor on the 1985 film Commando, and the series Buffalo Bill and The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd. He worked as an editor from the early 1990s on such series as Love Street, Cybil, The Larry Sanders Show which earned him two Emmy Award nominations, Work with Me, The Job, Watching Ellie, Just Shoot Me which gained him another Emmy nod, The Bernie Mac Show, Saving Grace, Rescue Me, and Notes from the Underbelly. Anderson also edited the films The Mosaic Project (1994) and Finding Amanda (2008), and the tele-films The End of Steve (2008) and Pulling (2009). ANDERSON, SPARKY George “Sparky” Anderson, a baseball player turned manager who led the Cincinnati Reds and Detroit Tigers to World Series championships, died of complications from dementia at his home in Thousand Oaks, California, on November 4, 2010. He was 76. Anderson was born in Bridgewater, South Dakota, on February 22, 1934, and moved to Los Angeles with his family at an early age. He played baseball in high school and was signed with the Brooklyn Dodgers’ minor league team in Santa Barbara 1953. He spent the next several years playing in Fort Worth, Montreal, and Los Angeles before being traded to the Philadelphia Phillies in 1958. He briefly made it to the majors the following year, before returning to the minors

2010 • Obituaries with the Toronto Maple Leafs in the early 1960s. He became the Maple Leafs’ manager in 1964 and managed in the minors for the next five seasons. He returned to the majors as coach for the San Diego Padres in 1969 and was named manager of the Cincinnati Reds later in the year. He led the team to the National League Pennant in 1970 and 1972 and took the team to World Series championship in 1975 and 1976. He was fired by Cincinnati’s new manager Dick Wagner in 1978 over a coaching dispute and was hired by the Detroit Tigers as manager the following year. He led the team to the American League championship and the World Series title in 1984. Anderson remained with the Tigers over the next decade, leaving in 1995 over a dispute with the club owners when they brought in replacement players during a strike of major leaguers. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame as a manager in 2000. Anderson was featured as himself in a 1979 episode of the sit-com WKRP in Cincinnati as a radio talk show host who got fired from the station. He also had cameo roles in an episode of The White Shadow in 1980 and the 1983 Disney tele-film Tiger Town.

ANGELL, CALLIE Callie Angell, a leading authority and curator of the films of Andy Warhol, was found dead of an apparent suicide at her Manhattan, New York, apartment on May 5, 2010. She was 62. Angell was born in Manhattan on January 6, 1948. She attended Goucher College and New York University and

Callie Angell

began her career with the Anthology Film Archives in Manhattan. She was a curator of the Andy Warhol Film Project at the Whitney Museum of American Art and a consultant to the Museum of Modern Art on the preservation of Warhol’s films. Angell spent nearly two decades researching, cataloging and restoring such Warhol films as The Chelsea Girls and Empire, and wrote the first volume of a catalogue raisonne on the short interview films Andy Warhol Screen Tests. She was working on a second volume at the time of her death.

Sparky Anderson

APPLEBY, JAMES S. Aviator James S. Appleby, who worked as a stunt pilot and coordinator in films and television, died in Palm Springs, California, of complications from a broken hip on August 23, 2010. He was 86. Appleby was a pilot with the Army Air Corps and the

Obituaries • 2010 U.S. Air Force from the mid–1940s through the early 1960s. He subsequently worked with Talmantz Aviation (a stunt flying operation founded by Paul Mantz and Frank Tallman), flying the B-25 in the 1970 film Catch22. He and his wife Zona formed Antique Aero Ltd. in

12 Lancelot from 1956 to 1957. Argent began working with the BBC as a floor manager in the late 1950s and was working as a producer and director on such series as Dixon of Dock Green and Till Death Us Do Part by the mid–1960s. He was also involved in the production of episodes of such series as That’s Your Funeral, Fawlty Towers, Steptoe and Son, The Liver Birds, and The Growing Pains of Sergeant Penrose. He retired from the BBC in the early 1980s, but continued to direct freelance for ITV’s That Beryl Marston and Channel 4’s Lady Is a Tramp. He returned to the BBC in 1991, directing several episodes of EastEnders.

ARI UP Ariane Forster, the lead singer for the 1970s British punk rock group The Slits, died on October 20, 2010. She was 48. Forster was born in Munich, Germany, on January 1, 1962. Her mother, Nora, was a punk music supporter who later married Sex Pistols lead singer John Lydon. Ari began performing in her teens, joining with drummer Palmolive to form The Slits in James S. Appleby

1972 at Flatbob Airport in Riverside, California. The couple worked on numerous films and television productions as stunt pilots and technical consultants. Appleby’s credits include the films The Great Waldo Pepper (1975), Hughes and Harlow: Angels in Hell (1978), The Stunt Man (1980), The World According to Garp (1982), and Three Amigos! (1986), and the 1985 television episode “The Mission” for Steven Spielberg’s Amazing Stories.

ARGENT, DOUGLAS British actor turned television director Douglas Argent died in London on October 30, 2010. He was 89. Argent was born in Bexleyheath, Kent, England, on May 21, 1921. He served as a navigator with the Royal Air Force in the Pacific during World War II and spent three years as a POW in Japan. He began performing on stage in repertory after the war. He appeared in several films in the 1950s including The Colditz Story (1955), Women Without Men (1956), Blonde Bait (1956), and Pursuit of the Graf Spree (1956). He also appeared on television in the 1955 series Sixpenny Corner and portrayed several roles in The Adventures of Sir

Douglas Argent

Ari Up

1976. She was a flamboyant stage presence, with wild costumes and wilder hair. They recorded the albums Cut (1979), The Slits (1980), and Return of the Giant Slits (1981) before disbanding. Ari traveled the world and continued her music career with the New Age Steppers and in solo recordings as Baby Ari, Madussa, and Ari Up. She teamed with former bandmate, bass player Tessa Pollitt, to reform The Slits in 2006, to tour Europe, Japan, and the United States. They released the album Trapped Animal in 2009.

ARKHIPOVA, IRINA Russian opera singer Irina Konstantinovna Arkhipova died of cardiac arrest in a Moscow hospital on February 11, 2010. She was 85. Arkhipova was born in Moscow on January 2, 1925. She studied at the Moscow Conservatory and made her operatic debut with the Sverdlovsk Opera in 1954. She began performing with the Bolshoi Theatre in 1956, where she was leading mezzo-soprano for 20 years. She was noted for such roles as Carmen in Bizet’s Carmen, Amneris in Giuseppe Verdi’s Aida, Marina in Mussorgsky’s Boris Godunov, Marfa in Khovanshchina and Sonja in Prokofiev’s War and Peace. She performed throughout Europe in the 1960s and made her U.S. debut in a production of Aida in San Francisco in 1972.

13 She was featured as the old Countess with the Kirov’s production of The Queen of Spades at the Metropolitan

Irina Arkhipova

2010 • Obituaries Quinn Martin’s science fiction series The Invaders starring Roy Thinnes from 1967 to 1968 and the western series Lancer from 1968 to 1971. He produced the first season of the detective series Cannon starring William Conrad in 1971 and the adventure series The Magician, starring Bill Bixby, from 1973 to 1974. He also produced the tele-films Birds of Prey (1973) and The Stranger (1973). Armer largely retired from television in the 1970s and became a lecturer, and later professor, with the Department of Cinema and Television Arts at Cal State Northridge. He also wrote several books including Directing Television and Film and Writing the Screenplay: TV and Film before his retirement in 2000.

ARNOLD, MARCELLE French actress Marcelle Arnold died in Monosque, France, on March 31, 2010. She was 92. Arnold was born in Thonon-les-Bains, Haute-Savoie, France, on May 4, 1917. She appeared frequently in films from the late 1940s with roles in Dedee d’Anvers (1948), All Roads Lead to Rome (1949), Occupe-

Opera in 1992 and made her official Met debut as Filippyevna in Robert Carsen’s staging of Eugene Onegin in 1997.

ARMER, ALAN Emmy Award–winning television producer Alan Armer, who worked on such series as My Friend Flicka, The Untouchables, and The Fugitive, died of colon cancer at his home in Century City, California, on December 5, 2010. He was 88. Armer was born in Los Angeles on July 7, 1922. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II and was an announcer for the Armed Forces Radio in India and Ceylon. He earned a degree in speech and drama at Stanford University after the war and continued to work in radio as an announcer in San Jose. He returned to Los Angeles later in the decade, where he worked for an advertising agency on early television commercials. He teamed with Walter Grauman to created the live television talent show Lights, Camera, Action, which aired in Hollywood from 1949 to 1951. He was soon producing such 1950s television series as My Friend Flicka, Broken Arrow, and Man Without a Gun. He served as executive producer for the crime show The Untouchables from 1960 to 1963 and produced the Emmy Award–winning drama The Fugitive for Quinn Martin from 1963 to 1966. He also produced

Alan Armer

Marcelle Arnold

toi d’Amelie! (1949), …Sans Laisser d’Adresse (1951), Mr. Peek-a-Boo (1951), Juliette, or Key of Dreams (1951), Miracles Only Happen Once (1951), The Night Is My Kingdom (1951), Mr. Peek-A-Boo (1951), Poison (1951), Three Women (1952), The Forest of Farewell (1952), Trois Vieilles Filles en Folie (1952), Matrimonial Agency (1952), Adieu Paris (1952), The Drunkard (1953), Companions of the Night (1953), Children of Love (1953), Mon Frangin du Senegal (1953), Service Entrance (1954), People of No Importance (1956), Shadow of the Guillotine (1956), Her Bridal Night (1956), The Suspects (1957), This Pretty World (1957), Secrets of a French Nurse (1958), Sins of Youth (1958), Lovers on a Tightrope (1960), The Seven Deadly Sins (1962), A Monkey in Winter (1962), Carom Shots (1963), The Reluctant Spy (1963), Killer Spy (1965), Faites donc Plaisir aux Amis (1969), The Things of Life (1970), Na! (1973), A Sea Urchin in the Pocket (1977), and Est-ce Bien Raisonnable? (1981). Arnold was also featured in television productions of Le Mariage de Figaro (1961), Chateau en Suede (1964), Les Irasibles (1965), Nanou (1970), La Possedee (1971), La Bonne Nouvelle (1972), Joseph Balsamo (1973), L’Alphomega (1973), Lucien Leuwen (1973), Malaventure (1974), Messieurs les Jures (1975), and Les Dossiers Eclates (1980).

Obituaries • 2010 ARROW Caribbean soca musician Alphonsus Celestine Edmund Cassell, who was known as Arrow, died of complications from brain cancer at his home on the West Indies island of Montserrat on September 15, 2010. He was 60. Cassell was born on Montserrat on November 16, 1949. He began performing in the 1970s and was crowned four times as Calypso King at Montserrat’s annual Christmas carnival, and released the albums

14 at the 1941 U.S. Figure Skating Championships. She signed with John H. Harris’ Ice Capades in 1941 and soon became its star performer. She provided the figure model for Thumper in Disney’s 1942 animated film Bambi. She appeared on screen in the 1942 film Ice-Capades Revue. She was married to Harris in 1949 and continued to headline his shows until retiring in 1956. She appeared on television in the 1950s in episodes of The Colgate Comedy Hour, The Ed Sullivan Show, The Dinah Shore Chevy Show, and Perry Mason. She and Harris were divorced in 1959.

AUBREY, CECILE French actress Cecile Aubrey died of lung cancer in Dourdan, France, on July 19, 2010. She was 81. She was born Anne-Marie Benard in Paris on August 3, 1928. She trained as a dancer and made her film debut as the star of Henri-Georges Clouzot’s Manon (1949). She went to Hollywood under contract to 20th Century–Fox the following year to make The Black Rose (1950) opposite Tyrone Power and Orson Welles. She also starred in Christian-Jacque’s 1952 film Bluebeard. Aubrey appeared in several other films during the decade Arrow

The Mighty Arrow (1974) and The Arrow Strikes Again (1975). He was soon playing and recording a mixture of Jamaican reggae, Cuban salsa, African tribal music, and American hip-hop, rock, and country in a dance style that became known as soca. The fusion was exemplified by the 1982 hit song “Hot Hot Hot,” written and performed by Arrow, and later a major hit by Buster Poindexter. Arrow had further success with the albums Heat (1983), Soca Salvage (1984) which included the popular single “Long Time,” Heavy Energ y (1986), and Knock Dem Dead (1988). He remained a popular performer in the Caribbean throughout his life.

ATWOOD, DONNA Ice skater Donna Atwood died of respiratory problems at the Motion Picture and Television Country House in Woodland Hills, California, on December 20, 2010. She was 85. Atwood was born in Newton, Kansas, on February 14, 1925. She trained herself to ice skate as a teen and won two medals

Donna Atwood

Cecile Aubrey

including Piovuto dal Cielo (1953), Tanz in der Sonne (1954), La Ironia del Dinero (1959), and L’Espionne sera a Noumea (1960). She was married to Si Brahim El Glaoui, son of the pasha of Marrakesh, in the 1950s, and their son, Mehdi El Glaoui, was born in 1956. Aubrey retired from the screen by the end of the decade and became a successful writer of children’s books. She soon starred in television adaptations of her books Poly (1961), Belle et Sebastien (1965), and Le Jeune Fabre (1973), with Aubrey also serving as director.

AUBREY, JAMES British actor James Aubrey, who made his film debut as a child in 1963’s Lord of the Flies, died of a heart attack at his home in Cranwell Village, Sleaford, England, on April 8, 2010. He was 62. He was born James Aubrey Tregidgo in Klagenfurt, Austria, on August 28, 1947, the son of a British Army officer. He began his career on stage in a production of Isle of Children in 1962 and appeared in the play on Broadway later in the year. He starred as Ralph in the 1963 film version of Lord of the Flies. He continued to study at the Drama Centre London from 1967 to 1970. He returned to the screen in the early 1970s and appeared in a hand-

15 ful of films including The Sex Thief (1973), Galileo (1975), Terror (1978), Home Before Midnight (1979), The Great Rock ’n’ Roll Swindle (1980), Forever Young (1983), The Hunger (1983), The American Way (1986), Cry Free-

2010 • Obituaries AUCHINCLOSS, LOUIS Novelist Louis Auchincloss died of complications from a stroke in a Manhattan, New York, hospital on January 26, 2010. He was 92. Auchincloss was born in Lawrence, New York, on September 27, 1917. He attended Yale and earned a law degree from the University of Virginia in 1941. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II and returned to a position as an associate at the Sullivan & Cromwell law firm after the war. His first novel, The Indifferent Children, was published in 1947. He spent several years working as a writer in the early 1950s before resuming his law practice with the New York City firm of Hawkins, Delafield and Wood. He continued to produce novels and short stories, many based on his patrician upbringing in New England. His 1956 novel The Great World and Timothy Colt was adapted for television as an episode of the CBS drama series Climax! in 1958. He balanced a career as a lawyer and novelist over the next three decades, producing Venus in Sparta (1958), Pursuit of the Prodigal (1959), The House of Five Talents (1960), Por-

James Aubrey (as a child)

dom (1987), The Rift (1990), A Demon in My View (1991), Buddy’s Song (1991), and Spy Game (2002). He was best known for his work in television, and he starred as Gavin Sorenson in the 1976 television series Bouquet of a Barbed Wire. He reprised his role in the 1977 sequel Another Bouquet. Aubrey was also seen in episodes of such series as Z Cars, Murder, The Sweeney, Van der Valk, Return of the Saint, Minder, Emmerdale Farm, Tales of the Unexpected, The Cleopatras, BBC Play of the Month, The Last Place on Earth, Lytton’s Diary, Lovejoy, World’s Beyond, The Modern World: Ten Great Writers, Rockliffe’s Folly in the recurring role of Detective Inspector Derek Hoskins, Louis Auchincloss

James Aubrey (older)

Mission: Eureka, Selling Hitler, Inspector Morse, A Fatal Inversion, Casualty, Full Stretch, Silent Witness, The Bill, The Cazalets, Heartbeat, Dalziel & Pascoe, Doctors, and Brief Encounters. His other television credits include productions of Mistral’s Daughter (1984), Shadow in a Landscape (1987), Thin Air (1988), The Final Frame (1990), The Men’s Room (1991), The Choir (1995), Circles of Deceit: Sleeping Dogs (1996), Robert Ludlum’s The Apocalypse Watch (1997), and The Government Inspector (2005).

trait in Brownstone (1962), The Rector of Justin (1964), The Embezzler (1966), A World of Profit (1968), I Come as a Thief (1972), The Dark Lady (1977), The Country Cousin (1978), The House of the Prophet (1980), The Cat and the King (1981), Watchfires (1982), Exit Lady Masham (1983), and The Book Class (1984). He continued to write after retiring from his career in law in the mid–1980s, producing numerous essays, short stories, and the novels Honourable Men (1986), Diary of a Yuppie (1987), The Golden Calves (1988), Fellow Passengers: A Novel in Portraits (1989), The Lady of Situations (1990), Three Lives (1993), The Education of Oscar Fairfax (1995), Her Infinite Variety (2000), The Scarlet Letters (2003), East Side Story (2004). The Headmaster’s Dilemma (2007), and Last of the Old Guard (2008).

AUCOIN, BILL Bill Aucoin, who managed and promoted the rock band Kiss, died of surgical complications from prostate cancer in Aventura, Florida, on June 28, 2010. He was 66. Aucoin was born on December 29, 1943, and was raised in Ayer, Massachusetts. He worked as a cinematographer for the PBS affiliate in Boston in the 1960s and was a creator and producer of the game show Supermarket Sweep. He became the man-

Obituaries • 2010 ager of Kiss in 1973 and was instrumental in the release of their debut album with Neil Bogart’s Casablanca label in February of 1974. The group had already been experimenting with makeup, but Aucoin helped refine the definitions of lead singer Gene Simmons as the Demon,

Bill Aucoin (right, with Gene Simmons of Kiss)

rhythm guitarist Paul Stanley as the Starchild, lead guitarist Ace Frehley as the Spaceman, and drummer Peter Criss as the Catman. The band scored a No. 1 hit with the 1975 single “Rock and Roll All Night,” which was also featured on their first live album Alive! The group became one of the leading rock acts of the decade with such albums as Destroyer (1976), Rock and Roll Over (1976) and Love Gun (1977). Aucoin produced the 1976 Paul Lynde Halloween Special, which featured Kiss singing several songs. The band also starred in the NBC tele-film Kiss Meets the Phantom of the Park in 1978. The band broke with Aucoin in the early 1980s, and he went on to manage Billy Squier and Billy Idol.

AVEY, DAN Radio reporter and broadcaster Dan Avey died of complications from prostate cancer in a Los Angeles hospital on August 15, 2010. He was 69. Avey was born in Spokane, Washington, on April 26, 1941. He began his career in radio as a disc jockey in Spokane in the early 1960s. He served in the U.S. Army as a Green Beret in Vietnam from 1966 to 1968. The following year he became an analyst for the Los Angeles

Dan Avey

16 Kings hockey team radio broadcasts, which he continued through 1976. He continued to work in radio at various Southern California stations as a news and sports reporter and anchor for more than 30 years. He was also featured as an announcer on episodes of Trapper John, M.D. and One Night Stand, and in the tele-films Ring of Passion (1978), Paula Poundstone: Cats, Cops, and Stuff (1990), and Dying to Be Perfect: The Ellen Hart Pena Story (1996). Avey was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for his work in radio in 2006.

AYLESWORTH, JOHN Canadian-born television writer and producer John Aylesworth, who co-created the rural music-comedy series Hee Haw, died of complications from pneumonia in a Rancho Mirage, California, hospital on July 28, 2010. He was 81. Aylesworth was born in Toronto, Canada, on August 18, 1928. He began his career on Canadian radio on the series Penny’s Diary and was narrator for the daily show High Newsreel. He began working with Frank Peppiatt in the early 1950s while working as a copywriter and staff announcer at MacLaren Advertising in Toronto. The two wrote and performed on After Hours, The Big Revue, and On Stage. Aylesworth also created the popular Canadian quiz program Front Page Challenge. He began working in

John Aylesworth

television in Canada in the sketch comedy series After Hours in 1953 and moved to the U.S. five years later to write for the CBS television series Your Hit Parade. He soon reunited with Peppiatt, writing for such series as The Gisele MacKenzie Show, The Andy Williams Show, Perry Como’s Kraft Music Hall, The Judy Garland Show, Hullabaloo, the 1965 special Frank Sinatra: A Man and His Music, The Jonathan Winters Show, John Wayne’s 1970 patriotic special Swing Out, Sweet Land, The Julie Andrews Hour, and The ABC Comedy Hour. They shared Emmy Award nominations for their work on The Julie Andrews Hour in 1973 and The Sonny and Cher Show in 1976. He and Peppiatt had their biggest success creating the country music-themed comedy variety series Hee Haw in 1969. The series was hosted by country stars Buck Owens and Roy Clark and showcased such entertainers as Grandpa Jones, Junior Samples, and Minnie Pearl. Hee Haw was canceled by CBS in 1971, but Aylesworth, Peppiatt, and Nick Vanoff syndicated the

17 program, where it remained a popular television staple for more than 20 years before ending in 1993. Aylesworth and Peppiatt also co-wrote the stage musical Durante and worked on the television variety series The Jud Strunk Show, The Harlem Globetrotters Popcorn Machine, and Shields and Yarnell. Aylesworth’s memoir The Corn Was Green: The Inside Story of “Hee Haw,” which was published by McFarland earlier in 2010.

AZUMA, EMIKO Japanese actress Emiko Azuma died of heart failure at her home in Itabashi, Tokyo, on January 8, 2010. She was 106. Azuma was born in Ushigome, Tokyo, on March 15, 1903. She began her career on stage in the late 1940s, joining the Gekidan Haiyuza in 1948. She was a founding member of the Geikdan Seinenza in 1954. She also appeared frequently in films from the 1950s with such credits as Night Drum (1958), Clandestine Zero Line (1960), Bushido (1963), School for Sex (1965), Shirotori (1965), Kimi ni Shiawase O — Sentimental Boy (1967), Funeral Parade of Roses (1969), Rika the Mixed-Blood Girl (1972), My Way (1974), Yakuza War: The Japanese Don (1977), Japanese Godfather: Ambition (1977), The Godfather: Resolution (1978) as Yukie Sakura, Heat Shimmer Theater (1981), Traffic Jam (1991), Sada (1998), and Across a Gold Prairie (1999). Azuma also appeared on television in such productions as Shiroi Kyoto (1978), Genji Monogatari (1980), Hi No Ataru Basho (1982), Shin Yumechiyo Nikki (1984), Himeta Kizuna (1998), and Kaseifu ha Mita! 17 (1999). BABAJA, ANTE Croatian film director Ante Babaja died in Zagreb, Croatia, on January 14, 2010. He was 82. Babaja was born in Imotski, Hrvatska, Yugoslavia, on October 6, 1927. He began working in films in the late 1940s, and served as assistant director on Kresimir Golik’s 1950 film Plavi 9. Babaja made his directorial debut with the documentary short Jedan dan u Rijeci in 1955. His first feature film, The King’s New Clothes, was released in 1961. He earned acclaim for his 1967 fea-

2010 • Obituaries BABAJEE, VIVEKA Mauritian-Indian actress and model Viveka Babajee was found dead, hanging from a ceiling fan in her apartment in Mumbai, India, in an apparent suicide on June 25, 2010. She was 37.

Viveka Babajee

Babajee was born in Mauritius on May 23, 1973. A model, she reigned as Miss Mauritius World in 1993 and Miss Mauritius Universe in 1994. She appeared frequently in television commercials in India, and starred in the 2002 film Yeh Kaisi Mohabbat.

BACON, JAMES Hollywood reporter, columnist, and occasional actor James Bacon died of congestive heart failure at his home in Northridge, California, on September 18, 2010. He was 96. Bacon was born in Buffalo, New York, on May 12, 1914. He attended Notre Dame and Syracuse University, where he earned a degree in journalism in 1943. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II, and began working for the Associated Press after his discharge. He was transferred to the AP desk in Los Angeles in 1948, where he specialized in covering news from Hollywood. He left AP in 1966 to write a column for The Los Angeles Herald-Examiner. Bacon’s association with the film industry led to his appearance in small roles in numerous features and television programs, often cast as a reporter. He was seen in the films Black Tuesday (1954), The Boss (1956), Teacher’s Pet (1958), Al Capone (1959), The Big Circus (1959), College

Ante Babaja

ture The Birch Tree, and continued to make documentaries and features including Gold, Frankincense and Myrrh (1971), Can You Hear Me Now? (1978), Lost Homeland (1980), and The Stone Gate (1992). Babaja also taught at the Zagreb Academy of Dramatic Arts for many years.

James Bacon

Obituaries • 2010 Confidential (1960), Pay or Die (1960), Pepe (1960), Cry for Happy (1961), Underworld U.S.A. (1961), The Oscar (1966), and Way … Way Out (1966). Bacon was featured as an ape in 1968’s Planet of the Apes, and the 1970 sequel Beneath the Planet of the Apes. He was a human, General Faulkner, in 1971’s Escape from the Planet of the Apes, and was again under ape make-up for the final two films in the series, Conquest of the Planet of the Apes (1972) and Battle for the Planet of the Apes (1973). He was also seen in the films 80 Steps to Jonah (1969), Skullduggery (1970), The Seven Minutes (1971), The Outfit (1973), Tunnel Vision (1976), The Last Hard Men (1976), High Velocity (1976), The Legend of Frank Woods (1977), Capricorn One (1977), Cat in the Cage (1978), Sextette (1978), Mean Dog Blues (1978), Good Guys Wear Black (1978), The One Man Jury (1978), Half a House (1979), Meteor (1979), The Man with Bogart’s Face (1980), Underground Aces (1981), Charlie Chan and the Curse of the Dragon Queen (1981), The Longshot (1986), and Vasectomy: A Delicate Matter (1986). He also appeared on television in episodes of 77 Sunset Strip, The Rebel, The Roaring 20’s, Run for Your Life, Here’s Lucy, The Big Valley, The Bold Ones: The Lawyers, The Virginian, That Girl, Adam-12, Hee Haw, Night Gallery, and Flying High. His other television credits include the productions Planet Earth (1974), The Amazing Howard Hughes (1977), More Wild Wild West (1980), The Patricia Neal Story (1981), The Day the Bubble Burst (1982), The Rules of Marriage (1982), My Wicked, Wicked Ways… The Legend of Errol Flynn (1985), Hollywood Wives (1985), John Wayne Standing Tall (1989), Lucy and Desi: A Home Movie (1993), and Frank Sinatra: The Very Good Years (1998). He also authored several popular books including Hollywood Is a Four Letter Town (1977) and Made in Hollywood (1978), and co-authored Jackie Gleason’s autobiography How Sweet It Is (1985). He continued to write a weekly column for Beverly Hills 213 from 1996 until his death. He was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for his work as a Hollywood columnist in 2007.

BAILEY, J.C. Professional wrestler J.C. Bailey, who was noted for his high-flying hardcore style, died in his sleep of a brain aneurysm caused by multiple concussions at his home in Louisville, Kentucky, on August 30, 2010. He was 27. He was born Joseph Carl Bailey, Jr., the

J.C. Bailey

18 son of promoter Joe Bailey, on August 23, 1983. He began wrestling professionally in 2001, and competed frequently with Combat Zone Wrestling (CZW) and Ian Rotten’s IWA Mid-South. He was the first Ultraviolent Underground Champion with CZW, and had won the King of the Death Match tournament in the IWA.

BAILEY, MAUREEN Actress, singer and songwriter Maureen Bailey died of heart failure in Lancaster, California, on June 15, 2010. She was 71. Bailey was born in Detroit, Michigan, in 1938. She began her career at the age of three, performing on Detroit’s WXYZ’s Radio Schoolhouse. She was soon appearing on radio’s The Lone Ranger, and was featured on WJR’s Make Way for Youth series in the 1950s. She created and performed the character of Christmas Carol, one of Santa’s helpers, for the

Maureen Bailey

Detroit market from 1953 to 1955. She subsequently moved to New York, where she appeared on Broadway with Dick Van Dyke in 1959’s The Girls Against the Boys. She was featured as Wendy Darling in a 1960 NBC television production of Peter Pan, starring Mary Martin in the title role. She also appeared with Martin on Broadway in The Sound of Music in the early 1960s, taking over the role of Liesl von Trapp. Bailey was also seen on television in such series as The Soupy Sales Show, The Steve Allen Playhouse, and Play of the Week. She relocated to Hollywood later in the decade, where she performed frequently on stage and appeared in the television series Occasional Wife with Michael Callan. She also wrote and recorded with Specialty Records before joining Motown, where she also did arrangements and production work for over a decade. She co-wrote Jermaine Jackson’s hit album Let’s Get Serious, and also worked with such artists as Fifth Dimension, George Benson, Syreeta, Thelma Houston, and DeBarge.

BAILLARGEON, CHARLES Canadian wrestler Charles Baillargeon, the last of the six wrestling Baillargeon Brothers, died of complications from a stroke in Quebec City, Canada, on February 10, 2010. He was 92. Charles was born in St. Magloire-de-Bellchasse, Quebec, on July 8, 1917. He was the second oldest of the brothers, who included Jean, Adrien, Lionel, Paul, and Tony, and they began their career performing in a strongman act in Canada and the U.S. They began competing as

19 wrestlers in the 1940s, and had success in single and tagteam competition. Charles ring career ended in 1955 after being injured in an automobile accident. He later

2010 • Obituaries BAIRD, ROY British film producer Roy Baird died in England on April 26, 2010. He was 76. Baird was born in Borehamwood, Hertfordshire, England, on September 3, 1933. He began working in films at Elstree Studios in the early 1960s as an assistant director on such features as Girl on Approval (1961), The Day the Earth Caught Fire (1961), Band of Thieves (1962), The Quare Fellow (1962), The Break (1963), 80,000 Suspects (1963), The Leather Boys (1964), The Beauty Jungle (1964), Devils of Darkness (1965), The Collector (1965), Rotten to the Core (1965), The Sandwich Man (1966), and Casino Royale (1966). He also served as a production manager on the films Sing and Swing (1963), Morgan! (1966), and Island of Terror (1966). Baird was working as a producer by the end of the decade with such credits as Our Mother’s House (1967), Lindsay Anderson’s If… (1968), Ken Rus-

Charles Baillargeon (left, with his brothers)

worked with brother Paul in the hotel industry in Quebec City.

BAINBRIDGE, BERYL British novelist Beryl Bainbridge died of cancer in a London hospital on July 2, 2010. She was 78. Bainbridge was born in Liverpool, England, on November 21, 1932. She began performing as an actress in the 1950s, appearing in a 1953 television production of Rookery Nook, and in episodes of Coronation Street and Doomwatch. She began writing novels in the 1960s, publishing A Weekend with Claud (1967), Another Part of the Wood (1968), Harriet Said… (1972), The Dressmaker (aka The Secret Glass) (1973), The Bottle Factory Outing (1974), Sweet William (1975), A Quiet Life (1976), Injury Time (1977), Young Adolf (1978), Winter Garden (1980), Watson’s Apolog y (1984), An Awfully Big Adventure (1989), The Birthday Boys (1991), Every Man for Himself (1996), Master Georgie (1998), and According to Queeney (2001). Bainbridge adapted her novel Sweet William as a 1979 film starring Sam Waterston. The Dressmaker was adapted for film in 1988, and An Awfully Big Adventure was filmed in 1995 starring Hugh Grant and Alan Rickman. Her grandson, Charlie Russell, produced a documentary about her life, Beryl’s Last Year, in 2007.

Beryl Bainbridge

Roy Baird

sell’s Women in Love (1969) the first of several collaborations with the director, Spring and Port Wine (1970), The Music Lovers (1970), The Devils (1971), Henry VIII and His Six Wives (1972), That’ll Be the Day (1973), The Last Days of Man on Earth (aka The Final Programme) (1973), Radio Wonderful (1974), Radio Wonderful (1974), Mahler (1974), Stardust (1974), Lisztomania (1975), Quadrophenia (1979) with the Who, and McVicar (1980).

BAKER, KAGE Science fiction and fantasy writer Kage Baker, who was best known for her timetraveling tales of The Company, died of uterine cancer

Kage Baker

Obituaries • 2010 in Pismo Beach, California, on January 31, 2010. She was 57. Baker was born in Hollywood, California, on June 10, 1952. She was active in local theater before becoming a professional writer in the pages of Asimov’s Science Fiction in 1997. Her first novel, In the Garden of Iden, which introduced The Company, was also published in 1997. The adventures of Dr. Zeus’ time-traveling cyborgs continued in Sky Coyote (1999), Mendoza in Hollywood (2000), The Graveyard Game (2001), The Empress of Mars (2003) which was nominated for both the Hugo and Nebula Awards for best novella, The Life of the World to Come (2004), The Children of the Company (2005), The Machine’s Child (2006), The Sons of Heaven (2007), and Not Less Than Gods (2010). Short stories in the series were collected in Black Projects, White Knights: The Company Dossiers (2002) and Gods and Pawns (2007). She also wrote the novels The Anvil of the World (2003) and The House of the Stag (2008), which was nominated for a World Fantasy Award.

BAKER, MARILYN CANTOR Performer and writer Marilyn Cantor Baker, the daughter of singer Eddie Cantor, died at her home in New York City on September 17, 2010. She was 89. Cantor was born in New York City on September 16, 1921. She was featured in a small role in the silent film Special Delivery as a child.

Marilyn Baker (second from right, with her parents and sisters)

She graduated from the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in the early 1940s, and became one of New York’s first female disc jockeys. She appeared frequently with her father on television in the 1950s, and was a guest on such series as This Is Your Life, The Colgate Comedy Hour, What’s My Line?, The Jack Paar Tonight Show, and Girl Talk. She also created the character of Sidney Shorr, which served as the basis for the 1981 television sit-com starring Tony Randall.

BAKER, ROY WARD British film and television director Roy Ward Baker, who helmed the 1958 Titanic film A Night to Remember, and was noted for directing numerous horror films for Hammer and Amicus in the 1960s and 1970s, died in a London hospital on October 5, 2010. He was 93. He was born Roy Horace Baker in London on December 19, 1916. He began working in films at Gainsborough Pictures in 1934, running

20

Roy Ward Baker

errands for crew members. He soon graduated to assistant director, working on such films as Windbag the Sailor (1936), Oh, Mr. Porter! (1937), Alfred Hitchcock’s The Lady Vanishes (1938), A Girl Must Live (1939), and Night Train to Munich (1940). He served in the British Army during World War II, working with the film unit to produce documentaries and training films for the troops. He returned to films after the war, and directed his first feature, The October Man, in 1947. He became a leading director in England over the next several years with such films as The Weaker Sex (1948), Paper Orchid (1949), Morning Departure (aka Operation Disaster) (1950) starring John Mills, Highly Dangerous (1950), and the 1951 fantasy I’ll Never Forget You starring Tyrone Power. Baker subsequently headed to Hollywood, where he directed Marilyn Monroe in 1952’s Don’t Bother to Knock. He also directed the 1952 thriller Night Without Sleep and the 1953 3-D film noir Inferno starring Robert Ryan before returning to England. He continued to helm such films as Passage Home (1955), Jacqueline (1956), Tiger in the Smoke (1956), The One That Got Away (1957), the 1958 account of the sinking of the Titanic A Night to Remember (1958), The Singer Not the Song (1961) starring John Mills and Dirk Bogarde, Flame in the Streets (1961), The Valiant (1962), and Two Left Feet (1962). Baker worked frequently in television from the early 1960s, helming episodes of Zero One, The Human Jungle, Gideon C.I.D., The Baron, The Avengers, The Saint, Department S, The Champions, Journey to the Unknown, My Partner the Ghost, Spyder’s Web, The Persuaders!, Jason King, The Protectors, Return of the Saint, and Danger UXB. He returned to films directing the 1967 Hammer science fiction classic Five Million Years to Earth (aka Quatermass and the Pit) and the 1968 psychological thriller The Nanny starring Bette Davis. He also helmed the Hammer sci-fi Moon Zero Two (1969), and the espionage tele-films The Spy Killer (1969) and Foreign Exchange (1970) starring Robert Horton. He was noted for his horror films in the 1970s, directing The Vampire Lovers (1970) with Ingrid Pitt, Scars of Dracula (1970) with Christopher Lee, Dr. Jekyll and Sister Hyde (1971), and The Seven Brothers Meet Dracula (1974) for Hammer, and Asylum (1972), The Vault of Horror (1973), …And Now the Screaming Starts! (1973), and The Monster Club (1980) for Amicus. He worked primarily in television

21 from the 1980s, directing for such series as Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson, The Flame Trees of Thika, Q.E.D., the 1984 television production of Sherlock Holmes and the Masks of Death, The Irish R.M., Fairly Secret Army, Minder, Saracen, and The Good Guys. Baker published his memoirs, Director’s Cut: A Memoir of 60 Years in Film, in 2000, and participated in several documentaries and DVD extras about his film and television work.

BAKER, TAB Actor Tab Baker died of a heart attack in Chicago, Illinois, on August 9, 2010. He was 50. He was born Terrence Alonzo Baker in Gary, Indiana, on November 15, 1959. He was a popular performer on the

2010 • Obituaries (1943) with Ethel Waters, Stormy Weather (1943) with Lena Horne, and Broadway Rhythm (1944). She served as a stand-in for Horne in several films, and also worked as a fashion model in Europe. She was also a leading figure on the social scene during Los Angeles’ Harlem Renaissance, and married Harlem Globetrotter, Bill “Rookie” Brown in 1953.

BANFFY, GYORGY Hungarian actor Gyorgy Banffy died in Corfu, Greece, on September 2, 2010. He was 83. Banffy was born in Budapest, Hungary, on June 19, 1927. He trained as an actor from the late 1940s, and appeared frequently on the Hungarian stage from the early 1950s. He was seen in numerous films from the mid–1960s with such credits as Ketten Haltak Meg (1966), Eine Handvoll Helden (1967), Forbidden Ground (1968), Sirokko (1969), Face (1970), Magasiskola (1970), Erik a Feny (1970), Tuzolto utca 25. (1973), Soldaty Svobody (1977), Toredek az Eletrol (1980), Mephisto (1981), Kettevalt Mennyezet (1982), Visszaesok (1983), Colonel Redl (1985), Lutra (1986), Tuskle a Korom Alatt (1988),

Tab Baker

Chicago stage from the early 1980s. He was also featured in several films including Gladiator (1992), Hoodlum (1997), Save the Last Dance (2001), Just Visiting (2001), The Ice Harvest (2005), Stranger Than Fiction (2006), and Death of a President (2006). Baker was also seen on television in episodes of Due South, Cupid, ER, and Prison Break.

BALL, JULIETTE Actress and dancer Juliette Ball, who was featured in several films in the 1940s, died in Los Angeles on June 7, 2010. She was 87. Ball was born in Birmingham, Alabama, on March 4, 1923. She began performing on stage and films in the early 1940s, and appeared onscreen as a dancer in Cabin in the Sky

Juliette Ball

Gyorgy Banffy

Nincs Mese (2004), and Rokonok (2006). Banffy also appeared on television in productions of Es Megis Mozog a Fold (1973), Uraim, Beszeljenek! (1974), Mesek az Erereg yejszakarol (1978), Az Elefant (1978), Mig uj a Szerelem (1986), Zsarumelo (1986), A Probababak Balja (1991), Devictus Vincit (1994), and A Morcogi (2008). His other television credits include episodes of Bors, Zrinyi, Daniel, Mag yar Nepmesek, Petofi, Kemeri, Linda, and Ang yali Tortenetek.

BANG-HANSEN, PAL Norwegian film director, actor, and television personality Pal Bang-Hansen died in Norway on March 25, 2010. He was 72. He was born in Oslo, Norway, on July 29, 1937, the son of writer Odd Bang-Hansen. He began his career as a child actor in the late 1940s, appearing in Arne Skouen’s Gategutter (1949), the children’s film Tom og Mette pa Sporet (1952) as Tom, Kvinnens Plass (1956), and Trost i Taklampa (1955). He began working behind the camera in the mid–1960s, and served as an assistant director on the films Daddy’s Success (1964) and The Guards (1965). He helmed his first feature, Script in the Snow in 1966. He also directed the films Douglas (1970), Norske Byggeklosser (1972), Kanarifuglen (1973), Bortreist pa Ubestemt

Obituaries • 2010

22

Tid (1974), and The Crown Prince (1979). Bang-Hansen was also noted as a leading film critic for the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation from 1967 to 2007.

Lucia Banti

Gli Scontenti (1961). She abandoned films in the early 1960s to marry and raise a family. Pal Bang-Hansen

BANKS, RON Soul singer Ron Banks, a founding member of the soul group The Dramatics, died of a heart attack in a Detroit, Michigan, hospital on March 4, 2010. He was 58. Banks was born in Detroit on May 10, 1951. He teamed with other Detroit-based singers and musicians in the early 1960s. Originally known as the

BARCLAY, VALERIE Valerie Barclay, a pioneer female comic illustrator in the 1930s and 1940s, died after a long illness on February 26, 2010. She was 87. She was born Violet Barclay in Manhattan, New York,

Valerie Barclay (portrait from 1940s comic)

Ron Banks

Sensations and the Dynamics, they had become The Dramatics by the time they signed with Stax-Volt Records in 1968. They had a major hit with the 1971 single “Whatcha See Is Whatcha Get.” Banks remained with the group as the line-up frequently changed, and was heard on such subsequent hits as “In the Rain,” “Toast to the Fool,” “Me and Mrs. Jones,” “I’m Going By the Stars in Your Eyes,” and “Be My Girl.”

BANTI, LUCIA Italian actress Lucia Banti died in Jesi, Ancona, Italy, on September 30, 2010. She was 77. Banti was born in Rome on January 19, 1933. She began her career in film in the early 1950s, with roles in Se Vincessi Cento Milioni (1953), Hano Rubato un Tramam (1954), The Country of the Campanelli (1954), Lacrime di Sposa (1955), Onore e Sangue (1957), Head of a Tyrant (1959), The Woman of Ice (1960), Toro Bravo (1960), and

on November 5, 1922. Artist Mike Sekowsky helped her get a job at Timely Comics, which later became Marvel, as an inker in the late 1930s. Barclay worked on features as the funny animals Super Rabbit and Zigg y Pig and Silly Seal, and in the teen-humor titles Jeanie, Rusty, Willie, and Georgie during the decade. She left Timely in 1949, but remained in comics as a freelance inker. Over the next several years she worked primarily in the romance genre for such publishers as D.S. Publishing, Standard, D.C., St. John, and Ace. Barclay left the industry in the mid–1950s, and had a brief stint as a fashion model. She later worked as a fashion illustrator for such retail outlets as Lane Bryant and Abraham & Straus.

BARKER, IRWIN Canadian comedian Irwin Barker died of cancer in a Toronto, Ontario, Canada, hospital on June 21, 2010. He was 57. Barker was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, on June 12, 1952. He began performing comedy routines in the late 1980s, and made stand-up comedy his full-time career in the early 1990s. Noted for his erudite manner, he earned the nick-

23 name the Professor. He appeared frequently on Canadian television in such shows as Point Blank, Ed Byrne’s Just for Laughs, This Hour Has 22 Minutes, The Ha!ifax Comedy Fest, and Rick Mercer’s Monday Report. Barker was diagnosed with cancer in 2007, and told he had

2010 • Obituaries Barshai was also noted as an interpreter and arranger of the works of Dmitri Shostakovich and Sergei Prokofiev.

BARSTOW, ROBBINS Robbins Barstow, who elevated home movies to an art form and saw his family vacation film, Disneyland Dream (1956), included in the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress in 2008, died at his home in Hartford, Connecticut, on November 7, 2010. He was 91. Barstow was born in Woodstock, Vermont, on October 24, 1919. He began making home movies after getting his first movie camera at the age of 10. He recorded family events and created his own jungle drama, Tarzan and the Rocky Gorge (1936) while in his teens. He graduated from Dartmouth, and earned a master’s in education and history from New York University and a doctorate in educational admin-

Irwin Barker

about a year to live. He made his diagnosis part of his comedy routine, and recorded the documentary That’s My Time. He also filmed the comedy special Can’t Stop Laughing, and was nominated for two Canadian Comedy Awards shortly before his death.

BARSHAI, RUDOLF Russian violist and conductor Rudolf Barshai, who was a founding member of the Borodin Quartet in the mid–1940s, died in Basel, Switzerland, on November 2, 2010. He was 86. Barshai was born in Stanitsa Lobinskaya, Krasnodar Krai, Russia, on September 28, 1924. He studied at the Moscow Conservatory, where he teamed with Valentin Berlinsky, Rostislav Dubinsky, and Nina Barshai to form the ac-

Rudolf Barshai

claimed Borodin Quartet in 1945. Barshai remained with the quartet as violist until 1953, and founded the Moscow Chamber Orchestra in 1955. He left Russia in 1977, and became artistic director of the Israeli Chamber Orchestra from 1976 to 1981. He also led the Vancouver Symphony, the Orchestre National de France, and the Bournemouth Symphony over the next several years.

Robbins Barstow

istration from the University of Connecticut. He married Margaret Vanderbeek in 1942, and they had two sons, David and Don, and a daughter, Mary. Barstow worked with the Connecticut Education Association for many years. He continued his love of filmmaking in his off hours, making numerous movies of family and friends that he would narrate for neighborhood screenings. His best known work, Disneyland Dream, began when the family won a vacation to Disneyland in 1956. His chronicling of the experience became one of the few amateur films selected for inclusion for the National Film Registry. He remained an avid home movie-maker throughout his life, creating Family Camping Through 48 States (1957–61) and Touring Paris with Two Grandchildren (1992). He posted many of his films on the internet repository archive.org in recent years.

BARTH, EDDIE Veteran character actor Eddie Barth died of heart failure at his home in Los Angeles on May 28, 2010. He was 78. Barth was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on September 29, 1931. He began appearing on television in the early 1960s, with roles in episodes of The Twilight Zone, Cimarron Strip, The F.B.I., The Invaders, Then Came Bronson, Mannix, The Streets of San Francisco, Cannon, Barney Miller, Baretta, Matt Helm, Kojak, Joe and Sons, Popi, The Bionic Woman, Kingston: Confidential, Husbands, Wives & Lovers, C.P.O. Sharkey, Alice, Stone, Number 96, The Incredible Hulk, Hill Street Blues, T.J. Hooker, The Paper Chase, Whiz Kids, Silver Spoons, Lottery!, The Love Boat, Mike Hammer,

Obituaries • 2010

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Scarecrow and Mrs. King, Magnum, P.I., Perfect Strangers, ABC Weekend Specials, Full House, Doctor Doctor, The Outsiders, Night Court, Civil Wars, Murder, She Wrote, Ink, and As Told by Ginger. Barth co-starred as Lt. Al Rossi in the short-lived television version of Shaft starring Richard Roundtree, and appeared in the recurring role of Myron Fowler, a rival private detective, in the series Simon & Simon from 1981 to 1988. He was also seen

Tom Basham

zona. He performed on the local stage and made his final film performance in the 2008 thriller The Appearance of a Man.

Eddie Barth

in the tele-films It Couldn’t Happen to a Nicer Guy (1974), The Orphan and the Dude (1975), Rich Man, Poor Man (1976), Amelia Earhart (1976), Final Warning (1977), The Man in the Santa Claus Suit (1979), Jimmy B. & Andre (1980), Ethel Is an Elephant (1980), The Red-Light Sting (1984), The Murder of Sherlock Holmes (1984), An Eight Is Enough Wedding (1989), and Deadline for Murder: From the Files of Edna Buchanan (1995). He was also noted as a voice actor in such films as Rover Dangerfield (1991), Babe: Pig in the City (1998), and Osmosis Jones (2001), and in the animated television series Challenge of the GoBots, James Bond Jr., Biker Mice from Mars, Superman, and Men in Black: The Series. He appeared in a handful of films during his career including Woody Allen’s Bananas (1971), Shaft (1971), Made for Each Other (1977), The Amityville Horror (1979), Boardwalk (1979), Fame (1980), Born in East L.A. (1987), Twenty Dollar Star (1991), Killing Obsession (1994), and Mr. Write (1994). His raspy voice was also heard closing beer commercials in the 1980s with the tagline “Miller Lite, everything you always wanted in a beer, and less.”

BASHAM, TOM Actor Tom Basham died in Phoenix, Arizona, on July 29, 2010. He was 68. Basham was born on May 16, 1942. He began appearing on television in the late 1960s, with roles in episodes of such series as Adam-12, It Takes a Thief, The Bold Ones: The New Doctors, Ironside, Night Gallery, The Name of the Game, Dragnet 1967, The Virginian, and Bonanza. He appeared on screen in the films Colossus: The Forbin Project (1970), Cockeyed Cowboys of Calico County (1970), the gay biker film Pink Angels (1971), and Squares (1972). He starred in the 1975 cult horror film The Psychopath as Mr. Rabbey, who took a strong stand against child abuse by slaughtering the perpetrators. He largely retired from the screen in the mid–1970s, and settled in Phoenix, Ari-

BASWANI, RAVI Indian actor Ravi Baswani died of a heart attack in Haldwani, while on route from Nainital to Delhi, India, after scouting film locations for his planned directorial debut on July 27, 2010. He was 63. Baswani was born in Delhi on September 26, 1946. He began his film career in the early 1980s, and

Ravi Baswani

was seen in such films as Chashme Buddoor (1981), Jaane Bhi Do Yaaro (1983), Dhat Tere … Ki (1983), Tum Laut Aao (1983), Ab Ayega Mazaa (1984), Peechha Karro (1986), Ghar Sansar (1986), Love 86 (1986), Main Balwan (1986), Zevar (1987), Jaan Tere Naam (1992), Kabhi Haan Kabhi Naa (1993), Raunaq (1993), Laadla (1994), Return of Jewel Thief (1996), Jab Pyaar Kisise Hota Hai (1998), Chhota Chetan (1998), Ghar Bazar (1998), Come On, My Brother (2000), Pyaar Tune Kya Kiya… (2001), The Film (2005), Bunty Aur Babli (2005), Lucky: No Time for Love (2005), It Could Be You (2005), Monsoon (2006), Anthony Kaun Hai? (2006), Yun Hota Toh Kya Hota: What If…? (2006), and Mastang Mama (2010). He also appeared frequently on Indian television in comic and character roles.

BATTISE, REGGIE LEON Singer and choreographer Reggie Leon Battise died of prostate cancer in

25 Los Angeles on October 8, 2010. He was 55. Battise was born in Chicago in 1955. He began his career on local television, hosting the series Dancing with Robyn and Reggie. He joined the rock band Bus Boys as Reggie Leon in the 1980s, and settled in Los Angeles. He danced in the 1983 film Stayin’ Alive with John Travolta, and had small

2010 • Obituaries Sidney Poitier in the 1963 film Lilies of the Field. He was president of ABC Pictures from 1968 to 1971, where he oversaw production of the films They Shoot Horses Don’t They? (1969) which earned his client Gig Young an Academy Award as supporting actor, Straw Dogs (1971), and Cabaret (1972). Baum served as producer for several films in the 1970s including The Last Valley (1971), Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974), The Wilby Conspiracy (1975), and The Killer Elite (1975). He brought his distinguished clients list to the newly formed Creative Artists Agency (CAA) in 1977. Baum remained one of Hollywood’s leading agents and an elder statesman at CAA until his death.

BAUMBAUER, ERNA German talent agent Erna Baumbauer died in Munich, Germany, on January 30, 2010. She was 91. Baumbauer was born in Munich on January 8, 1919. She became Germany’s leading

Reggie Leon Battise

roles in the films Breakin’ 2: Electric Boogaloo (1984), Kidnapped (1986), and White Men Can’t Jump (1992). He was also featured on television in an episode of Moonlighting. Battise joined Sha Na Na in 1989, replacing Guerin Barry as bass singer. He continued to perform with the group until his death.

BAUM, MARTIN Talent agent and film producer Martin Baum, who represented such talent as Julie Andrews, Sidney Poitier, Gene Wilder, and Bo Derek, died at his home in Beverly Hills, California, on November 5, 2010. He was 86. Baum was born in New York City on March 2, 1924. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II. He returned to New York after the war to work as a stage manager, and began working as an agent in the late 1940s. He teamed with Abe Newborn in the Baum-Newborn Agency in 1948, which they later sold to General Artists Corp. Baum moved to Los Angeles with GAC in 1960 to work in films. He subsequently worked with Ashley Famous Agency before forming his own firm, and was instrumental in casting

agent for actors, representing such performers as Maximilian Schell, Heinz Bennent, Susanne Lothar, and Bruno Ganz. Baumbauer received an honorary German Film Award in 2006 for her long career as an agent.

Martin Baum

Lynn Bayonas

Erna Baumbauer

BAYONAS, LYNN Australian television producer Lynn Bayonas died of cancer in Daylesford, Victoria, Australia, on January 25, 2010. She was 66. She was born Lynnette Margaret Bower in Australia on April 11, 1943. She toured Europe with the Australian

Obituaries • 2010

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Ballet at the age of 18, when she settled in London. She became an assistant to Orson Welles in the late 1960s, and met her husband, artist and screenwriter Luis Bayonas, while working with Welles in Spain. She subsequently returned to Australia, where she worked as a writer and script editor on such television series as Homicide, Division 4, The Box, Skyways, Holiday Island, Willing and Abel, Chances, The Sullivans, and A Country Practice. She went to Los Angeles in 1994 to write for Paramount, where she worked on the television shows Sunset Beach and Prime Time. She returned to Australia in 2000, where she produced such series as The Saddle Club, Guinevere Jones, and The Secret Life of Us.

BAZ, BEATRIZ Mexican actress Beatriz Baz died in El Paso, Texas, on January 5, 2010. She was 86. Baz was born in Mexico City on August 21, 1923. She was featured in over a dozen Mexican films in the 1960s and early 1970s including Las dos Elenas (1965), House of Evil (1968) with Boris Karloff, Corazon Salvaje (1968), La

Beaver

BEDDOW, MARGERY Actress and dancer Margery Beddow died at her home in Manhattan, New York, on January 3, 2010. She was 78. Beddow was born in Grosse Pointe, Michigan, on December 13, 1931. She began her career as a dancer, performing with the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo and the Metropolitan Opera Ballet. She made her Broadway debut in the early 1950s,

Beatriz Baz

Puerta y la Mujer del Carnicero (1968), A Wedding Night Essay (1968), La Gran Ventura (1969), Santa (1969), Trampas de Amor (1969), El Despertar del Lobo (1970), La Amante Perfecta (1970), Las Bestias Jovenes (1970), Las Chicas Malas del Padre Mendez (1970), and Siempre Hay una Primera Vez (1971). She was also seen in such television series as Ellas (1967), La Casa de las Fieras (1967), Pueblo sin Esperanza (1968), Destino la Gloria (1968), Puente de Amor (1969), and Mi Amor por Ti (1969).

BEAVER New Zealand jazz singer and actress Beverley Jean Morrison, who was known professionally as Beaver, died of cancer in Auckland, New Zealand, on May 23, 2010. She was 59. She was born in Lower Hutt, Wellington, New Zealand, in 1950. She began performing in the early 1970s, and became a singer with the musical theatrical troupes Blerta and Red Mole. She often worked as a session musician and backup vocalist during the 1970s, and released the single “Skin Deep” with Beaver and the Flyers in 1978. She was featured as Julie Patterson in the 1985 New Zealand film Should I Be Good?, and performed the theme for the television soap opera Gloss in the late 1980s. Beaver released the album Live at Ronnie Scott’s in 1987.

Margery Beddow

and was featured in productions of Two on the Aisle (1951), Redhead (1959), The Conquering Hero (1961), Little Me (1962), Ulysses in Nighttown (1974), and Wind in the Willows (1985). Beddow was also seen in small roles in several films including The Producers (2005), Waltzing Anna (2006), Enchanted (2007), and Doubt (2008).

BEEN, MICHAEL Musician Michael Been died of a heart attack while attending the Pukkelpop music festival in Hasselt, Belgium, on August 19, 2010. He was 60. Been was born in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, on March 17, 1950. He began his music career in Chicago in the late 1960s, and performed with the band Aorta on their second album in 1970. He also played with the bands Lovecraft, Fine Wine, and the Original Haze in the 1970s. He later formed the band The Call, and they released an album in 1982. They had a hit with the song “When the Walls Came Down” from their second album, Modern Romans, in 1983. Been composed and performed music for Paul Schrader’s 1992 film Light

27 Sleeper, and recorded a solo album, On the Verge of a Nervous Breakthrough, in 1994. Been was featured on-

2010 • Obituaries Marines (1975) and Cyrano (1990). He also composed numerous orchestral and chamber works during his career.

BEHR, MICHAEL British actor Michael Behr died in England on February 22, 2010. He was 82. Behr was born in Godalming, Surrey, England, in 1927. He performed with the Oxford University Dramatic Society, and appeared in repertory from the late 1940s. He continued his studies at the Royal Academy of Dramatic

Michael Been

screen as John the Apostle in Martin Scorsese’s 1988 film The Last Temptation of Christ. He later worked as a sound engineer for the band Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, led by his son, Robert Levon Been.

BEESON, JACK Composer Jack Beeson, who

Michael Behr

was best known for his opera Lizzie Borden, based on the notorious ax-murder case, died of congestive heart failure in a New York City hospital on June 6, 2010. He was 88. Beeson was born in Muncie, Indiana, on July 15, 1921. He trained as a pianist as a child, and became interested in opera from an early age. He trained under Bela Bartok in New York City in the mid–1940s, and composed his first opera, Jonah, while living in Rome later in the decade. He returned to the United States in the early 1950s, where he taught at Columbia University. He adapted William Saroyan’s play Hello Out There for an opera in 1953, and teamed with Kenward Elmslie for the opera The Sweet Bye and Bye (1956). He also worked with Elmslie on the 1965 opera Lizzie Borden, a tale of a spinster accused of murdering her father and stepmother with an axe in 1892. It was produced for television for NET in 1967. Beeson teamed with lyricist Sheldon Harnick for the operas Captain Jinks of the Horse

BELL, SHIRLEY Shirley Bell Cole, who starred as radio’s Little Orphan Annie in the 1930s, died in Arizona on January 12, 2010. She was 89. Bell was born in Chicago, Illinois, on February 21, 1920. She began singing as a small child, and was performing on local radio at the age of 6. She was hired to star as Harold Gray’s comic strip heroine Little Orphan Annie in 1930. The series was originally aired on WGN-AM, and was soon broadcast by the NBC network, with Ovaltine as sponsor. Little Orphan Annie opened with the theme song, “Who’s that little chatterbox, the one with pretty auburn locks? Whom do you see? It’s Little Orphan

Jack Beeson

Shirley Bell

Art in the early 1950s. He was featured in the 1960 film Piccadilly Third Stop, and on television in episodes of Pride and Prejudice and Crossroads. He later worked as a journalist, writing about the arts for such publications as the Times, the Telegraph Magazine, and the Guardian.

Obituaries • 2010 Annie.” Bell’s Annie was broadcast out of Chicago and heard on the East Coast. Another version, with the same scripts, was broadcast from San Francisco, with Floy Hughes as the adventurous urchin. Bell and the Chicago cast took over when the program went coast-to-coast in 1933. She was briefly replaced by Bobbe Dean during a contract dispute on 1934, but otherwise continued to voice Annie throughout the decade. She was assisted by her young friend, Joe Corntassel, her wealthy mentor, Daddy Warbucks, and his henchmen Punjab and the Asp. Ovaltine dropped its sponsorship of the show in 1940 in favor of Captain Midnight. Quaker Puffed Wheat Sparkies picked up Annie on Mutual radio in 1940, but Bell had departed and Janice Gilbert took over for the programs final two years. She later married Chicago businessman Irwin Cole, and they raised three daughters together. Cole died in 1998, and Bell authored her autobiography Acting Her Age: My Ten Years as a Ten-YearOld, in 2005.

BENSON, MARTIN British character actor Martin Benson died in his sleep in Buckinghamshire, England, on March 3, 2010. He was 91. Benson was born in London on August 10, 1918. He served in the military during World War II before embarking on a career as an actor on stage and screen in the late 1940s. The grimfaced performer appeared in numerous films over the next 50 years. His many credits include The Blind Goddess (1948), But Not in Vain (1948), Trapped By the Terror (1949), The Adventures of P.C. 49: The Case of the Guardian Angel (1948), Under Capricorn (1949), I’ll Get You for This (1950), Night Without Stars (1951), The Dark Light (1951), Assassin for Hire (1951), Mystery Junction (1951), Judgment Deferred (1952), The Frightened Man (1952), Ivanhoe (1952), The Gambler and the Lady (1952), Wide Boy (1952), Top of the Form (1953), Wheel of Fate (1953), Always a Bride (1953), Recoil (1953), Black 13 (1953), Escape By Night (1953), You Know What Sailors Are (1954), West of Zanzibar (1954), Lovers, Happy Lovers! (1954), Passage Home (1955), Doctor at Sea (1955), Soho Incident (1956), 23 Paces to Baker Street (1956), the musical The King and I (1956) as Siam’s duplicitous Kralahome (or Prime Minister), Istanbul (1957), Doctor at Large (1957), Interpol (1957), The Flesh Is Weak (1957), Thunder Over Tangier (1957), Windom’s Way (1957), The

Martin Benson

28 Cosmic Monster (aka The Strange World of Planet X (1958) as a benevolent alien, The Two-Headed Spy (1958), Make Mine a Million (1959), Killers of Kilimanjaro (1959), The Gentle Trap (1960), Once More, with Feeling! (1960), Oscar Wilde (1960), Sands of the Desert (1960), Oscar Preminger’s epic Exodus (1960), the fantasy classic The Three Worlds of Gulliver (1960), The Pure Hell of St. Trinian’s (1960), A Matter of WHO (1961), Five Golden Hours (1961), Gorgo (1961) as the circus ringmaster Dorkin who attempts to exploit the giant prehistoric reptile, I Tre Nemici (1962), The Silent Invasion (1962), Satan Never Sleeps (1962), Village of Daughters (1962), Hammer’s Night Creatures (aka Captain Clegg) (1962) as Mr. Rash the innkeeper, The Fur Collar (1962), Cleopatra (1963) with Elizabeth Taylor, The Secret Door (1964), Shot in the Dark (1964), and Behold a Pale Horse (1964). Benson was featured as American gangster Solo in the 1964 James Bond film Goldfinger. His refusal to take part in Goldfinger’s plot to rob Fort Knox resulted in his murder by henchman Oddjob, who then had him crushed along with his luxury car and gold bullion in a junk yard metal compactor. Benson’s other films credits include Mozambique (1965), The Secret of My Success (1965), A Man Could Get Killed (1966), The Magnificent Two (1967), Battle Beneath the Earth (1967) as the villainous Gen. Chan Lu, Pope Joan (1972), Tiffany Jones (1973), Mohammad: Messenger of God (1976), the horror classic The Omen (1976) as Father Spiletto, Meetings with Remarkable Men (1979), The Human Factor (1979), The Sea Wolves (1980), Sphinx (1981), Young Toscanini (1988), and Angela’s Ashes (1999). Benson appeared frequently on television from the early 1950s, appearing in such series as The Passing Show, The Vise, Colonel March of Scotland Yard, Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., Presents, 1957’s Sword of Freedom as Duke de Medici, The New Adventures of Martin Kane, Assignment Foreign Legion, The Adventures of Aggie, The Jack Benny Program, The Adventures of Sir Lancelot, Overseas Press Club — Exclusive!, Sailor of Fortune, O.S.S., White Hunter, The New Adventures of Charlie Chan, Dial 999, Invisible Man, The Third Man, Interpol Calling, The Four Just Men, On Trial, One Step Beyond, Silent Evidence, Richard the Lionheart, ITV Television Playhouse, Ghost Squad, Suspense, Danger Man, No Hiding Place, The Wednesday Play, Court Martial, The Man Who Never Was, The Saint, Theatre 625, The Troubleshooters, The Champions, The Protectors, The Adventurer, The Onedin Line, The Professionals, The Many Wives of Patrick, Return of the Saint, BBC2 Playhouse, Tales of the Unexpected, Schoolgirl Churns, The Hello Goodbye Man, Wyatt’s Watchdogs, Campion, The Bill, and Last of the Summer Wine. He was featured in the 1976 Thriller tele-film The Last Victim, and appeared in television productions of Jesus of Nazareth (1977) as Pharisee, Telford’s Change (1979) as Jacques Dupont, The Hitch Hikers Guide to the Galaxy (1981) as the Vogon Captain, and Arch of Triumph (1984). He made his final appearance in a 2005 episode of the Casualty television series in 2005.

BERAMBOI, DIN Malaysian radio and television personality Mior Ahmad Fuad Mior Badri, who was known as Din Beramboi, died of complications from dengue hemorrhagic fever in a Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia,

29 hospital on April 2, 2010. He was 43. He was born Mior Ahmad Fuad Mior Badri in Malaysia on December 22, 1966. The comedian was the co-host of the popular

2010 • Obituaries Beresford was born in Paris, France, on August 6, 1926, the daughter of British novelist J.D. Beresford. She began her career ghost writing speeches for British politicians before joining the BBC as a radio reporter. She married BBC sports commentator Max Robinson in 1949. Beresford began writing children’s novels in the late 1950s with The Television Mystery (1957) and The Flying Doctor (1958). She began a series about magic with 1964’s The Magic World, and included eight further entries including The Vanishing Garden (1965), Dangerous Magic (1972), Secret Magic (1978), Curious Magic (1980), and Strange Magic (1986). Beresford created the Wombles, fantasy creatures who pick up litter left by humans, in the 1968 children’s book The Wombles of Wimbledon Common, which introduced such characters as Great Uncle

Din Beramboi

Malaysian morning radio show Pagi Di Era with Aznil Nawawi. Din was also featured in several films including Duhai si Pari-Pari (2009) and Sifu & Tongga (2009).

BERAS GOICO, FREDDY Dominican actor and comedian Freddy Beras Goico died of complications of pancreatic cancer in a New York City hospital on November 18, 2010. He was 69. He was born in Santa Cruz del Seibo, El Seibo, Dominican Republic, on November 24, 1940. He was involved in the turbulent politics Elisabeth Beresford (with The Wombles’ Great Uncle Bulgaria)

Bulgaria, Tobermory, Orinoco, and Madame Cholet. They made their television debut in a short series on Jackanory in 1969, and were made into a series of shorts from BBC in 1973. Ivor Wood created the puppet characters, and Bernard Cribbins gave them voice. A live action feature film, Wombling Free, was released in 1977. Beresford penned over 20 Wombles books, and wrote the novels The Happy Ghost (1979), Jack and the Magic Stove (1982), The Ghosts of Lupus Street School (1986), and Emily and the Haunted Castle (1987). She also created the children’s television series Bertie the Bat (1990) and The Adventures of Dawdle the Donkey (1996). Freddy Beras Goico

of his country, and spent years in exile with his family during the dictatorship of Rafael Trujillo. He began working in television in the Dominican Republic in the early 1960s as a cameraman, and was soon writing and performing comedy sketches. He became host of the popular variety series El Gordo de la Semana, which aired for 30 years. He later co-hosted the nightly series Con Freddy y Punto. He was featured as Don Eligio in the 2005 film The Curse of Father Cardona.

BERESFORD, ELISABETH English children’s book writer Elisabeth Beresford, who was best known for creating the Wombles, died in Alderney, Guernsey, Channel Islands, on December 24, 2010. She was 84.

BERISTAIN, DOLORES Mexican actress Dolores Beristain died of respiratory complications in Mexico City on April 26, 2010. She was 83. She was born Dolores Bravo Mancera in Mexico City on May 10, 1926. She began her career on stage in the late 1940s, and became a leading performer in theatrical productions. She appeared frequently in films and television from the early 1970s. Her film credits include They Call Him Marcado (1971), Nest of Virgins (1972), El Premio Nobel del Amor (1973), La Palomilla al Rescate (1976), Life Changes (1976), Chin Chin the Drunken Bum (1976), Espejismo de la Ciudad (1976), Mil Caminos Tiene la Muerte (1977), El Moro de Cumpas (1977), Las Noches de Paloma (1978), Mary My Dearest (1979), La Hermana Enemiga (1979), Un Dia, una Familia, una Equis (1986), Romelia’s Secret

Obituaries • 2010 (1988), Cuento de Navidad (1989), Principio y Fin (1993), ’Til Death (1994), El Tesoro de Clotilde (1994), Besame en la Boca (1995), Adios Mama (1997), and The Magic Hour (1999). Beristain was also featured in the television series El Dios de Barro (1970), Las Fieras (1972),

Dolores Beristain

30 Long Live the Bride and Groom (1970), and Grandeur Nature (1974). He remained a leading figure in Spanish cinema in the post–Franco era, helming the trilogy La Escopeta Nacional (1978), Patrimonio Nacional (1981), and National III (1982). Berlanga also directed the films The Heifer (1985), Moors and Christians (1987), Todos a las Carcel (1993), Blasco Ibanez (1997), Paris-Timbuktu (1999), and El Sueno de la Maestra (2002).

BERN, MINA Actress Mina Bern, who was a leading performer in Yiddish theatre in New York, died of heart failure in Manhattan on January 10, 2010. She was 98. She was born Mina Bernholtz in Bielsk Podlaski, Poland, on May 5, 1911. She began her career on the stage in the Ararat Yiddish cabaret in Lodz in the 1930s, before fleeing Poland when the Nazis invaded Poland in 1939. She fled to Russia, where she continued to perform in Yiddish theatre, and moved to Palestine in 1947, where she joined the Li-La-Lo revue theater. Bern came to New York with the revue Shalom, Tel Aviv in 1949. She married fellow performer Ben Bonus, and the couple became leading performers of the Yiddish theater in

Anoranza (1979), Toda una Vida (1981), Te Amo (1984), La Gloria y el Infierno (1986), El Padre Gallo (1986), Tiempo de Amar (1987), La Fuerza del Amor (1990), Un Rostro en mi Pasado (1990), Clarisa (1993), La Sombra del Otro (1996), and Sentimientos Ajenos (1996). She was married to actor Luis Beristain until his death in 1962.

BERLANGA, LUIS GARCIA Spanish film director Luis Garcia Berlanga died at his home in Madrid, Spain, on November 13, 2010. He was 89. Berlanga was born in Valencia, Spain, on June 12, 1921. He studied at the Institute of Cinematographic Research and Experiences in Madrid from the late 1940s, and made several short films. He became one of the leading filmmakers in post–Civil War Spain in the early 1950s, teaming with Juan Antonio Bardem to direct his feature film debut, That Happy Couple (1953). Though he frequently ran afoul of the censors in Franco’s Spain, Berlanga’s film credits include Welcome Mr. Marshall! (1953), Boyfriend in Sight (1954), The Rocket from Calabuch (1956), Miracles of Thursday (1957), Placido (1961), Three Fables of Love (1962), The Executioner (1963), The Piranhas (1967),

Luis Garcia Berlanga

Mina Bern

New York. They also toured in productions throughout North and South America. They also brought several musicals to Broadway including Let’s Sing Yiddish (1966), Sing Israel, Sing (1967), and Light, Lively and Yiddish (1970) before Bonus’ death in 1984. Bern was also seen in character roles in over a dozen films including Tenement (1985), Crossing Delancey (1988), Avalon (1990), Pressure Drop (1994), It Could Happen to You (1994), Little Odessa (1994), Everything Relative (1996), I’m Not Rappaport (1996), Celebrity (1998), the tele-film The First Seven Years (1998), Flawless (1999), The Komediant (2000), and Brooklyn Babylon (2001). She returned to the Broadway stage in the 1990 musical Those Were the Days, and earned an Obie Award for her performance in The Folksbiene Yiddish Theatre’s Off-Broadway production of Sweet Dreams in 1999. She also performed in a one-woman show about her life, Mina Bern: A Life on the Stage, a Personal Memoir Told in Song and Story, in 2005.

BERTI, ALDO Italian actor Aldo Berti died of brain cancer in Florence, Italy, on December 26, 2010. He was 74. Berti was born in Florence on February 29,

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2010 • Obituaries

1936. He appeared in numerous films from the mid– 1950s through the early 1970s, including many Eurowesterns. His films include Time of Vacation (1956), White Slave Ship (1961), The Myth (1963), Imperial Venus (1963), Why Go on Killing? (1965), A Stranger in Sacramento (1965), Night of Violence (1965), Ramon the Mexican (1966), Django, a Bullet for You (1966), Go with God, Gringo (1966), The Dirty Outlaws (1967), A Stranger in Town (1967), How to Win a Billion … and Get Away with It (1967), An Angel for Satan (1967), Born to Kill (1967),

Raoul Billerey

Aldo Berti

Fifteen Scaffolds for the Killer (1968), Once Upon a Time in the West (1968), El Puro (1969), Defeat of the Mafia (1970), Sartana in the Valley of Death (1970), Hey Amigo! A Toast to Your Death (1970), My Name Is Mallory … M Means Death (1971), Heads I Kill You, Tails You’re Dead! They Call Me Hallalujah (1971), Have a Good Funeral, My Friend … Sartana Will Pay (1971), A Gunman Called Dakota (1972), Ivanhoe, the Norman Swordsman (1972), Spirito Santo e le Cinque Magnifiche Canaglie (1972), and Bada Alla tua Pelle, Spirito Santo! (1972). Berti retired from the screen in the early 1970s to travel the world, settling in Morocco in the mid–1980s.

BILLEREY, RAOUL French actor and stuntman Raoul Billerey died in Limoux, France, on July 28, 2010. He was 89. Billerey was born in Nice, France, on October 12, 1920. A fencing master and armorer, he performed stunts and was seen onscreen in such films as The Three Musketeers (1953), Cadet Rousselle (1954), The Impossible Mr. Pipelet (1955), Fernand Cow-Boy (1956), To Catch a Spy (1957), Back to the Wall (1958), The Hunchback of Paris (1959), The Battle of Austerlitz (1960), Captain Blood (1960), Captain Fracasse (1961), Blood on His Sword (1961, Cartouche (1962), Devil of Paris (1962), The Knight from Pardaillan (1962), The Iron Mask (1962), The Reluctant Spy (1963), Your Turn, Darling (1963), Panic in Bangkok (1964), L’Enfance Nue (1968), Mr. Freedom (1969), The French Calvinists (1972), The Eyes Closed (1974), Les Loulous (1977). Perceval le Gallois (1978), Outlaws (1985), L’Effrontee (1985), My Brother-in-Law Killed My Sister (1986), Betty Blue (1986), Widow’s Walk (1987), The Grand Highway (1987), Sorceress (1987), If the Sun Never Returns (1987), The House on the Dune (1988), Chouans! (1988), The Little Thief (1988), The War Is Over

(1989), The Handsome Priest (1989), La Mort d’Une Vache (1990), Un Type Bien (1991), Dien Bien Phu (1992), Grosse Fatigue (1994), Revenge of the Musketeers (1994) as Porthos, Unpredictable Nature of the River (1996), Oranges Ameres (1997), Jet Lag (2002), Ripoux 3 (2003), and A Ton Image (2004). He also worked frequently in television on such series as Rocambole, Thierry la Fronde, Lagardere, Allo Police, Fortune, D’Aretagnan, Schulmeister, Espion de l’Empereur, Les Cinq Dernieres Minutes, Manege, Louis Page, Quai n° 1 as Camille, and 1999’s Tramontane as Jose. His other television credits include productions of Les Trois Mousquetaires ou L’Escrime ne Paie Pas (1979), Alcyon (1990), Le Second Voyage (1991), La Fille du Roi (1994), L’île aux Momes (1994), Le mas Theotime (1995), La Riviere Esperance (1995), Pour une Vie ou Deux (1995), L’Esprit des Flots (1997), Le Serre aux Truffes (1997), Retour a Locmaria (2003), La Cliente (2004), La Tete Haute (2005), and Les Courriers de la Mort (2006). He made his final stage appearance in a production of Jesus II as Joseph Delteil in 2009.

BILLINGSLEY, BARBARA Actress Barbara Billingsley, who became a television icon with her role as the quintessential mom, June Cleaver, in the late 1950s television series Leave It to Beaver, died in Santa Monica, California, on October 16, 2010. She was 94. She was born Barbara Lillian Combes in Los Angeles on December 22, 1915. She performed in school plays as a child, and went to New York shortly after graduating high school. She was featured in the short-lived Broadway review Straw Hat, and worked as a fashion model. She began appearing in films in the mid–1940s, with small roles in Adventure (1945), the short So You Think You’re Allergic (1945), Up Goes Maisie (1946), Two Sisters from Boston (1946), Faithful in My Fashion (1946), Three Wise Fools (1946), Undercurrent (1946), The Secret Heart (1946), The Arnelo Affair (1947), The Sea of Grass (1947), Living in a Big Way (1947), The Romance of Rosy Ridge (1947), The Unfinished Dance (1947), The Arg yle Secrets (1948), the short Souvenirs of Death (1948), The Saxon Charm (1948), The Valiant Hombre (1948), Act of Violence (1948), The Sun Comes Up (1949), Caught (1949), I Cheated the Law (1949), Air Hostess (1949), Any Number Can Play (1949), Prejudice (1949), A Kiss for Corliss (1949), Shadow on the Wall (1950), Trial Without Jury

Obituaries • 2010 (1950), Pretty Baby (1950), Dial 1119 (1950), Three Guys Named Mike (1951), Inside Straight (1951), Oh! Susanna (1951), The Tall Target (1951), Two Dollar Bettor (1951), Angels in the Outfield (1951), Invitation (1952), Young Man with Ideas (1952), Woman in the Dark (1952), The Bad and the Beautiful (1952), The Lady Wants Mink (1953), Invaders from Mars (1953), Day of Triumph (1954), and The Careless Years (1957). She also appeared

32 tele-films High School U.S.A. (1984), Bay Coven (1987), and Secret Santa (2003). She was married to restaurateur Glenn Billingsley from 1941 until their divorce in 1947. They had two children, Glenn Jr. and Drew, who also found success in the restaurant business. She was married to British film director Roy Kellino from 1953 until his death in 1956, and to Dr. William Mortensen from 1959 until his death in 1981.

BILLINGSLEY, JO JO Deborah Jo Billingsley, who was a backup singer for the Southern rock band Lynyrd Skynyrd in the mid–1970s, died of cancer in Cullman, Alabama, on June 24, 2010. She was 58. Billingsley was born in Memphis, Tennessee, on May 28, 1952. She joined Skynyrd as a backup singer in December of 1975. The trio, that also included Cassie Gaines and Leslie Hawkins, were dubbed “The Honkettes,” and toured and recorded with the group for the next two

Barbara Billingsley

frequently on television from the early 1950s in episodes of such series as The Abbott and Costello Show, Rebound, The Pepsi-Cola Playhouse, The Lone Wolf, City Detective, The Pride of the Family, Four Star Playhouse, Schlitz Playhouse, You Are There, The Loretta Young Show, The Danny Thomas Show, Cavalcade of America, Panic!, and Mr. Adams and Eve. She also starred as Helen Wilson in the short-lived sit-com Professional Father in 1955, and was featured in the recurring role of Barbara in The Brothers in 1956. She was best known for her role as June Cleaver in the popular CBS sit-com Leave It to Beaver, which premiered in 1957. She and husband Ward, played by Hugh Beaumont, and children Wally and Theodore (aka “The Beaver”), played by Tony Dow and Jerry Mathers, moved to ABC after a mediocre first season. The series became a popular hit over the next five seasons before ending in 1963. Her role as June Cleaver left her largely type-cast, and other than a guest spot on The F.B.I. in 1971, she was largely off camera for nearly two decades. She returned to the screen in a cameo role in the 1980 comedy spoof Airplane!, as the elderly passenger who could “speak jive.” She also guest-starred in an episode of Mork and Mindy in 1982, and was the voice of Nanny and the Little Train on the animated series Muppet Babies from 1984 to 1991. She returned to the role of June Cleaver in the 1983 reunion tele-film Still the Beaver, and reunited with Mathers, Dow, and other cast members for the subsequent revival series The New Leave It to Beaver from 1985 to 1989 on Disney and TBS. She also made cameo roles as June Cleaver in episodes of Steven Spielberg’s Amazing Stories, Hi Honey, I’m Home, and Roseanne, and guest-starred in episodes of Silver Spoons, The New Mike Hammer, The Love Boat, Parker Lewis, Empty Nurse, Murphy Brown, The Mommies, and Mysterious Ways. She also had small roles in the films Back to the Beach (1987) and Going to the Chapel (1988), and the

Jo Jo Billingsley

years. She was the only member of the band not onboard when their plane crashed in October of 1977, killing lead singer Ronnie Van Zandt and several band and road crew members. Billingsley subsequently left the music industry to become an evangelist. She occasionally reunited with other Skynyrd survivors for charity events, and at the band’s induction in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2006.

BINI, ALFREDO Italian film producer Alfredo Bini died in a hospital in Tarquinia, Viterbo, Italy, on October 16, 2010. He was 83. Bini was born in Livorno, Italy, on December 12, 1926. He began producing films in the late 1950s with The Law Is the Law (1958), and formed the production company Arco Film to produce Mauro Bolognini’s Bell’ Antonio in 1960. He became best known for producing the works of Pier Paolo Pasolini, including Accattone! (1961), Mamma Roma (1962), RoGoPaG (1963), The Gospel According to St. Matthew (1964), Comizi d’Amore (1965), Sopralluoghi in Palestina per il Vangelo Secondo Matteo (1965), The Hawks and the Sparrows (1966), and Oedipus Rex (1967). He ran afoul of Italy’s obscenity laws as producer of Gian Luigi Polidoro’s Satyricon in 1968. Bini was married to Italian sex symbol Rosanna Schiaffino from 1963 to 1977, and was producer of her films Comizi d’Amore (1965), La Mandragola (1965), A Witch in Love (1966), El Greco (1966)

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2010 • Obituaries

with Mel Ferrer, Terence Young’s The Rover (1967) with Anthony Quinn, In Love, Every Pleasure Has Its Pain (1971), and The Heroes (1973) with Rod Steiger. He also

Jack Birkett

Alfredo Bini

produced the films The Black Decameron (1972), The Survivors of the Bounty (1974), Robert Bresson’s Lancelot du Lac (1974), and Banana Republic (1979).

BINIAK, BOB Pioneer skate boarder Bob Biniak, who was one of the original Dogtown Z-Boys, died of complications from a heart attack in a Jacksonville Beach, Florida, hospital, on February 25, 2010. He was 51. Biniak was born in Chicago on June 2, 1958,

Bob Biniak

and moved to Santa Monica, California, with his mother as a child. He was a surfer from an early age, and began skateboarding in the early 1970s. He joined the Z-Boys, sponsored by the Zephyr skate shop in 1975. The team revolutionized the sport, and Biniak pioneered vertical skateboarding. He was later featured in the 2001 documentary Dogtown and Z-Boys. He appeared in a small role as a restaurant manager in the 2005 fictionalized film account, Lords of Dogtown. Biniak later competed as a professional golfer.

BIRKETT, JACK British dancer, actor and mime Jack Birkett, who was often billed as the Incredible Orlando, died in London on May 10, 2010. He was 75. Birkett was born in Leeds, England, on June 11, 1934.

He studied dance and worked as an actor’s model while in his teens. He moved to London in the early 1950s, where he performed in musicals and touring productions. He made his West End debut in the musical Bye Bye Birdie in 1961, and worked with Lindsay Kemp’s dance and mime company from the early 1960s. Birkett began losing his vision in the mid–1960s, and was blind by the end of the decade. He continued to perform on stage and was featured as Blackbird in Kemp’s production of Jean Genet’s Flowers, which made its way to Broadway in 1974. He was featured as the Harlequin in the 1970 television production of Pierrot in Turquoise or The Looking Glass Murders (1970), and was Borgia Ginz in Derek Jarman’s 1978 film Jubilee. He portrayed Caliban in Jarman’s version of The Tempest in 1979, and was Thersites in Jonathan Miller’s adaptation of Shakespeare’s Troilus and Cressida for the BBC in 1981. He was featured as the Blind Man in 1985’s The Bride, with Sting as Dr. Frankenstein and Jennifer Beals in the title role. Birkett was also seen as the Pope in Jarman’s Caravaggio and Titania in a 1985 television production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. His other film credits include the Spanish films El Vent de l’Illa (1988) and El Nino de la Luna (1989).

BISCIGLIA, PAUL French character actor Paul Bisciglia died in Nanterre, Hauts-de-Seine, France, on April 18, 2010. He was 81. Bisciglia was born in Algiers, Algeria, on July 30, 1928. He began his acting career in France in the late 1940s. He appeared in numerous films over the next five decades including Paris Incident (1950), Under the Paris Sky (1951), The Beautiful Image (1951), The Turkey (1951), The High Life (1951), Le Desir et l’Amour (1951), Clara de Montargis (1951), Papa, Mama, the Maid and I (1954), Quai des Blondes (1954), Before the Deluge (1954), The Doctors (1955), M’sieur la Caille (1955), The River of Three Junks (1956), The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1956) with Anthony Quinn as Quasimodo, Les Lumieres du Soir (1956), Photo Finish (1956), Pardonnez nos Offenses (1956), The Seventh Commandment (1957), Crazy in the Noodle (1957), Funny Face (1957), Provisional Liberty (1958), Les Copains du Dimanche (1958), Night Dance Hall (1959), Witness in the City (1959), Checkerboard (1959), Twelve Hours by the Clock (1959), The Cousins (1959), Le Signe du Lion

Obituaries • 2010

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(1959), Les Vieux de la Vieille (1960), Les Mordus (1960), The Wretches (1960), Lovers on a Tightrope (1960), Paris Belongs to Us (1961), Tout l’or du Monde (1961), La Belle Americaine (1961), Arsene Lupin vs. Arsene Lupin (1962), Le Coup de Bambou (1963), Le Gendarme de Saint-Tropez (1964), Cherchez l’Idole (1964), Pas de Caviar pour Tante Olga (1965), The Big Swag (1965), Is Paris Burning? (1966), L’or et le Plomb (1966), The Boss of Champignol (1966), Action Man (1969), and Hibernatus (1969). He was featured as the Butler in Jean Rollin’s 1970 erotic horror film La Vampire Nue (aka The Nude Vampire (1970), and was also seen in Rollin’s Vierges et Vampires (aka Caged Virgins) (1971), Les Demoniaques (Curse of the Living Dead) (1974), Levres de Sang (aka Lips of Blood) (1975), and Les Raisins de la Mort (The Raisins of Death) (1978). His numerous film credits also include Pollux et le Chat Bleu (1970), Only the Cool (1970), Le Cinema de Papa (1970), Who Cares: Anatomy of a Delivery Boy (1971),

such productions as L’Equipage au Complet (1957), Gargantua (1962), Les Hommes (1964), Saturnin Belloir (1967), L’Homme du ’Picardie (1968), La Cravache d’Or (1969), Fortune (1969), The Little Theatre of Jean Renoir (1970), Les Fiances de Loches (1970), Pont Dormant (1972), La Tuile a Loups (1972), Figaro-ci, Figaro-la (1972), L’Equipe ou Le Roman des Fortifs (1973), La Folie des Betes (1974), Monsieur Barnett (1975), Les Zingari (1975), La Preuve par Treize (1975), Le Peril Bleu (1975), MiniChroniques (1976), Adios (1976), Allez la Rafale! (1977), La Mer Promise (1977), IClaudine a Paris (1978), La Grace (1978), Le Dernier Train (1979), Mont-Oriol (1980), Petit Dejeuner Compris (1980), Le Tour du Monde en 80 Jours (1980), Arsene Lupin Joue et Perd (1980), Le Moustique (1980), Le Surmale (1980), Legitime Defense (1980), Les Liaisons Dangereuses (1980), Le Grand Fosse (1980), L’Antichambre (1981), An Orphan’s Tale (1981), La Nonne Sanglante (1981), Jupiter 81 (1982), La Demobilisation Generale (1982), Panurge (1982), Non Recuperables (1982), La Nuit du General Boulanger (1982), L’Epingle Noire (1982), La Veuve Rouge (1983), Liebe Lasst alle Blumen Bluhen (1983), L’Homme des Couloirs (1985), Leon Blum a l’Echelle Humaine (1986), La Ruelle au Clair de Lune (1988), Crimes et Jardins (1991), La Venus a Lulu (1991), and Accalmies Passageres (1998). His other television credits include episodes of Rocambole, Les Saintes Cheries, Tang, Le Pain Noir, Les Brigades du Tigre, De Memoire d’Homme, Les Cinq Dernieres Minutes, Les Heritiers, Desire Lafarge, L’Etrange Monsieur Duvallier, Brigade des Mineurs, Commissaire Moulin, Medecins de Nuit, Le Mythomane, La Vie des Autres, Les Enquetes du Commissaire Maigret, Les Bargeot, Hotel de Police, Julien Fontanes, Magistrat, and Puissance 4.

Paul Bisciglia

BISUTTI, MARIA AURELIA Argentine actress Marie Aurelia Bisutti died in the town of Ingeniero Maschwitz, Buenos Aires province, Argentina, on April 12, 2010. She was 79. Bisutti was born in Buenos Aires on June 20, 1930. She began her career in films in the late 1940s appearing in La Serpiente de Cascabel (1948), White Horse Inn (1948), Los Ojos llenos de Amor (1954), Sangre y Acero (1956), Historia de una Carta (1957), Alto Parana (1958), Culpable (1960), Los de la Mesa 10 (1960), Plaza Huincul (Pozo Uno) (1960), Libertad Bajo Palabra (1961), Amorina (1961), A Puerta Cerrada

The Egg (1972), Murder Is a Murder (1972), Cobblestones (1972), The Annuity (1972), Fusil Charge (1972), Now Where Did the Seventh Company Get To? (1973), La Derniere Bourree a Paris (1973), The Mad Adventures of “Rabbi” Jacob (1973), The Crazy Capo Affair (1973), Lust and Desire (1973), Don Juan (Or If Don Juan Were a Woman) (1973), The Suburbs Are Everywhere (1973), Les Voraces (1973), Young Casanova (1974), La Gifle (1974), La Kermesse Erotique (1974), Like a Pot of Strawberries (1974), Verdict (1974), How to Make Good When One Is a Jerk and a Crybaby (1974), We Were Mistaken About a Love Story (1974), Bloody Murder (1974), House of 1000 Pleasures (1974), The Seventh Company Has Been Found (1975), That Most Important Thing: Love (1975), The Cold Soup (1975), The Wing and the Thigh (1976), Lumiere (1976), L’Animal (1977), Brigade Call-Girls (1977), Delectations (1977), The Small Timers (1978), Les Deux Mains (1980), Anthracite (1980), Les Contes de La Fontaine (1980), Belles, Blondes et Bronzees (1981), La Baraka (1982), Family Rock (1982), Lucie sur Seine (1982), La Derniere Image (1986), Grain de Ciel (1988), Love Without Pity (1989), Profil bas (1993), Montana Blues (1995), Le Voisin (1997), and Jacynthe, Tu as un Cul de Feu (1999). He was also a voice actor in several of the Asterix films in the 1980s. Bisciglia also appeared frequently on French television from the late 1950s, with roles in

Maria Aurelia Bisutti

35 (1962), La Calesita (1963), Canuto Canete, Detective Privado (1965), Hotel Alojamiento (1966), Forbidden Things Are in Fashion (1968), El Derecho a la Felicidad (1968), Martin Fierro (1968), Kuma Ching (1969), Con Alma y Vida (1970), Nino (1972), The Inquisitor (1975), Where the Wind Dies (1976), La Nueva Cigarra (1977), De Cara al Cielo (1979), Diablo Metio la Pata (1980), and Six Tickets to Hell (1981). She was also a popular performer on Argentine television from the late 1950s, with roles in such series and productions as Mas alla del Color: La Vida de Gauguin y Degas (1958), El Cielo es Para Todos (1962), El Satiro (1963), Show Standard Electric (1965), Su Comedia Favorita (1965), Nostalgias del Tiempo Lindo (1966), Tres Destinos (1966), Mujeres en Presidio (1967), La Pulpera de Santa Lucia (1968), Trampa Para un Play Boy (1969), Nino, las Cosas Simples de la Vida (1971), El Exterminador (1972), Alta Comedia (1972), Maleva (1972), Con Odio y con Amor (1974), La Pesadilla (1974), Mi Hijo Damian (1974), Donde Empezo la Tristeza (1977), El Hombre que yo Invente (1977), El Leon y la Rosa (1979), Coraje Mama (1985), and Inolvidable (1992). She also worked frequently on radio, starring in the series, Las dos Caratulas, from 2002.

BLAIR, BARRY Comic book illustrator Barry Blair, who was founder of the Aircel comic line in the mid–1980s, died of a brain aneurysm on January 3, 2010. He was 50. Blair was born in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, in 1959. He began his career as an animator, working on

2010 • Obituaries

Melva Blancett

was born in McAlester, Oklahoma, in 1924. She was active as a commercial actress for radio and television in Arizona, where she helped organize the Arizona branch of the Screen Actors Guild. She was also featured in the 1979 film The Emmett Smith Story, and the tele-films The Child Stealer (1979) and To Find My Son (1980).

BLANCHARD, NINA Leading talent and modeling agent Nina Blanchard died of cardiac arrest in a Burbank, California, hospital on February 7, 2010. She was 81. Blanchard was born in Greenwich, Connecticut, on July 21, 1928. She worked as a television makeup artist and casting director before forming the Nina Blanchard

Barry Blair Nina Blanchard

the children’s television series You Can’t Do That on Television and Let Me Prove It. He founded the independent comic line Aircel in 1985, and wrote and illustrated several titles including Elflord, Dragonring, and Samurai. Aircel also published Warlock 5, Team Nippon, Gun Fury, Leather and Lace, and Men in Black. Aircel was acquired by Malibu Comics in the early 1990s and Blair drew adaptations of the Logan’s Run and Logan’s World science fiction novels. He left the company in 1992 to work for the Elfquest series, and later teamed with Colin Chan to revive the Elflord and Samurai series at WaRP Graphics. They also worked together on the erotic Sapphire and Nymphettes series.

BLANCETT, MELVA Actress Melva Blancett died in Mesa, Arizona, on March 2, 2010. She was 85. She

Agency in 1961. She specialized in representing models for television and print advertising and runway modeling. She helped guide the career of such supermodels as Cheryl Tiegs, Christie Brinkley, Shari Belafonte, and Cristina Ferrare before selling her agency to Ford Models in 1995. Blanchard was featured in a cameo role as a judge in the 1998 Burt Reynolds’ film Hard Time.

BLANCHET, SEVERIN French documentary filmmaker Severin Blanchet was killed in a suicide bombing attack on a hotel in Kabul, Afghanistan, on February 26, 2010. He was 66. Blanchet was born in France on April 27, 1943. He traveled the world making documentary films, and helped form filmmaking courses in several Third World countries. He co-wrote the 1991

Obituaries • 2010 feature Tinpis Run. Blanchet went to Afghanistan in 2006, where he taught classes for aspiring young Afghan

Severin Blanchet

36 ence-Fiction and Supernatural Fiction in 1978. Bleiler was the recipient of the World Fantasy Award for Lifetime Achievement in 1988. His only work of fiction, the fantasy Firegang: A Mythic Fantasy, was published in 2006.

BLEWITT, DAVID EDWARD Film and television editor David Edward Blewitt died of complications from Parkinson’s disease at his home in Sherman Oaks, California, on July 8, 2010. He was 81. Blewitt was born in Los Angeles on August 7, 1928. He served as an aerial reconnaissance photographer for the Air Force in World War II. He pursued a career in film after the war, working as a cameraman and cinematographer. He filmed segments of the television documentary series Hollywood and the Stars in the early 1960s. He was soon working as an editor on such series as Time-Life Specials: The March of Time, Men in Crisis, The Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau, The World of Animals, Untamed Frontier, and National Geographic Specials. Blewitt

filmmakers. He was also featured as Vincent in Otar Iosselani’s 2006 film Gardens in Autumn.

BLEILER, E.F. Science fiction and fantasy editor and bibliographer Everett Franklin Bleiler died in Ithaca, New York, on June 13, 2010. He was 90. Bleiler was born in Massachusetts on April 30, 1920. He graduated from Harvard with a degree in anthropology in 1942, and earned a degree in the history of culture from the University of Chicago after World War II. He was best known as the compiler of The Checklist of Fantastic Literature: A Bibliography of Fantasy, Weird and Science Fiction Books Published in the English Language in 1948, which was the first noted bibliographic work in the field. Bleiler teamed with T.E. Dikty to produce the first bestof-the-year anthologies in science fiction in 1949, with the annual Best Science Fiction Stories appearing through 1954. He began working for Dover Publications in 1955, and rose to the position of vice-president in 1967. He was instrumental in editing a series of anthologies of such writers of the fantastic as Ambrose Bierce, Algernon Blackwood, Robert W. Chambers, Arthur Conan Doyle, Lord Dunsany, Sheridan Le Fanu, H.P. Lovecraft, and H.G. Wells. He also edited Three Gothic Novels: And a Fragment of a Novel by Lord Byron (1966), Five Victorian Ghost Novels (1971), and Three Supernatural Novels of the Victorian Period (1975), before retiring from Dover in 1977. His later extensive bibliographic works include The Guide to Supernatural Fiction: A Full Description of 1,775 Books from 1750 to 1960, Including Ghost Stories, Weird Fiction, Stories of Supernatural Horror, Fantasy, Gothic Novels, Occult Fiction, and Similar Literature, with Author, Title and Motif Indexes (1983), Science Fiction: The Early Years: A Full Description of More Than 3,000 Science-Fiction Stories from Earliest Times to the Appearance of the Genre Magazines in 1930 with Author, Title, and Motif Indexes (1990), and Science-Fiction: The Gernsback Years: A Complete Coverage of the Genre Magazines Amazing, Astounding, Wonder, and Others from 1926 Through 1936 (1998), the latter two with the assistance of his son, Richard Bleiler. His original work was reprinted by Shasta Publishers as The Checklist of Sci-

David Edward Blewitt

worked frequently as a film editor from the early 1970s, with such credits as The Love Machine (1971), Hammersmith Is Out (1972), Butterflies Are Free (1972), the concert film Wattstax (1973), 40 Carats (1973), the MGM tribute to Hollywood’s Golden Age of musicals, That’s Entertainment! (1974) and the sequel That’s Entertainment, Part II (1976), Report to the Commissioner (1975), Life Goes to War: Hollywood and the Home Front (1977), The Buddy Holly Story (1978), Steel (1979), The Competition (1980) which earned him an Academy Award nomination, In God We Tru$t (1980), Under the Rainbow (1981), Smokey and the Bandit Part 3 (1983), D.C. Cab (1983), Ghost Busters (1984), Fast Forward (1985), Hell Hunters (1986), Psycho III (1986), and Michael Jackson’s Moonwalker (1988). He also continued to work in television, earning an Emmy Award for the variety special Bob Hope: The First 90 Years in 1993. He also served as an editor for the series Key West and Hercules: The Legendary Journeys.

BLITZER, BARRY Veteran television writer Barry Blitzer died of complications from abdominal surgery in Santa Monica, California, on January 27, 2010. He was 80. Blitzer was born on April 29, 1929, and attended the University of Georgia. He served in the Army during the Korean War, and began writing for television

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2010 • Obituaries

in the mid–1950s. He shared an Emmy Award for comedy writing for his work on The Phil Silvers Show on 1956. Blitzer wrote for numerous comedy series over the next four decades, often collaborating with Raymond Brenner. His television credits include the series The Ann Sothern Show, I’m Dickens, He’s Fenster, Broadside, McHale’s Navy, The Andy Griffith Show, Get Smart, Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C., Barefoot in the Park, The Paul Lynde Show, Land of the Lost, Good Times, Hot L Baltimore, The Lost Saucer, The Love Boat, California Fever,

Lisa Blount

Barry Blitzer

Filthy Rich, Too Close for Comfort, and Small Wonder. Blitzer also scripted episodes of numerous animated series including The Flintstones, The Roman Holidays, Goober and the Ghost Chasers, Partridge Family 2200 AD, Uncle Croc’s Block, Wacky and Packy, Jokebook, The Jetsons, The Flintstone Kids, Top Cat and the Beverly Hills Cat, Foofur, The New Yogi Bear Show, and Tom & Jerry Kids Show.

BLOUNT, LISA Actress Lisa Blount, who was featured in the 1982 film An Officer and a Gentleman, and earned an Academy Award for producing the 2001 short film The Accountant, was found dead at her home in Little Rock, Arkansas, on October 27, 2010. She was 53. The coroner reported that she had likely been dead for two days from natural causes. Blount was born in Little Rock, Arkansas, on July 1, 1957. She made her film debut opposite Richard Thomas in 1977’s September 30, 1955, about the effect of James Dean’s death on a small Arkansas town. She was also featured in 1979’s The Swap and the 1981 horror film Dead & Buried. She was best known for her role as Lynette Pomeroy, the love interest of David Keith in the 1982 film An Officer and an Gentleman, with Richard Gere and Debra Winger. She was an attractive presence in several cult films of the 1980s including What Waits Below (1984), Radioactive Dreams (1985), Cut and Run (1985), Cease Fire (1985), Nightflyers (1987), John Carpenter’s Prince of Darkness (1987), South of Reno (1988), Out Cold (1989), and Blind Fury (1989). She was featured in the 1989 Jerry Lee Lewis biopic Great Balls of Fire! starring Dennis Quaid, and appeared in Femme Fatale (1991), Needful Things (1993), Judicial Consent (1994), Box of Moon Light (1996), If … Dog … Rabbit (1999), and Birdseye (2002). Blount ap-

peared frequently on television from the 1980s, with roles in episodes of Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, Moonlighting, The Hitchhiker, Starman, Magnum, P.I., CBS Summer Playhouse, Murder, She Wrote, Sons and Daughters, Picket Fences, The Client, Cracker: Mind Over Murder, and Judging Amy. She was also seen in the tele-films Murder Me, Murder You (1983), Stormin’ Home (1985), Annihilator (1986), Unholy Matrimony (1988), In Sickness and in Health (1992), An American Story (1992), Murder Between Friends (1994), Get to the Heart: The Barbara Mandrell Story (1997) as Mary Mandrell, Traffic (1999), and Trash (2003). She also starred as step-mother Bobbi Stakowski in the short-lived television series Profit from 1996 to 1997. She married actor and director Ray McKinnon in 1998, and she served as executive producer for his 2001 Oscar-winning short The Accountant. She also co-starred with her husband in the films Chrystal (2004) and Randy and the Mob (2007), which McKinnon also wrote and directed.

BLYTH, GAVIN British television producer Gavin Blyth, who worked on the ITV Yorkshire soap opera Emmerdale Farm in the 2000s, died after a brief battle with cancer in a Leeds, England, hospital on November 26, 2010. He was 41. Blythe was born in Southport, Lancashire, England, on October 27, 1969. He began working with Emmerdale as senior publicist in 2002, and soon was serving as script editor for the series.

Gavin Blyth

Obituaries • 2010

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He moved to the ITV soap Coronation Street as a story associate and assistant producer in 2005. Blyth returned to Emmerdale Farm as producer in 2009.

BLYTHE, DOMINI British actress Domini Blythe, who spent most of her career in Canada, died of cancer in Montreal, Canada, on December 15, 2010. She was 63. Blythe was born in Cheshire, England, on August 28, 1947. She studied at the Central School of Speech and Drama, and performed with the Royal Shakespeare Company. She made her West End stage debut in a production of Oh, Calcutta! in 1970, and was featured as Anna Mueller in the 1972 Hammer horror film Vampire Circus. She subsequently moved to Canada, where she performed on stage with the Shaw Festival from 1973 to 1975. She spent five seasons with the Stratford Shakespeare Festival in Ontario, and starred as Katherine Valeur in the short-lived Canadian primetime television soap opera Mount Royal in 1988. Blythe

Domini Blythe

was also seen on television in episodes of Search for Tomorrow, Street Legal, Formula I, Urban Angel, and Avonlea. She appeared in the television productions Million Dollar Babies (1994), Danielle Steel’s Vanished (1995), More Tales of the City (1998), and Criminal Instincts: Deadly Appearances (2000). She was also featured in a handful of films during her career including The Wars (1983), Montreal vu Par (1991), Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle (1994), Voices (1995), Afterglow (1997), When I Will Be Gone (1998), External Affairs (1999), and Stardom (2000). She returned to Stratford in 2000, and was noted for her performance in King Lear as Goneril opposite Christopher Plummer in 2004. She made her final stage performance at Stratford in the one-woman show Fanny Kemble in 2006. Her later film credits include Savage Messiah (2002), Affinity (2008), The Trotsky (2009), and the tele-film Ties That Bind (2010).

BOCK, JERRY Composer Jerry Bock, who teamed with lyricist Sheldon Harnick to create the Tony Award winning Broadway musicals Fiorello! and Fiddler on the Roof, died of heart failure in a Mount Kisco, New York, hospital on November 3, 2010. He was 81. Jerrold Lewis Bock was born in New Haven, Connecticut, on November 23, 1928, and was raised in Queens, New York. He began writing musicals while attending the

Jerry Bock

University of Wisconsin in Madison, teaming with Larry Holofcener on Big as Life, about Paul Bunyan. He and Holofcener went to New York after graduation, where they wrote songs for The Admiral Broadway Revue, which later became Sid Caesar’s Your Show of Shows. They also worked on the unsuccessful Broadway musical Catch a Star in 1955. They also wrote for the Sammy Davis, Jr., musical Mr. Wonderful in 1956. Bock soon began teaming with lyricist Sheldon Harnick, though their first effort, 1958’s The Body Beautiful, had little success. Their next collaboration, Fiorello!, directed by George Abbott and starring Tom Bosley as New York Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia, was a major hit in 1959, earning a Tony Award and a Pulitzer Prize. They also wrote music and lyrics for the Broadway productions Tenderloin (1960) and She Loves Me (1963), and scored another major hit with 1964’s Fiddler on the Roof. The musical about the poor Russian Jewish milkman Tevye and his family included such popular songs as “If I Were a Rich Man,” “Tradition,” “Matchmaker, Matchmaker,” and “Sunrise, Sunset.” The show earned nine Tony Awards and had an extraordinary eight-year run on Broadway, and was adapted for an Oscar-nominated film in 1971. Bock and Harnick also earned Tony nominations for their work on the musicals The Apple Tree (1966) and The Rothschilds (1970), which proved their last production together after they had an artistic dispute about the play’s director. Bock was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1972. He also wrote numerous children’s songs and won an Emmy Award in 2010 for the song “A Fiddler Crab Am I” from the show The Wonder Pets!

BON, CHELA Chilean actress Chela Bon died of cancer in Los Angeles, California, on January 23, 2010. She was 79. She was born Graciela Bon in Santiago, Chile, in 1930. She became a leading actress in the emerging Chilean cinema in the 1940s, with roles in such films as La Casa esta Vacia (aka The House Is Empty) (1945), Bitter Truth (1945), Suena mi Amor (1946), El Padre Pitilo (1946), El Diamante del Maharaja (1946), Si Mis Campos Hablaran (1947), Yo Vendo Unos Ojos Negros (1948), and El Paso Maldito (1949). She came to the United States in the late 1940s, where she performed with the Columbia Workshop Theatre. Bon’s earlier performance in La Casa esta Vacia was combined with an-

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2010 • Obituaries

other Chilean film (La Dama de la Muerte, an adaptation of Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Suicide Club), and additional U.S.-shot footage featuring John Carradine to form Jerry Warren’s notorious 1964 release Curse of the Stone Hand. She was credited as the female lead under the name Sheila Bon. She occasionally returned to Chile to

Caterina Boratto

Chela Bon

perform in films made there, including the low-budget action films Land Without Law (1987) and The Secret of the Ice Cave (1988). She again returned to Chile with director James Beckett to appear in the 1999 film Southern Cross with Malcolm McDowell. Bon was also involved in production, and had been promoting a film version of The Quintrala about accused 17th century murderer Catalina de los Rios y Lisperguer.

BONYNGE, LETA Actress Leta Bonynge died in Kensington, Connecticut, on March 1, 2010. She was 92. Bonynge was born in Los Angeles on May 11, 1917. She appeared on the New York stage in the 1940s, and was featured in Broadway productions of Strange Bedfellows (1948), The Ivy Green (1949), My Fair Lady (1956), How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (1961), The Miser (1969), The Time of Your Life (1969), and Camino Real (1970). She was also seen on television in episodes of Lux Video Theatre, Jamie, Decoy, and Naked City, and was Mrs. Prothero in the 1966 film The Group. BORATTO, CATERINA Italian actress Caterina Boratto, whose long film career was highlighted in the 1960s with her work with Federico Fellini, died in Rome on September 14, 2010. She was 95. Boratto was born in Turin, Italy, on March 15, 1915. She made her film debut in Guido Brignone’s To Live in 1937 opposite Tito Schipa, and continued her career in the features Marcella (1937), Who Is Happier Than I? (1938), They’ve Kidnapped a Man (1938), and I Figli del Marchese Lucera (1939). She went to Hollywood in the late 1930s after being offered a contract by Louis B. Mayer. She was groomed as a singing star, but no films developed and Boratto returned to Italy during World War II. She resumed her film career in Romanzo di un Giovane Povero (1942), Measure for Measure (1943), and Peddler and the Lady (1943). She experienced tragedy during the war when her lover, the Romanian Count Guidi, was killed in an air crash. She married Armando Ceratto, a doctor

at a Turin clinic, and helped him care for the many victims of the World War II. She returned to Rome after the war, and was featured in the 1951 film Double Cross. Her film career was revitalized in the early 1960s when she appeared in Federico Fellini’s surreal classic 8 1⁄2 as La Signora Misteriosa. She also starred in Fellini’s Juliet of the Spirits (1965) as Juliet’s mother. She remained a familiar face in films over the next three decades with roles in Me, Me, Me … and the Others (1966), Pardon, Are You for or Against? (1966), Stasera mi Butto (1967), Non Stuzzicate la Zanzara (1967), Pronto … c’e una Certa Giuliana per te (1967), The Tiger and the Pussycat (1967), Danger: Diabolik (1968), Una Storia d’Amore (1969), The Lady of Monza (1969), Sydney Pollack’s bizarre World War II drama Castle Keep (1969) as the Red Queen, Angeli Senza Paradiso (1970), Lady Caroline Lamb (1972), Hector the Mighty (1972), The House of the Doves (1972), La Ragazza Fuoristrada (1973), Unholy Convent (1973), Summer to Remember (1974), Footprints on the Moon (1975), Pier Paolo Pasolini’s Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom (1975), Per Questa Notte (1977), First Love (1978), Enzo Castellari’s 1979 horror film The House by the Edge of the Lake as the witch Kira, Uno Contro l’Altro, Pratiocamente Amici (1980), Ehrengard (1982), The Night of Varennes (1982), Claretta Petacci (1984), All My Friends Part 3 (1985), 32a Dicembre (1988), Un Delitto Poco Comune (1988), and Lo Zio Indegno (1989). Boratto appeared in an episode of the television series I Spy in 1966, and was also featured in television productions of Anna Karenina (1974), Bel Ami (1979), La Donna in Bianco (1980), Il Giovane Dottor Freud (1980), La Freccia nel Fianco (1983), The Far Pavilions (1984), Lulu (1986), Villa Arzilla (1990), and Bride of Violence 2 (1993). She made her final film appearance in the 1992 comedy caper film Once Upon a Crime starring John Candy and James Belushi.

BORETZ, ALVIN Veteran television writer Alvin Boretz died in New York City on July 22, 2010. He was 91. Boretz was born in New York City on June 15, 1919. He served in the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II. He began writing for radio and television in the late 1940s. Boretz scripted hundreds of radio programs, and penned episodes of such television series as The Philco-Goodyear Television Playhouse, The Ford Theatre Hour, Treasury Men in Action, The Man Behind the

Obituaries • 2010 Badge, The Alcoa Hour, The Big Story, Matinee Theatre, Kraft Theatre, Playhouse 90, Diagnosis: Unknown, The Asphalt Jungle, G.E. True Theater, Alcoa Premiere, Armstrong Circle Theatre, Breaking Point, Brenner, The Doctors and the Nurses, The Defenders, The Virginian, Felony Squad, Laredo, The Danny Thomas Hour, N.Y.P.D., The Mod Squad, Medical Center, Ironside, Cade’s County, The Rookies, and Kojak. He scripted the 1972 tele-film Lights Out, based on the earlier radio series, and the pilot film for the short-lived 1977 series The Amazing Spider-Man, starring Nicholas Hammond as the Marvel super hero. Boretz also wrote the tele-films Chelsea D.H.O (1973), Corey: For the People (1977), Crisis in Sun Valley (1978), The Night the Bridge Fell Down (1983), Master of the Game (1984), and Sister Margaret and the Saturday Night Ladies (1987). He wrote the 1975 film My Pleasure Is My Business, and 1978’s Brass Target starring Sophia Loren.

BORINO-QUINN, DENISE Denise BorinoQuinn, who starred as Ginny Sack on the television series The Sopranos, died of liver cancer in a Morristown,

Denise Borino-Quinn

New Jersey, hospital on October 27, 2010. She was 46. Borino had no previous acting experience when she tried out for the role of Ginny Sacrimoni, the Mafia wife with weight problems, for The Sopranos in 2000. She was featured in the recurring role through 2007.

BOSCO, GIAN FABIO Italian actor Gian Fabio Bosco died of an aneurysm in a hospital in Lavagna, Genoa, Italy, on February 14, 2010. He was 73. Bosco was born in Florence, Italy, on July 30, 1936. He began his career in films in the mid–1960s as half of the comedy duo Ric and Gian with Riccardo Miniggio. They were featured in such films as Ischia Love Operation (1966), Ric e Gian alla Conquista del West (1967), Lisa Dagli occhi Blu (1969), Quelli Belli … Siamo Noi (1970), Italian Sex (1974), La Banca di Monate (1975), and Kakkientruppen (1977). Bosco continued to appear in films and television, with roles in Joan Lui — Ma un Giorno nel Paese Arrivo io di Lunedi (1985), Fratelli d’Italia (1989), Le Comiche (1990), Gli Inaffidabili (1997), Libero Burro (1999), Ho Visto le Stelle (2003), and InvaXon — Alieni in Liguria (2004). His television credits include I Cinque del Quinto Piano (1986), Gran Casino

40

Gian Fabio Bosco

(1995), Ladri si Nasce (1997), Anni ’60 (1999), Tre Stelle (1999), Ma il Portiere non c’e Mai? (2002), Le Ragazze di Miss Italia (2002), and Di che Peccato Sei? (2007).

BOSLEY, TOM Actor Tom Bosley, who was best known for his role as Happy Days patriarch Howard Cunningham, died of heart failure and complications from lung cancer in a Palm Springs, California, hospital on October 19, 2010. He was 83. Bosley was born in Chicago, Illinois, on October 1, 1927. He served in the U.S. Navy before attending Chicago’s DePaul University, where he made his stage debut in 1947. He performed in productions at the Woodstock Opera House in Woodstock, Illinois, later in the decade. He appeared on the New York stage in the 1950s, with roles in several OffBroadway productions. He was also featured as the Knave of Hearts in a 1955 television adaptation of Alice in Wonderland for Hallmark Hall of Fame. Bosley earned a Tony Award for his performance as New York Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia in the popular Broadway musical Fiorello! in 1959. He became a familiar face on television in the early 1960s, appearing episodes of Diagnosis: Unknown, The Law and Mr. Jones, Hallmark’s 1962 production of Arsenic and Old Lace as Teddy Brewster, Car 54, Where Are You?, Naked City, Route 66, The DuPont Show of the Week, The Doctors and the Nurses, Dr. Kildare, Profiles in Courage, Ben Casey, The Defenders, Jericho, The Girl from U.N.C.L.E., The F.B.I., Get Smart, The Vir-

Tom Bosley

41 ginian, The Mod Squad, Bonanza, Marcus Welby, M.D., The Bill Cosby Show, The Most Deadly Game, The Silent Force, Night Gallery, The Name of the Game, Bewitched, Mission: Impossible, Funny Face, Sarge, The New Dick Van Dyke Show, Me and the Chimp, Banyon, The Sixth Sense, Me and the Chimp, The New Temperatures Rising Show, Medical Center, The Paul Lynde Show, Maude, A Touch of Grace, Chase, Love, American Style, Tenafly, McMillan and Wife, Insight, Kolchak: The Night Stalker, Ellery Queen, Mobile One, The Love Boat, and The Streets of San Francisco. Bosley was seen in several films in the 1960s and 1970s including Love with the Proper Stranger (1963), The World of Henry Orient (1964), Divorce American Style (1967), The Bang-Bang Kid (1967), The Secret War of Harry Frigg (1968), Yours, Mine and Ours (1968), To Find a Man (1972), Mixed Company (1974), and Gus (1976). He also appeared in the tele-films A Step Out of Line (1971), Vanished (1971), Congratulations, It’s a Boy! (1971), Mr. and Mrs. Bo Jo Jones (1971), Bobby Jo and the Good Time Band (1972), No Place to Run (1972), the 1973 television remake of Miracle on 34th Street as Judge Henry X. Harper, The Girl Who Came Gift-Wrapped (1974), Death Cruise (1974), Who Is the Black Dahlia? (1975), The Last Survivors (1975), and The Night That Panicked America (1975). Bosley starred as Bob Landers in the short-lived sit-com The Debbie Reynolds Show from 1969 to 1970, and was Bert Quinn in 1972’s The Sandy Duncan Show. He was the voice of Harry Boyle in the animated series Wait Till Your Father Gets Home from 1972 to 1974. He starred as Howard Cunningham in the 1950s-set hit sit-com Happy Days from 1974 to 1984, with Marion Ross as his wife, Ron Howard and Erin Moran as children Richie and Joanie, and Henry Winkler as Arthur “The Fonz” Fonzarelli. Bosley reprised his role in several episodes of the 1982 spin-off series Joanie Loves Chachi. Bosley was featured in the recurring role of Sheriff Amos Tupper in Angela Lansbury’s mystery series Murder, She Wrote from 1984 to 1988, and was detective-priest Father Frank Dowling in Father Dowling Mysteries from 1987 to 1991. He also guest-starred in episodes of Here’s Boomer, Finder of Lost Loves, Glitter, Hotel, The Love Boat, Out of This World, ABC Weekend Specials, Burke’s Law, The Drew Carey Show, Early Edition, Maggie, Jack & Jill, Walker, Texas Ranger, ER, Family Law, Touched by an Angel, It’s All Relative, Still Standing, One Tree Hill, and That ’70s Show. Bosley was featured in the tele-films Black Market Baby (1977), Testimony of Two Men (1977), With This Ring (1978), The Bastard (1978), The Triangle Factory Fire Scandal (1979), The Castaways on Gilligan’s Island (1979), The Rebels (1979), The Return of Mod Squad (1979), For the Love of It (1980), The Jesse Owens Story (1984), Private Sessions (1985), Perry Mason: The Case of the Notorious Nun (1986), Fire and Rain (1989), The Love Boat: A Valentine Voyage (1990), Mary Christmas (2002), Christmas at Water’s Edge (2004), The Fallen Ones (2005), Hidden Places (2006), and Charlie & Me (2008). He was a voice actor in animated productions of The Stingiest Man in Town (1978) as B.A.H. Humbug, The Gnomes’ Great Adventure (1987), Pinocchio and the Emperor of the Night (1987) as Geppetto, Legend of the Candy Cane (2001), and Geppetto’s Secret (2005), and episodes of Rugrats Johnny Bravo, Family Guy, and Betsy’s

2010 • Obituaries Kindergarten Adventures. Bosley’s later film credits include O’Hara’s Wife (1982), Million Dollar Mystery (1987), Wicked Stepmother (1989) starring Bette Davis in her final role, Little Bigfoot 2: The Journey Home (1997), Mothers and Daughters (2002), Returning Mickey Stern (2002), Confession (2005), and Popstar (2005). He made his final film appearance in the 2010 film The BackUp Plan starring Jennifer Lopez.

BOSTON, JOE Television producer Joe Boston died in Torrance, California, on July 14, 2010. He was 74. Boston was born on January 20, 1936. He was a graduate of the University of North Carolina. He began working in television in the late 1960s as an assistant director on episodes of such series as Ironside, Marcus Welby, M.D., Owen Marshall: Counselor at Law, and Columbo. He was also assistant director on the 1969 film Death of a Gunfighter. He worked as a production manager on the series Quincy, The Master, and Dirty Dozen: The Series, and produced episodes of The Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew Mysteries, Sword of Justice, Lobo, B.J. and the Bear, The Master, and The Equalizer. Boston also produced the tele-films A Double Life (1978) and Broken Promise (1981), and was unit production manager for Everybody’s Baby: The Rescue of Jessica McClure (1989), A Mother’s Courage: The Mary Thomas Story (1989), Fourth Story (1991), Child of Darkness, Child of Light (1991), and Lady Against the Odds (1992). He was line producer for the series Erotic Confessions from 1994 to 1996. BOTTCHER, URSULA Circus performer Ursula Bottcher, who was noted for her Polar Bear act in Europe and the United States, died at her home in Dresden, Germany, on March 3, 2010. She was 82. She was born Ursula Blutchen in Dresden on June 6, 1927. She joined the Circus Roland Busch in 1952 where she worked in menial jobs and learned various circus acts. She met and married animal trainer Erich Bottcher in 1955, and was soon training big cats. She took over the brown bear act the following year, and polar bears were added to the mix later in the decade. She became one of the most popular circus acts in East Germany in the 1960s and 1970s, where she was known as the Brilliant Baroness of Bears. She and her bears came to the United States in 1976, where they performed with Ringling Brothers for several years. Divorced from Erich, she was assisted by

Ursula Bottcher (with her polar bears)

Obituaries • 2010

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Manfred Horn in her act until he died after an attack by a Kodiak Bear in 1990. Ursula continued to tour with various circuses in Europe until retiring to Dresden in the late 1990s.

BOURJAILY, VANCE Novelist and playwright Vance Bourjaily died in Greenbrae, California, on August 31, 2010. He was 87. Bourjaily was born in Cleveland, Ohio, on September 17, 1922. He volunteered as an ambulance driver during World War II, and served in the army from 1944 to 1946. His first novel, The End of My Life (1947), borrowed from his wartime experiences, and his next, The Hound of Earth, depicted the United States during the Cold War from the viewpoint of a scientist who had developed the atomic bomb. He also Marjorie Bowman

Vance Bourjaily

wrote tele-plays for various television anthology series in the 1950s including The Philco Television Playhouse, The DuPont Show of the Month, Kraft Theatre, Armstrong Circle Theatre, and The Robert Herridge Theater. He continued his writing career with the books The Violated (1958), Confessions of a Spent Youth (1960), The Unnatural Enemy: Essays on Hunting (1963), The Man Who Knew Kennedy (1967), Brill Among the Ruins (1970), Now Playing at Canterbury (1976), A Game Men Play (1980), The Great Fake Book (1986), and Old Soldier: A Novel (1990). He also taught creative writing at the University of Iowa from 1957 to 1980.

worked frequently with such directors as Alfred Hitchcock and Norman Jewison, died in a Los Angeles hospital on August 2, 2010. He was 100. Boyle was born in Los Angeles on October 10, 1909. He graduated from the University of Southern California’s School of Architecture in 1933, and began working in the art department at Paramount Studios as a sketch artist and assistant designer. He later moved to Universal, where he was art director for the classic horror film The Wolf Man (1941) starring Lon Chaney, Jr., and Hitchcock’s Saboteur (1942). He continued to work on such films as Private Buckaroo (1942), Invisible Agent (1942), Give Out, Sister (1942), Don Winslow of the Navy (1942), Who Done It? (1942), It Comes Up Love (1943), Shadow of a Doubt (1943), White Savage (1943), Good Morning, Judge (1943), Two Tickets to London (1943), Gals, Incorporated (1943), Corvette K-225 (1943), and Flesh and Fantasy (1943). He served in the Army Signal Corps as a combat photographer in Europe during World War II. He resumed his career in Hollywood after his discharge as an art director on such films as Nocturne (1946), They Won’t Believe Me (1947), Ride the Pink Horse (1947), Another Part of the Forest (1948), For the Love of Mary (1948), An Act of Murder (1948), Arctic Manhunt (1949), The Gal Who Took the West (1949), Abandoned (1949), Buccaneer’s Girl (1950), Louisa (1950), Sierra (1950), The Milkman (1950), Mystery Submarine (1950), Mark of the Renegade (1951), Iron Man (1951), The Lady Pays Off (1951), Week-End

BOWMAN, MARJORIE Actress Marjorie Bowman Lambie died of complications from a congenital heart defect in an Aberdeen, Scotland, hospital on March 13, 2010. She was 51. Bowman was born on October 14, 1958. She began training for the stage as a child at the Cheltenham Playhouse, where her mother was a producer. She came to the United States in the 1980s, and performed with the national touring company of Grease. She worked frequently with the San Luis Obispo Little Theatre as an actress and director. Bowman was seen on television in episodes of the series Princesses, The Secret World of Alex Mack, Becker, Bull, Secret Lives of Men, and Living Single. She taught drama at Paso Robles High School in the 2000s. BOYLE, ROBERT F. Oscar-nominated art director and production designer Robert F. Boyle, who

Robert F. Boyle

43 with Father (1951), Bronco Buster (1952), Lost in Alaska (1952), Yankee Buccaneer (1952), Girls in the Night (1953), Gunsmoke (1953), Ma and Pa Kettle on Vacation (1953), Abbott and Costello Go to Mars (1953), the sci-fi classic It Came from Outer Space (1953), East of Sumatra (1953), Ride of Clear of Diablo (1954), Ma and Pa Kettle at Home (1954), Johnny Dark (1954), Chief Crazy Horse (1955), The Private War of Major Benson (1955), Kiss of Fire (1955), Lady Godiva of Coventry (1955), Running Wild (1955), Never Say Goodbye (1956), A Day of Fury (1956), Congo Crossing (1956), Operation Mad Ball (1959), The Brothers Rico (1957), Buchanan Rides Alone (1958), Wild Heritage (1958), and The Crimson Kimono (1959). Boyle also worked in television in the 1950s on episodes of such series as The Web, Casey Jones, The Donna Reed Show, and Alcoa Theatre. He worked again with Hitchcock as production designer for the 1959 thriller North by Northwest, providing the backdrop for the climax on Mount Rushmore. He received an Academy Award nomination for his efforts, and also earned Oscar nods for his work on Gaily, Gaily (1969), Fiddler on the Roof (1971), and The Shootist (1976). Boyle’s other film credits include Cape Fear (1962), The Thrill of It All (1963), Hitchcock’s The Birds (1963) and Marnie (1964), The Reward (1965), Do Not Disturb (1965), The Russians Are Coming the Russians Are Coming (1966), How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (1967), In Cold Blood (1967), Fitzwilly (1967), The Thomas Crown Affair (1968), The Landlord (1970), Portnoy’s Complaint (1972), Mame (1974), Bite the Bullet (1975), W.C. Fields and Me (1976), Leadbelly (1976), The Big Fix (1978), and Winter Kills (1979) which also featured him in a rare onscreen appearance as a desk clerk. He earned an Emmy Award nomination as art director for the 1973 tele-film The Red Pony, and also worked on the television production Incident on a Dark Street (1973). Boyle continued to work as a production designer through the 1980s on such films as Private Benjamin (1980), The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (1982), Lookin’ to Get Out (1982), Table for Five (1983), Staying Alive (1983), Rhinestone (1984), No Small Affair (1984), Explorers (1985), Jumpin’ Jack Flash (1986), Dragnet (1987), and Troop Beverly Hills (1989). Boyle was the subject of the 2000 documentary The Man on Lincoln’s Nose, which showcased his work in North by Northwest. He was given a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Art Director’s Guild in 1997, and received an Honorary Academy Award from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in 2008.

BOYNE, GIL Leading hypnotherapist Gil Boyne, who was an advisor for films and television from the late 1950s including the cult classic The Hypnotic Eye, died at his home in London on May 5, 2010. He was 85. Boyne was technical advisor on the gruesome 1960 horror film The Hypnotic Eye, which was advertised as introducing the “NEW AUDIENCE-PARTICIPATION THRILL HYPNOMAGIC — It makes YOU part of the show!” He also served as an advisor on several television series including The Eleventh Hour and Above and Beyond in the early 1960s. Boyne remained a leading hypnotherapist, frequently lecturing at London’s Hypnotherapy Training Institute, until shortly before his death.

2010 • Obituaries

Gil Boyne

BRADLEY, GRACE Actress Grace Bradley, the widow of William “Hopalong Cassidy” Boyd, who appeared in numerous films in the 1930s and early 1940s, died in Dana Point, California, on her 97th birthday on September 21, 2010. She was 97. Bradley was born in Brooklyn, New York, on September 21, 1913. She trained as a pianist and dancer from an early age, and began appearing on the New York stage while in her teens. She performed on Broadway in the 1930 musical Ballyhoo, and had a small role in the 1932 film Tip Tap Toe (1932). Bradley signed with Paramount and starred in the 1933 film Too Much Harmony with Bing Crosby. She appeared in numerous films over the next decade, often cast as the femme fatale in musicals. Girl Without a Room (1933), The Way to Love (1933), Redhead (1934), The Cat’s-Paw (1934), She Made Her Bed (1934), Come on Marines (1934), Wharf Angel (1934), Six of a Kind (1934), TwoFisted (1935), Old Man Rhythm (1935), Stolen Harmony (1935), The Gilded Lily (1935), Don’t Turn ’Em Loose (1936), Sitting on the Moon (1936), Three Cheers for Love (1936), F-Man (1936), Thirteen Hours by Air (1936), Dangerous Waters (1936), Anything Goes (1936), Rose of the Rancho (1936), Wake Up and Live (1937), It’s All Yours (1937), Roaring Timber (1937), Larceny on the Air (1937), You’re in the Army Now (1937), Romance on the Run (1938), The Big Broadcast of 1938 (1938), The Invisible Killer (1939), The Hard-Boiled Canary (1941), Sign of the Wolf (1941), Two Mugs from Brooklyn (1942), Brooklyn

Grace Bradley

Obituaries • 2010 Orchid (1942), and Taxi, Mister (1943). Bradley met actor William Boyd on a blind date and the two were married three weeks later in June of 1937. Despite a 20-year age difference, their marriage (Boyd’s fifth), proved a success, and Grace abandoned her film career in the early 1940s to travel around the country promoting her husband’s career as a Western hero. Boyd formed his own production company in 1946 after securing the rights to the character of Hopalong Cassidy. Hopalong became one of the first cowboy stars to make the transition to television, with the old films being aired, and Boyd starred in a new series of Cassidy’s episodes for television. Bradley continued to keep Boyd’s memory alive after her husband’s death in September of 1972, and kept a vigilant eye on how Boyd and Hoppy’s image was portrayed throughout her life. She also served as a volunteer at the Laguna Beach hospital where Boyd spent his final days.

BRANCHEAU, DAWN Dawn Brancheau, a veteran trainer at SeaWorld in Orlando, Florida, perished when the killer whale Tillikum grabbed her by her ponytail during a performance and dragged her underwater on February 24, 2010. She was 40. Brancheau reportedly

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Gosta Bredefeldt

the late 1960s including Made in Sweden (1969), Ture Sventon — Privatdetektiv (1972), A Handful of Love (1974), The White Wall (1975), The American Dream (1976), Manrape (1978), Dens Frusna Leoparden (1986), Tryggare kan Ingen Vara… (1993), Mannen pa Balkongen (1993), Sommarmord (1994), The Lake (1999), A Little Christmas Story (1999), Moreno & Tystnaden (2006), Keillers Park (2006), Wellkamm to Verona (2006), and Fire Checking Grandpa (2007). His final film appearance was as Harald Vanger in the 2009 adaptation of Stieg Larsson’s The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.

BREWER, NORMAN Television commentator Norman Brewer died of cancer in Memphis, Tennessee, on December 19, 2010. He was 76. Brewer was born in

Dawn Brancheau

died of drowning and blunt force trauma as the five-ton orca throttled her. Brancheau worked with SeaWorld from the mid–1990s. She had completed a performance with Tillikum in front of an audience when she was pulled back into the tank and thrashed about before her death.

BREDEFELDT, GOSTA Swedish actor Gosta Bredefeldt died in Stockholm, Sweden, on January 9, 2010. He was 74. Bredefeldt was born in Gothenburg, Sweden, on December 19, 1935. He appeared frequently in television productions throughout his career, with roles in Huset vid Landsvagen (1961), Ordet (1962), Daniel Hjort (1962), Greve Oderland (1963), Galenpannan (1961), Fangarnas Natt (1967), Badjavlar (1971), Kunglig Toalette (1986), Don Juan (1987), Fiendens Fiende (1990), Tre Karlekar (1989), Blueprint (1992), Kejsarn av Portugallien (1992), Hassel — De Giriga (1992), Kvallspressen (1992), Fallet Paragon (1994), Den Vite Riddaren (1994), The Tattooed Widow (1994), Freundschaft mit Herz (1995), Ivar Kreuger (1998), Call of Death (1999), and Rederiet (2000). He was featured in numerous films from

Norman Brewer

Memphis on February 4, 1934. He began his career as a radio disc jockey for WMPS-AM in the mid–1950s. He began working for local WMC television in 1958, serving as reporter, anchorman, and news director. His support of striking Memphis sanitation workers during the 1968 labor conflict that culminated in the assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, made him a leading spokesman for equality in the New South. He left WMC in 1975, and subsequently served as leader of the local Downtown Council, editorial writer for the Commercial Appeal newspaper, and head of a public relations agency over the next two decades. He returned to tele-

45 vision in 1995, supplying daily commentary and analysis for local and national new stories at WREG until his death.

BRIQUET, SACHA French character actor Sacha Briquet died in Deauville, France, on July 10, 2010. He was 80. Briquet was born in Neuilly-sur-Seine, France, on April 16, 1930. He began his film career in the early 1950s with roles in Under the Paris Sky (1951), Tower of Nesle (1955), Shadow of the Guillotine (1956), Senechal the Magnificent (1957), Mademoiselle et son Gang (1957), Premier Mai (1958), Miss Pigalle (1958), Archimede, le Clochard (1959), The Indestructible (1959), Witness in the City (1959), The Enigma of the Folies-Bergere (1959), Match Contre la Mort (1959), Thank You, Natercia (1960), The Good Time Girls (1960), The Gigolo (1960), Wise Guys (1961), Amelie or The Time to Love (1961), The Seven Deadly Sins (1962), The Elusive Corporal (1962), Clementine Cherie (1963), Bluebeard (1963), Ophelia (1963), Le Gendarme de Saint-Tropez (1964), Male Companion (1964), Rasputin (1967), Benjamin: The Diary of an Innocent Young Boy (1968), Spray of the Days (1968), Le Concierge (1973), La Gueule de l’Emploi (1974),

Sacha Briquet

Gross Paris (1974), Le Portrait de Dorian Gray (1977), The Paradise of Riches (1978), First Name: Carmen (1983), Ave Maria (1984), La Vengeance du Serpent a Plumes (1984, Hotel du Paradis (1986), Follow My Gaze (1986), L’Auscultation (1989), Eye of the Widow (1989), Un Weekend sur Deux (1990), The Accompanist (1992), Le Roi de Paris (1995), Pedale Douce (1996), Beautiful Mother (1999), Monsieur Naphtali (1999), My Wife’s Name Is Maurice (2002), Les Irreductibles (2006), and Just the Three of Us (2010). He was also seen in television in productions of Mouche (1968), Les Saintes Cheries as Noel Verjus from 1968 to 1970, La Visite de la Vieille Dame (1971), Mozart (1975), La Nuit des Cent Millions (1975), L’Ile aux Enfants as Albert Travling from 1976 to 1982, Les Folies Offenbach (1977), Au Plaisir de Dieu (1977), Arsene Lupin joue et Perd (1980), Le Systeme du Docteur Goudron et du Professeur Plume (1981), Nana (1981), Arcole ou la Terre Promise (1981), Mistral’s Daughter (1984), A Corps et a Cris (1989), If the Shoe Fits (1990), Strangers dans la Nuit (1991), Eugenie Grandet (1994), La Nourrice (2004), and La Reine Sylvie (2006). He also guested in episodes

2010 • Obituaries of The Tiger Brigades, Le Retour d’Arsene Lupin, Avocat d’Office, and Maigret.

BRISCO, JACK Wrestler Jack Brisco, who was NWA heavyweight champion twice in the mid–1970s, died of complications from open heart surgery in Tampa, Florida, on February 1, 2010. He was 68. He was born Freddie Joe Brisco in Blackwell, Oklahoma, on September 21, 1941. He attended Oklahoma State where he was an All-American wrestling champion in 1964 and 1965. He began wrestling professionally in 1965, and traded the NWA Missouri Junior Heavyweight Championship with Don Kent several times later in the year. He was soon wrestling for NWA Tri-State, holding titles in Oklahoma and Arkansas and teaming with Haystacks Calhoun and Gorgeous George, Jr., for tag belts. He moved to Florida in the late 1960s, where he competed with Championship Wrestling, where he was a frequent singles and tag title champ. His younger brother, Gerald, followed him into the wrestling business, and the duo had several runs as tag team champions. Brisco also continued a singles career against such opponents as Dory Funk, Jr., Terry Funk, Dick Murdoch, and Paul Jones. He defeated Harley Race for the NWA World Heavyweight Championship title in July of 1973. He briefly lost the title to Giant Baba in December of 1974, and was NWA champ for another year before losing to Terry Funk in December of 1975. The Brisco and Funk brothers continued their long-standing feud, and Jack also competed in singles and tag matches against Jerry Lawler, Bob Backlund, Ox Baker, Billy Graham, Ivan Koloff, Steve Keirn, Austin Idol, and numerous others to hold a succession of titles in Florida, Georgia, and on the independent circuit. Jack wrestled in Puerto Rico for the World Wrestling Council in the early 1980s, and captured the NWA Mid-Atlantic Heavyweight Championship from Roddy Piper in 1982. He traded the belt several times with Piper and Paul Jones before reteaming with his brother to defeat Ricky Steamboat and Jay Youngblood for the NWA World Tag Titles in June of 1983. The Briscos were instrumental in Vince McMahon’s WWF (now WWE) taking over Georgia Championship Wrestling in 1984. Jack retired from the business the following year, Gerald worked in various capacities with the WWE over the next 25 years. He also operated

Jack Brisco

Obituaries • 2010

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the Brisco Body Shop in Florida for many years. He was inducted into the Professional Wrestling Hall of Fame in 2005 and the WWE Hall of Fame in 2008.

BROCKETTE, GARY Actor turned assistant director Gary “Tex” Brockette died of complications from cancer in Los Angeles on January 1, 2010. He was 62. Brockette was born in Denton, Texas, on September 13, 1947. He began his career as an actor on the New York stage, and was featured in such films as Mark of the Witch (1970), The Last Picture Show (1971), Encounter with the Unknown (1973), The Ice Pirates (1984) as Percy the Robot, The Philadelphia Experiment (1984), Mac and Me (1988), Adjustments (2001), Streets of Legend (2003), Adam and Eve (2005), and Three (2005). He also appeared on television in episodes of Joe Forrester, Charlie’s Angels, and Trapper John, M.D. He worked as a teacher

Roosevelt Brodie

vocalist. Brodie decided he was done with touring, and returned to Philadelphia to work in the garment industry.

Gary Brockette

and director at the American Theatre Arts conservatory in Hollywood. He served as a script supervisor on several films including Mannequin: On the Move (1991), Lost in Africa (1994), and A Month of Sundays (2001), and was writer and associate producer for the 1994 feature Tammy and the T-Rex. Brockette was an assistant director on the films and shorts America So Beautiful (2001), Red (2001), Adjustments (2001), Swatters (2002), While You Were Waiting (2002), Devil’s Knight (2003), Truth and Dare (2003), Streets of Legend (2003), Nursie (2004), Larcen (2004), Adam and Eve (2005), Three (2005), Unbeatable Harold (2006), The Haunting Hour: Don’t Think About It (2007), and Mysterious (2007). He was also director for Shut Up and Kiss Me! (2004) and Deceit (2009).

BRODIE, ROOSEVELT Singer Roosevelt Brodie, who was a founding member of the soul group Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes, died of complications of diabetes on July 13, 2010. He was 75. Brodie began performing with Harold Melvin in the early 1950s with the vocal group The Charlemagnes. They evolved into the group Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes in 1954, with Brodie signing second tenor. He performed on such recordings as “If You Love Me,” “There Is Something in Your Eyes, Eloise,” “Retribution Blues,” and “Wagon Wheels.” He left the group in the early 1970s, shortly before Teddy Pendergrass put them on the charts as lead

BROWN, DAVID Film executive David Brown, who earned Oscar nominations for producing the films Jaws (1975), The Verdict (1982), A Few Good Men (1992), and Chocolat (2000), died at his home in Manhattan, New York, of kidney failure after a long illness on February 1, 2010. He was 93. Brown was born in New York on July 28, 1916. He graduated from Stanford University and Columbia University’s school of journalism, and was hired as night editor and assistant drama critic at Women’s Wear Daily in 1937. Over the next decade he wrote articles for such magazines as The Saturday Evening Post, Harper’s and Collier’s, and was non-fiction editor at Liberty magazine before being drafted into the Army in 1943. He returned to Liberty after the war as fiction editor, rising to the position of editor-and-chief. He subsequently served as managing editor for Cosmopolitan magazine, before joining 20th Century–Fox as head of the story department in 1951. Brown met advertising copywriter Helen Gurley in Los Angeles, and they married in 1959. She became the best-selling author of the novel Sex and the Single Girl in 1962, and revitalized the fortunes of a new Cosmopolitan as editor-and-chief in 1965. Brown was deeply involved in his wife’s endeavor, editing articles and writing cover blurbs for the magazine.

David Brown

47 He also returned to Fox in the early 1960s, where he worked closely with Richard Zanuck on such films as The Sound of Music (1965), Doctor Dolittle (1967), Hello, Dolly! (1969), Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969), and Patton (1970). Brown and Zanuck were terminated by Fox in 1970, but they continued their partnership as film producers, with the schlock horror film Sssssss (1973) and the Blaxploitation feature Willie Dynamite (1974). They produced Steven Spielberg’s first theatrical film, The Sugarland Express (1974), and earned Oscar nominations for Spielberg’s 1975 box-office blockbuster Jaws. Brown and Zanuck also produced the films The Black Windmill (1974), The Girl from Petrovka (1974), The Eiger Sanction (1975), MacArthur (1977), Jaws 2 (1978), The Island (1980), Neighbors (1981), The Verdict (1982), Cocoon (1985), Target (1985), Cocoon: The Return (1988), and Driving Miss Daisy (1989). Brown and Zanuck were given the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in 1991 for their body of work, and received the David O. Selznick Lifetime Achievement Award from the Producers Guild of America in 1993. Brown became a theatrical producer after acquiring the rights to Aaron Sorkin’s play A Few Good Men, which premiered on Broadway in 1989. He also produced the subsequent film adaptation starring Tom Cruise and Jack Nicholson in 1992. Brown produced the 1989 one-man play Tru about author Truman Capote, starring Robert Morse, and the 1990 Broadway comedy The Cemetery Club. He produced Robert Altman’s 1992 film The Player, and the 1993 film adaptation of The Cemetery Club. Brown’s other film credits, many under his Manhattan Project Ltd. banner include Rich in Love (1993), Watch It (1993), Canadian Bacon (1995), The Saint (1997), Kiss the Girls (1997), Deep Impact (1998), Angela’s Ashes (1999), Chocolat (2000), Along Came a Spider (2001), and the 2002 tele-film Framed. He also produced the Broadway musicals Sweet Smell of Success (2002) and Dirty Rotten Scoundrels (2005).

BROWN, HIMAN Pioneer radio producer Himan Brown died in New York on June 4, 2010. He was 99. Brown was born on July 21, 1910, the son of Russian immigrants from the Ukraine. He began working in radio in the late 1920s, reading newspapers with a Yiddish dialect for New York station WEAF. He soon joined Gertrude Berg on the radio for a stint as her husband. He continued to work as a radio actor, and also began producing programs. Brown oversaw over 30,000 radio programs during his eight decade career including The Adventures of the Thin Man, Inner Sanctum, The Affairs of Peter Salem, Bulldog Drummond, Captain Tom’s Log, City Desk, Dick Tracy, Flash Gordon, Grand Central Station, Green Valley, USA, The Gumps, Joyce Jordan, M.D., John’s Other Wife, Marie, the Little French Princess, The NBC Radio Theater, The Private Files of Rex Saunders, Terry and the Pirates, Barrie Craig, Confidential Investigator and many soap operas. He also served as director for episodes of many of the shows he produced. He moved into television in the late 1940s, producing the syndicated series Lights Out, Inner Sanctum, His Honor, Homer Bell, and The Chevy Mystery Show. He also produced sev-

2010 • Obituaries

Himan Brown

eral films with director John Newland including That Night! (1957) and The Violators (1957), and the television production Summer of Decision (1959). His popular series, CBS Radio Mystery Theater, debuted in 1974, and ran seven days a week for nine years. He created the children’s program The General Mills Adventure Theater in 1977, and dramatized biographies of famous Americans for Voice of America. Brown also taught audio drama at Brooklyn College and the School of Visual Arts. He was inducted into Emerson Radio Hall of Fame in 1988, and the Museum of Broadcast Communication’s Radio Hall of Fame in 1995.

BROWN, JACKIE Canadian actress and comedian Jackie Brown died Brampton, Ontario, Canada, on February 21, 2010. She was 44. Brown was born in Brampton on June 18, 1965. She performed on the local stage and was featured in the independent films Snow Cake (2006), The Tracey Fragments (2007), and Blindness

Jackie Brown

(2008). She was also seen in the tele-films Samantha: An American Girl Holiday (2004), The Gathering (2007), Accidental Friendship (2008), and Anne of Green Gables: A New Beginning (2008). Brown was also featured in an episode of The Border.

BROWN, KEN British guitarist Ken Brown, who played several shows with the proto–Beatles group The Quarrymen in 1959, was found dead at his apart-

Obituaries • 2010 ment in Essex, England, on June 14, 2010. He was 70. He had been suffering from emphysema and reports indicate that he may have been dead for five days before his body was found. Brown was born in Enfield, Middlesex, England, in 1940. He was part of the Les Stewart Quartet

Ken Brown (center, with Paul McCartney and John Lennon)

with George Harrison in 1958, and was part of the first teaming of Harrison, John Lennon, and Paul McCartney when they played the Casbah Coffee Club in Liverpool in August of 1959. After a financial disagreement, Brown split with the others and continued to play at the club with The Blackjacks, which included future Beatle drummer Pete Best. Brown’s music career largely ended by the early 1960s, though he later wrote a memoir of his experiences entitled Some Other Guy.

BRUBAKER, ROBERT Veteran character actor Robert Brubaker, who was seen regularly as stagecoach driver Jim Buck in early episodes of Gunsmoke and returned in the recurring role of Floyd the bartender in the series’ later years, died on April 15, 2010. He was 93. Brubaker was born in Robinson, Illinois, on October 9, 1916. He became interested in acting while in high school, and headed to New York in 1935 to work in theater. His first professional role was in a 1936 production of Oh Say Can You Sing, Dance or Act for the Federal Theater. He headed to Hollywood later in the decade,

Robert Brubaker

48 where he continued his studies at the Bards acting school. He spent several years there before becoming a member of the faculty. Brubaker appeared in local theatrical productions and was featured in numerous radio programs. He joined the U.S. Army Air Force at the start of World War II, where he served as an aircraft commander of B-24s. He was discharged in December of 1945, and made his film debut in a small role in 1946’s Blonde Alibi. Brubaker was recalled to duty in 1949 to participate in the Berlin Airlift, and was assigned to the Strategic Air Command during the Korean War. He resumed his acting career after his final discharge in 1954. He played supporting roles in such films as The Court-Martial of Billy Mitchell (1955) as Major Hap Arnold, Pardners (1956), The Girl He Left Behind (1956), Written on the Wind (1956), Battle Hymn (1957), Mister Cory (1957), the 1957 Lon Chaney bio-pic Man of a Thousand Faces as director Jack Conway, My Man Godfrey (1957), The Female Animal (1958), The Gift of Love (1958), The Walking Target (1960), the Disney sci-fi comedy Moon Pilot (1962), Apache Rifles (1964), Mirage (1965), Seconds (1966) with Rock Hudson, 40 Guns to Apache Pass (1967), Airport (1970), and The Bus Is Coming (1971). Brubaker was a familiar face on television from the mid–1950s, appearing in hundreds of episodes of such series as Hallmark Hall of Fame, The Public Defender, I Love Lucy, It’s a Great Life, Noah’s Ark, Sheriff of Cochise, Navy Log, Highway Patrol, Official Detective, The Millionaire, Panic!, Broken Arrow, The Ford Television Theatre, Richard Diamond, Private Detective, Goodyear Theatre, Harbor Command, The Walter Winchell File, Flight, Sally, State Trooper, Tombstone Territory, Dragnet, Tales of Wells Fargo, Decision, The Rough Riders, Steve Canyon, The Thin Man, Frontier Doctor, and Border Patrol. Brubaker was featured in the recurring role of stagecoach driver Jim Buck in the long-running western series Gunsmoke from 1955 to 1962, and co-starred with John Bromfield in U.S. Marshal as Deputy Blake from 1958 to 1959. He returned to Gunsmoke as a guest star in several episodes in the 1960s, and replaced Glenn Strange as bartender at the Long Branch Saloon from 1974 to 1975. His many television credits also include episodes of Whirlybirds, The Loretta Young Show, Tightrope, Phillip Marlowe, Five Fingers, Wanted: Dead or Alive, Men into Space, The Texan, Pony Express, Perry Mason, The Man from Blackhawk, Mr. Lucky, Tate, Bronco, Assignment: Underwater, The Rebel, The Case of the Dangerous Robin, The Deputy, The Untouchables, Two Faces West, The Asphalt Jungle, The Twilight Zone, Hawaiian Eye, The Jack Benny Program, Checkmate, The Detectives Starring Robert Taylor, 87th Precinct, 77 Sunset Strip, Saints and Sinners, Cheyenne, The Wide Country, G.E. True, The Dakotas, The Outer Limits, Kraft Suspense Theatre, The Eleventh Hour, Dr. Kildare, This Is the Life, 12 O’Clock High, The Andy Griffith Show, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., I Spy, Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C., Please Don’t Eat the Daisies, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, The Fugitive, Insight, Daniel Boone, the soap opera Days of Our Lives as John Martin from 1966 to 1971, Tarzan, The Invaders, Bonanza, Lassie, The Virginian, Storefront Lawyers, The F.B.I., The Smith Family, My Three Sons, Marcus Welby, M.D., The Sixth Sense, Search, Kojak, Ironside, Barnaby Jones, Cannon,

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2010 • Obituaries

The Streets of San Francisco, and Quincy. Brubaker also appeared in the tele-films The Brotherhood of the Bell (1970) and A Cry in the Wilderness (1974). He largely retired from acting in the early 1970s, and subsequently worked in sales for Forest Lawn cemetery.

BRYANT, PAMELA Playboy centerfold and actress Pamela Jean Bryant died in Hawaii on December 4, 2010. She was 51. Bryant was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, on February 8, 1959. She first appeared in the pages of Playboy in a “Girls of the Big Ten” pictorial in September of 1977, and returned to become Playboy Playmate of the Month in April of 1978. The buxom blonde soon embarked on an acting career, with roles in such films as H.O.T.S. (1979), the psycho thriller Don’t Slim Bryant

were soon hosting the local television program Duquesne Showtime, and also appeared on ABC’s Jubilee U.S.A. in the early 1950s. The local shows ended a decade later, and Slim subsequently opened a gift and card shop, and taught guitar on the side.

Pamela Bryant

Answer the Phone! (1980), Lovely but Deadly (1981), Separate Ways (1981), Private Lessons (1981), Lunch Wagon (1981), Looker (1981), Rigged (1986), Scorpion (1986), Tigershark (1989), Legal Briefs (1993), Road to Revenge (1993), The Killing Jar (1994), and After Dark: Love and Desire (1995). Bryant was also seen on television in episodes of Fantasy Island, B.J. and the Bear, The Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew Mysteries, Barnaby Jones, The Dukes of Hazzard, Lobo, The Incredible Hulk, The Love Boat, 1st and Ten, T.J. Hooker, Magnum, P.I., She’s the Sheriff, and the tele-film The Return of the Six-Million Dollar Man and the Bionic Woman (1987).

BRYANT, SLIM Country singer and musician Slim Bryant died in Dormont, Pennsylvania, on May 28, 2010. He was 101. He was born Thomas Hoyt Bryant in Atlanta, Georgia, on December 7, 1908. He began playing the guitar while in his teens and joined Clayton McMichen’s band, the Melody Men, in 1931. He wrote the song “Mother, the Queen of My Heart,” which was recorded by Jimmy Rodgers in 1932, and accompanied Rodgers on the guitar for several other recordings. He remained part of McMichen’s newly-named Georgia Wildcats band throughout the 1930s. Bryant took over the band in 1940, relocating to Pittsburgh to perform on the local KDKA morning radio show Farm Hour. The band became known as Slim Bryant and the Wildcats, and they played and recorded numerous songs over the next decade. Bryant’s “Eeny Meeny Dixie Deeny,” became a popular hit on regional charts. He and the band

BURDINE, BRIGITTE Brigitte Burdine, an actress turned video game director, died in a Los Angeles hospital of injuries she received in a hit-and-run accident in Marina del Rey on December 28, 2010. She was 48. Burdine began her career as an actress in the early 1980s, appearing on television in episodes of CHiPs, The New Mike Hammer, and Hill Street Blues. She was also featured in several films including The Killing Game (1988), Trust Me (1989), Fred Olen Ray’s Beverly Hills Vamp (1989), Instant Karma (1990), and Roots of Evil (1992). She worked in dubbing as an ADR (automated dialogue replacement) supervisor for films and television in the 1990s, and was casting voice talent for video games by the end of the decade. Burdine worked on numerous video game productions through the 2000s, often directing the voice talent, for such games as Spider-Man (2000), X2 — Wolverine’s Revenge (2003), SOCOM II: U.S. Navy SEALs (2003), CSI: Crime Scene Investigation — Dark Motives (2004), SOCOM 3: U.S. Navy SEALs (2005), Justice League Heroes: The Flash (2006), Happy Feet (2006), Guitar Hero: On Tour (2008), Blitz: The League 2 (2008) World of Warcraft: Wrath of the Lich King

Bridgette Burdine

Obituaries • 2010

50

(2008), Mortal Kombat vs. DC Universe (2008), ModNation Racers (2010), and the forthcoming Mortal Kombat (2011).

BURGESS, JOHN British character actor John Burgess died in England on November 15, 2010. He was 77. Burgess was born in London on February 2, 1933. He trained at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art and performed in repertory for several years. He abandoned the stage during the 1960s to work in menswear and academia. He returned to the stage in the early 1970s and spent over a decade performing with the Royal Shakespeare Company. He also appeared frequently on British television from the mid–1970s, with roles in such productions as I, Claudius (1976) as one of Julia’s lovers, The Tragedy of Coriolanus (1984), Sakharov (1984), Love’s Labour’s Lost (1985), Cristabel (1988), Murderers Among Us: The Simon Wiesenthal Story (1989), The Green Man (1990), Adam Bede (1991), and The Jazz Detective (1992).

John Burgess

He was featured Dr. Len Crocker in the series Ruth Rendell Mysteries from 1988 to 1992, and was Poppy on Lovejoy from 1991 to 1993. He was also seen as David “Bing” Crosby on Brookside from 1992 to 1998. His other television credits include the series Against the Crowd, Together, From the Top, The Bill, EastEnders as Gerald Ludlow, Boon, Mystery!: Campion, Casualty, 4 Play, Agatha Christie’s Poirot, Grange Hill, Van der Valk, Sam Saturday, The House of Eliott, Holby City, My Family, Doctors, Pulling, and Midsomer Murders. Burgess also appeared in a handful of films during his career including Give My Regards to Broad Street (1984), Miss Firecracker (1989), Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead (1990), The Great Indoors (2000), and The 10th Man (2006).

BURGON, GEOFFREY British composer Geoffrey Burgon, who scored the television productions of Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy and Brideshead Revisited, died in London on September 21, 2010. He was 69. Burgon was born in Hambledon, Hampshire, England, on July 15, 1941. He played the trumpet from an early age, and studied at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama. He subsequently turned to composing, and achieved critical success with his 1976 Requiem at the Three Choirs Festival. Burgon composed frequently for television from the early 1970s, scoring several episodes of the

Geoffrey Burgon

cult sci-fi series Doctor Who and productions of Treasure of Abbot Thomas (1974), As You Like It (1978), Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy (1979), Testament of Youth (1979), Brideshead Revisited (1981), How Many Miles to Babylon? (1982), Objects of Affection (1982), Bewitched (1983), Z for Zachariah (1984), The Death of a Heart (1985), Bleak House (1985), The Happy Valley (1987), The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe (1988), Prince Caspian and the Voyage of the Dawn Treader (1989), The Silver Chair (1990), Robin Hood (1991), Martin Chuzzlewit (1994), Turning World (1996), Silent Witness (1996), When Trumpets Fade (1998), Cider and Rosie (1998), Longitude (2000), Ghost Stories for Christmas (2000), The Forsyte Saga (2002), and Island at War (2004). He also scored several films including the 1979 Monty Python comedy Life of Brian, The Dogs of War (1980), and Turtle Diary (1985).

BURKE, SOLOMON Soul singer Solomon Burke died suddenly at Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport en route to a performance after landing from a flight out of Los Angeles on October 10, 2010. He was 70. Burke was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on March 21, 1940. His grandmother was a preacher and founder of Solomon’s Temple: The House of God for All People in 1924, and his mother was also a preacher with the church. Solomon was pronounced a bishop with the church at his birth and began preaching sermons by the age of 7. He was frequently heard preaching and singing

Solomon Burke

51 on gospel radio. He began recording gospel music tracks for Apollo in the mid–1950s, but soon began expanding his repertoire to blues and soul. He recorded such hits as “Cry to Me” (1962), “You Can Make It If You Try” (1963), and “Everybody Needs Somebody to Love” (1964). He was noted for his flamboyant style, which became more pronounced in the mid–1960s after a radio DJ dubbed him the King of Rock and Soul. Burke began performing in regal attire, with crown, robe and scepter, and often sat in a golden throne while on stage. His career was revived in the 1980s when his song “Everybody Needs Somebody to Love” was featured in the film The Blues Brothers (1980), and “Cry to Me” was featured in Dirty Dancing (1987). Burke was also featured onscreen in several films including The Big Easy (1986), Body & Soul (1988), The Little Death (1996), and Time of Fear (2002). He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2001, and released the album Don’t Give Up on Me the following year.

BURKS, WILLIS, II Character actor Willis Burks, II, died in Los Angeles on November 21, 2010. He was 75. Burks was born in Birmingham, Alabama, on October 25, 1935. He began appearing in films and television in the early 1990s. He was featured in episodes of

Willis Burks, II

Law & Order, NYPD Blue, New York Undercover, Law & Order: Criminal Intent, ER, Everybody Hates Chris, Without a Trace, and CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. Burks was also seen in the films Equinox (1992), Sunday (1997), Fall (1997), Everything’s Jake (2000), Trigger Happy (2001), Gift for the Living (2005), Sarang Song (2006), and King of California (2007).

BURNET, SUSAN British actress Susan Burnet died in London on January 17, 2010. She was 71. Burnet was born in Salisbury, Southern Rhodesia (now Harare, Zimbabwe), on November 25, 1938. She went to London in her teens where she trained as an actress. She made her West End debut in the play Flowering Cherry in the late 1950s, where she met and soon married her husband, actor Andrew Ray. She appeared in a handful of films over the next several years including Expresso Bongo (1959), Skywatch (1960), This Is My Street (1964), and The Girl-Getters (1964). She also appeared on television in productions of The Younger Generation (1959),

2010 • Obituaries

Susan Burnet

Black Limelight (1962), Stamboul Train (1962), and The Offence (1964). Her other television credits include episodes of Maigret, The Human Jungle, and Public Eye. She retired from acting in the mid–1960s after the birth of her first child. She and Ray separated in the 1970s but never divorced, and he died in 2003.

BURROUGHS, JACKIE Canadian actress Jackie Burroughs died of complications from stomach cancer at her home in Toronto, Canada, on September 22, 2010. She was 71. Burroughs was born in Lancashire, England, on February 2, 1939. She moved to Canada with her family in the early 1950s, and graduated from the University of Toronto. She was married to Zal Yanovsky, the co-founder of the band The Lovin’ Spoonful, and lived with him in New York until their divorce in 1968. She subsequently returned to Canada where she became a popular performer on stage, film, and television. Her numerous film credits include 125 Rooms of Comfort (1974), Monkeys in the Attic (1974), Running Time (1974), My Pleasure Is My Business (1975), Twelve and a Half Cents (1977), The Kidnapping of the President (1980), the animated anthology film Heavy Metal (1981), The Intruder (1981), The Grey Fox (1982), the off-beat science fiction film Overdrawn at the Memory Bank (1983) as Emmaline Ozmondo Fingal in the Mystery Science 3000 favorite, Gentle Sinners (1983), Chautaqua Girl (1983), The Wars (1983), the 1983 adaptation of Stephen King’s

Jackie Burroughs

Obituaries • 2010 The Dead Zone as Vera Smith, All the Years (1984), The Surrogate (1984), The Care Bears Movie (1985) as the voice of the Spirit, A Judgment in Stone (1986), and John and the Missus (1987). Burroughs produced, directed, scripted, and starred in the 1987 film A Winter Tan, adapted from Maryse Holder’s book Give Sorrow Words. Her other film credits include The Midday Sun (1989), Food of the Gods II (1989), Whispers (1990), Elizabeth Smart: On the Side of the Angels (1991), Careful (1992), Bleeders (1997), Last Night (1998), Have Mercy (1999), Washed Up (2000), Lost and Delirious (2001), On Their Knees (2001), Night’s Noontime (2002), A Guy Thing (2003), the 2003 remake of Willard as Crispin Glover’s mother, Mrs. Stiles, Rhinoceros Eyes (2003), The Republic of Love (2003), Cavedweller (2004), National Lampoon’s Going the Distance (2004), Re-Generation (2004), Bailey’s Billion$ (2005), Fever Pitch (2005), King’s Ransom (2005), Leo (2005), The Sentinel (2006), First Snow (2006), Deck the Halls (2006), Into the Labyrinth (2008), and Small Town Murder Songs (2010). She was also featured in the tele-films The Undergrads (1985), Seduced (1985), Evergreen (1985), Anne of Green Gables (1985) as Mrs. Amelia Evans, Taking Care of Terrific (1987), I Vant to be Alone (1988), Carnival of Shadows (1989), Final Notice (1989), Night Owl (1993), Elvis Meets Nixon (1997), Platinum (1997), Evidence of Blood (1998), Happy Christmas, Miss King (1998), Cover Me (1999), Angela Anaconda (1999), The Pilot’s Wife (2002), The Winning Season (2004), Snow (2004), Martha Behind Bars (2005), and Skip Tracer (2008). She starred as Hetty King in the series Avonlea from 1990 to 1996, and was Mona “Mother Mucca” Ramsey in Armistead Mapin’s More Tales from the City and Further Tales of the City in the late 1990s. Her other television credits include episodes of Wojeck, The Psychiatrist, Chairman of the Board, the animated Star Wars spin-off The All New Ewoks as the voice of Morag and Tulgah Witch, the new Twilight Zone, Lonesome Dove: The Outlaw Years, Due South, Heritage Minute, Smallville, Just Cause, The Industry, Mystery Ink, Dead Like Me, The Eleventh Hour, Walter Ego, Slings and Arrows, and Sophie.

BURTON, PHILIP, JR. Documentary filmmaker Philip Burton, Jr., died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease in Santa Barbara, California, on De-

Philip Burton, Jr.

52 cember 24, 2010. He was 76. Burton was born in Manhattan on December 9, 1934. He earned a degree in political science from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1956, and returned to New York to work in documentary filmmaking several years later. He worked on Richard Drew’s 1963 documentary of desegregation in Alabama, Crisis: Behind a Presidential Commitment, in 1963. He earned an Emmy Award for his work on the National Educational Television program Black Journal in 1970. He also created the Emmy-winning CBS documentary Blacks in America: With All Deliberate Speed in 1979, and profiled exiled journalist Jacobo Timerman in PBS’s 1984 documentary Timerman: The News from Argentina. He also directed a series of reports on American health care for NBC’s C. Everett Koop, M.D. in 1991.

BURTON, TOM Wrestler Tom Burton, who was best known for teaming with Tony Anthony as the Dirty White Boys in the early 1990s, died on March 29, 2010. He was 46. He made his ring debut in the mid– 1980s, and competed in several televised matches on WWF’s Superstars of Wrestling show later in the decade.

Tom Burton

He also wrestled on the independent circuit before settling in Memphis in 1990. He teamed with Tony Anthony as the Dirty White Boys to capture the USWA tag titles several times in the early 1990s. He subsequently teamed with Mike Davis as the Dirty Davis Brothers in Global Wrestling where they frequently feuded with Terry Garvin, Tug Taylor, and Chaz. He spent the next few years competing in Japan with UWF International. He also wrestled several bouts in world Championship Wrestling (WCW) in the mid–1990s, before retiring from the ring.

BUSCHHOFF, WALTER German actor Walter Buschhoff died in Munich, Germany, on December 7, 2010. He was 87. Buschhoff was born in Worms, Germany, on July 8, 1923. He began his career on stage, appearing in productions in Munich and Berlin. He appeared in numerous films from the mid–1950s including IA in Oberbayern (1956), Vater, Unser Bestes Stuck (1957), Zwei Beyern in Harem (1957), Duel in the Forest (1958), Two Times Adam, One Times Eve (1959), The Miracle of Father Malachia (1961), Life Begins at Eight (1962), Dicke Luft (1962), Die Endlose Nacht (1963), The Fountain of

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2010 • Obituaries

Love (1965), The House in Karp Lane (1965), Daisy Chain (1965), Adrian, der Tulpendieb (1966), Once Upon a Greek (1966), The Brazen Women of Balzac (1969), Help, I Love Twins (1969), Swedish Wife Exchange Club (1969), Der Pfarrer of St. Pauli (1970), Das Studenhotel von St. Pauli (1970), David and the Ice Age (1971), Bloody Friday (1972), The Stuff That Dreams Are Made Of (1972), Vortex (1976), The Education in Love of Valentin (1976), Das Schweigen im Walde (1976), Didi auf Vollen Touren (1986), Non Stop Trouble with the Experts (1988), Plaze Real (1988), Wer Zweimal Lugt (1993), and Rudy, the Racing Pig (1995).

Frances Buss

Walter Buschhoff

Buschhoff also appeared frequently on German television, appearing in productions of Der Versteinerte Wald (1957), Der Dank der Unterwelt (1958), Johnny Belinda (1961), Schritte in der Nacht (1961), Affare Blum (1962), Reporter (1963), Der Grotte (1963), Portrat eines Helden (1966), Zuchthaus (1967), Graf Oderland (1968), Der Grosse Projekt (1971), Der Lift (1972), Das Geheimnis der Mary Celeste (1972), Les Nouvelles Aventures de Vidocq as the Doctor, The Golden Years —The Bitter Years (1984), Peter the Great (1986), and Babes in Toyland (1986). His other television credits include episodes of Der Kommissar, Ein Fall fur Stein, Ein Mann will Nach Oben, Orient-Express, Liebt diese Erde as Alberti, Tatort, Eurocops, A Case for Two, Regina auf den Stufen, SOKO 5113, Zwei Halbe sind noch Lange kein Ganzes as Bromberg, Hessische Geschichten, and Stubbe — Von Fall zu Fall. Buschhoff starred as Vinzenz Bieler in the television series Forsthaus Falkenau from 1989 to 2006.

BUSS, FRANCES Frances Buss Buch, a pioneering female television director who began her career at CBS in 1941, died in a rest home near Hendersonville, North Carolina, on January 19, 2010. She was 92. Buss was born on June 3, 1917, and was raised in St. Louis, Missouri. She attended Washington University, and performed on the New York stage in the late 1930s. She was hired by CBS as a receptionist in 1941, shortly after commercial television was licensed in the United States by the Federal Communications Commission. She was soon appearing in front of the camera for various programs, including a stint as scorekeeper for the first television game show, The CBS Television Quiz. Buss was also involved in the network’s coverage of the bombing of Pearl Har-

bor. She worked with the U.S. Navy, producing and directing training films in Florida during World War II. She rejoined CBS in 1944 and was soon directing programs ranging from musicals to Brooklyn Dodgers games. She also helmed the first television talk show, Mike and Buff, which starred newsman Mike Wallace and his then-wife, Buff Cobb, from 1951 to 1953. She also worked on such early series as Missus Goes A-Shopping (1944), It’s a Gift (1946), Sorry, Wrong Number (1946), King’s Party Line (1946), Hold It Please (1949), Winner Take All (1951), The Whistling Wizard (1951), and Wheel of Fortune (1952). Buss married Bill Buch in 1949 and resigned from CBS to raise a family in 1954. She and her husband retired to Hendersonville in 1985, where they remained until Buch’s death in 1998.

BYRD, CARUTH C. Film producer Caruth C. Byrd died at his home in Van, Texas, on December 16, 2010. He was 69. Byrd was born in Dallas, Texas, on March 25, 1941. He produced and appeared in small roles in the films Comanche Crossing (1968), Santee (1973), and Murph the Surf (1975). He was also featured

Caruth C. Byrd

in an episode of the television series Black Sheep Squadron in 1977, and was a producer for the films Sudden Death and The Great Monkey Rip-Off (1979). He produced, directed, and scripted the 1981 film Hollywood High Part II, and produced the 1982 horror film Trick or Treats (1982).

Obituaries • 2010 CABLE, STUART Welsh rock drummer Stuart Cable, who performed with The Stereophonics from the mid–1990s, choked to death at his home in Llwydcoed, Wales, after an evening of drinking on June 7, 2010. He was 40. Cable was born in Cwmaman, Wales, on May 19, 1970. He formed a band with childhood friends Kelly Jones and Richard Jones in the early 1990s called Tragic Love Company, which soon evolved into The Stereo-

54 March 2, 1981. He began training as a wrestler with Shawn Michaels in Texas in the late 1990s, and made his ring debut as Lance Cade in Japan’s FMW promotion in 1999. He spent several years wrestling in the WWE developmental territories in Memphis and Ohio Valley Wrestling (OVW), and made his WWE debut with RAW as Garrison Cade, teaming with Mark Jindrak, in 2003. He spent a year with the OVW recuperating from a knee injury before returning to the WWE as Lance Cade. He teamed with Trevor Murdoch to hold the WWE World Tag Team Title several times. He also partnered with Chris Jericho before leaving the company in late 2008.

CALLAHAN, JOHN Cartoonist John Callahan, a quadriplegic who was known for his black humor cartoons depicting the plight of the handicapped, died of complications from his condition in a Portland, Oregon, hospital on July 24, 2010. He was 59. Callahan was born on February 5, 1951, and was adopted from a Portland orphanage by David and Mary Callahan as an infant. He became a quadriplegic as the result of a spinal cord injury in an automobile accident in 1972, when he was a Stuart Cable

phonics. They were signed by Richard Branson’s V2 record company in 1996 and released the popular albums Word Gets Around (1997), Performance and Cocktails (1999), Just Enough Education to Perform (2001), and You Gotta Go There to Come Back (2003). Cable became the band’s most recognized member, with his unkempt hair and out-going demeanor, and began hosting his own television show, Cable TV, for BBC Wales in 2002. He was replaced in the Stereophonics by Javier Weyler on drums in September of 2003. He subsequently hosted several local radio programs, and headlined the BBC Radio Wales show Saturday Night Cable from Spring of 2010.

CADE, LANCE Professional wrestler Lance McNaught, who was best known in the ring as WWE tag team champ Lance Cade, died of an accidental drug overdose in San Antonio, Texas, on August 13, 2010. He was 29. McNaught was born in Carroll, Iowa, on

Lance Cade

John Callahan

passenger in a car driven by a fellow bar-hopper. Callahan dealt with his paralysis and alcoholism and began drawing cartoons as a form of therapy. With a pen clutched between his hands, his simple drawings broke barriers, poking fun at those with physical disabilities. He created a semi-autobiographical work Will the Real John Callahan Please Stand Up?, and his cartoons served as the basis for the Nickelodeon cartoon Pelswick and the Canadian-Australian co-production Quads.

CAMACHO, CORINNE Actress Corinne Camacho, who appeared frequently on television in the 1970s and 1980s, died of cancer in Beaverton, Oregon, on September 15, 2010. She was 68. She was born Gloria Angelina Katharina Alletto in New Jersey on March 2, 1942, and moved with her family to Los Angeles as a child. She began her career as a model in the 1960s and made her television debut in an episode of Wild Wild West in 1967. She was soon appearing in episodes of Bewitched, I Dream of Jeannie, Mayberry R.F.D., The Flying Nun, Love, American Style, Sarge, The F.B.I., Mannix, The Sixth Sense, Banyon, Jigsaw, The

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Rookies, Barnaby Jones, The Girl with Something Extra, M*A*S*H, Griff, The New Temperatures Rising Show, Amy Prentiss, and Cannon. Camacho starred as Dr. Jeanne Bartlett in the series Medical Center from 1969 to 1972. She was also seen in the 1969 detective film Marlowe with James Garner, and the tele-films The Mask of Sheba (1970), Gidget Gets Married (1972), What Are Best Friends For? (1973), Planet Earth (1974), and The Specialists (1975). She continued her acting career over the

Carole Ann Campbell

Corinne Camacho

next decade under the name Corinne Michaels, guesting in episodes of Kolchak: The Night Stalker, S.W.A.T., City of Angels, The Bionic Woman, The Six Million Dollar Man, Wonder Woman, The Rockford Files, Charlie’s Angels, The Waltons, Magnum, P.I., Lou Grant, Little House on the Prairie, Trapper John, M.D., Flamingo Road, Capitol, Lottery!, Airwolf, T.J. Hooker, Cagney & Lacey, and Hunter. She appeared as Joanne Barnes in the daytime soap opera Days of Our Lives from 1979 to 1980, and was seen in the tele-films Killing Stone (1978) and Consenting Adult (1985). She was also featured in the films Born Again (1978) and Laboratory (1980), and had a small role in 1997’s Lewis & Clark & George. Camacho moved to New Mexico to run a hospice center in the mid–1990s, and became a life coach in Oregon in 2001. She also composed and sang children’s music, releasing the album Love Notes & Lullabies in 2006.

CAMPBELL, CAROLE ANN Former child actress Carole Ann Campbell died of cancer in Laguna Woods, California, on March 6, 2010. She was 65. Campbell was born in Sherman Oaks, California, on March 27, 1944. She began her acting career in the mid–1950s and was best known for her role as Iola Morton, the wannabe girlfriend of Joe Hardy, played by Tommy Kirk, in The Hardy Boys segments of The Mickey Mouse Club. She also appeared in small roles in the films I’ll Cry Tomorrow (1955) and Bernardine (1957) and in television episodes of Willy and 26 Men. She abandoned her acting career in 1958 and left show business in the early 1960s after recording three singles for Kangaroo Records. CAMPBELL-BADIANE, JAMES Senegalese actor James Campbell-Badiane died in Dakar, Senegal, on April 7, 2010. He was 78. He was born in Senegal on

August 5, 1931. He began appearing in films in the mid–1950s, with such credits as Heroes and Sinners (1955), Dangerous Love Affairs (1959), One Does Not Bury Sunday (1960), Jack of Spades (1960), Please, Not Now! (1961), The Big Gamble (1961), The Deadly Decoy (1962), Play Time (1967), Cry of the Cormoran (1970), Boubou Cravate (1972), Don Juan (Or If Don Juan Were a Woman) (1973), La Grande Bouffe (1973), The Passenger (1975), Ashakara (1991), Karim and Sala (1991), Simeon (1992), Pressions (1995), Watani, un Monde sans Mal (1998), Life on Earth (1998), Abdel a Rendez-vous (2000), The Price of Forgiveness (2001), The Pleasure Is All Mine (2004), Un Parfum de Caraibes (2004), Le Sifflet (2005), and Ahmed (2006).

James Campbell-Badiane

CANNELL, STEPHEN J. Television writer and producer Stephen J. Cannell, who co-created such hit shows as The Rockford Files and The A-Team, died of complications from melanoma at his home in Pasadena, California, on September 30, 2010. He was 69. Cannell was born in Los Angeles, California, on February 5, 1941. He graduated from the University of Oregon in 1964 and worked in his father’s furniture store for several years. He made his first television script sale for Universal’s It Takes a Thief series in 1968, and was soon writing episodes of such series as Ironside, The D.A., and Columbo. He served as story editor for the police series Adam-12 from 1971 to 1972. Over the next four decades he was a creator

Obituaries • 2010 of nearly 40 television series and formed his own production company in the late 1970s. The many series Cannell created, wrote and produced include Chase, Toma, Switch, City of Angels, Black Sheep Squadron, Baretta, The Duke, The Rockford Files, Stone, Richie Brockelman, Private Eye, Tenspeed and Brown Shoe, The Quest, The Greatest American Hero, The Rousters, Hunter, The New Mike Hammer, Hardcastle and McCormick, Riptide, The ATeam, Stingray, The Last Precinct, J.J. Starbuck, Sonny Spoon, Unsub, Booker, Wiseguy, Broken Badges, Disney Presents the 100 Lives of Black Jack Savage, 21 Jump Street, Street Justice, Palace Guard, Traps, The Hat Squad, Cobra, Missing Persons, Marker, The Commish, Renegade, Two, Silk Stalkings, and Profit. He was also writer or producer for the tele-films The November Plan (1976), Scott Free (1976), Dr. Scorpion (1978), The Gypsy Warriors (1978), The Jordan Chance (1978), The Chinese Typewriter (1979), Stone (1979), The Night Rider (1979), Nightside (1980), Midnight Offerings (1981), Brothers-in-Law (1985), The Great Pretender (1991), The Belles of Bleeker Street (1991), Greyhounds (1994), Jake Lassiter: Justice on the Bayou (1995), The Rockford Files: A Blessing in Disguise (1995), A Child Is Missing (1995), The Rockford Files: Friends and Foul Play (1996), Them (1996), Hawaii-Five O (1997), The Rockford Files: If It Bleeds … It Leads (1999), Hunter: Return to Justice (2002), and Hunter: Back in Force (2003). Cannell also produced the films Bad Boy (2002) and The Poker House (2008), and was producer and sometimes writer for the horror films Dead Above Ground (2002), It Waits (2005), Demon Hunter (2005), The Tooth Fairy (2006), The Garden (2006), and Left in Darkness (2006). Cannell made occasional appearances onscreen, with roles in the films Identity Crisis (1989), Posse (1993), The Contract (2002), Dead Above Ground (2002), and Half Past Dead (2002). He was featured in the regular role of Lt. Donald “Dutch” Dixon in his Renegade action series with Lorenzo Lamas from 1992 to 1997, and appeared in episodes of Tenspeed and Brown Shoe, Magnum, P.I., Santa Barbara, Silk Stalkings, V.I.P., Diagnosis Murder in the recurring role of Jackson Burley, and Pacific Blue. He also hosted the 1995 syndicated documentary series U.S. Customs Classified. He was also seen in the tele-films Charley Hannah (1986), CHiPs ’99 (1998), Threshold (2003), and the schlocktastic 2007 Sci-Fi Channel offering Ice Spiders. He also penned over

Stephen J. Cannell

56 a dozen novels, many of which featured the character of LAPD detective Shane Scully. Cannell appeared as himself as one of Nathan Filion’s poker buddies, along with several other leading crime novelists, in episodes of the 2009 mystery series Castle. He was featured in the 2009 documentary Dislecksia: The Movie, where he discussed how his struggle with dyslexia affected his career as a writer. He also served as a producer and creative consultant for the 2010 feature film adaptation of his series The A-Team.

CAPALBO, CARMEN Theatrical director and producer Carmen Capalbo, who guided a revival of The Threepenny Opera for a major Off-Broadway success in the mid–1950s, died of emphysema in Manhattan on March 14, 2010. He was 84. Capalbo was born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, on November 1, 1925. He began performing in local productions on stage and radio from

Carmen Capalbo

his youth. He served with distinction in the Army during World War II, and began pursuing a career in theater in New York in the mid–1940s. He co-produced several plays in New York, and was a story editor for the CBS drama series Studio One in the early 1950s. He teamed with Stanley Chase to stage a revival of Kurt Weill’s Threepenny Opera at the Theater de Lys in 1954, starring Weill’s widow, Lotte Lenya. Capalbo directed the musical to rave reviews, and it became one of the first Off-Broadway productions to receive a special Tony Award in 1956. Capalbo also helmed the Broadway productions The Potting Shed (1957), A Moon for the Misbegotten (1957), William Saroyan’s The Cave Dwellers (1957), and Seidman and Son (1962). His production of the Bertold Brecht–Kurt Weill opera The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahogonny proved a disaster in 1970. Subsequent efforts to revive Cole Porter’s Nymph Errant and direct a musical adaptation of Chaim Potok’s The Chosen also proved unsuccessful.

CAPRI, AHNA Actress Ahna Capri died on August 19, 2010, in a Los Angeles hospital of injuries she received when her car was struck by a truck ten days earlier. She was 66. She was born Anna Marie Nanasi in Budapest, Hungary, on July 6, 1944. She came to the United States in the 1950s and began her film career as a child. She had small roles in such films as The Oppo-

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site Sex (1956), Outlaw’s Son (1957), and The Remarkable Mr. Pennypacker (1959). She was also featured frequently on television in such series as The Walter Winchell File, The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin, Telephone Time, Father Knows Best, The Danny Thomas Show, Sugarfoot, The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show, Circus Boy, Wanted: Dead or Alive, Trackdown, Buckskin, Cheyenne, Maverick, Bronco, 77 Sunset Strip, The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis, The Jack Benny Program, and Leave It to Beaver. She was featured as Mary Rose in the short-lived sit-com Room for One More starring Andrew Duggan in 1962. The buxom blonde soon graduated to more mature

Captain Beef heart

Ahna Capri

roles in the films Critic’s Choice (1963), The Girls in the Beach (1965), Target: Harry (1969), and Darker Than Amber (1970). She also continued to appear on television in episodes of Branded, Laredo, I Spy, 12 O’Clock High, The Felony Squad, The Monroes, The Wild Wild West, The Iron Horse, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., The Invaders, The Guns of Will Sonnett, Run for Your Life, The Name of the Game, The Outsiders, and Adam-12. She continued her film and television career through the 1970s with roles in such films as the cult horror The Brotherhood of Satan (1971), Piranha, Piranha! (1972) with William Smith, Payday (1973), the Bruce Lee kung fu classic Enter the Dragon (1973) as Mr. Hans’ secretary Tania, The Specialist (1975), and The Bingo Long Traveling All-Stars and Motor Kings (1976). She also starred in the tele-films Double Jeopardy (1970), Company of Killers (1970), and Nowhere to Run (1978). Capri’s other television credits include episodes of To Rome with Love, It Takes a Thief, The F.B.I., Ironside, Dan August, The Smith Family, O’Hara, U.S. Treasury, Mannix, Banacek, Banyon, Love, American Style, The Mod Squad, Search, Cannon, Police Story, Kojak, Matt Helm, Baretta, Man from Atlantis, and Mrs. Columbo. Capri retired from the screen in the late 1970s.

CAPTAIN BEEFHEART Don Van Vliet, who created the artistic persona of Captain Beefheart for his music career with the Magic Band from the late 1960s through the early 1980s, died after a long battle with multiple sclerosis on December 7, 2010. He was 69. He was born Don Glen Vliet in Glendale, California on January 15, 1941. He was a friend of fellow music iconoclast

Frank Zappa from high school. He originated Captain Beefheart in 1964 and formed the original Magic Band the following year. They recorded their first album, Safe as Milk, in 1967. Van Vliet subsequently signed with Zappa’s Straight Records label to release the 1969 album Trout Mask Replica. The recordings were a surreal blend of free style jazz and blues, psychedelia, and experimental rock, with Van Vliet on vocals, harmonica, and saxophone. The original Magic Band left in 1974 over a contract dispute, and after a brief solo career, Beefheart resurrected a new Magic Band for the albums Shiny Beast (Bat Chain Puller) (1978), Doc at the Radar Station (1980), and Ice Cream for Crow (1982). He abandoned music to become a sculptor and artist in the early 1980s. He was featured in Anton Corbijn’s short documentary Some Yo Yo Stuff in 1993.

CARMICHAEL, IAN British comedy actor Ian Carmichael actor died at his home in the Esk Valley on the North Yorkshire Moors, England, on February 5, 2010. He was 89. Carmichael was born in KnigstonUpon-Hull, East Riding, Yorkshire, on June 19, 1920. He trained at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, and made his stage debut in 1930 as a mute robot in a production of RUR. He continued to perform on stage in the early 1940s, until his career was interrupted by World War II. He served as an officer with the Royal Armored Corps throughout the war and returned to the stage in

Ian Carmichael

Obituaries • 2010 1947. He became a popular performer in comedy plays and music hall revues. Carmichael made his film debut in a small role in 1948’s Bond Street and continued to appear on stage, film, and television over the next 60 years. He was featured in such films as Trottie True (1949), Dear Mr. Prohack (1949), Time, Gentlemen, Please! (1952), Ghost Ship (1952), Miss Robin Hood (1952), Meet Mr. Lucifer (1953), Betrayed (1954), The Colditz Story (1955), Simon and Laura (1955) reprising his stage role as David Prentice, Storm Over the Nile (1955), Private’s Progress (1956) and the sequel I’m All Right Jack (1959) as Stanley Windrush, Lucky Jim (1957), Brothers in Law (1957), Happy Is the Bride (1958), The Big Money (1958), Left Right and Centre (1959), Light Up the Sky! (1960), School for Scoundrels (1960), Double Bunk (1961), The Amorous Mr. Prawn (1962), Heavens Above! (1963) with Peter Sellers, Hide and Seek (1964), Case of the 44’s (1965), Smashing Time (1967), The Magnificent Seven Deadly Sins (1971), From Beyond the Grave (1973), The Lady Vanishes (1979), and Diamond Skulls (1989). He appeared frequently on television from the mid–1950s, with roles in such series as Here and Now, BBC SundayNight Theatre, ITV Play of the Week, Compact, Armchair Theatre, Thursday Theatre, and Theatre 625. He starred as jovial idiot Bertie Wooster in the television adaptation of P.G. Wodehouse’s Jeeves stories, The World of Wooster, from 1965 to 1967, with Dennis Price as his multi-talented valet. He was also featured in episode of The Root of All Evil?, Play for Today, and Father Dear Father, and was Peter Lamb in the series Bachelor Father from 1970 to 1971. He starred as bon vivant sleuth Lord Peter Wimsey in a series of mini-series featuring Dorothy L. Sayers’ detective, including Clouds of Witness (1972), The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club (1973), Murder Must Advertise (1973), The Nine Tailors (1974), and Five Red Herrings (1975). Carmichael was also seen in the television productions Three More Men in a Boat (1983), A Day in Summer (1989), Obituaries (1990), The Great Kandinsky (1995), and Wives and Daughters (1999). He narrated the animated series The Wind in the Willows from 1984 to 1988, and Oh! Mr. Toad in 1990. He also appeared in the series All for Love, The Mind of David Bergalis, Under the Hammer, Bramwell, and Heartbeat. He starred as Sir James Menzies in Strahthblair from 1992 to 1993, and was T.J. Middleditch in The Royal from 2003 to 2009. His autobiography, Will the Real Ian Carmichael?…, was published in 1979.

CARO, ISABELLE French model Isabelle Caro, who became best known for her emaciated appearance in a 2007 ad campaign against anorexia, died of acute respiratory disease in a hospital on November 17, 2010. She was 28. Caro was born in Marseille, France, on September 12, 1982. She studied acting and aspired to be a model from an early age. She developed the eating disorder anorexia nervosa when she was 13, and while standing 5’5,” she weighed less than 60 pounds while in her teens. Italian photographer Oliviero Toscani’s 2007 ad campaign promoting “No Anorexia,” featured a nude Caro in billboard and print ads. She wrote the 2008 book The Little Girl Who Didn’t Want to Get Fat, and was featured on the television reality series Supersize vs Superskinny

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Isabelle Caro

(2008) and Jessica Simpson’s The Price of Beauty (2010). She also appeared in a small role in the 2010 film The Extraordinary Adventures of Adele Blanc-Sec.

CARPENTIER, EDOUARD French-Canadian wrestler Edouard Carpentier, who was noted for his acrobatic style, died of a heart attack at his home in Montreal, Canada, on October 30, 2010. He was 84. He was born Edouard Weiczorkiewicz in Roanne, France, on July 17, 1926. He trained as a gymnast in his youth and began wrestling in the mid–1950s. He took the name Carpentier when he began his ring career in Montreal in 1956. He was a dynamic and popular performer known as the Flying Frenchman, who feuded with such ring villains as Killer Kowalski and Mad Dog Vachon. He captured the National Wrestling Alliance (NWA) World Heavyweight Championship in a match against Lou Thesz in June of 1957 in a disputed decision. Carpentier was only recognized by some promotions as champ, which led to a schism in the NWA and the creation of the American Wrestling Association (AWA). He was proclaimed the first champion of the Omaha AWA title, and held the belt until a loss to Verne Gagne in August of 1958. He held numerous other single and tag titles in the United States and Canada during his career, frequently teaming with Bobo Brazil, Antonino Rocca, and Argentine Apollo. He retired from the ring in the early 1980s and continued to train younger wrestlers. He also

Edouard Carpentier

59 served as a color commentator for various wrestling telecasts.

CARR, NEIL Canadian wrestler Neil Carr died of cancer in Brantford, Ontario, Canada, on December 18, 2010. He was 51. Carr was born in Brantford on February 16, 1959. He began his career as a wrestler in Toronto in the mid–1980s, and held the Canadian Junior Heavyweight Championship in Ontario. Often billed

2010 • Obituaries Laurie, French and Saunders, and Absolutely Fabulous. He was soon directing episodes of such series as Pilgrim’s Rest, Goodness Gracious Me, Keeping Mum, This Morning with Richard Not Judy, The Vicar of Dibley, Rhona, Important Astrology Experiment, Mad About Alice, Two Pints of Lager and a Packet of Crisps, The Smoking Room, Grownups, Little Miss Jocelyn, Marc Wootton Exposed, and Beautiful People. He made his feature film debut with the 2009 BBC/HBO sci-fi co-production Frequently Asked Questions About Time Travel.

CARROLL, EDDIE Canadian actor Eddie Carroll, who was best known as the voice of Disney’s Jiminy Cricket from the early 1970s, died of a brain tumor at the Motion Picture and Television Fund Hospital in Woodland Hills, California, on April 6, 2010. He was 66. Carroll was born in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, on September 5, 1933. He began his career performing on the local stage and writing for Canadian radio and television. He came to California in the 1960s, where he appeared on

Neil Carr

as Mad Dog Rex, he competed throughout Canada and overseas in Puerto Rico and Singapore. He wrestled for the WWF under a hood as Mr. X in the 1980s, but his U.S. appearances were limited as he frequently neglected to get a work visa and was deported on several occasions. He retired from the ring in the late 1990s, and later worked in the construction business.

CARRIVICK, GARETH British television comedy director Gareth Carrivick died of complications from leukemia and a stem-cell transplant in Runnymede, Surrey, England, on March 16, 2010. He was 52. Carrivick was born in Plymouth, Devon, England, on November 16, 1957. He became involved in local theatre in his youth and moved to London to work on the West End as a stage manager. He began working with the BBC in the late 1980s as an assistant floor manager and was promoted to production manager in the mid–1990s. He worked on the comedy shows Bottom, A Bit of Fry and

Gareth Carrivick

Eddie Carroll

television in episodes of such series as The Lieutenant, Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C., Mission: Impossible, and The Andy Griffith Show. He was also featured in a small role in the 1966 film The Last of the Secret Agents? He formed Carroll-Farr Productions with actor Jamie Farr, writing such projects as Hanna-Barbera’s animated The Amazing Chan and the Chan Clan. He continued to appear on television in episodes of Mary Tyler Moore, One Day at a Time, All in the Family, Life with Lucy, Fantasy Island, Love, American Style, Maude, and Alice. He was hired by the Walt Disney Company to take over the voice role of Pinocchio’s pal Jiminy Cricket in 1973, two years after the death of the original Jiminy, Cliff “Ukuele Ike” Edwards. He voiced the role in numerous Disney animated specials and cartoons over the next three decades. Carroll also appeared on television in episodes of Frasier and SpyTV, and was also noted for his one-man stage show, Jack Benny — Laughter in Bloom.

CARROLL, JEAN Jean Carroll, a pioneer female comedienne, died in a White Plains, New York, hospital on January 1, 2010. She was 98. She was born Celine Zeigman in Paris, France, on January 6, 1911. She came to the United States with her family at an early age and was raised in the Bronx, New York. She began her career

Obituaries • 2010 as a dancer on the vaudeville circuit while in her early teens. She met acrobatic dancer Buddy Howe in the early 1930s and they soon formed the comedy dance team Carroll and Howe. The two married in 1936 and toured England and the United States. Carroll performed as a solo act when Howe was drafted into the Army during World War II. He became a talent agent after his discharge, and she continued her career as a comedienne. She was one of the first females to headline a solo act on the

Jean Carroll

nightclub circuit. She also wrote for the CBS radio serial Our Gal Sunday from 1945 to 1959. She was seen frequently on television in the 1950s on such variety series as This Is Show Business, Frankie Laine Time, Cavalcade of Stars, The Tony Bennett Show, The Garry Moore Show, and The Ed Sullivan Show. She also starred in the short-lived comedy series The Jean Carroll Show in 1953 and released the comedy album Girl in a Hot Steam Bath in 1960. Carroll guest starred in an episode of Boris Karloff ’s horror anthology series Thriller in 1962 and was featured in the 1968 film The Legend of Lylah Clare. Her husband became chairman of the Creative Management Agency before his death in 1981.

CARTER, DIXIE Actress Dixie Carter, who was best known for her role as formidable southern belle and businesswoman Julia Sugarbaker in the television sitcom Designing Women, died of complications from endometrial cancer in a Houston, Texas, hospital on April 10, 2010. She was 70. Carter was born in McLemoresville, Tennessee, on May 29, 1939, and graduated from Memphis State University with a degree in English. She was runner-up in the Miss Tennessee pageant in 1959 and began her acting career on stage in Memphis in a 1960 production of Carousel. She moved to New York several years later, where she was featured in a production of Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale. She subsequently abandoned her career to marry businessman Arthur Carter, and raise a family. She returned to acting a decade later, filling in as Dorian Cramer on the daytime soap-opera One Life to Live while actress Nancy Pinkerton was on maternity leave in 1974. She was also featured in the short-lived Broadway musical Sextet in 1974. Carter was subsequently cast as Assistant District Attorney Brandy Henderson in the crime soap The Edge

60 of Night, where she remained until 1976. She appeared in the 1976 Broadway revival of Pal Joey in 1976 before heading to Hollywood. She was featured as April Baxter in the short-lived sit-com On Our Own from 1977 to 1978. She was Aunt Marion Richards in the shorter-lived fantasy comedy Out of the Blue in 1979, starring comedian Jimmy Brogan as the angel Random, out to earn his wings. She was also seen in episodes of The Andros Targets, Cassie & Co., Bret Maverick, Best of the West, The Greatest American Hero, Quincy, Lou Grant, and Crazy Like a Fox. Carter was featured in the tele-films OHMS (1980) and The Killing of Randy Webster (1981) with Hal Holbrook, and made her film debut in David Steinberg’s 1983 comedy Going Berserk. She starred as Carlotta Beck on the comedy series Filthy Rich from 1982 to 1983 and joined the cast of the popular sit-com Diff ’rent Strokes as Maggie McKinney, the love interest of Philip Drummond (Conrad Bain), in the series’ sixth season in 1984. The characters soon married, but Carter departed Diff ’rent Strokes the following year, with Mary Ann Mobley taking over the role. She was best known for her role as Atlanta-based interior designer Julia Sugarbaker in the series Designing Women from 1986 to 1993. She was also seen in the tele-films A Perry Mason Mystery: The Case of the Lethal Lifestyle (1994), Gambler V: Playing for Keeps (1994), Judith Krantz’s “Dazzle” (1995), Gone in the Night (1996), Comfort and Joy (2003), Sudbury (2004), and Our First Christmas (2008), and in episodes of Christy, Diagnosis Murder, Fired Up, Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, and Hope & Faith. She was featured in the recurring role of Peaches in the television series Ladies Man from 1999 to 2000, and was Randi King on the drama series Family Law from 1999 to 2002. Carter was seen in the film The Big Day in 2001, and returned to the Broadway stage as Mrs. Meers in Thoroughly Modern Millie in 2004. She appeared in the recurring role of Gloria Hodge in the television series Desperate Housewives from 2006 to 2007, which earned her an Emmy nomination. Her memoir, Trying to Get to Heaven, was published in 1996, and she soon returned part-time to Tennessee to restore her family home. She and her father, Halbert Carter (who died in 2007), appeared in a series of commercials in the South for the Yellow Pages during the process. She continued to perform on stage as a singer and entertainer throughout the country. Carter was briefly married to

Dixie Carter

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Broadway actor George Hearn from 1977 to 1979. She married actor Hal Holbrook in 1984, who was an occasional guest-star on her series, Designing Women, as her boyfriend, Reese Watson. She made her final film appearance with him in 2009’s That Evening Sun. She is also survived by two daughters from her first marriage, actress Ginna Carter, and screenwriter Mary Dixie Carter.

CARY, CLAIBORNE Actress and cabaret performer Claiborne Cary died of complications from Parkinson’s disease in Costa Mesa, California, on March 20, 2010. She was 78. She was born Claiborne Leachman in Lone Tree, Iowa, on February 17, 1932, the younger sister of actress Cloris Leachman. She began performing Isabelle Caubere

Claiborne Cary

as a dancer from an early age and moved to New York City to pursue an acting career. She was featured in the Broadway touring production of Silk Stockings in 1956 and appeared on Broadway in the musicals New Girl in Town (1957) and Beg, Borrow or Steal (1960). She was also featured in a small role in the 1971 film The Sporting Club, and the tele-films Crime Club (1973), Hitchhike! (1974), Doctor Franken (1980), and Nurse (1980). Her other television credits include episodes of The Dick Van Dyke Show, Young Dr. Kildare, Law & Order, and Boston Common. Cary starred in numerous regional theater productions during her career and was a popular cabaret performer until her retirement in the early 2000s.

CAZENOVE, CHRISTOPHER British actor Christopher Cazenove died in England of septicemia on April 7, 2010. He was 64. Cazenove was born in Winchester, Hampshire, England, in December 17, 1945. He trained as an actor at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School in the 1960s and made his stage debut in a production of Man and Superman in 1967. He remained a frequent performer on the British stage, and made his film debut in a small role in a 1970 production of Julius Caesar starring Charlton Heston. He appeared in numerous films over the next forty years including There’s a Girl in My Soup (1970), Royal Flash (1975), East of Elephant Rock (1977), Little Girl in Blue Velvet (1978), Zulu Dawn (1979) as Lt. Coghill, The Eye of the Needle (1981), From a Far Country (1981), Heat and Dust (1983), Until September (1984), Mata Hari (1985), The Fantasist (1986), Blind Justice (1988), Souvenir (1989), Three Men and a Little Lady (1990), Aces: Iron Eagle III (1992), The Proprietor (1996), Shadow Run (1998), Contaminated Man (2001), A Knight’s Tale (2001) as John Thatcher, Beginner’s Luck (2001), Lost and Found (2003), Vernic (2005) in the title role, Young Alexander the Great (2007) as Aristotle, and Bloodline (2008). Cazenove was a familiar face on television from the early 1970s. He starred as Lt. Richard Gaunt in the series The Regiment from 1972 to 1973 and was Charles Haselmere in The Duchess of Duke Street from 1976 to 1977. He was also featured in episodes of The Rivals of Sherlock Holmes, The Pathfinders, Affairs

CAUBERE, ISABELLE French actress Isabelle Caubere died in France on April 13, 2010. She was 55. Caubere was born in Marseille, France, on June 5, 1954. She studied dance from an early age and began performing on stage in the 1970s. She appeared in numerous theatrical productions during her career. Caubere made her film debut in 1985’s Hell Train and was also seen in the films L’Etudiante (1988), Read My Lips (2001), Adolphe (2002), A Ton Image (2004), Ole! (2005), Ma Vie en l’Air (2005), Brice de Nice (2005), Murderers (2006), Moliere (2007), and Leur Morale … et la Notre (2008). She was featured in television productions of L’Enfant de la Honte (2000), Lagardere (2003), and Securite Interieure (2007). Her other television credits include episodes of Crimes en Serie, Josephine, ange Gardien, P.J., Avocats & Associes, Chez Maupassant, and Les Bougon. Christopher Cazenove

Obituaries • 2010 of the Heart, Jennie: Lady Randolph Churchill, Lady Killers, Lou Grant, and The Agatha Christie Hour. Cazenove was best known in the United States for his role as Ben Carrington, the scheming brother of Blake Carrington, played by John Forsythe, on the primetime soap opera Dynasty from 1986 to 1987. He was also seen in television productions of K Is for Killing (1974), East Lynne (1976), Children of the Full Moon (1980) on Hammer House of Horror, Treasure Island (1982) as Captain Smollett, The Letter (1982), the Hammer House of Mystery and Suspense episode In Possession (1985), Lace II (1985), Jenny’s War (1985), Kane & Abel (1985), Shades of Love: The Man Who Guards the Greenhouse (1988), Windmills of the Gods (1988), Tears in the Rain (1988), The Lady and the Highwayman (1988), To Be the Best (1992), The Way to Dusty Death (1995), Dead Man’s Island (1996), Home Song (1996), Fun at the Funeral Parlour (2001), Trance (2001), Johnson County War (2002), and La Femme Musketeer (2004) as Athos. He starred Michael Trent in the 1989 series A Fine Romance and was assistant deputy police commissioner Row Colemore on Judge John Deed from 2001 to 2003. His other television credits include episodes of Strangers, Tales from the Crypt, Nash Bridges, Charmed, Dalziel and Pascoe, Diamond Geezer, and Hotel Babylon. Cazenove was married to actress Angharad Rees from 1973 until their divorce in 1994.

CECCHI D’AMICO, SUSO Italian screenwriter Suso Cecchi d’Amico, one of the leading female scripters in post-war Italy who worked with such directors as Vittorio De Sica, Michelangelo Antonioni, Luchino Visconti, and Mario Monicelli, died in Rome on July 31, 2010. She was 96. She was born Giovanna Cecchi in Rome on July 21, 1914, the daughter of literary critic and screenwriter Emilio Cecchi. She was raised in Florence, Italy, and studied in Switzerland and England. She worked as a secretary for the government trade department in the late 1930s. She married music critic and leftist writer Fedele d’Amico in 1938, who spent most of World War II in hiding. Cecchi worked as a literary translator after the war, and soon began writing for films. She made her screenwriting debut with Professor, My Son (1946) and continued to write such films Rome: Free City (1946), Vivere in Pace (1947), Flesh Will Surrender (1947), Angelina: Member of Parliament (1947), and Hey Boy (1948). She earned acclaim for co-writing Vittorio De Sica’s 1948 film The Bicycle Thief and became an early exemplar of the storytelling style that became known as neorealism. She also scripted Fabiola (1949), The Walls of Malapaga (1949), Heaven Over the Marshes (1949), Due Mogli Sono Troppe (1950), It’s Forever Springtime (1950), Father’s Dilemma (1950), Twelve Hours to Live (1950), All for Love (1950), and Miracle in Milan (1951). She collaborated frequently with director Luchino Visconti scripting nearly all of his films from Bellissima in 1951, including the acclaimed Rocco and His Brothers (1960). Her many screenplay credits also include Times Gone By (1952), Anita Garibaldi (1952), Hello Elephant (1952), The City Stands Trial (1952), Of Life and Love (1953), I Vinti (1953), Il Mondo le Condanna (1953), The Lady Without Camelias (1953), Empty Eyes (1953), Eager

62

Suso Cecchi d’Amico

to Live (1953), The Cheerful Squadron (1954), The Anatomy of Love (1954), 100 Years of Love (1954), Graziella (1954), The Wanton Contessa (1954), Too Bad She’s Bad (1954), Forbidden (1954), The Girlfriends (1955), Kean: Genius or Scoundrel (1956), Lucky to Be a Woman (1956), Defend My Love (1956), The Window to Luna Park (1957), White Nights (1957), Husbands in the City (1957), Mario Monicelli’s Big Deal on Madonna Street (1958), La Sfida (1958), Wild Wild Women (1959), Estate Violenta (1959), Risate di Gioia (1960), the Paramount film It Started in Naples (1960) starring Clark Gable and Sophia Loren, La Contessa Azzurra (1960), The Wastrel (1961), The Best of Enemies (1961), Boccaccio ’70 (1962), Salvatore Giuliano (1962), Three Fables of Love (1962), The Leopard (1963), Time of Indifference (1964), Casanova 70 (1965) which earned her an Academy Award nomination for the script, Sandra of a Thousand Delights (1965), The Queens (1966), Me, Me, Me … and the Others (1966), Shoot Loud, Louder … I Don’t Understand (1966), Franco Zeffirelli’s 1967 production of The Taming of the Shrew, The Stranger (1967), Pride and Vengeance (1968), Infanzia, Vocazione e Prime Esperienze di Giacomo Casanova, Veneziano (1969), Senza Sapere Niente di Lei (1969), Metello (1970), Lady Liberty (1971), Ludwig: The Mad King of Bavaria (1972), Brother Sun, Sister Moon (1972), I Figli Chiedono Perche (1972), Il Diavolo nel Cervello (1972), Amore e Ginnastica (1973), Bitter Love (1974), Conversation Piece (1974), Prete, Fai un Miracolo (1975), Dimmi che fai Tutto per Me (1976), The Innocent (1976), Caro Michele (1976), Les Mots pour le Dire (1983), Bertoldo, Bertoldino, and Cascacenno (1984), Big Deal After 20 Years (1985), The Two Lives of Mattia Pascal (1985), The Inquiry (1986), Caravaggio (1986), Speriamo che sia Femmina (1986), Dark Eyes (1987), Private Affair (1987), I Picari (1988), Stradivari (1989), Dark Illness (1990), Rossini! Rossini! (1991), Parenti Serpenti (1992), La Fine e Nota (1993), Cari Fottutissimi Amici (1994), Looking for Paradise (1995), Bruno Is Waiting on the Car (1996), The Room of the Scirocco (1998),The Last Summers: If You Do Not Want (1998), Dirty Linen (1999), the documentary One Magical Friend: Master Nino Rota (1999), Martin Scorsese’s documentary on Italian cinema My Voyage to Italy (1999), The Sky Will Fall (2000), Raul: Straight to Kill (2005), The Roses of the Desert (2006), and The Final Inquiry (2006). Cecchi d’Amico

63 also worked in television, scripting such productions as Vita col Padre e con la Madre (1960), Giovanni ed Elviruccia (1970), The Adventures of Pinocchio (1972), Zeffirelli’s Jesus of Nazareth (1977), La Velia (1980), Vita di Antonio Gramsci (1981), Heart (1984), History (1986), Marco e Laura Dieci Anni Fa (1989), The Ingenuous Moglie and the Sick Husband (1989), and Come Quando Fuori Piove (2000). She received a lifetime achievement award at the Venice Film Festival in 1994.

CHABROL, CLAUDE French film director Claude Chabrol, who was a leading figure in the French New Wave cinema in the late 1950s and 1960s, died in Paris on September 12, 2010. He was 80. Chabrol was born in Paris on June 24, 1930. The son of a pharmacist, he was raised in the village of Sardent. He was fascinated by films from childhood and though he studied pharmacology at the Sorbonne in Paris, he soon embarked on a career in cinema. He briefly served as the head of publicity for Twentieth Century–Fox in Paris in 1955. He wrote frequently for the film journal Cahiers du Cinéma, where he associated with such future New Wave auteurs as Eric Rohmer, Jacques Rivette, Jean-Luc Godard, and Francois Truffaut. Chabrol and Rohmer wrote the book Hitchcock in 1957, one of the first studies of the works of Alfred Hitchcock. Chabrol was the first of the New Wave directors to helm a film with Le Beau Serge in 1958, which was partially financed by his first wife, Agnes Goute. The film proved a critical success, and was followed by A Double Tour (aka Leda) and The Cousins in 1959. Chabrol became recognized as a leading director of thrillers and mysteries in the 1960s, directing and writing the films The Good Time Girls (1960), Wise Guys (1961), The Seven Deadly Sins (1962), The Third Lover (1962), Bluebeard (1963), Ophelia (1963), Code Name: Tiger (1964), Marie-Chantal vs. Doctor Kha (aka Blue Panther) (1965), Our Agent Tiger (1965), Line of Demarcation (1966), The Champagne Murders (1967), Who’s Got the Black Box? (1965), Les Biches (1968), The Unfaithful Wife (1969), and The Beast Must Die (1969). He remained a prolific and popular filmmaker throughout his life, helming The Butcher (1970), The Breach (1970), Just Before Nightfall (1971), Ten Days Wonder (1971), High Heels (1972), Wedding in Blood (1973), The Nada Gang (1974), Pleasure Party (1975), Dirty Hands (1975), Death

Claude Chabrol

2010 • Obituaries Rite (1976), The Twist (1976), Alice, or the Last Escapade (1977), Blood Relatives (1978), Violette (1978), The Horse of Pride (1980), The Hatter’s Ghost (1982), The Blood of Others (1984), Chicken with Vinegar (1985), Inspecteur Lavardin (1986), Masks (1987), The Cry of the Owl (1987), Story of Women (1988), Jours Tranquilles a Clichy (1990), Club Extinction (aka Dr. M) (1990), Madame Bovary (1991), Betty (1992), The Eyes of Vichy (1993), Hell (1994), La Ceremonie (1995), The Swindle (1997), The Color of Lies (1999), Nightcap (2000), The Flower of Evil (2003), The Bridesmaid (2004), The Comedy of Power (2006), The Girl Cut in Two (2007), and Inspector Bellamy (2009). Chabrol also worked in television, directing segments of Nouvelles de Henry James, Madame le Juge, Histoires Insolites, Il Etait un Musicien, and Les Dossiers Secrets de l’Inspecteur Lavardin. His other television credits include the productions Fantomas (1980), Le Systeme du Docteur Goudron et du Professeur Plume (1981), La Danse de Mort (1982), M. le Maudit (1982), Les Affinites Electives (1982), and Cyprien Katsaris (1996). Chabrol also appeared frequently in cameo roles in many of his films during his career, and was also seen in small parts of the films of others including Paris Belongs to Us (1961), A Touch of Treason (1962), Hard Boiled Ones (1964), Brigitte and Brigitte (1966), A Little Virtuous (1968), The Bitch Wants Blood (1969), As Far as Love Can Go (1971), The Other Side of the Wind (1972), Murder Is a Murder (1972), La Bonne Nouvelle (1974), Le Permis de Conduire (1974), L’Animal (1977), Les Folies d’Elodie (1981), Homicide by Night (1984), Les Voleurs de la Nuit (1984), Polar (1984), Follow My Gaze (1986), Je Hais les Acteurs (1986), Rotten Fate! (1987), Jeux d’Artifices (1987), L’Ete en Pente Douce (1987), Alouette (1988), Sam Suffit (1992), Avida (2006), Lucifer et Moi (2008), A Bicyclette (2009), and Gainsbourg (2010). His final directorial efforts were several adaptations of the works of Guy de Maupassant on French television in 2009 and 2010. Chabrol was married to Agnes Goute from 1956 to 1962, and their son, Matthieu Chabrol, scored many of his father’s films from the 1980s. He was married to actress Stephane Audran from 1964 to 1978, and later married script supervisor Aurore Paquiss.

CHALLIS, BARBARA Actress Barbara Challis Koch, who had a brief career in Hollywood in the late

Barbara Challis

Obituaries • 2010 1940s, died of cancer in Sewickley, Pennsylvania, on December 29, 2010. She was 81. Challis was born in Sewickley on August 8, 1929. Challis went to Hollywood in 1947 under contract to Universal and appeared in the film Alice with Elizabeth Taylor. She appeared in three other films, Larceny (1948), The Saxon Charm (1948), and Family Honeymoon (1949), before abandoning her career and returning to Pennsylvania. She married and raised a family, and later wrote two volumes of poetry and a mystery novel.

CHANDLER, JOHN DAVIS Character actor John Davis Chandler died in Toluca Lake, California, on February 16, 2010. He was 73. Chandler was born in Hinton, West Virginia, on January 28, 1937. He made his film debut as the sniveling psychotic gangster in the title role of 1967’s Mad Dog Coll. Over the next three decades, he appeared in numerous films and television productions, often typecast as weasely villains in western and crime productions. His film credits include The Young Savages (1961), Sam Peckinpah’s Ride the High Country (1962) as Jimmy Hammond, Those Calloways (1965), Major Dundee (1965), Once a Thief (1965), Return of the Gunfighter (1967), The Hooked Generation (1968) as the crazed Acid, The Good Guys and the Bad Guys (1969), Barquero (1970), Drag Racer (1971), Shoot Out (1971), Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid (1973), The Take (1974), The Ultimate Thrill (1974), Capone (1974) as gangster Hymie Weiss, Walking Tall Part II (1975), Doc Hooker’s Bunch (1976), The Outlaw Josie Wales (1976) with Clint Eastwood, Mako: The Jaws of Death (1976) as a shark poacher, Scorchy (1976), Chesty Anderson, USN (1976), the horror western The Shadow of Chikara (1977), Whiskey Mountain (1977) as a vicious pot farmer, The Little Dragons (1979), Triumphs of a Man Called Horse (1982), The Sword and the Sorcerer (1983), Adventures in Babysitting (1987), Double Revenge (1990), Crash and Burn (1990), Only the Lonely (1991), Trancers II (1991), Inside Out II (1992), Body of Evidence (1993), Phantasm III: Lord of the Dead (1994), and Carnosaur 2 (1995). Chandler was seen frequently on television from the early 1960s in episodes of such series as The Untouchables, The Asphalt Jungle, The Dick Powell Show, The Detectives Starring Robert Taylor, The Rifleman, Route 66, The Virginian, Combat!, Empire, The Travels of Jamie McPheeters, A

John Davis Chandler

64 Man Called Shenandoah, Run for Your Life, The Fugitive, Felony Squad, The High Chaparral, Judd for the Defense, The Partners, Adam-12, Toma, Cannon, The Rookies, Columbo, Gunsmoke, Lincoln, Quincy, Police Woman, O’Hara, U.S. Treasury, Lucan, Switch, The Incredible Hulk, B.J. and the Bear, Flamingo Road, Fantasy Island, T.J. Hooker, Airwolf, Hill Street Blues, Matt Houston, Murder, She Wrote, Hunter, Simon & Simon, Dragnet, Renegade, In the Heat of the Night, E.R., Chicago Hope, Walker, Texas Ranger, and Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. Chandler’s other television credits include the tele-films Hitched (1971), Moon of the Wolf (1972), Chase (1973), The Desperate Miles (1975), and Love Among Thieves (1987).

CHARLES, BOBBY Singer and songwriter Bobby Charles, who pioneered Louisiana swamp pop with the song “See You Later, Alligator,” died at his home near Abbeville, Louisiana, on January 14, 2010. He was 71. He was born Robert Charles Guidry in Abbeville on February 21, 1938. He was interested in music in his youth and led a local band, the Cardinals, in his early teens. He wrote and performed the song “Hey Alligator” at the age of 14, and was signed by Chess

Bobby Charles

Records in 1955. The song became a major hit when Bill Haley & His Comets recorded a cover as “See You Later, Alligator.” He also co-wrote the song “Walking to New Orleans,” which was a major hit for Fats Domino in 1960. Charles had less success with his own recordings and disappeared from the music scene in the mid–1960s. He returned to release a self-titled album in 1972 that included the songs “Before I Grow Too Old” and “Small Town Talk.” He also performed as a guest singer on The Band’s farewell concert tour, The Last Waltz, in 1976. He recorded sporadically over the years, releasing You Were Here Right Now (1995), Secrets of the Heart (1998), and Homemade Songs (2008).

CHASEN, RONNI Leading Hollywood publicist Ronni Chasen was shot to death in Beverly Hills the early hours of November 16, 2010, while driving home from a film premiere. She received five gunshot wounds before crashing her car into a light pole, and was pronounced dead at a nearby hospital. She was 64. Chasen was born in New York City in 1946. She began her career as a pub-

65 licist in the early 1970s, working at American International Pictures. She was an executive vice president at the prestigious Rogers & Cowan Agency for over a decade. She became a leading Hollywood publicist and was responsible for numerous Academy Award publicity campaigns. She was particularly noted for orchestrating Oscar campaigns in music categories for such clients as Sony Pictures. She also worked publicity for composer

Ronni Chasen

2010 • Obituaries tures of Goopy and Bagha. He was also seen in the films Dhanyee Meye (1971) and Sangini (The Companion) (1974). He reprised his role as Goopy in Ray’s Heerak Rajar Deshe (The Kingdom of Diamonds) in 1980, and again in Sandip Ray’s Goopy Bagha Phire Elo in 1991.

CHAYKIN, MAURY Canadian character actor Maury Chaykin died in Toronto, Canada, on July 27, 2010. He was 61. Chaykin was born in Brooklyn, New York, on July 27, 1949. He studied drama at the State University of New York at Buffalo. He subsequently moved to Toronto, Ontario, where he embarked on a career on stage, screen, and television. He appeared in numerous films during his career in Canada and the United States from the mid–1970s. His film credits include Me (1975), Double Negative (1980), Nothing Personal (1980), The Kidnapping of the President (1980), Death Hunt (1981), Soup for One (1982), Highpoint (1982), Curtains (1983), WarGames (1983) as computer programmer Jim Sting, Of Unknown Origin (1983), Harry & Son (1984), Mrs. Soffel (1984), Turk 182! (1985), Death-Con 4 (1985), Canada’s Sweetheart: The Saga Hal C. Banks (1985), Meatballs III: Summer Job (1986), The Vindicator (1986), Higher Education (1987), Future Block (1987), The Bedroom Window (1987), Wild Thing (1987), Nowhere to

Hans Zimmer, songwriter Diane Warren, and producers Richard and Lili Zanuck and Irwin Winkler. She was named senior vice president for worldwide publicity at MGM in 1993 and owned the public relations firm Chasen & Co. Her efforts contributed to over 150 Oscar nominations during her career, including such Best Picture winners as Driving Miss Daisy (1989), Shakespeare in Love (1998), Chicago (2002), The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003), No Country for Old Men (2007), Slumdog Millionaire (2008), and The Hurt Locker (2009). Her survivors include her brother, exploitation film director Larry Cohen.

CHATTERJEE, TAPEN Indian actor Tapen Chatterjee, who appeared in several Bengali features by director Satyajit Ray, died of a heart attack at his home in Kolkata, India, on May 24, 2010. He was 72. Chatterjee worked as an engineer before being cast as singer Goopy Gyne in Satyajit Ray’s musical fantasy The Adven-

Tapen Chatterjee

Maury Chaykin

Hide (1987), Hearts of Fire (1987), Caribe (1987), Stars and Bars (1988), Iron Eagle II (1988), Twins (1988), Cold Comfort (1989), George’s Island (1989), Millennium (1989), Breaking In (1989), Where the Heart Is (1990), Mr. Destiny (1990), Kevin Costner’s Dances with Wolves (1990) as Major Fambrough, The Pianist (1991), The Adjuster (1991), My Cousin Vinnie (1992) as prosecution witness Sam Tipton, Leaving Normal (1992), Buried on Sunday (1992), Hero (1992), Sommersby (1993), Money for Nothing (1993), Josh and S.A.M. (1993), Beethoven’s 2nd (1993), Transplant (1994), Exotica (1994), Whale Music (1994) as burned out rocker Desmond Howel, Camilla (1994), Unstrung Heroes (1995), Devil in a Blue Dress (1995), Cutthroat Island (1995), Harriet the Spy (1996), Love and Death on Long Island (1997), The Sweet Hereafter (1997), Gone Fishin’ (1997), Strip Search (1997), Pale Saints (1997), A Life Less Ordinary (1997), Mousehunt (1997), Death by Dawn (1998), Jerry and Tom (1998), The Mask of Zorro (1998), Let the Devil Black (1999), En-

Obituaries • 2010 trapment (1999), Touched (1999), Mystery, Alaska (1999), Jacob Two Meets the Hooded Fang (1999), What’s Cooking? (2000), The Art of War (2000), Bartleby (2001), Plan B (2001), On Their Knees (2001), Past Perfect (2002), The Wet Season (2002), Hostage (2002), Owning Mahowny (2003) as bookie Frank Perlin, Intern Academy (2004), Sugar (2004), Being Julia (2004), Wilby Wonderful (2004), Where the Truth Lies (2005), Heavens Fall (2006), It’s a Boy Girl Thing (2006), Hooked on Speedman (2008), Production Office (2008), The Grift (2008), Blindness (2008), Adoration (2008), Bull (2008), Cooking with Stella (2009), Casino Jack (2010), and Conduct Unbecoming (2010). Chaykin was also a familiar face on television from the late 1970s, appearing in such productions as Riel (1979), Jimmy B. & Andre (1980), The July Group (1981), Just Jessie (1981), Overdrawn at the Memory Bank (1981), The Guardian (1984), Hockey Night (1984), The Suicide Murders (1985), In Like Flynn (1985), Act of Vengeance (1986), Race for the Bomb (1987) as General Leslie Groves, Hot Paint (1988), Labor of Love (1990), Conspiracy of Silence (1991), Split Images (1992), Sugartime (1995), Keeping the Promise (1997), Northern Lights (1997), Joan of Arc (1999), Varian’s War (2001), Bleacher Bums (2001), Crossed Over (2002), Tracy Ullman in the Trailer Tales (2003), Sex Traffic (2004), The Hunt for the BTK Killer (2005), Superstorm (2007), Elijah (2007), Glitch (2008), Of Murder and Memory (2008), and Abroad (2010). His other television credits include episodes of King of Kensington, ABC Weekend Specials, Seeing Things in the recurring role of Randall Jackson, Philip Marlowe, Private Eye, Adderley, Night Heat, Diamonds, The Twilight Zone, Street Legal, Matrix, La Femme Nikita, Tracey Takes On…, Emily of New Moon, Lexx in the recurring role of Pa Gollean, Due South, PSI Factor: Chronicles of the Paranormal, The Industry, Andromeda, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, The Eleventh Hour, Boston Legal, At the Hotel, Trailer Park Boys, and Eureka. Chaykin starred as gourmand detective Nero Wolfe in the 2000 tele-film The Golden Spiders: A Nero Wolfe Mystery, with Timothy Hutton as his assistant Archie Goodwin. They reprised their role in the subsequent series A Nero Wolfe Mystery from 2001 to 2002. He also appeared as intergalactic gourmand Nerus in several episodes of the sci-fi television series Stargate SG-1 from 2005 to 2006. He was featured as producer Harvey Weingard in the cable series Entourage from 2005 to 2007, and was Sam Blecher in Less Than Kind from 2008 to 2010.

CHEBOTARYOV, VLADIMIR Russian film director Vladimir Chebotaryov, who was best known for co-directing the 1961 science-fiction/fantasy classic The Amphibian Man, died in Moscow on March 4, 2010. He was 88. Chebotaryov was born in Karachev, Russia, on August 16, 1921. He co-directed The Amphibian Man (aka Chelovek-Amfibiya) with Gennadi Kazansky in 1961. The tale of a doctor who performed surgery on his son to create a gilled mutant who could live on land and under the water was one of the most popular Russian films of the decade. Chebotaryov also helmed over a dozen action films during his career including How to Name You Now? (1965), Wild Honey (1966), Crash (1968), Tsena Bystrykh Sekund (1971), Vystrel v Spinu (1980), Ring

66

Vladimir Chebotaryov

of Amsterdam (1981), Trevozhnyy Vylet (1983), Batallions Ask for Fire (1985), Neizvestrye Stranitsky iz Zhizni Razvedchika (1990), and Why Would an Honest Man Need an Alibi? (1993).

CHEESEMAN, PETER British stage director Peter Cheeseman, who pioneered the concept of “theatre in the round,” died of complications from Parkinson’s disease in London on April 27, 2010. He was 78. Cheeseman was born in Portsmouth, England, on January 27, 1932. He became involved in theatre while in his teens, and made his directorial debut in the late 1950s.

Peter Cheeseman

He opened the Victoria Theatre, at Stoke-on-Trent, in 1962, which presented a novel approach to traditional stagings. He remained the Victoria’s sole artistic director for the next 36 years, staging over 140 productions. He staged 11 musical documentaries incorporating local folk musicians, including The Fight for Shelton Bar. Another popular production was The Knotty, about the North Staffordshire Railway. He relocated to Newcastle-under-Lyme with the New Vic Theatre in 1986, where he remained until his retirement in 1998.

CHENAULT, GENE Radio executive Gene Chenault, who teamed with Bill Drake to revolutionize radio programming in the 1960s with the “Boss Radio” format, died of non–Hodgkin’s lymphoma in a Tarzana, California, hospital on February 23, 2010. He was 90.

67 Chenault was born in Eldorado, Oklahoma, on June 12, 1919. He moved to California with his family as a child, and became involved with radio while in his teens. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II and was co-founder of the Fresno station KYNO in 1947. Chenault hired Bill Drake as programming director in 1962 and soon introduced a new style of disc jockey for

Gene Chenault

2010 • Obituaries mand. Chercover joined the newly formed private network CFTO-TV in 1960, which evolved into CTV Network the following year. He became president and managing director of CTV in 1968. He also served as producer for the television productions Mirror, Mirror Off the Wall (1969), Black Water Gold (1970), The Trouble with Tracy (1971), and Half the George Kirby Comedy Hour (1972). Chercover was named president and CEO of CTV in 1986. He retired in 1990 but continued as a special consultant for the network.

CHI, CHAO-LI Chinese-American actor, dancer and Tai Chi master Chao-Li Chi, who was featured regularly in the prime-time soap opera Falcon Crest from 1981 to 1990, died in Granada Hills, California, on October 16, 2010. He was 83. Chi was born in Shanxi Province, China, on April 5, 1927, and came to the United States with his family in 1939. He performed with the Maya Deren dance company from the late 1940s, and appeared in Deren’s 1948 film Meditation on Violence. He remained with the company through the 1960s and became dance director for the Dayton, Ohio, Living Arts Program in 1967. He also performed with the national touring production of Rodgers and Ham-

the rock era. Concentrating of Top 40 hits, with a minimum of DJ patter, Drake created a template for stations around the country, and Chenault put it in syndication. The format took the country my storm, and “boss radio” was serving nearly 350 stations by the mid–1970s. Drake-Chenault Enterprises also produced the ’50s documentary The History of Rock ’n’ Roll for radio in 1979.

CHERCOVER, MURRAY Canadian television producer and executive Murray Chercover died in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, on July 3, 2010. He was 80. Chercover was born in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, on August 18, 1929. He began working at a local radio station in Port Arthur at the age of 15 and was soon involved in the production of plays in Toronto and New York City. He returned to Canada in 1952 to work with CBC Television, where he was a producer on such series as General Motors Presents, Procter & Gamble’s On Camera, The Ford Motor Company’s Playbill, and Space Com-

Murray Chercover

Chao-Li Chi

merstein’s Flower Drum Song. He appeared frequently in character roles in film and television from the 1970s, with roles in episodes of S.W.A.T., ABC Afterschool Specials, Rosetti and Ryan, Quincy M.E., The Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew Mysteries, Husbands, Wives & Lovers, Fantasy Island, How the West Was Won, Hello, Larry, Trapper John, M.D., CHiPs, Barney Miller, M*A*S*H, Faerie Tale Theatre’s 1983 production of The Nightingale, Civil Wars, NYPD Blue , High Incident, The Single Guy, Martial Law, Party of Five, Providence, Robbery Homicide Division, and Pushing Daisies. He was ChaoLi, loyal servant of Jane Wyman’s matriarchal character Angela Channing, on Falcon Crest from 1981 to 1990. He was also featured in the tele-films The Dream Merchants (1980), The Archer: Fugitive from the Empire (1981), Seeds of Tragedy (1991), Extralarge: Lord of the Sun (1993), and The Dukes of Hazzard: Hazzard in Hollywood (2000). Chi appeared in a handful of films during his career including The Big Brawl (1980), First Family (1980), Eyewitness (1981), John Carpenter’s Big Trouble in Little

Obituaries • 2010

68

China (1986) as Uncle Chu, Eye of the Stranger (1993), Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story (1993), The Joy Luck Club (1993), Eddie Murphy’s The Nutty Professor (1996), Warriors of Virtue (1997), Still Breathing (1997), What’s Cooking? (2000), Now Chinatown (2000), Extreme Days (2001), The Master of Disguise (2002), Blood Work (2002), Hold the Rice (2004), Wedding Crashers (2005), American Dreamz (2006), and The Prestige (2006).

CHILLY B Rapper Bob Crafton, who was a founding member of the early hip hop group Newcleus in the late 1970s, died of complications from a stroke on February 23, 2010. He was 47. Crafton was born in Alex Chilton

Chilly B

Brooklyn in 1962. He began performing in his teens with Jam-On Productions in 1977, which became Newcleus in 1979. The core group included Chilly B, his wife Monique Angevin, Ben “Cozmo D” Cenac, and his wife, Yvette “Lady E” Cook. The group released the albums Jam-On’s Revenge in 1983 and Space Is the Place in 1984. He was singer, keyboardist, bass player, and writer for Newcleus, and continued to tour and record with them throughout his life.

CHILTON, ALEX Singer, musician and songwriter Alex Chilton, who was lead singer for the bands the Box Tops and Big Star, died of a heart attack in a New Orleans hospital on March 17, 2010. He was 59. Chilton was born in Memphis, Tennessee, on December 28, 1950, the son of jazz musician Sidney Chilton. He began performing as a teenager and joined the local band The Devilles as lead singer in 1966. They soon became known as the Box Tops, and recorded such hit songs as “The Letter,” “Cry Like a Baby,” “Soul Deep,” and “Sweet Cream Ladies, Forward March.” The group disbanded by the end of the decade, and Chilton spent the next several years learning the guitar and refining his music. He formed the pop group Big Star in 1971, and their single “In the Street” became a hit years later as the theme for the television sit-com That ’70s Show in 1998. Big Star recorded the albums #1 Record (1972) and Radio City (1974) for Ardent/Stax, and 1978’s Third/Sister Lovers for PVC. Chilton moved to New York City in the late 1970s, where he became involved with the early punk scene. He produced and performed with the Cramps on their album Song the Lord Taught Us, and recorded a lim-

ited edition album Like Flies on Sherbert in 1979. Chilton relocated to New Orleans in the early 1980s, touring with Panther Burns and recording the solo album Love in London in 1982. He was the subject of the song “Alex Chilton” by the rock band The Replacements in 1987, and played guitar on their song “Can’t Hardly Wait.” He continued recording solo with the albums High Priest (1987), Cliches (1994), and A Man Called Destruction (1995). He frequently performed and recorded cover versions of blues songs and jazz standards and reunited with versions of the Box Tops and Big Star in the 1990s. He recorded the album Tear Off with the Box Tops in 1997 and In Space with Big Star in 2005.

CHOI JIN-YOUNG South Korean actor and singer Choi Jin-young was found dead of an apparent suicide by hanging at his apartment in Seoul, South Korea, on March 29, 2010. He was 39. Choi was born in Seoul on February 27, 1971. He began his acting career in 1993, appearing in the popular drama Our Heaven.

Choi Jin-young

He began singing later in the decade under the name Sky and released his first album, Final Fantasy, in 1999. He recorded two other albums and returned to the screen in the drama It’s Okay to Love in 2007. His sister, actress Choi Jin-sil, hung herself in October of 2008.

CHRISTIE, SHANNON Actress Shannon Christie, who appeared in a handful of films and television

69 productions in the 1970s, died in California on October 12, 2010. She was 76. Christie was born on September 21, 1934. She was featured in small roles in the films Those Mad, Mad, Movie Makers (1974), Roger Corman’s

Shannon Christie

Big Bad Mama (1974), Earthquake (1974), and Smile (1975). She was also seen in episodes of Alias Smith and Jones, Bonanza, Adam-12, Barney Miller, Baretta, and Executive Suite.

CHULA, BABZ American-Canadian actress Babz Chula died of cancer in Vancouver, Canada, on May 7, 2010. She was 63. She was born Barbara Ellen Zuckerman in Springfield, Massachusetts, on March 12, 1947, and was raised in Jamaica, New York. She moved to British Columbia, Canada, with her first husband in the early 1970s. She performed as a folksinger in Hawaii and California later in the decade. She turned to acting after returning to Canada, and appeared frequently in films and television from the early 1980s. Chula was seen in the films Runaway (1984), My American Cousin (1985) as Dolly Walker, Immediate Family (1989), American Boyfriends (1989), Beyond the Stars (1989), Cousins (1989), The Accused (1988), Crooked Hearts (1991), Run (1991), North of Pittsburgh (1992), Kanada (1993), The Raffle (1994), Valentine’s Day (1994), A Pyromaniac’s Love Story (1995), Live Bait (1995), Power of Attorney (1995), Away (1996), Barbecue: A Love Story (1997), The Ex (1997),

Babz Chula

2010 • Obituaries Silent Cradle (1997), Dirty (1998), Noroc (1999), Double Jeopardy (1999), Late Night Sessions (1999), No More Monkeys Jumpin’ on the Bed (2000), Last Wedding (2001), Cheats (2002), Bitten (2002), Tilt (2003), Moving Malcolm (2003), Little Brother of War (2003), 21st Century Scott (2003), Cellmates (2003), Kaufman’s Care (2004), Connie and Carla (2004), Seven Times Lucky (2004), The French Guy (2005), After Tomorrow (2005), The Saddest Boy in the World (2006), The Secret (2007), Power Lunch (2007), The Green Chain (2007), The X Files: I Want to Believe (2008), Mothers & Daughters (2008), and Fathers & Sons (2010). Chula was also featured in the tele-films Into Thin Air (1985), Mrs. Delafield Wants to Marry (1986), The Penthouse (1989), A Killer Among Friends (1992), When a Stranger Calls Back (1993), Without a Kiss Goodbye (1993), Double, Double, Toil and Trouble (1993), Dying to Remember (1993), Roommates (1994), My Name Is Kate (1994), For Hope (1996), Echo (1997), Dean Koontz’s Intensity (1997), Jitters (1997), Out of Nowhere (1997), Seduction in a Small Town (1997), Sweetwater: A True Rock Story (1999), Becoming Dick (2000), The Wednesday Woman (2000), Croon (2002), Baby for Sale (2004), When Angels Come to Town (2004), Cantata for the King (2005), Criminal Intent (2005), Home by Christmas (2006), and Living Out Loud (2009). Her other television credits include episodes of Wiseguy, The New Adventures of Beans Baxter, MacGyver, Mom P.I., Neon Rider, 21 Jump Street, The Commish in the recurring role of Helen Stags, M.A.N.T.I.S., Side Effects, the teen soap opera Madison in the recurring role of Eileen Lemieux, Cold Squad, the 1999 drama-comedy series These Arms of Mine as Esme Price, Bliss, John Doe, The L Word, The Days as Dr. Brugano, jPod, and Sanctuary. Chula was also a voice actor in such animated productions as Captain N: The Game Master (1989), G.I. Joe (1990), Heidi (1991), Alice in Wonderland (1991), Captain N & the Adventures of Super Mario Bros. 3 (1990), Legend of the Hawaiian Slammers (1991), Madeline (1993), Double Dragon (1993), The Adventures of Sonic the Hedgehog (1993), Christopher the Christmas Tree (1994), Action Man (1995), Littlest Pet Shop (1995), Little Witch (1999), and Yvon of the Yukon (2000).

CIRKER, IRA Television director Ira Cirker died in New York City on February 10, 2010. He was 86. He

Ira Cirker

Obituaries • 2010 began his career as an actor and was featured in the Broadway production of Moss Hart’s Winged Victory during World War II. He also was featured in the Broadway plays Christopher Blake (1946) and Sundown Beach (1948). He began directing for television in the 1950s, helming broadcasts of such live anthology series as Robert Montgomery Presents, Nash Airflyte Theatre, and Kaiser Aluminum Hour. He also directed the daytime soap operas Valiant Lady, Search for Tomorrow, and Somerset, and earned 6 Emmy nominations for his work on the soap Another World during his 17 years with the program.

CLARE, INA British actress Ina Clare, who was featured in a background role in the long-running British soap opera EastEnders for the past several years, died on October 30, 2010. She was 77. She began her career as a dancer, and had small roles in the films The Slipper and

Ina Claire

the Rose (1976) and Evita (1996). She also appeared on television in episodes of Blakes 7, Tales of the Unexpected, French and Saunders, and In Sickness and in Health. She was seen in EastEnders as flower stall vendor Ina Foot from 2008 until her death.

CLAYBURGH, JILL Actress Jill Clayburgh, who earned Academy Award nominations for her roles in the films An Unmarried Woman (1978) and Starting Over (1979), died after a long battle with chronic lymphocytic leukemia at her home in Lakeville, Connecticut, on November 5, 2010. She was 66. Clayburgh was born in New York City on April 30, 1944. She studied theater at Sarah Lawrence College, graduating in 1966. She soon began performing on stage, and made her Broadway debut the short-lived 1968 production of The Sudden & Accidental Re-Education of Horse Johnson. She went on to star in the hit musicals The Rothschilds (1970) with Hal Linden, and Pippin (1972). Clayburgh made her film debut in Brian DePalma’s first feature, The Wedding Party, in 1969, and was also seen in the films The Telephone Book (1971), Portnoy’s Complaint (1972), The Thief Who Came to Dinner (1973), and The Terminal Man (1974). She starred as screen legend Carole Lombard in the 1976 bio-film Gable and Lombard opposite James Brolin, and co-starred with Gene Wilder and Richard Pryor in the comedy Silver Streak (1976). She starred opposite Burt Reynolds and Kris Kristofferson in the 1977

70 football comedy Semi-Tough. She was nominated for an Oscar for her leading role in Paul Mazursky’s An Unmarried Woman (1978), and another opposite Burt Reynolds in Starting Over (1979). Clayburgh also starred in such films as Bernardo Bertolucci’s Luna (1979), It’s My Turn (1980) with Michael Douglas, First Monday in October (1981) opposite Walter Matthau, I’m Dancing as Fast as I Can (1982), Hanna K. (1983), Where Are the Children? (1986), Shy People (1987), Beyond the Ocean (1990), Pretty Hattie’s Baby (1991), Whispers in the Dark (1992), Rich in Love (1992), Le Grand Pardon II (1992), Naked in New York (1993), Going All the Way (1997), Fools Rush In (1997) as Matthew Perry’s Mother, Never Again (2001), Falling (2001), and Running with Scissors (2006). Clayburgh appeared frequently on television from the late 1960s, with small roles in the series N.Y.P.D. and the soap opera Search for Tomorrow. She was featured in the 1972 pilot for The Snoop Sisters with Helen Hayes and Mildred Natwick, and appeared in episodes of Medical Center, Maude, and The Rockford Files. She also starred in television productions of Going Places (1973), Tiger on a Chain (1974), Hustling (1974) which earned her an Emmy nomination, The Art of Crime (1975), Griffin and Phoenix: A Love Story (1976) opposite Peter Falk, Miles to Go… (1986), Who Gets the Friends? (1988), Fear Stalk (1989), Unspeakable Acts (1990), Reason for Living: The Jill Ireland Story (1991), Trial: The Price of Passion (1992), the 1992 documentary Lincoln as the voice of Emilie Todd Helm, Firestorm: 72 Hours in Oakland (1993), Honor Thy Father and Mother: The True Story of the Menendez Murders (1994) as Kitty Menendez, For the Love of Nancy (1994), The Face on the Milk Carton (1995), When Innocence Is Lost (1997), Sins of the Mind (1997), Crowned and Dangerous (1997), My Little Assassin (1999), The Only Living Boy in New York (2000), and Phenomenon II (2003). She appeared in an episode of Law & Order and had voice cameo in Frasier. Clayburgh was featured as Eileen McCallister in the short-lived drama series Trinity in 1998, and co-starred as Mickey Gorelick with Jeffrey Tambor in the shorter-lived sit-com Everything’s Relative in 1999. She was featured in the recurring role of Jeannie McBeal, Calista Flockhart’s mom, in the series Ally McBeal from 1999 to 2001. She starred as Cricket Wardwell in another short-lived comedy series, Leap of Faith, in 2002, and was featured as Victo-

Jill Clayburgh

71 ria Stewart in several episodes of The Practice in 2004. Clayburgh guest-starred as Bobbi Broderick in Nip/Tuck in 2004, earning another Emmy nomination, and starred as Letitia “Tish” Darling in the ABC series Dirty Sexy Money from 2007 to 2009. She continued to perform on stage throughout her career, appearing on Broadway in a 1984 revival of Noel Coward’s Design for Living, and a 2006 revival of Barefoot in the Park. Her final film roles featured her as Jake Gyllenhaal’s mother in the 2010 romantic dramady Love and Other Drugs with Anne Hathaway, and in Judd Apatow’s forthcoming comedy Bridesmaid. Clayburgh was romantically involved with Al Pacino in the early 1970s. She married playwright David Rabe in 1979, and they had two children, son Michael and daughter Lily, an actress.

CLAYTOR, JAMES, SR. Film and television art director James Claytor died in Gresham, Oregon, on August 29, 2010. He was 76. Claytor worked as an art director on the television productions Washington: Behind Closed Doors (1977), The Plant Family (1978), and Perfect Gentlemen (1978), and the 1982 film Pandemonium. He was also art director on the series Working Stiffs, Mork and Mindy, Family Ties, and American Dreamer. He was a set designer on the second season of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine in 1994, and for the films Hot Shots! Part Deux (1993), The Nutty Professor (1996), Metro (1997), Contact (1997), and Species II (1998). CLECH, YVONNE French actress Yvonne Clech died in Paris on February 25, 2010. She was 89. Clech was born in Guingamp, France, on June 3, 1920. She began her career on stage, and was featured in numerous films from the early 1950s including The Strange Madame X (1951), Men Think Only of That (1954), This Pretty World (1957), Why Women Sin (1958), Gangster Boss (1959), Zazie Dans le Metro (1960), Saint Tropez Blues (1961), Kes Livreurs (1961), The Busybody (1961), Arsene Lupin vs. Arsene Lupin (1962), Moonlight in Maubeuge (1962), The Murderer Knows the Score (1963), People in Luck (1963), The Reluctant Spy (1963), The Fire Within (1963), The Blockhead Fair (1963), Les Gros Bras (1964), Rob the Bank (1964), Coplan Prend des Risques (1964), Relaxe-toi Cherie (1964), Life Upside Down (1964), When the Peasants Pass (1965), Killer Spy (1965), L’Or et le Plomb (1966), The Big Softie (1967), The Gazebo (1971), Le Rempart des Be-

Yvonne Clech

2010 • Obituaries guines (1972), Q (1974), Soldat Duroc, ca va Etre ta Fete! (1975), Le Maestro (1977), Au Bout du Bout du Banc (1979), Mireille and the Others (1979), Comme une Femme (1980), Y a-t-il un Pirate sur l’Antenne? (1983), Le Hasard Mene le Jeu (1985), A Deux Minutes Pres (1989), and Suivez cet Avion (1989). She was also seen frequently on television, with roles in such productions as Les Femmes de Bonne Humeur (1961), Les Aventures de Monsieur Pickwick (1964), A Saint-Lazare (1967), Le Bouton de Rose (1971), La Bonne Nouvelle (1972), Joyeux Chagrins (1972), Les Ecrivains (1973), Aurore et Victorien (1975), Le Peril Bleu (1975), Chantecler (1977), Les Incorrigibles (1980), George Dandin (1982), Jules et Georgia (1982), Le Reve d’Icare (1982), Le Herisson (1989), Madame Dubois — Hotel Bellevue (1997), and Nora (1999). Her other television credits include episodes of Allo Police, Minouche, Bonsoir Chef, La Pendule, Les Enquetes du Commissaire Maigret, and Une Femme d’Honneur.

CLIFFORD, JOHN Screenwriter John Clifford, who was best known for scripting the 1962 cult classic horror film Carnival of Souls, died of a heart attack on March 2, 2010. He was 91. Clifford was born in Springfield, Illinois, on October 19, 1918, and was raised by relatives in Chicago after the death of his parents. He began his career writing jokes for radio comedian Ken

John Clifford

Murray. He served in the military during World War II, and studied screenwriting after his discharge. He began writing industrial and educational films at Centron Films in Lawrence, Kansas. He worked on numerous productions there from the 1950s through the 1980s. He teamed with director Herk Harvey to write Carnival of Souls in the early 1960s. Filmed on a low budget ($30,000), the feature became a creepy cult classic, and spawned a remake in 1998. Clifford also penned the western novel The Shooting of Storey James, and teamed with composer Angelo Badalamenti, he wrote lyrics for such songs as “Another Spring” and “I Hold No Grudge,” that were recorded by singer Nina Simone.

CLINTON, MILDRED Character actress Mildred Clinton died in New York on December 18, 2010. She made her film debut in the late 1950s in The Trapp Family in America (1958), A New Leaf (1971), Serpico

Obituaries • 2010 (1973), the cult horror classic Alice Sweet Alice (1976) as Mrs. Tredoni, For Those I Loved (1983), Seize the Day (1986), Spike Lee’s Crooklyn (1994), Summer of Sam

Mildred Clinton

(1999), and Bamboozled (2000). She was also seen on television episodes of Armstrong Circle Theatre, Car 54, Where Are You?, The Edge of Night, and Kate & Allie.

CLOKEY, ART Art Clokey, a pioneer in clay animation who created the iconic green character Gumby, died of complications from a bladder infection at his home in Los Osos, California, on January 8, 2010. He was 88. He was born Arthur Farrington in Detroit, Michigan, on October 12, 1921. His father was killed in an automobile accident in the late 1920s, and his mother and her new husband abandoned him to a halfway house after moving to California. He was adopted by composer and music teacher Joseph W. Clokey in 1932, who trained him in art and photography. He served in the military during World War II, performing photo reconnaissance missions over France and North Africa. After his discharge he met Ruth Parkander while studying to be an Episcopal minister. The two married and began working together in films. Clokey studied under Slavko Vorkapich. He created the 1953 clay-animation film Gumbasia, with objects of different sizes, shapes, and colors reshaping themselves to a jazz score. Sam Engel, 20th Century–Fox president, was instrumental in the

Art Clokey (right, with Gumby)

72 Clokeys producing The Gumby Show after as debuting on The Howdy Doody Show. The green clay figure was based on the shape of a gingerbread man, and his legs were spaced apart to balance the figure during stop-motion animation photography. Gumby was usually accompanied by his brown pony, Pokey. He was voiced by several female performers, including Ginny Tyler and Nancy Wible, in his original run in the late 1950s. Dallas McKinnon became the voice of Gumby when the series returned in the early 1960s. The Clokeys also created the claymation series Davey and Goliath, produced by the Lutheran Church in America, in the early 1960s. He also created animation for the opening titles for the AIP films Dr. Goldfoot and the Bikini Machine (1965) and How to Stuff a Wild Bikini (1965). Art and Ruth divorced in 1966, and he married Gloria Clokey in 1976. Gumby and Pokey became popular bendable toys in the 1960s, and reentered popular culture in the 1980s, when Eddie Murphy parodied the green-hued figure on Saturday Night Live with the catchphrase “I’m Gumby Dammit.”

COBB, BUFF Buff Cobb, who teamed with then-husband Mike Wallace to host the early television talk show Buff and Mike, died in a Lebanon, New Hampshire, nursing home on July 12, 2010. She was 82. She was born Patrizia Cobb Chapman in Florence, Italy,

Buff Cobb

on October 19, 1927. Her father was an opera singer and her mother was a dramatist. She was raised in New York City and Santa Monica, California, and began performing on stage after graduating high school in the mid–1940s. She was featured in a touring production of Noel Coward’s Private Lives starring Tallulah Bankhead from 1946 to 1948. She also appeared in small roles in several films including Anna and the King of Siam (1946) as one of Rex Harrison’s wives. She married future 60 Minutes correspondent Mike Wallace in 1949, and they hosted a radio program in Chicago together. They became hosts of one of televisions first talk shows, Mike and Buff, on CBS in the early 1950s. They also hosted All Around the Town for CBS in New York from 1951 to 1952. Cobb was a panelist on the ABC game show Masquerade Party, which aired from 1953 to 1955. She and Wallace divorced in 1957. Cobb produced several Broad-

73

2010 • Obituaries

way productions in the 1970s including a revival of George Bernard Shaw’s Too Good to Be True.

COCHRAN, HANK Singer and songwriter Hank Cochran, who co-wrote Patsy Cline’s hit country song “I Fall to Pieces,” died of cancer at his home in Hendersonville, Tennessee, on July 15, 2010. He was 74. He was born Garland Perry Cochran in Isola, Mississippi, on August 2, 1935. He began singing and playing guitar from an early age and, after a troubled childhood, he moved to California at 15. He teamed with fellow performer Eddie Cochran (no relation) as the Cochran Brothers. They made several rockabilly recordings in the Guido Coen

Hank Cochran

mid–1950s and performed on such local programs as California Hayride and Town Hall Party. After disbanding Eddie became a leading rock ’n’ roll performer before a car crash in 1960 ended his career and life. Hank moved to Nashville in 1960, where he began writing songs for Pamper Music. He teamed with Harlan Howard to pen the 1961 Patsy Cline hit “I Fall to Pieces.” He also wrote the Cline hits “She’s Got You” and “Why Can’t He Be You.” His song “Make the World Go Away” was a hit for Ray Price and Eddy Arnold. Cochran also wrote several popular songs for Burl Ives, including “A Little Bitty Tear,” “It’s Just My Funny Way of Laughin’,” and “The Same Old Hurt.” He also wrote the hits “The Chair” and “Ocean Front Property” for George Strait, “It’s Not Love (But It’s Not Bad)” and “Don’t You Ever Get Tired (of Hurting Me)” for Merle Haggard, and Mickey Gilley’s “That’s All That Matters.” Cochran was featured in Willie Nelson’s 1980 film Honeysuckle Rose, and in 2000’s Radical Jack with Billy Ray Cyrus. He also recorded several albums during his career including 2002’s Livin’ for a Song: A Songwriter’s Autobiography.

COEN, GUIDO Italian-British film executive Guido Coen, who headed Twickenham Film Studios from the late 1950s, died in England on October 19, 2010. He was 95. Coen was born in Milan, Italy, in 1915, and came to England with his family in 1929. He began working in films as an assistant to producer Filippo Del Giudice in the late 1930s. His career was interrupted during World War II, when he was interned on the Isle of Man because he was an Italian. He resumed his career after the war, serving as secretary for Del Giudice’s Two

Cities Films production company from 1947 to 1949. He subsequently began working as an independent producer on such films as She Shall Have Murder (1950), Meet Mr. Callaghan (1954), The Golden Link (1954), One Jump Ahead (1955), The Hornet’s Nest (1955), Behind the Headlines (1956), The Man Without a Body (1957), There’s Always a Thursday (1957), Date with Disaster (1957), The End of the Line (1957), Kill Her Gently (1957), The Woman Eater (1958), Murder Reported (1958), Strictly Confidential (1959), and The Pleasure Lovers (1959) which he also wrote. Coen joined Twickenham Film Studios in 1959, serving as studio and production controller and executive director. He continued to produce, and occasionally write, such films as Operation Cupid (1960), Jungle Street Girls (1961), Dangerous Afternoon (1961), Strongroom (1962), Panic (1963), The Penthouse (1967), Baby Love (1968), One Brief Summer (1970), Burke & Hare (1972), Au Pair Girls (1972), and Intimate Games (1976). Coen remained at Twickenham until his retirement in January of 1999.

COHAN, MARTIN Television writer and producer Martin Cohan, who was co-creator of the sit-coms Who’s the Boss? and Silver Spoons, died of complications from large cell lymphoma in Pacific Palisades, California, on May 19, 2010. He was 77. Cohan was born on July 4, 1932. He graduated from Stanford University, and began his career working as an assistant director and stage man-

Martin Cohan

Obituaries • 2010 ager at ABC-TV. He was second assistant director under Mike Nicholls on the 1970 film Catch-22, and an assistant director for episodes of such series as The Big Valley, Gunsmoke, and Mary Tyler Moore. He also worked on the documentaries The Children of Paris, Let My People Go, and Hollywood and the Stars. He worked primarily in sitcoms from the early 1970s, writing and directing episodes of Mary Tyler Moore, and serving as a producer, director and writer for The Bob Newhart Show. He also directed episodes of Rhoda and Doc, and produced and scripted the 1978 series Flying High. He wrote and produced numerous episodes of Diff ’rent Strokes, and scripted episodes of The Odd Couple, The New Dick Van Dyke Show, The Partridge Family, All in the Family, The Bob Crane Show, The Love Boat, Hello, Larry, and the tele-film The Fantastic World of D.C. Collins (1984) starring Gary Coleman. He created the sit-com Silver Spoons and scripted numerous episodes of the Rick Schoeder starrer from 1982 to 1987. Cohan teamed with partner Blake Hunter to create the comedy series Who’s the Boss? starring Tony Danza and Judith Light, which they produced and wrote from 1984 to 1992.

74 COLE, JAMES Actor James Cole died of lung disease in Raleigh, North Carolina, on January 25, 2010. He was 84. Cole was born in Porum, Oklahoma, on August 7, 1925. He was a dentist in Norman, Oklahoma, before retiring in the late 1980s to embark on a career as an actor and model. He was featured in the films

James Cole

COLE, CLAY Disc jockey Clay Cole, who was a fixture on New York City radio and television from the late 1950s, died on December 18, 2010. He was 72. He was born Albert Rucker, Jr., in Youngstown, Ohio, on January 1, 1938, and began hosting his own local teen television music show in 1953. He moved to New York City later in the decade, and where he changed his name

R.O.T.O.R. (1988) and Home Alone 2: Lost in New York (1992), and appeared on television in episodes of the soap opera One Life to Live and the crime drama Law & Order. He also performed frequently with the OffBroadway interactive mystery troupe, Murder Mystery Inc., and was featured in numerous print advertising campaigns.

COLEMAN, GARY Former child star Gary Coleman, who starred as the endearingly diminutive Arnold Jackson on the hit sitcom Diff ’rent Strokes from 1978 to 1986, died of a Provo, Utah, hospital on May 28, 2010. He was 42. He had been hospitalized for a head injury from a fall, and was removed from life support after suffering a brain hemorrhage. Coleman suffered from congenital kidney disease as a child, and health problems plagued him throughout his life. He had undergone kidney transplants at the age of five and again at 16, and had been hospitalized twice with seizures over the past year. Coleman was born in Zion, Illinois, on February 8, 1968, and was adopted as an infant. He apClay Cole

to Clay Cole in 1959. He hosted the television dance program The Clay Cole Show on WNTA and WPIX from 1959 through 1968. He also appeared in a cameo role in the 1961 film Twist Around the Clock. He remained in television, hosting the 1974 music special Clay Cole’s 20 Years of Rock and Roll. He was also co-creator of the CBS primetime entertainment series People in 1979, and produced such specials as The Discovery of Marilyn Monroe, Play Bridge with Omar Sharif, and the daily segments This Day in Hollywood. His final credit was producing and directing the television broadcast of the Sanremo Music Festival in Italy in 2002. He was also the author the memoir-music history Sh-Boom!: The Explosion of Rock ’n’ Roll (1953 –1968), published in 2009.

Gary Coleman

75 peared in local commercials as a child, and his on screen chemistry brought him to Hollywood. He was originally cast by television producer Norman Lear for a proposed new version of the Our Gang comedies, but the project was never completed. Instead, he became the young star of the sitcom Diff ’rent Strokes in 1978. He played Arnold Jackson, who along with his older brother Willis (Todd Bridges), were orphaned black children adopted by the wealthy white businessman Phillip Drummond (Conrad Bain). Dana Plato was featured as Drummond’s daughter, who became older sister to the two boys. The series ran from 1978 until 1986, and Coleman became a cultural icon. Off screen the three young stars of the show all led turbulent private lives. Bridges was arrested several times, including an acquittal on charges of attempted murder in 1990. Plato also encountered legal difficulties resulting from drug use, and died of an overdose in 1999. Coleman sued his parents and business manager in 1989 for misuse of his trust fund, and was forced to file for bankruptcy protection 10 years later. He was arrested on charges of assault and disorderly conduct in the 1990s, and again on domestic violence charges in 2009. He was unable to parlay his success in Diff ’rent Strokes to other projects, though he did appear frequently on television, guesting in such series as Medical Center, The Jeffersons, Good Times, Buck Rogers in the 25th Century, The Facts of Life, The Alan Thicke Show, The John Davidson Show, The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson, Silver Spoons, Amazing Stories, The Hollywood Squares, Simon & Simon, 227, Married … With Children, The Jackie Thomas Show, Saturday Night Live, The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, Homeboys in Outer Space, The Parent ’Hood, The Keenan Ivory Wayans Show, The Naked Truth, MADtv, The Wayans Bros., the animated series Waynehead as the voice of Kevin, Shasta McNasty, The Simpsons, Electric Playground, The Jamie Foxx Show, The Drew Carey Show, My Wife and Kids, The Hughleys, Baby Bob, The Rerun Show, Son of the Beach, The Parkers, Jimmy Kimmel Live!, The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, and The Surreal Life. Coleman was also featured in several tele-films including The Kid from Left Field (1979), Lucy Moves to NBC (1980), Scout’s Honor (1980), Anson and Lorrie (1981), The Kid with the Broken Halo (1982) and its animated spin-off The Gary Coleman Show (1982) as Andy LeBeau, The Kid with the 200 I.Q. (1983), The Fantastic World of D.C. Collins (1984), Playing with Fire (1985), Like Father, Like Santa (1988), and A Christmas Carol (2003) as the Ghost of Christmas Past. He appeared in a handful of feature films during his career including On the Right Track (1981), Jimmy the Kid (1982), S.F.W. (1994), Party (1994) which he also produced, Fox Hunt (1996), Dirty Work (1998), Shafted! (1999), The Flunky (2000), Frank McKlusky, C.I. (2002), Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star (2003), Chasing the Edge (2004), Save Virgil. (2004), Church Ball (2006), An American Carol (2008), The Great Buck Howard (2008), and Midgets vs. Mascots (2009). He was one of more than 100 candidates for governor of California in a special election in October of 2003 following the recall of Gray Davis. He placed 8th in the large field that was won by fellow actor Arnold Schwarzenegger. Coleman married Shannon Price in 2007, and their tumultuous relation-

2010 • Obituaries ship resulted in appearances on the television reality series Divorce Court in 2008.

COLEMAN, KING Rhythm and blues singer King Coleman, who was best known for the 1959 hit “(Do the) Mashed Potatoes,” died in Miami, Florida, on September 11, 2010. He was 78. He was born Carlton Coleman in Tampa, Florida, on January 20, 1932. He

King Coleman

was a popular disc jockey in Tampa and Miami in the 1950s. He sang vocals on the hit single “(Do the) Mashed Potatoes” with James Brown’s band in 1959. He also recorded the novelty singles “Mashed Potato Man” and “The Boo Boo Song.” He was also featured in several films including Claudine (1974) and Up the Academy (1980), and guest-starred in an episode of television’s Welcome Back, Kotter.

COLITTI, RIK Stage, screen and television actor Rik Colitti died in a Southampton, New York, hospital on January 30, 2010. He was 75. Colitti was born in New York City on February 1, 1934. He began his career on stage in the late 1950s, and performed frequently in local productions and touring companies. He toured with the first national company of The Odd Couple in 1965, and made his Broadway debut in Terrence McNally’s The Ritz in 1975. He also performed in the New York Shakespeare Festival productions of The Threepenny Opera (1976) and Macbeth (1982), and the Off-Broadway

Rik Colitti

Obituaries • 2010 production of One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. Colitti made his film debut in Murder, Inc. (1960), and was also seen in the films Terror in the City (1964), My Brother Anastasia (1973), Road Movie (1974), Love and Bullets (1979), Voices (1979), Fort Apache the Bronx (1981), Billions for Boris (1984), The Pope of Greenwich Village (1984), Fast Forward (1985), Crocodile Dundee (1986), Barfly (1987), She’s Back (1989), A Shock to the System (1990), Car 54, Where Are You? (1994), Dead Presidents (1995), and Two Bits (1995). Colitti also appeared on television in several episodes of the sit-com version of Car 54, Where Are You? in the early 1960s. His other television credits include the tele-film Almost Partners (1987), and episodes of Taxi, The George Carlin Show, The Cosby Mysteries, and Law & Order.

COLLETTE, BUDDY Jazz saxophonist and band leader Buddy Collette died of a respiratory ailment in a Los Angeles hospital on September 19, 2010. He was 89. He was born William Marcel Collette in Los Angeles on August 6, 1921. He began performing on the alto sax as a child and formed his first band, which included Charlie Mingus, at the age of 12. Collette served in the U.S. Navy during World War II, and played with dance bands in the Los Angeles area. He also worked as a stu-

Buddy Collette

dio musician, and played with the band on Groucho Marx’s television show, You Bet Your Life. He teamed with Benny Carter to fight segregation in the American Federation of Musicians in the early 1950s, and succeeded in merging the black and white union locals. He was flutist for drummer Chico Hamilton’s quintet in 1955, and performed with such artists as Charlie Parker, Dexter Gordon, Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Thelonious Monk, Stan Kenton, Sarah Vaughan, Ella Fitzgerald, Nat King Cole, and Louie Bellson during his career. He was forced to retire from performing in 1998 after suffering a stroke.

COLLETTI, BOB Stuntman and actor Bob Colletti died in Long Beach, New York, on March 9, 2010. He was 39. Colletti was born on November 11, 1970. He began working in television in the late 1980s, performing stunts for such series as America’s Most Wanted, Law & Order, Spin City, Saturday Night Live, Homicide: Life on the Street, Oz, Third Watch, The Beat, Young Ameri-

76 cans, Sex and the City, 100 Centre Street, The Wire, Hack, The Sopranos, Queens Supreme, The Jury, Prison Break, All My Children, One Life to Live, Law & Order: Criminal Intent, Kidnapped, 30 Rock, Rescue Me, New Amsterdam, Life on Mars, Kings, Bored to Death, and Boardwalk Empire. He also worked on the tele-film Empire

Bob Colletti

Falls in 2005. Colletti performed stunts and appeared in small roles in numerous films during his career including The Basketball Diaries (1995), Sleepers (1996), The Associate (1996), Conspiracy Theory (1997), The Object of My Affection (1998), The Last Days of Disco (1998), Girl, Interrupted (1999), Animal Factory (2000), Frequency (2000), Prince of Central Park (2000), Little Nicky (2000), Prison Song (2001), Pootie Tang (2001), Tuck Everlasting (2002), Gangs of New York (2002), Daredevil (2003), Anger Management (2003), The School of Rock (2003), Barbershop 2: Back in Business (2004), New York Minute (2004), The Stepford Wives (2004), Spider-Man 2 (2004), The Manchurian Candidate (2004), Ladder 49 (2004), Alfie (2004), xXx: State of the Union (2005), War of the Worlds (2005), Brooklyn Lobster (2005), Stay (2005), Rent (2005), The Producers (2005), The Pink Panther (2006), Freedomland (2006), 16 Blocks (2006), The Sentinel (2006), The Devil Wears Prada (2006), My Super Ex-Girlfriend (2006), All the King’s Men (2006), The Departed (2006), School for Scoundrels (2006), Kings (2007), We Own the Night (2007), I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry (2007), The Bourne Ultimatum (2007), Underdog (2007), The Invasion (2007), The Nanny Diaries (2007), Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead (2007), The Brave One (2007), Across the Universe (2007), August Rush (2007), American Gangster (2007), Enchanted (2007), I Am Legend (2007), Be Kind Rewind (2008), Welcome Home, Roscoe Jenkins (2008), Leatherheads (2008), Two Lovers (2008), You Don’t Mess with the Zohan (2008), The Dark Knight (2008), Body of Lies (2008), Cadillac Records (2008), Paul Blart: Mall Cop (2009), Little New York (2009), Old Dogs (2009), Edge of Darkness (2010), Remember Me (2010), The Bounty Hunter (2010), The Sorcerer’s Apprentice (2010), and The Other Guys (2010).

COLLINS, CATFISH Funk guitarist Phelps “Catfish” Collins died of cancer in Cincinnati, Ohio, on August 6, 2010. He was 66. Collins was born in Cincin-

77 nati in 1944. He teamed with his younger brother, Bootsy, and Kash Waddy and Philippe Wynne to form the group The Pacemakers in 1968. They accompanied James Brown as The J.B.’s, and were heard on his recordings of “Super Bad,” “Get Up (I Feel Like Being a) Sex Machine,” “Soul Power,” and “Give It Up or Turnit a

2010 • Obituaries aspiring model Aveline Boswell in the Liverpool-based sit-com Bread from 1986 to 1989. She was also seen as Carol Jones in the series Children’s Ward from 1990 to 1991, and was Denise in Brookside in 1992. She starred as Liz Freeman in Springhill from 1996 to 1997. Coman was featured in several films during her career including A Private Function (1984), The Higher Mortals (1993), and Priest (1994). She retired from acting to raise her family in 2000.

CONDON, CHRIS Cinematographer and 3D optical pioneer Chris Condon died of complications from a stroke in Encino, California, on December 19, 2010. He was 87. He was born Christo Dimitri Koudounis in North Chicago, Illinois, in 1923. He served in the Army Air Force in the Pacific during World War II. He worked for Douglas Aircraft after leaving the military, before joining Century Precision Optics as a photo-optical designer. He helped develop the Tele-Athenar tele-

Catfish Collins

Loose.” They left Brown in the early 1970s, and the Collins brothers joined Parliament-Funkadelic for the album America Eats Its Young. Catfish also performed with his brother in Bootsy’s Rubber Band in the mid–1970s. He largely retired from the music scene in the mid–1980s.

COMAN, GILLY British actress Gilly Coman, who starred as Aveline Boswell in the sit-com Bread in the late 1980s, died of a heart attack in Wirral, Merseyside, England, on July 13, 2010. She was 54. Coman was born in Liverpool, England, on September 13, 1955. She trained in drama and dance as a child, and began appearing on British television in the late 1970s. She was featured in episodes of Scene, Coronation Street, Chintz, Boys from the Blackstuff, The Gathering Seed, Scully as Marie Morgan, Weekend Playhouse, Give Us a Break, Emmerdale Farm, Summer Season, Open All Hours, The Practice, Stay Lucky, Take Off with T-Bag, Inspector Morse, Against All Odds, The Man Who Made Husbands Jealous, Casualty, A Touch of Frost, and Nature Boy. She starred as

Gilly Coman

Chris Condon

photo lens that cinematographers for Walt Disney’s True Life Adventures series frequently used in the 1950s. He also developed a 3D camera lens that allowed the use of a single camera to film the effects. Condon formed Magnavision (later renamed StereoVision Entertainment) in 1969, and produced and photographed the 1971 3D exploitation film The Stewardesses (1971). The company supplied 3D camera lens for over 50 features around the world. Condon served as cinematographer on the films The Capitol Hill Girls (1977), Surfer Girls (1978), Parasite (1983), Jaws 3-D (1983), and Evil Spawn (1987).

CONRAD, SID Character actor Sid Conrad died at his home in Williamsburg, Virginia, on April 16, 2010. He was 86. Conrad was born on August 10, 1923, and raised in Otsego, Michigan. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II, and earned a bachelors degree in history and a masters in journalism from Columbia University after his discharge. He embarked on a career as an actor, performing on stages throughout the country. He also began appearing in films and television in the 1960s. He was featured in episodes of such series as Judd for the Defense, The Doris Day Show, Police Woman, All in the Family, Charlie’s Angels, The Waltons, Supertrain, Little House on the Prairie, Father Murphy, Voyagers!, Archie Bunker’s Place, Simon & Simon, Lottery!,

Obituaries • 2010 Airwolf, Who’s the Boss?, Dallas, Moonlighting, The Paper Chase, Knots Landing, Brothers, The Young and the Restless in the recurring role of Judge Patrick Sullivan, CBS Schoolbreak Special, Cheers, My Two Dads, My Sister Sam, General Hospital, Homefront, The Marshal, Sisters, Chicago Hope, The Michael Richards Show, ER, The West Wing, and JAG. Conrad was also seen in the tele-films

78 seidon Explosion (1973), Toate Pinzele Sus (1976), The Billion Dollar Fire (1976), Gloria nu Cinta (1976), Impuscaturi sub Clar de Luna (1977), Revansa (1978), Actiunea Autobuzul (1978), Duelul (1981), Uncle Marin, the Billionaire (1981), The Mysteries of Bucharest (1983), The Secret of Bacchus (1984), Secretul lui Nemesis (1985), Cucoana Chirita (1986), Miss Litoral (1990), Cry of Redemption (1996), Sexy Harem Ada-Kaleh (2001), How I Celebrated the End of the World (2006), Pacala se Intoarce (2006), Roming (2007), Supravietuitorul (2008), and Poker (2010).

CORNEAU, ALAIN French film director Alain Corneau died of cancer in Paris on August 30, 2010. He was 67. Corneau was born in Meung-sur-Loire, Loiret, France, on August 7, 1943. He began working in films in the late 1960s as an assistant director for Target: Harry (1969), Time to Live (1969), The Confession (1970), Elise, or Real Life (1970), A Savage Summer (1970), Atlantic Wall (1970), and It Only Happens to Others (1971). He

Sid Conrad

The Amazing Howard Hughes (1977), The Last Ride of the Dalton Gang (1979), Nightside (1980), Best Kept Secrets (1984), Casebusters (1986), Police Story: Gladiator School (1988), and The Burkittsville 7 (2000). He appeared in a handful of films during his career including King Kong (1976), A Different Story (1978), The Annihilators (1985), Wisdom (1986), Caddyshack II (1988), The Glimmer Man (1996), and Welcome to Paradox (2009).

CONSTANTIN, JEAN Romanian actor Jean Constantin died in Constanta, Romania, on May 26, 2010. He was 81. Constantin was born in Techirghiol, Romania, on August 21, 1928. He made his film debut in the early 1960s, and appeared frequently on stage, film, and television over the next 50 years. His film credits, which often cast him in comic roles, include The Baron of the Locks (1960), Candide (1960), Haiducii (1966), The Boss of Champignol (1966), Zile de Vara (1968), The Axe (1969), Haiducii lus Saptecai (1970), B.D. in Alerta (1970), Stejar, Extrema Urgenta (1973), The Po-

Jean Constantin

Alain Corneau

began writing and directing films in the early 1970s, and was best known for his crime dramas. His directorial credits include France Inc. (1974), Police Python 357 (1976) starring Yves Montand, La Menace (1977), Serie Noire (1979), Choice of Arms (1981), Fort Saganne (1984), Extreme Justice (1986), Nocturne Indien (1989), Tous les Matins du Monde (1991), New World (1995), Les Enfants de Lumiere (1995), Le Cousin (1997), The Prince of the Pacific (2000), Fear and Trembling (2003), Le Deuxieme Souffle (2007), and Love Crime (2010) starring Kristin Scott Thomas.

CORS, MIQUEL Spanish actor Miquel Cors died of a heart attack in Valldoreix, Catalonia, Spain, on May 27, 2010. He was 62. Cors was born in Barcelona, Spain, in 1948. He appeared on stage, screen, and television from the mid–1970s. He was featured in various roles in episodes of Festa amb Rosa Maria Sarda on television in 1979, and was Amadeu Hurtado in Telegaseta de Catalunya in 1984. He starred as Antonio Aiguader in the Catalan soap opera Poble Nou in 1994, and was Eloi Blanc in the series Laberint d’Ombres in 1999. Cors also appeared in several films during his career including My Soul Brother (1994), Con dos Cojones (2001), and The One-Handed Truck (2008).

79

2010 • Obituaries

Miquel Cors

Geraldine Court

CORSICA JOE Wrestler Francois Miquet, who better known in the ring as Corsica Joe, died in Nashville, Tennessee, on March 14, 2010. He was 90. Miquet was born in Bonbillett, France, on January 17, 1920, the younger brother of wrestler Felix Miquet. He was a leading amateur wrestler before turning pro in 1948. He

Richards on Guiding Light from 1980 to 1983, and was Mary Georgia on All My Children in 1987. She was also featured in the 1990 film Love Hurts, and an episode of the television sit-com Kate & Allie.

COURTNEY, BOB South African radio broadcaster and actor Bob Courtney died in South Africa on October 23, 2010. He was 86. Courtney was born in Dorset, England, on October 25, 1923. He served with the RAF Entertainment section during World War II.

Corsica Joe

competed throughout the United States and Canada, and soon teamed with Jean-Louis Roy (Corsica Jean) as the pirate-inspired Corsica Brothers. They were a formidable pairing, and held tag titles in Florida, Alabama, and Tennessee on numerous occasions. The duo continued to tag together through the early 1960s, and Joe retired from the ring in the 1970s. He was married to wrestler Sara Lee for over 45 years until her death in 2008. The two were active behind the scenes in the Jarrett’s TNA wrestling promotion in Nashville in the early 1990s.

He settled in South Africa in 1946 where he hosted such radio programs as Greet the Bride, Welcome Little Stranger, Stop the Music, and Eyegene Jackpot. He was also featured in a handful of South African films in the 1960s including Jamie Uys’ All the Way to Paris (1965), Dingaka (1965), The Jackals (1967) with Vincent Price, and The Cape Town Affair (1967) with James Brolin and Jacqueline Bisset.

COURT, GERALDINE Actress Geraldine Court died at her home in Warwick, New York, on November 20, 2010. She was 71. She was born Geraldine Ann Oldenboom in Binghampton, New York, on July 28, 1939. She began her career on stage in New York in the 1960s. Court was best known for her work in soap operas, starring as Nurse Jennifer Sullivan on As the World Turns from 1971 to 1972, and as Dr. Ann Larimer on The Doctors from 1973 to 1977. She starred as Jennifer

COURTNEY, JACQUELINE Actress Jacqueline Courtney, who was best known for her role as Alice Matthews Frame on the daytime soap opera Another World from 1964 to 1975, died of metastatic melanoma on December 20, 2010. She was 64. She was born Sharon Courtney in East Orange, New Jersey, on September 24, 1946. She was featured in small roles in several soap operas from the early 1960s including Our Five Daughters, The Doctors, and The Edge of Night. She also appeared in

Bob Courtney

Obituaries • 2010 two episodes of the prime-time adventure series Route 66. She was Alice Matthews on the NBC soap Another World from its inception in May of 1964. Her romance and eventual marriage to Steve Frame, played by George Reinholt, became a major storyline before the actors were dismissed in 1975. Courtney subsequently joined the

Jacqueline Courtney

cast of ABC’s One Life to Live as Pat Kendall, where she remained through 1983. She reprised her role as Alice on Another World from 1984 to 1985, and made a cameo on the soap’s 25th anniversary in 1989. She was also featured as Diane Winston in the soap Loving in 1987, before retiring from the screen.

COWGILL, TIM Actor Tim Cowgill died in a road mishap when he was thrown from his motorcycle after striking a deer, and was hit by another vehicle in Auburn Township, Ohio, on June 13, 2010. He was 52. Cowgill was born in Maywood, California, on November 19, 1957. He worked with the Ventura County Sher-

80 on televisions in episodes of ER, Guilty or Innocent?, and Mystery ER.

COWLING, BRENDA British comic character actress Brenda Cowling died in Deville Hall, the retirement home for British actors in Northwood, London Borough of Hillingdon, on October 2, 2010. She was 85. Cowling was born in London in 1925, and studied at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in the 1940s. She made her film debut in a small role in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1950 thriller Stage Fright and was seen in The Silken Affair in 1956. She became a familiar face on British television from the mid–1950s, appearing in episodes of The Other Man, The Budds of Paragon Row, ITV Play of the Week, Suspense, Outbreak of Murder, Maigret, The Avengers, Sergeant Cork, The Wednesday Play, The Forsyte Saga as Mrs. Perren, Champion House, Nicholas Nickleby, The Root of All Evil?, Special Branch, Dixon of Dock Green, The Goodies, Budgie, All Gas and Gaiters, Armchair Theatre, The Rivals of Sherlock Holmes, Tom Brown’s Schooldays, Six Days of Justice, Follyfoot, Scott On…, Dad’s Army, My Wife Next Door, Love Story, Oh, Father!, Romany Jones, The Pallisers as Mrs. Bunce, Good Girl as Gwen Botley, No Strings, Z Cars, Fawlty Towers, Shadows, Angels, The Emigrants, Raffles, Happy Ever After, The Duchess of Duke Street, Grange Hill, The Famous Five, Sykes, The Old Curiosity Shop, Only When I Laugh, How’s Your Father?, Shoestring, Nanny, Are You Being Served?, You’re Only Young Twice, It Ain’t Half Hot Mum, Sink or Swim, Stalky & Co., Q.E.D., The Agatha Christie Hour, Jackanory Playhouse, Potter as Jane from 1979 to 1983, Sharon and Elsie, Murder Not Proven?, The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged 13 3/4, Lytton’s Diary, T-Bag Strikes Again, A Dorothy L. Sayers Mystery, The Charmer, In Sickness and in Health, Hi-de-Hi!, The Upper Hand, The Legacy of Reginald Perrin, The Detectives, Casualty, Goodnight Sweetheart, Get Real, Babes in the Wood, Where the Heart Is, Barbara, The Bill, The Last Detective, Doctors and Nurses, Jonathan Creek, Murder in Suburbia, Holby City, Doctors, French and Saunders, and According to Bex. She starred as Mrs. Blanche Lipton in the comedy series You Rang, M’Lord? from 1988 to 1993. Her other television credits include productions of Crime Story (1979), We, the Accused (1980), Hammer House of Horror’s The Two Faces of Evil (1980), Oliver Twist (1982), The Ghost Downstairs

Tim Cowgill

iff ’s Department as a deputy from 1980 to 2001. He also began appearing in small roles in films in the late 1990s, with roles in Happy, Texas (1999), Pros & Cons (1999), The Perfect Storm (2000), Hot Parts (2003), Believers Among Us (2005), White Nights (2005), Rose (2006), Satisfy Me (2007), Crystal Hearing (2009), Identity Theft (2009), Amulett (2009), and Desert Fox (2009). He also appeared

Brenda Cowling

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2010 • Obituaries

(1982), The Rainbow Coloured Disco Dancer (1983), London’s Burning: The Movie (1986), They Do It with Mirrors (1991), Aka Albert Walker (2002), and The Legend of the Tamworth Two (2004). Cowling continued to make occasional film appearances throughout her career, with roles in Bindle (1966), Up in the Air (1969), The Railway Children (1970), Please Sir! (1971), The Man and the Snake (1972), Young Winston (1972), Carry on Girls (1973), The Black Windmill (1974), Carry on Behind (1975), The Black Panther (1977), Terry Gilliam’s Jabberwocky (1977) as Mrs. Fishfinger, International Velvet (1978), Pink Floyd The Wall (1982) as a teacher, the 1983 James Bond film Octopussy (1983) with Roger Moore, Dream Lover (1986), Greenfingers (2000), and Room to Rent (2000).

CRAIG, DONALD Character actor Donald Craig died in Round Rock, Texas, on April 20, 2010. He was 68. Craig was born in Abilene, Texas, on August 14, 1941. He appeared frequently in films and television from the early 1980s. His film credits include Frances (1982), Dragnet (1987), Shag (1989), The White Girl (1990), Gang Related (1997), Living in Fear (2001), and Skinwalker: Curse of the Shaman (2005). He also appeared in the tele-

Vincent Craig

CRAMSEY, DENISE Television reality show producer Denise Cramsey, who shared two Emmy Awards for her work on the ABC series Extreme Makeover: Home Edition, collapsed from a brain aneurysm after a workout at a Hollywood fitness center on November 23, 2010, and died at Cedars-Sinai Hospital soon after. She was 41. She began working in television in the

Donald Craig

films Bare Essence (1982), Amazons (1984), Space (1985), The Revenge of Al Capone (1989) as FDR, Guts and Glory: The Rise and Fall of Oliver North (1989), The Court-Martial of Jackie Robinson (1990), The Heart of Justice (1992), and The Ultimate Lie (1996). Craig’s other television credits include episodes of Charlie’s Angels, Father Murphy, General Hospital, Remington Steele, Scarecrow and Mrs. King, Knots Landing, Dallas, Knight Rider, Comedy Factory, You Again?, Dynasty, Simon & Simon, Santa Barbara, Dear John, Small Wonder in the recurring role of Robert Jennings, Murder, She Wrote, MacGyver, Columbo, Baywatch Nights, and Sabrina, the Teenage Witch.

CRAIG, VINCENT Navajo comedian, singer and actor Vincent Craig died of cancer in Scottsdale, Arizona, on May 15, 2010. He was 59. Craig was born in Crownpoint, New Mexico, on June 6, 1950. He was creator of the comic strip super hero Mutton Man, and was a popular performer at live venues. Craig was also featured in the film drama Turquoise Rose (2007), and starred in the 2008 comedy Blue Gap Boy’z with comedians James Junes and Ernie Tsosie.

Denise Cramsey

early 2000s as an executive producer on the reality series Medical Detectives, A Baby Story, Trading Spaces, House Wars, and Manhunt: The Search for America’s Most Gorgeous Male Model. She was executive producer of Extreme Makeover: Home Edition from 2006 to 2008, and of ABC’s True Beauty from 2009 to 2010. Cramsey was also executive producer for the 2010 documentary Expedition Inspiration with her fiancé, filmmaker Scott Farquharson, and the NBC reality series School Pride.

CRAWFORD, JOHN Actor John Crawford, who appeared in films from the 1940s and was a familiar face on television for over three decades, died of a stroke in Newbury Park, California, on September 21, 2010. He was 90. He was born Cleve Richardson in Colfax, Washington, on September 13, 1920. He studied drama at the University of Washington, and began his career in films working as a laborer at RKO Studios. He also helped construct sets at Los Angeles’ Circle Theater, where he occasionally appeared on stage. He began ap-

Obituaries • 2010 pearing onscreen in small roles in films and serials in the mid–1940s including Thoroughbreds (1944), The Phantom of 42nd Street (1945), Without Reservations (1946), The Time of Their Lives (1946), G-Men Never Forget (1948), Dangers of the Canadian Mounted (1948), Sons of Adventure (1948), Adventures of Frank and Jesse James (1948), Ghost of Zorro (1949), The James Brothers of Missouri (1949), Radar Patrol vs. Spy King (1949), Chain Lightning (1950), The Invisible Monster (1950), Mystery Street (1950), Lonely Heart Bandits (1950), A Life of Her Own (1950), Union Station (1950), Right Cross (1950), Cyrano de Bergerac (1950), Cuban Fireball (1951), The Red Badge of Courage (1951), Raton Pass (1951), I Was a Communist for the FBI (1951), Hollywood Story (1951), Show Boat (1951), Honeychile (1951), Man in the Saddle (1951), Northwest Territory (1951), A Star Shall Rise (1952), The Greatest Show on Earth (1952), Scaramouche (1952), Actors and Sin (1952), Zombies of the Stratosphere (1952), the 1952 serial Blackhawk as Chuck, Old Oklahoma Plains (1952), The Ring (1952), Son of Geronimo (1952), Stop, You’re Killing Me (1952), Invasion USA (1952), Star of Texas (1953), Marshal of Cedar Rock (1953), Salome (1953), Serpent of the Nile (1953), Rebel City (1953), Mission Over Korea (1953), the Columbia serial The Great Adventures of Captain Kidd (1953) as Captain Kidd, Conquest of Cochise (1953), The Big Heat (1953), Slaves of Babylon (1953), Prisoners of the Casbah (1953), Three Sailors and a Girl (1953), Man Crazy (1953), Trader Tom of the China Seas (1954), Battle of Rogue River (1954), Captain Kidd and the Slave Girl (1954), John Paul Jones (1959) as George Washington, and Solomon and Sheba (1959) as Joab. Crawford was featured in a handful of films in England in the late 1950s, occasionally playing the lead, in such films as The Key (1958), Intent to Kill (1958), Orders to Kill (1958), Floods of Fear (1959), The Impersonator (1960), The Man Who Was Nobody (1960), Hell Is the City (1960), and Piccadilly Third Stop (1960). He continued in supporting roles in films and television in Hollywood, appearing as Dr. Bosco in 1960’s I Aim at the Stars and Captain Hank Schlosberg in Exodus (1960). His other film credits include The Long Shadow (1961), The 300 Spartans (1962), The Longest Day (1962), Come Fly with Me (1963), Captain Sinbad (1963), Jason and the Argonauts (1963) as Polydeuces, The Victors (1963), The Americanization of Emily (1964), The Greatest Story Every

John Crawford

82 Told (1965), William Castle’s thriller I Saw What You Did (1965), Duel at Diablo (1966), Return of the Gunfighter (1967) as Butch Cassidy, Miss Jessica Is Pregnant (1967), The Ravine (1969), J.W. Coop (1971), Napoleon and Samantha (1972), Trouble Man (1972), The Poseidon Adventure (1972), The Severed Arm (1973), The Towering Inferno (1974), Night Moves (1975), The Enforcer (1976), Outlaw Blues (1977), Dreamer (1979), Hard Knocks (1979), Tilt (1979), The Appling Dumpling Gang Rides Again (1979), and The Boogens (1981). Crawford was a prolific television actor from the early 1950s, with roles in episodes of such series as The Roy Rogers Show, Boston Blackie, Family Theatre, The Lone Ranger, Hopalong Cassidy, Superman, The Cisco Kid, I Spy, Commando Cody, Matinee Theatre, The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin, State Trooper, Sheriff of Cochise, Telephone Time, Playhouse 90, The Loretta Young Show, Circus Boy, The Ford Television Theatre, The Silent Service, White Hunter, O.S.S., Adventures of Wild Bill Hickok, 13 Demon Street, Interpol Calling, The Edgar Wallace Mystery Theatre, Danger Man, Twilight Zone, The Untouchables, Wagon Train, The Pursuers, Ghost Squad, Zero One, The Third Man, Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre, Combat!, Profiles in Courage, The Fugitive, My Favorite Martian, The F.B.I., Batman as henchman to Roddy McDowall’s bat-villain The Bookworm, Daniel Boone, Star Trek as Commissioner Ferris in the 1967 episode “The Galileo Seven,” The Time Tunnel, Hondo, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, Mannix, Tarzan, Lost in Space as Dr. Chronos in “The Time Merchant” episode, The Wild Wild West, The Big Valley, The Guns of Will Sonnett, Bonanza, Medical Center, Land of the Giants, Hogan’s Heroes, Cade’s County, Nichols, Gunsmoke, Mission: Impossible, Banacek, Petrocelli, The Rockford Files, Rhoda, Harry O, The Invisible Man, Swiss Family Robinson, The Blue Knight, Police Story, The Bionic Woman, The Bob Newhart Show, Charlie’s Angels, The Tony Randall Show, Police Woman, The Incredible Hulk, The Amazing Spider-Man, Kaz, How the West Was Won, Salvage 1, Friends, Trapper John, M.D., Eight Is Enough, Alice, Dallas, Lou Grant, The Dukes of Hazzard, The Powers of Matthew Star, Dynasty in the recurring role of Dan Cassidy, The Mississippi, Matt Houston, Knight Rider, and Hardcastle and McCormick. Crawford was featured in the recurring role of Sherrif Ep Bridges in The Waltons from 1972 to 1981. His other television credits include the tele-films Killer by Night (1972), Message to My Daughter (1973), Strange Homecoming (1974), Guilty or Innocent: The Sam Sheppard Murder Case (1975), The Macahans (1976), The Two-Five (1978), Wheels (1978), Desperate Women (1978), From Here to Eternity (1979), The Sky Trap (1979), Lawman Without a Gun (1979), Elvis and the Beauty Queen (1981) as Vernon Presley, and The Other Victim (1981). He retired from the screen in the early 1980s.

CREMER, BRUNO French actor Bruno Cremer, who starred in the television detective series Maigret in the 1990s, died of cancer in a Paris hospital on August 6, 2010. He was 80. Cremer was born in SaintMande, France, on October 6, 1929. He studied at the Paris Conservatory, and began his career on the French stage in the early 1950s. He created the role of Thomas

83 Beckett in the 1959 premiere of Jean Anouilh’s Beckett. Cremer also appeared in numerous films from the 1950s including The Long Teeth (1952), When a Woman Meddles (1957), Mourir d’Amour (1961), Le Tout pour le Tout (1963), La 317e Section (1965), Marco the Magnificent (1965), Objective 500 Million (1966), the World War II drama Is Paris Burning? (1966) as Colonel Rol Tanguy, If I Were a Spy (1967), Un Homme de Trop (1967), The Stranger (1967), Le Viol (1967), Un Killer per sua Maesta (1968), Bye, Barbara (1968), Les Gauloises Bleues (1968), Bonnot’s Gang (1969), The Time to Die (1970), Pour un Sourire (1970), Safety Catch (1970), Biribi (1971), The Assassination (1972), L’Amante dell’orsa Maggiore (1972), Without Appeal (1973), The Suspects (1974), The Protector (1974), Section Speciale (1975), Flesh of the Orchid (1975), Hunter Will Get You (1976), The Good and the

2010 • Obituaries Tango Bar (1991), and La Piovra 6 — L’Ultimo Secreto (1992). He became best known for his role as the pipesmoking Belgian detective Jules Maigret in the Maigret television series from 1991 to 2005. Cremer published his autobiography, Un Certaine Jeune Homme, in 2003.

CROCITTI, VINCENZO Italian comic character actor Vincenzo Crocitti died in Rome after a long illness on September 29, 2010. He was 61. Crocitti was born in Rome on July 16, 1949. Crocitti began his film career in the late 1960s, and was seen in such features as The World’s Gold (1967), Mario Bava’s spaghetti western Roy Colt and Winchester Jack (1970), L’Uccello Migratore (1972), The Bodies Presented Traces of Carnal Violence (aka Torso) (1973), Giovannona Long-Thigh (1973), The Gamecock (1974), Come Home and Meet My Wife (1974), Il Trafficone (1974), Il Giustiziere di Mezzogiorno (1975), The Human Factor (1975), The Cop in Blue Jeans (1976), La Madama (1976), Au-Pair Girl (1976), Melodrammore (1977), An Average Little Man (1977), Being Twenty (1978), American Fever (1978), Polvos Magicos (1979), Midnight Blue (1979), La Supplente va in Citta (1979), Ciao Cialtroni! (1979), The Precarious Bank Teller (1980), Girls Will Be Girls (1981), Casta e Pura (1981), La Settimaba al Mare (1981), Help Me Dream (1981), C’e un Fantasma nel mio Letto (1981), Una Vacanza del Cactus (1981), Desirable Teacher (1981), Pierino il Fichissimo (1981), The Odd Squad (1982), Il Sommergibile piu Pazzo del Mondo (1982), Carabinieri si Nasce (1985), Odipussi (1988), Le Finte Bionde (1989), Magnificat (1993), Italia

Bruno Cremer

Bad (1976), William Friedkin’s Sorcerer (1977) as embezzler Victor Manzon, one of the doomed nitroglycerine truck drivers, Drummer-Crab (1977), A Simple Story (1978), Last In, First Out (1978), We Forget Everything! (1979), Anthracite (1980), Meme les Momes ont du Vague a l’ame (1980), Operation Leopard (1980), Aimee (1981), La Puce et le Prive (1981), Une Robe Noire pour un Tueur (1981), Josepha (1982), Espion, Leve-toi (1982), Un jeu Brutal (1983), Effraction (1983), Le Prix du Danger (1983), Le Matelot 512 (1984), Fanny Pelopaja (1984), The Book of Mary (1984), Le Transfuge (1985), Derborence (1985), Menage (1986), Falsch (1987), De Bruit et de Fureur (1988), Adieu je t’aime (1988), Noce Blanche (1989), Brothers in Arms (1989), Tumultes (1990), Act of Sorrow (1991), Money (1991), the comedy-horror Un Vampire au Paradis (1992) as Antoine Belfond, Taxi de Nuit (1993), Under the Sand (2000), My Father Saved My Life (2001), and Above the Clouds (2003). Cremer also appeared on French television in such productions as Cet Homme-la (1979), Orient-Express (1980), Une Page d’Amour (1980), La Traque (1980), Ce Fut un Bel Ete (1982), Un Fait d’Hiver (1982), Donatien-Francois, Marquis de Sade (1985) as the Marquis, Le Regard dans le Miroir (1985), L’Enigme Blanche (1985), L’Ile (1987), Operation Ypsilon (1987), Sueurs Froides (1988), Medecins de Hommes (1988), La Piovra 4 (1989), L’Ete de la Revolution (1989), Ceux de la Soif (1989), Les Dossiers Secrets de l’Inspecteur Lavardin (1989), La Piovra 5 — Il Cuore del Problema (1990), Coma Depasse (1990),

Vincenzo Crocitti

Village (1994), Beniamino Gad — Alle Soglie dell’Incubo (1994), Uomini sull’Orlo di una Crisi di Nirvi (1995), Out of Hand (1997), Il Peso dell’Aria (2007), and La Vita e una Cosa Meravigliosa (2010). He also appeared frequently on Italian television in such productions as Orzowei, il Figlio della Savana (1977), Illa: Punto d’Osservazione (1981), Morte di Una Strega (1995), Pazza Famiglia 2 (1996), Anni ’60 (1999), Indizio Fatale (1999), and La Casa Delle Beffe (2000). He starred as Dr. Mariano in the television series Un Medico in Famiglia from 1998 to 2004, and was Vittorio Bordi in Carabinieri from 2002 to 2007.

CRONIN, RICH Singer and songwriter Rich Cronin, who was lead singer for the pop group Lyte

Obituaries • 2010 Funky Ones (LFO), died of complications from leukemia and a stroke in Boston, Massachusetts, on September 8, 2010. He was 36. Cronin was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts, on August 30, 1974. He was a founding member of the LFO group in the late 1990s, and they released the singles “Sex U Up (The Way You Like It)”

Rich Cronin

and “Can’t Have You.” They had a hit with the single “Summer Girls” in 1999, from their album LFO, and released the album Life Is Good before disbanding in 2002. Cronin was one of the former pop stars to star in the VH1 reality show, Mission: Man Band in 2007. He recorded the solo album, Billion Dollar Sound, in 2008.

CROWDEN, GRAHAM Scottish character actor Graham Crowden, who appeared as eccentric characters in films and television for over 60 years, died on October 19, 2010. He was 87. Crowden was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on November 30, 1922. He joined the Royal Scots Youth Battalion in 1940, but his career in the military ended abruptly several months later when he was seriously injured after being accidentally shot by his platoon sergeant. He decided to pursue a career in acting, despite being discouraged for his ungainly height (6' 3") and off-kilter looks. He worked in repertory both on and off stage through the early 1950s, before making his West End debut in a production of Major Barbara. He was soon playing a succession of off-beat roles on

Graham Crowden

84 stage, film, and television. He made his film debut in a small role in The Bridal Path in 1959, and was seen in the films Why Bother to Knock (1961), We Are in the Navy Now (1962), One Way Pendulum (1964), Dead Man’s Chest (1965), Morgan! (1966), The File of the Golden Goose (1969), The Virgin Soldiers (1969), Leo the Last (1970), The Rise and Rise of Michael Rimmer (1970), Up the Chastity Belt (1971), Percy (1971), The Night Digger (1971), Something to Hide (1972), and The Amazing Mr. Blunden (1972). Crowden notably brought what he called his “quality of madness” to roles in a trio of films from director Lindsay Anderson, If… (1968) as the History Master, O Lucky Man! (1973), and Britannia Hospital (1982). He was Truscott, the Master of Lunacy, in 1972’s The Ruling Class with Peter O’Toole, Mr. Clutterbug in fantasy The Amazing Mr. Blunden (1972), and Dr. Smiles in the 1973 adaptation of Michael Moorcock’s sci-fi novel The Final Programme (aka The Last Days of Man on Earth). Crowden’s other film credits include Romance with a Double Bass (1974), The Abdication (1974), The Little Prince (1974) as the General, Three Dangerous Ladies (1977), Terry Gilliam’s Jabberwocky (1977), Fiona (1977), Out of Order (1981), the James Bond film For Your Eyes Only (1981), The Missionary (1982), the dark fantasy The Company of Wolves (1984), Code Name: Emerald (1985), Out of Africa (1985), A Handful of Dust (1988), The Innocent Sleep (1996), The Sea Change (1998), I Want You (1998), Possession (2002), and Calendar Girls (2003). Crowden was a familiar face on British television from the mid–1950s, appearing in productions of David Copperfield (1956), Destination Downing Street (1957), Nicholas Nickleby (1957), Women in Love (1959), Trilby (1959), The Eustace Diamonds (1959), Nil Carborundum (1962), She’s a Free Country (1963), Much Ado About Nothing (1967), The Soldier’s Tale (1968) as The Devil, Salve Regina (1969), Trelawny of the Wells (1972), Bellamira (1974), The Sun Trap (1980), Cymbeline (1982), Much Ado About Nothing (1984), Bleak House (1985), All Passion Spent (1986), Monsignor Quixote (1987), Thacker (1992), Gulliver’s Travels (1996) with Ted Danson, Richard II (1997), Vanity Fair (1998) as Lord Bareacres, The 10th Kingdom (2000) as an Elderly Elf, Don Quixote (2000), Attila (2001), The Lost Prince (2003), and The Planman (2003). He was also featured in episodes of Dixon of Dock Green, Fair Game, Charlesworth at Large, The Life and Death of Sir John Falstaff, On Trial, The Citadel, Doctor Knock, Armchair Theatre, Harpers West One, No Hiding Place, Espionage, Detective, First Night, Marriage Lines, The Indian Tales of Rudyard Kipling, Love Story, Dave’s Kingdom, HMS Paradise as Commander Shaw, Secret Agent, Redcap, Public Eye, The Edgar Wallace Mystery Theatre, The Wednesday Play, Dr. Finlay’s Casebook, Fraud Squad, Jackanory’s 1969 production of Over Sea, Under Stone as Uncle Merry, Happy Every After, the 1970 Mystery and Imagination episode The Curse of the Mummy, Two in Clover, Callan, W. Somerset Maugham, The Adventures of Don Quick, Catweazle The Misfit, The Ten Commandments, The Guardians, the 1971 Hallmark Hall of Fame production of The Snow Goose, Casanova, His and Hers, Now Look Here, The Adventures of Black Beauty, Zodiac, Crown Court, Father Brown, Rooms, Bill Dainty, Esq., Porridge, Shades of Greene, Star Maidens,

85 Raffles, 1990, The Camerons as Henry Selkirk, The Brack Report, and The Professionals. He declined an offer to take over as the fourth Doctor Who when Jon Pertwee left the series in 1974, but later appeared as Soldeed in the 1979 episode “The Horns of Nimon” with Tom Baker. He was Theodotus in the 1983 series The Cleopatras, and continued to guest-star in such series as Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime, C.A.T.S. Eyes, Chance in a Million, My Husband and I, Bulman, Ten Great Writers of the Modern World, A Very Peculiar Practice as Dr. Jock McCannon from 1986 to 1988, The Return of Shelley, Rumpole of the Bailey, Alleyn Mysteries, Delta Wave, Love on a Branch Line as Professor Pollux, Brotherly Love, the horror spoof series Dr. Terrible’s House of Horrible in the 2001 episode “Curse of the Blood of the Lizard of Doom,” The Way We Live Now as Marquis of Auld Reekie, Mr Charity, Midsomer Murders, Waking the Dead, and Foyle’s War. He starred as Tom Ballard in the popular comedy series Waiting for God from 1990 to 1994.

CRUZON, VIRGINIA Actress and model Virginia Cruzon, who was featured in a handful of films as an MGM Goldwyn Girl in the 1940s, died at her home in Laramie, Wyoming, on August 21, 2010. She was 89. She was born Virginia Kirkpatrick in San Francisco on May 25, 1921. A dancer and model, she was contracted by MGM in the early 1940s, using her step-father’s last

Virginia Cruzon

name for billing. She was featured in the films Ziegfeld Girl (1941) and Up in Arms (1944). She also decorated the screen for Columbia and RKO during the 1940s in Having a Wonderful Crime (1945), A Thousand and One Nights (1945), George White’s Scandals (1945), Shadowed (1946), One Sunday Afternoon (1948), and Emergency Wedding (1950). She made her final screen appearance in a small role in the 1969 Elvis Presley film Charro! Cruzon also worked for many years with Chevron USA until retiring to Wyoming in 1988.

CUENOD, HUGUES Swiss operatic tenor Hugues Cuenod died in Vevey, Vaud, Switzerland, on December 3, 2010. He was 108. Cuenod was born in Corseaux-sur-Vevey, Switzerland, on June 26, 1902. He trained as a singer in Geneva and Vienna, and began his career as a concert singer. He made his debut in the United States in a production of Noel Coward’s Bitter

2010 • Obituaries

Hugues Cuenod

Sweet in 1929. He performed in Geneva and Paris during the 1930s, and taught at the Geneva Conservatory during the early 1940s. He also resumed his opera career in Geneva, and appeared in productions with Milan’s La Scala and London’s Royal Opera House in Covent Garden in the 1950s. He was noted for his performances as the Astrologer in the Rimsky-Korsakov opera The Golden Cockerel and as Basilio in Mozart’s The Marriage of Figaro. He was the oldest person to make his debut with the Metropolitan Opera, performing the role of Emperor Altoum in Puccini’s Turandot in 1987 at the age of 84. He made his final stage appearances in Tchaikovsky’s Eugene Onegin in Mezieres, Switzerland, in 1994.

CUFF, BOB British film matte artist Bob Cuff died in England in early April 2010. He was 87. Cuff was born in Ilford, Essex, England, in 1922. He began working in films in the early 1950s at Shepperton Studios, where he often teamed with visual effects artist John Mackey. His work was featured in such films as Hobson’s Choice (1953), Richard III (1955), Big Time Operators (1957), A King in New York (1957), The Silent Enemy (1958), The Guns of Navarone (1961), The Day of the Triffids (1962), Dr. Strangelove (1964), First Men in the Moon (1964), One Million Years B.C. (1966), Dracula Has Risen from the Grave (1968), The Vengeance of She (1968), 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), Mackenna’s Gold (1969),

Bob Cuff

Obituaries • 2010 Young Winston (1972), Life of Brian (1979), The Princess Bride (1987), The Adventures of Baron Munchausen (1988), and Erik the Viking (1989).

CULP, ROBERT Leading actor Robert Culp, who starred in the television series I Spy and The Greatest American Hero, died of a heart attack after collapsing outside his home in Los Angeles on March 24, 2010. He was 79. Culp was born in Oakland, California, on August 16, 1930, the son of lawyer Crozier Culp and Bethel Collins. He began his career on stage in New York City in 1951, appearing in the Off-Broadway production of He Who Gets Slapped and several other plays. He also appeared in such television series as You Are There, Star Tonight, The United States Steel Hour, and Playwrights ’56. He made his Broadway debut in 1957’s production of A Clearing in the Woods. He went to Hollywood in 1957 to star for two seasons as Texas Ranger Hoby Gilman in the western series Trackdown. He also guest starred in various series including Kraft Television Theater, Zane Grey Theater, Robert Montgomery Presents, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, The Jack Benny Program, The Ed Sullivan Show, The DuPont Show with June Allyson, The Rifleman, General Electric Theater, Tate, Johnny Ringo, The Chevy Mystery Show, Outlaws, The Westerner, the 1960 Shirley Temple’s Storybook production of “The House of the Seven Gables,” Rawhide, The Detectives Starring Robert Taylor, Hennesey, The Barbara Stanwyck Show, The Americans, 87th Precinct, Death Valley Days, Bonanza, Target: The Corruptors, Cain’s Hundred, Wagon Train, Empire, Naked City, Dr. Kildare, Insight, Combat!, several episodes of the science fiction anthology The Outer Limits including the acclaimed “The Architects of Fear” and “Demon with a Glass Hand,” The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, The Great Adventure, Ben Casey, Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre, The Virginian, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Gunsmoke, Dr. Kildare, and Mr. Novak. Culp was best known for starring as Kelly Robinson in the popular espionage series I Spy with Bill Cosby from 1965 to 1968. He earned three Emmy Award nominations for his acting on the series and one for scripting an episode. Culp had also written episodes of Trackdown, The Rifleman, and Cain’s Hundred, and made his debut as a director on an episode of I Spy. He also appeared in episodes of Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In, Get Smart, and The Name of the Game. Culp starred in the 1962 television production of Disney’s Sammy the Way Out Seal, and in such films as PT 109 (1963), Sunday in New York (1963), The Raiders (1963) as Wild Bill Hickok, Rhino! (1964), and sex comedy Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice (1969) as Bob Sanders. He remained a popular performer on television and in films in the 1970s, appearing in the tele-films Married Alive (1970), Columbo: Death Lends a Hand (1971), See the Man Run (1971), Columbo: The Most Crucial Game (1972), The Chill Factor (1973), Outrage (1973), Columbo: Double Exposure (1973), Houston, We’ve Got a Problem (1974), Strange Homecoming (1974), A Cry for Help (1975), Flood! (1976), Spectre (1977), Last of the Good Guys (1978), Greatest Heroes of the Bible (1978) as Joshua, Women in White (1979), Roots: The Next Generations (1979), Kate Loves a Mystery (1979), Hot Rod (1979), The Dream Merchants (1978), and The Night the

86 City Screamed (1980). He also starred in several features including Hannie Caulder (1971), Hickey & Boggs (1972) which co-starred Bill Cosby and was directed by Culp, A Name for Evil (1973), The Castaway Cowboy (1974), Inside Out (1975), Sky Riders (1976), Breaking Point (1976), Great Scout and Cathouse Thursday (1976), Cry for Justice (1977), and Goldengirl (1979). Culp starred as government agent Bill Maxwell in the super-hero adventure series The Greatest American Hero with William Katt from 1981 to 1983. He also appeared in the films National Lampoon Goes to the Movies (1983), Turk 182! (1985), Big Bad Mama II (1987), Silent Night, Deadly Night 3: Better Watch Out! (1989), Pucker Up and Bark Like a Dog (1990), Timebomb (1991), John Grisham’s The Pelican Brief (1993) as the President of the United States, Xtro 3: Watch the Skies (1995), Panther (1995), Spy Hard (1996), Most Wanted (1997), Wanted (1999), Unconditional Love (1999), Dark Summer (1999), NewsBreak (2000), Hunger (2001), Farewell, My Love (2001), Blind Eye (2004), The Almost Guys (2004), and Santa’s Slay (2005). Culp continued to star in numerous tele-films including Killjoy (1981), Thou Shalt Not Kill (1982), Her Life as a Man (1984), The Calendar Girl Murders (1984), The Key to Rebecca (1985), Brothers-in-Law (1985), The Gladiator (1986), The Blue Lightning (1986), Combat High (1986), Matlock: The Power Brokers (1987), What Price Victory (1988), Voyage of Terror: The Achille Lauro Affair (1990), Perry Mason: The Case of the Defiant Daughter (1990), Columbo: Columbo Goes to College (1990), Murderous Vision (1991), I Spy Returns (1994) reuniting with Bill Cosby, Favorite Deadly Sins (1995), Mercenary (1997), and Running Mates (2000). Culp was a voice actor in the 1994 animated series Gargoyles. His other television credits include episodes of Police Story, Shaft, Mrs. Columbo, A Man Called Sloane, The Love Boat, Hardcastle and McCormick, Murder, She Wrote, Hotel, Highway to Heaven, The Cosby Show as Cliff Huxtable’s old friend Scott Kelly, Jake and the Fatman, Matlock, The Famous Teddy Z, Doctor Doctor, Who’s The Boss?, The Golden Girls, The Ray Bradbury Theater, Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman, The Nanny, Wings, Walker, Texas Ranger, Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman in the recurring role of Mr. Darryl, Burke’s Law, Spy Game, Law & Order, Viper, Diagnosis Murder, Conan as King Vog in the “Red Sonja” episode, Holding the

Robert Culp

87 Baby, Cosby, Chicago Hope, and The Dead Zone. He was featured in the recurring role of Raymond’s father-inlaw, Warren Whalen, in episodes of the popular sitcom Everybody Loves Raymond from 1996 to 2004. Culp was married several times, and had four children by his second wife, Nancy Wilner Ashe, including sons Joseph, Joshua, and Jason, and daughter Rachel. He was married to actress France Nuyen from 1967 to 1969, and to Sheila Sullivan from 1972 to 1981. He married Candace Faulkner in 1981, and they had a daughter, Samantha, the following year.

CUMMINS, JAMES Special effects designer James Cummins died of complications from hardening of the arteries on December 1, 2010. He was 51. Cummins was born in Wichita Falls, Texas, on May 22, 1959. He began working in films in the early 1980s as a lab tech and special effects designer for such films as The Exterminator (1980), The Intruder Within (1981), Dead & Buried

James Cummins

(1981), Heartbeeps (1981), The Beast Within (1982), Cat People (1982), The Thing (1982), Strange Invaders (1983), Jaws 3-D (1983), Cocoon (1985), Enemy Mine (1985), House (1986), Alien Predator (1987), Slumber Party Massacre II (1987), The Garbage Pail Kids Movie (1987), DeepStar Six (1989), and Speak of the Devil (1991). He also provided effects for episodes of television’s The Hitchhiker, and 1985’s Twilight Zone. Cummins wrote and directed several films including The Boneyard (1991), Dark:30 (1993), and Harbinger (1996).

CURTIS, TONY Leading actor Tony Curtis died of complications from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in a Las Vegas hospital after collapsing from an asthma attack during a book signing in Henderson, Nevada, on July 8, 2010. He was 85. He was born Bernard Schwartz in the Bronx, New York, on June 3, 1925, to a family of Hungarian Jewish immigrants. He experienced a difficult childhood and spent time in an orphanage when his parents could not afford to feed him. He served as a signalman in the U.S. Navy during World War II aboard the submarine tender USS Proteus. After his discharge he attended the City College of New York and studied drama under Erwin Piscator at the New School for Social Research. He began performing on stage in the Catskills before being discovered by Holly-

2010 • Obituaries wood talent agent Joyce Selznick. He made his film debut in the small role of a gigolo rumba dancer in 1948’s Criss Cross. He appeared in small supporting roles over the next two years in such films as City Across the River (1949), The Lady Gambles (1949), Johnny Stool Pigeon (1949), Woman in Hiding (1950), Francis (1950), I Was a Shoplifter (1950), Sierra (1950), Kansas Raiders (1950), and the Anthony Mann western Winchester ’73 (1950). He had his first starring role in 1951’s The Prince Who Was a Thief as Julna, opposite Piper Laurie, and continued in the Arabian Nights milieu as Kashma Baba in 1952’s Son of Ali Baba. He also starred in the films Flesh and Fury (1952), the comedy No Room for the Groom (1952) again with Laurie, The All American (1953), and Forbidden (1953). Curtis married actress Janet Leigh in 1951, and they starred together in the bio-film of master magician Harry Houdini, Houdini, in 1953. He starred in the Universal costume drama The Black Shield of Falworth with Leigh in 1954, and continued his career in the films Johnny Dark (1954), Six Bridges to Cross (1955), So This Is Paris (1955), The Purple Mask (1955), The Rawhide Years (1955), and The Square Jungle (1955). He co-starred with Burt Lancaster in 1956 circus drama Trapeze, and starred in 1957’s Mister Cory. Curtis proved his prowess as an actor as hustler and press agent Sidney Falco opposite Lancaster’s venomous Broadway columnist J.J. Hunsecker in 1957’s Sweet Smell of Success. He also starred in the films The Midnight Story (1957), Kings Go Forth (1958), and The Perfect Furlough (1958). He teamed with Kirk Douglas in the 1958 action film The Vikings, and earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Actor for his role as Joker Jackson, a bigoted escaped convict chained to Sidney Poitier, in The Defiant Ones (1958). He and Jack Lemmon dressed in drag for the 1959 comedy Some Like It Hot with Marilyn Monroe, and Curtis continued in light fare with Operation Petticoat (1959) with Cary Grant, Who Was That Lady? (1960), and The Rat Race (1960). He was featured as Antoninus the slave in Stanley Kubrick’s 1960 epic Spartacus starring Kirk Douglas, and starred as Ferdinand Waldo Demara, Jr., The Great Impostor, in the 1961 bio-film. He was Native American World War II hero Ira Hayes in 1961’s The Outsider, and co-starred as Yul Brynner’s son in 1962’s costume actioner Taras Bulba. Curtis’ career was damaged by his 1962 divorce from Janet Leigh, and subsequent

Tony Curtis

Obituaries • 2010 marriage to his Taras Bulba ingénue, the young German actress Christine Kaufmann. He starred opposite Suzanne Pleshette in the 1962 comedy 40 Pounds of Trouble, and with Gregory Peck in 1963’s Captain Newman, M.D. He was also featured in cameo roles in the films Pepe (1960), The List of Adrian Messenger (1963), Paris—When It Sizzles (1964), and Chamber of Horrors (1966). He spent most of the decade in romantic comedies, with such credits as Wild and Wonderful (1964), Goodbye Charlie (1964), Sex and the Single Girl (1964) with Natalie Wood, Blake Edwards’ The Great Race (1965), Boeing Boeing (1965), Not with My Wife, You Don’t! (1966), Arrivederci, Baby! (1966), Don’t Make Waves (1967), On My Way to the Crusades, I Met a Girl Who… (1968), Those Daring Young Men in Their Jaunty Jalopies (1969), You Can’t Win ’Em All (1970), and Suppose They Gave a War and Nobody Came? (1970). He had a cameo voice role in Roman Polanski’s 1968 Satanic thriller Rosemary’s Baby, and played against type in starring roles in The Boston Strangler (1968) as Albert DeSalvo and Lepke (1975) as gangster Louis “Lepke” Buchalter. Curtis had made occasional appearances on television from the 1950s, with guest roles in Schlitz Playhouse, The Colgate Comedy Hour, The George Gobel Show, G.E. True Theater, The Rosemary Clooney Show, The Ed Sullivan Show, Startime, and Bracken’s World. He also voiced Stony Curtis in an episode of the animated series The Flintstones in 1965. He starred as Danny Wilde in the action series The Persuaders! from 1971 to 1972, and was McCoy in the short-lived McCoy series in 1975. He also appeared in the tele-films The Third Girl from the Left (1973), The Count of Monte-Cristo (1975), The Big Rip-Off (1975), The Users (1978), The Scarlett O’Hara War (1980) as David O. Selznick, Inmates: A Love Story (1981), The Million Dollar Face (1981), Portrait of a Showgirl (1982), Mafia Princess (1986) as Sam Giancana, Charlie (1989), Tarzan in Manhattan (1989) as Archimedes Porter, Thanksgiving Day (1990), the 1992 remake of Christmas in Connecticut as Alexander Yardley, Bandit: Beauty and the Bandit (1994), and A Perry Mason Mystery: The Case of the Grimacing Governor (1994). His other television credits include episodes of The Sonny and Cher Comedy Hour, Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In, Shaft, Vega$ in the recurring role of Philip Roth, The Fall Guy, Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman as Dr. Isaac Mamba, Roseanne, Suddenly Susan, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, and Hope & Faith. His later film credits include The Last Tycoon (1976), Some Like It Cool (1977), Mae West’s Sextette (1978), the horror film The Manitou (1978), The Bad News Bears Go to Japan (1978), Title Shot (1979), Little Miss Marker (1980), It Rained All Night the Day I Left (1980), the Agatha Christie mystery The Mirror Crack’d (1980), Black Commando (1982), Where Is Parsifal? (1983), BrainWaves (1983), Insignificance (1985), Balboa (1986), Club Life (1986), The Last of Philip Banter (1986), Welcome to Germany (1988), Lobster Man from Mars (1989), Midnight (1989), Walter & Carlo i Amerika (1989), Prime Target (1991), Center of the Web (1992), The Mummy Lives (1993), Naked in New York (1993), The Immortals (1995), Brittle Glory (1997), Hardball (1997), Stargames (1998), Louis & Frank (1998), Play It to the Bone (1999), and Reflections of Evil (2002). Curtis

88 also achieved renown as an artist from the early 1980s, which he professed to prefer to acting in his later years. His final credits were as the voice of God in the 2007 comedy The Blackmith and the Carpenter, and as an elderly Jewish man in the 2008 Arab-Israeli romance David & Fatima (2008). His autobiography, Tony Curtis: The Autobiography, was published in 1993, and his American Prince: A Memoir came out in 2008. Curtis had two daughters with Janet Leigh, actresses Kelly Curtis and Jamie Lee Curtis. He also had two daughters with Christine Kaufmann, Alexandra and Allegra. He married model Leslie Allen in 1983, the year after his divorce from Kaufmann. They had two sons before their divorce in 1982, including Nicholas, who died of a heroin overdose in 1994. Curtis was married to actress Andrea Savio from 1983 to 1992, and to Lisa Deutsch from 1993 to 1994. He was married to Jill Vandenberg from 1998 until his death. They were featured together in the 2008 documentary The Jill & Tony Curtis Story about their efforts to rescue horses from slaughterhouses.

CZYZEWSKA, ELZIBIETA Polish actress Elzibieta Czyzewska, who was a leading film star in her home country until her marriage to U.S. journalist David Halberstam in the mid–1960s, died of esophageal cancer in a Manhattan, New York, hospital on June 17, 2010. She was 72. Czyzewska was born in Warsaw, Poland, on May 14, 1938. She studied theater in Warsaw and began her career in film in the 1960 short Erotique. She and director Jerzy Skolimowski paired on and off screen (they were rumored to be married), with Czyzewska starring in his short, Little Hamlet (1960), and the features Rysopis (1964) and Walkover (1965). She became one of Poland’s leading screen stars in the early 1960s, starring in the films Maz Swojej Zony (1961), Zuzanna i Chlopcy (1961), Dziewczyna z dobrego Domu (1962), Zloto (1962), Dom bez Okien (1962), Zaduszki (1962), Godzina Pasowej Rozy (1963), The Passenger (1963), Milczenie (1963), The First Day of Freedom (1964), Przerwany Lot (1964), Giuseppe w Warszawie (1964), Zona dla Australijczyka (1964), Gdzie jest General? (1964), Wojciech Has’ surreal supernatural classic The Saragossa Manuscript (1965), Swieta wojna (1965), Obok Prawdy (1965), Niekochana (1966), and Malzenstwo z Rozsadku (1967). She starred on the

Elzibieta Czyzewska

89 Warsaw stage in a production of Arthur Miller’s play After the Fall in 1965, and met U.S. journalist David Halberstam when he interviewed her about her performance. The two married soon after, and Halberstam was expelled from Poland several months later after writing an article exposing anti–Semitism in the country. Czyzewska’s career there also suffered and she soon joined her husband in New York. She briefly returned to Poland to appear in Andrzej Wajda’s 1968 film Everything for Sale, but was forced to spend the next decade in exile. She performed on the New York stage and was featured in character roles in the films Putney Swope (1968) and 1973 adaptation of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn’s The First Circle. She and Halberstam divorced later in the 1970s, and she was allowed to return and work in Poland following the rise of the Solidarity Movement there in the early 1980s. She was featured in the films Debiutantka (1982), Daimler-Benz Limousine (1982), Odwet (1983), Kocham Kino (1988), Szczur (1995), Charms Zwischenfalle (1996), and Smotnosc w Sieci (2006). The 1987 film Anna, which earned Sally Kirkland an Oscar nomination, was largely based on Czyzewska’s experiences in the United States. She also continued to appear in character roles in U.S. films including Running on Empty (1988), Rude Awakening (1989), Misplaced (1989), Music Box (1989), Cadillac Man (1990), A Kiss Before Dying (1991), I Love You, I Love You Not (1996), O.K. Garage (1998), Coming Soon (1999), Hunters in the Snow (2000), the shorts Happiness (2006) and June Weddings (2007), and The Hungry Ghost (2009). Czyzewska was also seen on television in episodes of Sex and the City, Third Watch, Law & Order: Criminal Intent, and Damages.

DACQMINE, JACQUES French actor Jacques Dacqmine died in Periers-en-Auge, France, on March 29, 2010. He was 86. Dacqmine was born in La Madeleine, France, on November 30, 1923. He performed frequently on the French stage and screen from the early 1940s. His many film credits include Her First Affair (1941), Queen’s Necklace (1946), Back Streets of Paris (1946), Julie de Carneilhan (1950), Caroline Cherie (1951), The Aristocrats (1955), It Happened in Aden (1956), Michael Strogoff (1956), To Catch a Spy (1957), Too Many Lovers (1957), Leda (1959), The Big Risk (1960), Ravishing (1960), Quai Notre-Dame (1961), The Nina B. Affair

Jacques Dacqmine

2010 • Obituaries (1961), Where the Truth Lies (1962), Knights of Terror (1964), FX 18, Secret Agent (1964), Phedre (1968), Vice Squad (1978), Cover Up (1983), L’Operacion Corned-Beef (1991), Germinal (1993), OcchioPinocchio (1994), White Lies (1998), The Ninth Gate (1999), A Crime in Paradise (2001), Happy Victor (2003), Don’t Worry, Be Happy (2003), and Adieu (2003). Dacqmine also appeared frequently on television from the 1950s, with roles in such series as The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes with Ronald Howard, L’Inspecteur Leclerc Enquete, Treasure Island, Les Brigades du Tigre, Les Enquetes du Commissaire Maigret, Commissaire Moulin, and Maigret. His other television credits include such productions as Siegfried (1963), Le Mutant (1978), Louix XI ou Le Pouvoir Central (1979), Arsene Lupin Joue et Perd (1980), The Fall of the House of Usher (1981), La Mystere de Saint Chrolu (1981), Arcole ou la Terre Promise (1981), L’Affaire Saint-Romans (1988), Medee (1996), L’Algerie des Chimeres (2001), La Bataille d’Hernani (2002), and Mata Hari, la Vraie Historie (2003).

DADDY Pitbull terrier Daddy, who was featured on trainer Cesar Millan’s television series Dog Whisperer, died in Santa Clarita, California, on February 19, 2010. He was 16. Millan acquired Daddy from the rapper Red-

Daddy (with Cesar Millan)

man, and he became top dog on Millan’s National Geographic television series Dog Whisperer. He was a partner in Millan’s canine rehabilitation service, using his calm temperament to train more aggressive dogs.

D’AGOSTINO, JON Veteran comic books artist Jon D’Agostino died at his home in Ansonia, Connecticut, on November 29, 2010. He was 81. D’Agostino was born on June 13, 1929. He began working in comics as a colorist at Timely in the 1940s, and was penciling and inking stories by the early 1950s. He worked frequently for Charlton during his career, illustrating tales for such titles as Fightin’ Army, Attack, Sweethearts, Pudg y Pig, Freddy, My Little Margie, and Timmy the Timid Ghost. He was sometimes credited as Johnny Dee and John Duffy during his career. He was a letterer at Marvel Comics on the first three issues of the landmark series The Amazing Spider-Man in the early 1960s. He worked for Archie, Charlton, and Gold Key during the 1960s and 1970s as an artist and letterer. He served as inker on Marvel’s chil-

Obituaries • 2010 dren’s imprint Star Comics in the 1980s and continued to work on such Archie titles as Archie’s Pals and Gals, Jug-

90 screen in Giorgos Panousopoulos’ surreal sex comedy Testosterone.

DALIANIDIS, GIANNIS Greek film director and writer Giannis Dalianidis died in Athens, Greece, on October 16, 2010. He was 86. Dalianidis was born in Thessaloniki, Greece, on December 31, 1923. He began writing for films in the late 1950s, and made his directorial debut with 1959’s Moussitsa. He remained a leading director over the next 40 years with such credits as An Imbecile and a Half (1959), West Side and East Side (1959), The Boy I Love (1960), The Young Lady’s Fool (1960), The Tough Guy (1961), Liar Wanted (1961), Some

Jon D’Agostino

head’s Time Police, Sabrina the Teenage Witch, Sonic the Hedgehog, and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles through the 2000s.

DALI, GISELA Greek actress Gisela Dali died of cancer in Naxos, Greece, on September 10, 2010. She was 73. Dali was born in Megara, Greece, on August 27, 1937. She was a popular Greek actress and model from the early 1960s. Known as the Greek Brigitte Bardot, she was seen in such films as Rendez-Vous in Venice (1960), I Betty Pantrevetai (1961), Tou Koutrouli o Gamos (1962), I Ellinida kai o Erotas (1962), To Gelio Vgike ap’ ton Pa-

Giannis Dalianidis

Gisela Dali

Like It Cool (1962), The Master’s Lady (1962), Law 4000 (1962), The Wise Guy (1962), A Girl for Two (1963), The Heirs (1964), Egoism (1964), Kiss the Girls (1965), A Smart Guy (1965), Rendezvous in the Air (1966), Stefania (1966), Wedding Night (1967), The Blue Beads from Greece (1968), Mermaids and Rascals (1968), A Knight for Vasoula (1968), Naked in the Street (1969), When the City Dies (1969), The Parisian (1969), Wake Up Vasili (1969), Marijuana Stop! (1971), The Dodger (1971), A Greek Woman in the Harem (1971), An Enemy of the Society (1972), O Magas Me to Trikyklo (1972), Twenty Women and I (1973), Under the Sign of Virgo (1973), Lovers of Dreams (1974), Vasika … Kalispera Sas (1982), Kamikazi, Agapi Mou (1983), Peraste … Filiste … Teleiosate! (1986), and Epikindynos Erotas (1989). Dalianidis worked frequently in television from the 1970s, producing and directing such series as Luna Park and To Retire. He was recognized as a national film hero at Greece’s International Thessaloniki Film Festival in 2002.

radeiso (1963), Skandala sto Nisi tou Erota (1963), Diestrammenoi (1963), Otan i Moira Prostazei (1964), Ftohos Ekatommyriouhos (1965), Ou klepseis (1965), Daphnis and Chloe (1969), and The Wild Pussycat (1969). She became noted for her roles in adult erotic features in the 1970s, appearing in The Executioner (1970), Enas Vengos gia oles tis Douleies (1970), Erotas Dihos Synora (1970), O Lipotaktis (1970), Oso Yparhei Erotas (1970), O Kyklos tis Anomalias (1971), Image of Love (1972), Passion Beach (1973), The Sexy Mirella (1973), Aimilia, the Psychopath (1974), and Fountains of Lust (1976). Dali largely retired from the screen in the mid–1970s, but returned to the

DALL, EVELYN Singer and actress Evelyn Dall died in Phoenix, Arizona, after a long illness on March 10, 2010. She was 92. She was born Evelyn Mildred Fuss in the Bronx, New York, on January 8, 1918. She began her career in the mid–1930s with small roles in the short films The Inventors (1934) and Tickets, Please (1935), and the Broadway musical Parade (1935). She joined Bert Ambrose and His Orchestra in England as lead singer and was billed as the “original blonde bombshell.” She was featured in a handful of British films including the revue Soft Lights and Sweet Music (1936), Calling All Stars (1937), Sing as You Swing (1937), Kicking the Moon

91 Around (1938), He Found a Star (1941), King Arthur Was a Gentleman (1942) with Arthur Askey, Miss London Ltd. (1943), and the sci-fi comedy Time Flies (1944). Dall also

2010 • Obituaries (1971), L’Eloignement (1973), Un Amour de Quartier (1984), and Si la Tendance se Maintient (2001). Dalmain was also seen in a handful of films during his career including Comme tu me Veux (1962), Tight Skirts, Loose Pleasures (1965), The Act of the Heart (1970), Violette Noziere (1978), Girls (1980), and Le Vent du Wyoming (1994).

DANIELS, DANNY Guyanese actor Danny Daniels died of lung cancer in Yarrokabra, Guyana, on December 6, 2010. He was 83. Daniels was born in Georgetown, British Guiana (now Guyana), on November 1, 1927. He began appearing in television in England in the mid–1950s, with roles in episodes of Fast and Loose, White Hunter, No Hiding Place, Armchair Theatre, Secret Agent, The Saint, Man in a Suitcase, The Power Game, Up Pompeii, Mogul, and Scoop. Daniels also appeared in a handful of films during his career, including Evelyn Dall

performed in London stage productions of Present Arms (1940), Something for the Boys (1944), and Follow the Girls (1945). She returned to the United States in 1946, where she married and raised a family.

DALMAIN, JEAN French Canadian actor Jean Dalmain died in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, on March 28, 2010. He was 94. He was born Jean Gironnay in France on June 25, 1915. He began studying under Louis Jouvet at the National Conservatory of Dramatic Art in 1934. He graduated from the Academy in 1945, and remained there for the remainder of the decade as an Danny Daniels

Storm Over Jamaica (1958), Woman of Straw (1964), Jemina & Johnny (1965), Curse of the Voodoo (1965), Prehistoric Women (1967), Dark of the Sun (1968), Sympathy For the Devil (1968), the horror film The Oblong Box (1969) starring Vincent Price and Christopher Lee, Carry On Up the Jungle (1970), and The Body (1970). Daniels resumed his film career in Hollywood in the mid–1980s in such films as Thunder Run (1986), Retribution (1987), The Outing (1987), Naked Gun 33 1 ⁄ 3: The Final Insult (1994), and Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls (1995). He subsequently retired to Guyana.

Jean Dalmain

assistant to Jouvet. Dalmain went to Canada in 1952, where he was instrumental in the formation of Quebec’s New World Theater. He appeared in numerous theatrical productions and was an instructor at the School of Theatre at St. Hyacinthe from 1979 to 2006. Dalmain was seen on television from the mid–1950s, with roles in such series as Enigmes de l’Histoire, La Camera Explore le Temps, Sous le Signe du Lion, Les Cinq Dernieres Minutes, The Aeronauts, and Les Nouvelles Aventures de Vidocq. He also appeared in the television productions of La Cerisale (1961), La Balsamine (1962), Mesure pour Mesure

DANIELS, LISA British actress Lisa Daniels died in a Los Angeles retirement village on February 12, 2010. She was 79. She was born Gladys Morgan in Birmingham, England, on December 31, 1930. She was crowned Miss Birmingham at the age of 13, and she performed on the local stage. She was performing in London’s West End by the early 1950s under the stage name Lisbeth Kearns. She was known as Lisa Daniels when she came to Hollywood several years later. She was featured in the films Man in the Attic (1953) with Jack Palance as Jack the Ripper, Princess of the Nile (1954), The Gambler from Natchez (1954), The Glass Slipper (1955), and The Virgin Queen (1955) with Bette Davis. She also appeared frequently on television in episodes of Stories of the Century, Soldiers of Fortune, Topper, Lux Video Theatre,

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Casablanca, Star Tonight, Climax!, Matinee Theatre in productions of Dracula (1956) starring John Carradine and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1957) starring Douglass

original theme for the cult spy television series The Avengers. He also composed for the 1959 series The Voodoo Factor, and for such films as Concrete Jungle (1960), Saturday Night and Sunday Morning (1960), The Servant (1963) which also featured him onscreen as a jazz band leader, Scruggs (1965), Darling (1965), Return to the Ashes (1965), Sands of the Kalahari (1965), Morgan! (1966, Modesty Blaise (1966), The Idol (1966), Accident (1967), The Last Safari (1967), Fathom (1967), Salt and Pepper (1968), I Love You, I Hate You (1968), The Magus (1968), The Last Grenade (1970), Perfect Friday (1970), 10 Rillington Place (1971), The Kingfish Caper (1976), Kiss Kiss (Bang Bang ) (2000), and Gangster No. 1 (2000). He also served as musical director for the British tours of such artists as Nat King Cole, Ella Fitzgerald, Duke Ellington, Sophie Tucker, and Oscar Peterson. He founded the London Symphony Orchestra’s pops program in 1985 and became its musical director. He continued to perform and record throughout his life.

Lisa Daniels

DAS, HEMANTA Indian actor Hemanta Das, who was a leading figure in the Oriya film industry, died in Khamaranga, Cuttack, Orissa, India, on April 27, 2010. He was 76. Das was born in Khuranga, Cuttack, India, in 1934. Das appeared in over 40 films from the 1970s including Jajabar (1975), Shesha Shrabana (1976), Eternal Love (1976), Sandhya Tara (1977), the 1979 Hindi

Montgomery, The U.S. Steel Hour, Shirley Temple Theatre, The Millionaire, Kraft Theatre, and G.E. True Theater. She was the voice of Perdita in the Walt Disney animated classic One Hundred and One Dalmatians (1962), and was featured in small roles in the films The Swimmer (1968) produced by husband Roger Hill Lewis, The Andromeda Strain (1971), and Swashbuckler (1976). She was also seen in the tele-films Act of Separation (1970) and Hustling (1975).

DANKWORTH, JOHNNY British jazz saxophonist and composer Johnny Dankworth died in Marylebone, London, England, on February 6, 2010. He was 82. Dankworth was born in Woodford, Essex, England, on September 20, 1927. He trained on the piano and violin as a child before changing to the clarinet and saxophone in his teens. He trained at the Royal Academy of Music in London and embarked on a career as a jazz musician in the late 1940s. He formed his own group in 1950s and was leading a big band by 1953. He was a popular performer and recording artist throughout the decade, and he married singer Cleo Laine in 1957. Dankworth worked frequently in films and television from the late 1950s, and was best known for composing the

Johnny Dankworth

Hemanta Das

film Shodh, The Street Loafer (1980), Winter Night (1981), Pooja (1981), Troubled Planet (1982), Bhakta Salabega (1983), Kalyani (1983), The Silent Storm (1984), Pratidhwani (1984), Chaka Bhaunri (1985), Samay Bada Balwan (1985), Sanskara (1985), Kasturi (1987), Kichu Smruti Kichu Anubhuti (1988), Mamata Ra Dori (1989), Sasti (1989), Agni Veena (1990), The Unspeakable Story (1994), and The Words of Silence (1998).

DAVAO, CHARLIE Filipino actor Charlie Davao died of cancer in a Manila, the Philippines, hospital on August 8, 2010. He was 75. Davao was born in Iloilo City, the Philippines in 1935. He began his career in Manila in the late 1950s as a commercial model, and had an early film role in 1959’s Isinumpa (Cursed). He was a familiar face in films and television over the next 50 years, often cast as villainous characters. His numerous film credits include Double Cross (1960), The Laws of So-

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ciety (1961), We Who Are Sexy (1962), Sabina (1963), Tomorrow Is Mine (1963), Mr. Wong vs. Mistico (1964), 7 Mata Hari (1965), Dugo ng Vampira (1969), Women in Cages (1971), Roulette (1972), The Panther (1973), The Dragon Force Connection (1974), Nino Valiente (1975), Supercock (aka A Fistful of Feathers) (1975), Gorgonya (1978), Blind Rage (1978), Last Target (1978), Ninja Nightmare (1980), Palengke Queen (1982), Bad Boy from Dadiangas (1982), the horror fantasy The Killing of Satan

Metring David

trang Kabayo at ang Pilyang Kuting (1988), Rosenda (1989), Balbakwa: The Invisible Man (1989), Tootsie Wootsie: Ang Bandang Walang Atrasan (1990), Papa’s Girl (1990), Chickboys (1994), Abrakadabra (1994), Kailangan ko’y Ikaw (2000), and Burles King (Daw O…)! (2002). Charlie Davao

(1983) as Satan, Over My Dead Body (1983), To Love Again (1983), Bed Sins (1985), Zuma (1985), Get Victor Corpus: The Rebel Soldier (1987), Boy Tornado (1987), Ready! … Aim! … Fire!… (1987), Afuang: Bounty Hunter (1988), Sgt. Ernesto Boy Ibanez: Tirtir Gang (1988), Carnap King: The Randy Padilla Story (1989), Here Comes the Bride (1989), Virginia P. (1989), Wanted: Pamilya Banal (1989), Sgt. Patalinhug: CIS Special Operations Group (1990), Sgt. Miguel Carpio: Multiple Murder (1990), Once Upon a Time in Manila (1994), Alfredo Lim: Batas ng Maynila (1995), Bridesmaids (1997), Dugo ng Birhen: El Kapitan (1999), Pangako… Ikaw Iang (2001), Batas ng Lansangan (2002), Walang Kapalit (2003), and Desperadas: All They Need Is Love (2008).

DAVID, METRING Filipino actress and comedian Metring David died in the Philippines on October 7, 2010. She was 90. David was born in the Philippines on June 20, 1920. She began her film career with Lebran Pictures, appearing in the 1953 dramas Malapit sa Diyos (Near to God) and Walang Hanggang. She soon turned to comedy, and had a lengthy career in such films as Babaing Kalbo (1953), Galawgaw (1954), Sapagka’t Mahal Kita (1955), Puro Labis Puro Kulang (1962), Pitong Atsay (1962), Si Romeo at si Julieta (1968), The Jukebox King (1969), Oh, Delilah (1969), Facifica Falayfay (1969), Signos Trece (1971), Make Laugh, Not War (1971), Love Pinoy Style (1972), Edgar Loves Vilma (1972), Because You Are Mine (1973), Asiong Aksaya (1977), Buhay Artista Ngayon (1979), Roberta (1979), Why Is the Sky Blue? (1981), Cross My Heart (1982), My Juan en Only (1982), Bagets 2 (1984), Inday-Inday sa Balitaw (1986), Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow (1986), Jack en Poy: Hale-Hale Hoy! (1987), Forward March (1987), Family Tree (1987), Shoot That Ball (1987), Maria Went to Town! (1988), Pe-

DAVIDSE, BOB Belgian television personality Bob Davidse died in Antwerpen, Belgium, on February 16, 2010. He was 89. Davidse was born in Berchern, Flanders, Belgium, on July 26, 1920. He began his career as a singer in the early 1940s, sometimes performing in

Bob Davidse

the streets of Belgium during World War II. He married Annie Vermeulen in 1944, and they formed a singing duo. As Nonkel Bob (Uncle Bob) he served as the host of a long-running series of youth talent showcases on Flemish television from the mid–1950s. He remained a popular figure on Belgian television for the next three decades, retiring in 1985.

DAVIES, ROBIN British actor Robin Davies died of lung cancer in Norwich, Norfolk, England, on February 22, 2010. He was 56. Davies was born in Merionetshire, North Wales, on January 16, 1954. He trained as an actor at the Aida Foster Stage School, and began his career as a child, starring as Steve in the children’s film series The Magnificent 6 and 1 ⁄ 2 in the late 1960s. He was featured as Machin in If… (1968), Lindsay Anderson’s

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anarchic depiction of a English private school, and was Carrot in the children’s magical television series Catweazle from 1969 to 1970. Davies appeared as Mark Vespers, one of the bewitched youngsters, in Tigon’s 1971 horror film Blood on Satan’s Claw (aka Satan’s Skin). He starred

Willie Davis

Robin Davies

as Simon, with Wendy Craig as his mother, in the British television comedy series And Mother Makes Three from 1971 to 1973, and And Mother Makes Five from 1974 to 1976. He was also featured in episodes of Doomwatch, Play for Today, A Moment in Time, Secret Army, Escape, Split Ends, The Bill, Trainer as Neil Johnson, The Lifeboat, and One Foot in the Grave. Davies starred as Corporal Box in the series Spearhead, about a British army regiment stationed in Northern Ireland, from 1978 to 1981. He was featured in a small role in Lindsay Anderson’s 1982 satire Britannia Hospital, and starred in the 1991 thriller A Mind to Kill. He made his final screen performance as Master Plum in 1998’s Shakespeare in Love.

DAVIS, SYLVIA Actress Sylvia Davis, who was featured as Arlo Guthrie’s mother in the 1969 film Alice’s Restaurant, died at the Lillian Booth Actors Home in Englewood, New Jersey, on November 3, 2010. She was 100. Davis was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on April 10, 1910. She appeared on television during the 1950s and 1960s in episodes of Danger, Goodyear Playhouse, the 1960 Play of the Week production of The Dybbuk, Naked City, and The Defenders. She was seen in a small role in the 1961 film The Third Alibi, and was Marjorie Guthrie in 1969’s Alice’s Restaurant. Davis was featured as Lillian in the daytime soap opera Edge of Night in 1979, and appeared in Woody Allen’s Stardust Memories (1980) and the 1988 film Tiger Warsaw. DAVIS, WILLIE Baseball player Willie Davis, the long-time center fielder for the Los Angeles Dodgers who also appeared in films and television, was found dead at his home in Burbank, California, on March 8, 2010. He was 69. Davis was born in Mineral Springs, Arkansas, on April 15, 1940. He moved to Los Angeles with his family as a child, and was a high school track star. He signed with the Dodgers after graduating from high school in 1958, and made his debut with the team in 1960 after a stint in the minor leagues. He played 14 sea-

sons with the Dodgers, including the World Series Championships in 1963 and 1965. During his career in Los Angeles he also appeared on television in episodes of Mister Ed, The Flying Nun and Owen Marshall: Counselor at Law. He was also seen in the films Which Way to the Front? (1970) with Jerry Lewis, and The Love Machine (1971). He left the Dodgers in 1973, but continued to play with such teams as the Montreal Expos, Texas Rangers, St. Louis Cardinals, San Diego Padres, and California Angels throughout the decade.

DAWSON, DANA Actress and singer Dana Dawson died of colon cancer on August 10, 2010. She was 36. Dawson was born in New York City on August 7, 1974. She began her stage career at the age of 7, performing on the national tour of Annie. She was also

Dana Dawson

featured in the 1988 film Starlight: A Musical Movie. She made her recording debut in 1988 with the single “Ready to Follow You,” and had success in France with the subsequent album Paris, New York and Me. She recorded her second album, Black Butterfly, in England in 1995, which included the popular songs “3 Is Family,” “Got to Give Me Love,” and “Show Me.” Dawson was understudy for the characters Mimi and Joanne for the musical Rent in the early 2000s.

DEADY, MOIRA Irish actress Moira Deady Hoey, who starred as Mary Riordan on the popular tel-

95 evision series The Riordans, died in a Dublin hospital on November 15, 2010. She was 88. She starred as the matriarch of The Riordans from 1965 to 1979, and was also

Moira Deady

seen in the series Bracken, Glenroe, The Irish R.M., and Legend. Deady was also featured in several films including 35 Aside (1996), The Nephew (1998), This Is My Father (1998), Angela’s Ashes (1999), Headrush (2003), Aroma (2005), and The Tiger’s Tail (2006).

2010 • Obituaries 1962 song “PT 109,” honoring President John F. Kennedy. He became a frequent guest host on The Tonight Show, and hosted the ABC variety series The Jimmy Dean Show in the mid–1960s. The very first Muppet, Jim Henson’s Rowlf the dog, was introduced on his show. Dean continued to appear on such series as The Patty Duke Show, Hippodrome Show, The Andy Williams Show, The Porter Wagner Show, The Ed Sullivan Show, The Hollywood Palace, Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In, The Joey Bishop Show, The Mike Douglas Show, The David Frost Show, The Dick Cavett Show, The Hollywood Squares, Dinah!, and The Merv Griffin Show. He made his film debut as reclusive millionaire Willard Whyte in the 1971 James Bond film Diamonds Are Forever with Sean Connery. He was also featured in the recurring role of Josh Clements in the frontier television series Daniel Boone with Fess Parker from 1967 to 1970. Dean was featured in the tele-films The Ballad of Andy Crocker (1969), Rolling Man (1972), and The City (1977), and guest starred in episodes of Fantasy Island and Murder, She Wrote. He starred as Charlie Bullets in the television series J.J. Starbuck from 1987 to 1988, and was Cletus Morgan in the 1990 film version of Big Bad John. He went into the sausage business in 1969, founding the Jimmy Dean Meat Co. His Jimmy Dean Pure Pork sausage became a breakfast favorite, with Dean as the commercial spokesperson. He sold the company to the Sara Lee Corp. in 1984. He remained the company spokesman until Sara Lee terminated him in 2003. His autobiography, 30 Years of Sausage, 50 Years of Ham, was published in 2004. Dean was elected to the Country Music Hall of Fame earlier in 2010.

DEAN, JIMMY Jimmy Dean, country music legend turned sausage magnate, died at his home in Henrico County, Virginia, on June 13, 2010. He was 81. Dean was born in Plainview, Texas, on August 10, 1928. He served in the U.S. Air Force during the late 1940s and embarked upon a singing career after his discharge. He toured with his band, The Texas Wildcats, and scored a hit with the 1953 song “Bummin’ Around.” He was soon hosting a local Washington, D.C., television variety series, Town and Country Time, which helped popularize such country singers as Roy Clark and Patsy Cline. He became the host of The Jimmy Dean Show at CBS in 1957. He also performed on such variety series as The Perry Como Show, The Steve Allen Show, The Pat Boone–Chevy Showroom, The Dinah Shore Chevy Show, and The Tonight Show. He scored a major hit with his 1961 song “Big Bad John,” which earned him a Grammy Award the following year. He had another hit with the

DE ANDA, RODOLFO Mexican actor Rodolfo de Anda, who starred as masked swordsman Zorro in the 1976 film La Gran Aventura del Zorro, died in Aguascalientes, Mexico, on February 1, 2010. He was 66. De Anda was born in Mexico City on July 6, 1943. He began his film career in his youth, appearing in 1955’s La Venganza del Diablo. He appeared in more than 150 films over the next five decades including Echenme al Gato (1958), Red Sky (1962), Alias El Alacran (1963), Smiles of the City (1963), La Mascara de Jade (1963), Los Hermanos Barragan (1964), Dos Caballeros de Espada (1964), Los Novios de Mis Hijas (1964), Shadow of the Black Hand

Jimmy Dean

Rodolfo de Anda

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(1964), La Duquesa Diabolica (1964), El Texano (1965), Ghost Town (1965), El Zurdo (1965), Outside the Law (1966), Acapulco a Go-Go (1967), La Muerte en Bikini (1967), Vagabundo en la Lluvia (1968), El Caudillo (1968), Una Horca para el Texano (1969), El Hombre de Negro (1969), La Marcha de Zacatecas (1969), El Cinico (1970), Su Precio … Unos Dolares (1970) as William Bonney, Juegos de Alcoba (1971), Siete Evas Para un Adan (1971), La Mula de Cullen Baker (1971), Manuel Saldivar, el Texano (1972), Indio (1972) which also marked his directorial debut, Los Hombres no Lloran (1973), Qujiero Vivir mi Vida! (1973), La Gran Aventura del Zorro (1976) as Diego de Vega and his masked alter ego El Zorro, Santo vs. las Lobas (1976), The Dynasty of Death (1977), Los Hermanos del Viento (1977), El Rey de los Tahures (1980), Toy Soldiers (1984), Abriendo Fuego (1985), City Rats (1986), Policia de Narcoticos (1986), El Hijo de Pedro Navaja (1986), Matanza de Judiciales (1987), Operacion Condor (1989), Secuestro y Muerte (1989), El Hombre que Volvio de la Muerte (1990), Death on the Beach (1991), Pecado Original (1991), Kino (1993), The Steel Horseman (1994), Felix, Como el Gato (1995), Doble Indemnizacion (1996), El Rey del Cristal (1999), One Man’s Hero (1999), 80 Kilos Suicidas (2000), Deaths at Midnight (2001), En la Mira de mi Gatillo (2001), Los Higos del Odio (2003), and Morelia de mis Amores (2003). He appeared on Mexican television in Tres Destinos (1993), La Casa del Naranjo (1998), Tres Veces Sofia (1998), and El Pantera (2008).

He worked on over 100 films with writer Leonardo Benvenuti, amassing such credits as The Girls of San Frediano (1955), Destination Piovarolo (1956), Camping (1957), The Awakening (1957), Holiday Island (1957), A Man of Straw (1958), The Mine (1958), You’re on Your Own (1959), Girl in a Suitcase (1961), The Joy of Living (1961), Don Camillo: Monsignor (1961), Mad Sea (1963), KaliYug, Goddess of Vengeance (1963), Il Mistero del Tempio Indiano (1963), Imperial Venus (1963), Countersex (1964), Summer Frenzy (1964), Marriage Italian-Style (1964) star-

DE BEL, LYNNE Celine Belanger Deschamps,

ring Sophia Loren, Woman Is a Wonderful Thing (1964), The Camp Followers (1965), Don Camillo in Moscow (1965), The Almost Perfect Crime (1966), Soldier’s Girl (1966), Me, Me, Me … and the Others (1966), Ghosts — Italian Style (1967), Italian Secret Service (1968), A Pocketful of Chestnuts (1970), Let’s Have a Riot (1970), In Love, Every Pleasure Has Its Pain (1971), Between Miracles (1971), Alfredo, Alfredo (1972), While There’s War, There’s Hope (1974), Black Is Beautiful (1974), White Collar Blues (1975), My Friends (1975), The Flower in His Mouth (1975), Goodnight, Ladies and Gentlemen (1976), The Bishop’s Bedroom (1977), Dottor Jekyll e Gentile Signora (1979), Fantozzi Against the Wind (1980), Fun Is Beautiful (1980), Bianco, Rosso e Verdone (1981), Verdi (1982), All My Friends Part 2 (1982), Petomaniac (1983), Bertoldo, Bertoldino, and Cascacenno (1984), Once Upon a Time in America (1984), I Due Carabinieri (1984), All My Friends Part 3 (1985), Speriamo che sia Femmina (1986), Fantozzi va in Pensione (1988), La Cintura (1989), I Won the New Year’s Lottery (1989), Lo Zio Indegno (1989), Le Comiche (1990), I Wanted Pants (1990), Fantozzi Strikes Back (1990), Piedipiatti (1991), Parenti Serpenti (1992), Ciao, Professore! (1992), Al Lupo, al Lupo (1992), Ricky e Barabba (1992), Caino e Caino (1993), Cari Fottutissimi Amici (1994), Looking for Paradise (1995), The Blue Collar Worker and the Hairdresser in a Whirl of Sex and Politics (1996), Fantozzi—Il Ritorno (1996), Finally Alone (1997), The Last Stop (1998), Bagnomaria (1999), Coconut Heads (2000) and Every Dumped Boyfriend Is Lost (2001). He continued to write for films after Benvenuti’s death in 2000, and his later credits include What Fault Is It of Ours? (2003), In Questo Mondo di Ladri (2004), Il Ritorno del Monnezza (2005), Grande, Grosso e Verdone (2008), and My House Is Full of Mirrors (2010).

who performed under the name Lynne De Bel, died in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, on February 11, 2010. She was 91. A singer and actress, she was featured in small roles in the films Time at the Top (1999), The Day After

Lynne De Bel

Tomorrow (2004), and Punisher: War Zone (2008) as Micro’s Mother. She was also seen in an episode of the television series Sophie in 2008.

DE BERNARDI, PIERO Italian screenwriter Piero De Bernardi, who helped script Sergio Leone’s 1984 feature Once Upon a Time in America, died in Milan, Italy, on January 8, 2010. He was 83. De Bernardi was born in Prato, Tuscany, Italy, on April 12, 1926. He began writing for films in the early 1950s, scripting Il Tesore del Bengala (1953) and Black Devils of Kali (1954).

Piero De Bernardi

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DE BORBA, DOROTHY Dorothy de Borba, who starred as Dorothy in the Our Gang comedy shorts in the early 1930s, died of emphysema in a Walnut Creek, California, hospital on June 2, 2010. She was 85. De Borba was born in Los Angeles on March 28, 1925. She was cast as Norman “Chubby” Chaney’s kid sister in several early Our Gang comedies, and her habit of repeating him gave her the nickname Echo. With lightbrown hair in ringlet curls, topped with a big bow, de Borba was seen in Pups Is Pups (1930), Teacher’s Pet (1930), School’s Out (1930), Helping Grandma (1931),

Renato De Carmine

Dorothy de Borba

Love Business (1931), Little Daddy (1931), The Slippery Pearls (1931), Bargain Day (1931), Dogs Is Dogs (1931), Shiver My Timbers (1931), Big Ears (1931), Fly My Kite (1931), A Lad an’ a Lamp (1932), Birthday Blues (1932), Free Wheeling (1932), Hook and Ladder (1932), The Pooch (1932), Spanky (1932), Choo-Choo! (1932), Free Eats (1932), Readin’ and Writin’ (1932), Mush and Milk (1933), The Kid from Borneo (1933), Forgotten Babies (1933), and Fish Hooky (1933). She was also featured in the 1931 short Blood and Thunder with Mickey Daniels, and appeared in small roles in the films A Royal Romance (1930), Men of the North (1930), and Bombshell (1933) with Jean Harlow. Her film career ended in 1933, though she later worked at Republic Pictures as a secretary. She was a senior clerk at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism from the 1960s. De Borba was a popular guest at Sons of the Desert conventions honoring comedians Laurel and Hardy.

DE CARMINE, RENATO Italian actor Renato De Carmine died of complications from anemia in Rome on July 18, 2010. He was 87. De Carmine was born in Rome on February 23, 1923. He studied at the National Academy of Dramatic Arts in Rome and began his career on radio in the 1940s. He made his film debut later in the decade, and was seen in such features as Fantasmi del Mare (1948), William Tell (1949), Man of Death (1949), Mistress of the Mountains (1949), Capitan Demonio (1950), Milady and the Musketeers (1952), The Merchant of Venice (1953), Charge of the Black Lancers (1962), No Man’s Land (1962), Torpedo Bay (1963), Untamable Angelique (1967), Angelique and the Sultan (1968), Possibility Zero (1969), Yellow: Le Cugine (1969), Io non

Scappo … Fuggo (1970), Seven Shawls of Yellow Silk (1972), No More Time (1973), Allonsanfan (1974), Challenge to White Fang (1974) as Lt. Charles LeClerq, In Nome del Papa Re (1977), La Guerra sul Fronte Est (1981), La Monaca di Monza (1986), L’Ingranaggio (1987), Un Uomo di Razza (1989), Per Amore, Solo per Amore (1993), Romanzo di un Giovane Povero (1995), Ultimo Bersaglio (1997), Word and Utopia (2000), February, 30th (2006), Il Nostro Messia (2008), and La Pacificazione (2009). De Carmine also appeared frequently on television from the late 1950s, appearing in productions of Sette Piccole Croci (1957), Scacco Matto (1959), Il Malato Immaginario (1963), Il Ventaglio di Lady Windermere (1966), Quinta Colonna (1967), Una Corsa in Moto (1968), Processi a Porte Aperte: Io Accuso, tu Accusi (1968), Le Terre del Sacramento (1970), Come un Uragano (1971), Ho Incontrato un’Ombra (1972), Puccini (1973), Lungo il Fiume e Sulla’Acqua (1973), L’Armadietto Cinese (1975), Lo Scandalo della Banca Romana (1977), Traffico d’Armi nel Golfo (1977), Re Lear (1979), L’Altro Simenon (1979), La Donna in Bianco (1980), Tre Anni (1983), Olga e i Suoi Figli (1985), Strada Senza Uscita (1986), Il Boss (1986), Treasure Island in Outer Space (1987), La Piovra 7 — Indagine Sulla Morte del Commissario Cattani (1995), La Donna del Treno (1998), and Una Sola Debole Voce (1999). His other television credits include episodes of Aprite Polizi, Tenente Sheridan, Sheridan: Squadra Omicidi, Nero Wolfe, Double Identity, The Octopus, and Linda e il Brigadiere as Inspector Piperno in 1997. De Carmine was also noted as a dubbing actor, providing John Merivale’s Italian voice in the 1959 horror film Caltiki, the Immortal Monster, and dubbing Rod Taylor for the 1960 sci-fi classic The Time Machine.

DECASTRO, CHERIE Cherie DeCastro, the last survivor of the singing DeCastro Sisters, died of pneumonia in a Las Vegas hospital on March 14, 2010. She was 87. She was born in New York City on September 1, 1922. She and her sisters Peggy and Babette began their show business careers in Cuba. She came with her family to Florida in 1945. The sisters provided many bird and animal voices in the 1946 Disney film Song of the South, and sang background vocals on the song “ZipA-Dee-Doo-Dah.” They appeared with Carmen Miranda in the 1947 film Copacabana, and were featured in

Obituaries • 2010 the film Over the Santa Fe Trail (1947) and the short Rhythms with Rusty (1956). They had a major hit with their 1954 recording of the song “Teach Me Tonight.” They also appeared in the film The Helen Morgan Story

98 DE GOLDSCHMIDT, GILBERT French film producer Gilbert de Goldschmidt died in Switzerland on January 1, 2010. He was 84. De Goldschmidt was born in Berlin, Germany, on April 26, 1925. He was raised in France and left before the German occupation during World War II. He returned to France with the U.S. Army in 1944 and began working in films after the war. He founded Madeleine Films in 1951, and was a leading film producer in France over the next 40 years.

Cherie DeCastro (center, with sisters Peggy and Babette)

in 1957. The sisters remained popular performers in Las Vegas through the 1990s. Babette died in 1992 and Peggy died in 2004. Olgita, a cousin who sometimes filled in for one of the sisters, died in 2000.

DEDRICK, DAVE Dave Dedrick, who was Captain 11, host of the longest running U.S. children’s television program on South Dakota station KELO, died in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, on January 25, 2010. He was 81. Dedrick was born in Marshalltown, Iowa, on

Gilbert de Goldschmidt

De Goldschmidt produced such films as A Double Life (1954), Special Delivery (1955), Girl in His Pocket (1957), The Wolves in the Sheepfold (1960), The Girl with the Golden Eyes (1961), Three Fables of Love (1962), The Young Girls of Rochefort (1967), The Wanderer (1967), Hoa Binh (aka The Bamboo Incident) (1970), Servant and Mistress (1977), Trocadero Lemon Blue (1978), Les Turlupins (1980), Signe Furax (1981), Bankers Also Have Souls (1982), P.R.O.F.S. (1985), Les Oreilles entre les Dents (1987), and Suivez cet Avion (1989).

DEJMEK, PIOTR Polish actor Piotr Dejmek died in Warsaw, Poland, of cancer on April 20, 2010. He was 56. Dejmek was born in Lodz, Poland, on April 25, 1953. He attended the Lodz Film School, and made his film debut in the 1978 war drama Akcja pod Arsenalem. He performed on stage, film, and television over the next 20 years. His other film credits include Szpital Przemie-

Dave Dedrick

March 29, 1928, and was raised in Sioux Falls. He served in the Marine Corps in the late 1940s and was called back into duty during the Korean War. He was weatherman at KELO from the station’s inaugural airing May of 1953. Dedrick made his debut as the futuristic hero Captain 11 in March of 1955, hosting Popeye and HannaBarbera cartoons with his live studio audience of children until his retirement in December of 1996. He published his autobiography, It Ain’t All Cartoons: Memoirs of the Captain, in 1989. Piotr Dejmek

99

2010 • Obituaries

nienia (1979), W Bialy Dzien (1981), Komediantka (1987), Pulapka (1997), and Unser Fremdes Kind (1998).

Mariposa (1986), El Color Escondido (1988), Funes, un Gran Amor (1993), and Peperina (1995).

DE LA FUENTE, VICTOR Spanish comic artist Victor de la Fuente, who was noted for his western and fantasy art, died in Le Mesnil-Saint-Denis, France, on July 2, 2010. He was 83. De La Fuente was born in Riocaliente, Asturias, Spain, in 1927. He began drawing comics in Spain while in his teens, and worked as an ad-

DE LAURENTIIS, DINO Italian film producer Dino de Laurentiis, who produced nearly 150 films during a career that lasted over 60 years, died at his home in Beverly Hills, California, on November 10, 2010. He was 91. He was born Agostino de Laurentiis in Torre Annunziata, Campania, Italy, on August 8, 1919. He worked in Rome selling spaghetti for his father before enrolling at the Centro Sperimentale di Cinematografia. He initially was interested in becoming an actor, and appeared onscreen in small roles in the films L’Orologio a Cucu (1938), Heartbeat (1939), Department Store (1939), Small Hotel (1939), I Met You Too Late (1940), Boccaccio (1940), and The Last Fight (1941). He soon realized his talents were more suited behind the scenes, and was a production supervisor for several films in the early 1940s. He produced his first film L’Amore Canta (Love Song) in 1941. De Laurentiis’ film career was sidetracked during World War II when he served in the Italian Army. He resumed his career after the war, working as a producer for the film company Lux on Return of the Black Eagle (1946), The Bandit (1946), La Figlia del Capitano (1947), The Mysterious Rider (1948), The Fireman of Viggiu (1949), Adam and Eve (1949), Lure of the Sila (1949), and Giuseppe De Santis’ Bitter Rice (1949). De Laurentiis teamed with Carlo Ponti in 1950 to form their own company, Ponti–De Laurentiis Cinematografica. They produced a string of comedies, romances and action films over the next five years including Napoli Milionaria (Side Street Story) (1950), Outlaw Girl (1950), Accidents to the Taxes!! (1951), Toto the Third Man (1951), Last Meeting (1951), Anna (1951), Toto in Color (1952), Jolanda, the Daughter of the Black Corsair (1952), The Eleven Musketeers (1952), Roberto Rossellini’s No Greater Love (aka Europa ’51) (1952), Girls Marked Danger (1952), Three Corsairs (1952), Brothers of Italy (1952), Hell Raiders of the Deep (1953), The Unfaithfuls (1953), The Devil Is a Woman (1953), Easy Years (1953), Poverty and Nobility (1954), Federico Fellini’s La Strada (1954) which earned the Academy Award for Best Foreign-Language Feature in 1957, Mambo (1954), Ulysses (1954) starring Kirk Douglas, Woman of Rome (1954), The Gold of Naples (1954), An American in Rome (1954), Attila (1954), The River Girl (1954), Girls of Today (1955), Eighteen Year Olds (1955), and King Vidor’s adaptation of Leo Tolstoy’s novel War and Peace (1956) starring Audrey Hepburn, Henry Fonda, and Mel Ferrer. De Laurentiis split from Ponti to form his own production company in the mid–1950s and continued to produce such films as The Miller’s Beautiful Wife (1955), Guendalina (1957), Fellini’s Nights of Cabiria (1957), Maid, Thief and Guard (1958), This Angry Age (1958), Fortunella (1958), Tempest (1958), The Great War (1959), I Love, You Love (1960), Il Gobbo (1960), 5 Branded Women (1960), Under Ten Flags (1960), Everybody Go Home (1960), …And Suddenly It’s Murder! (1961), The Fascist (1961), Goliath and the Vampires (1961), Black City (1961), The Best of Enemies (1961), The Last Judgment (1961), A Difficult Life (1961), Barabbas (1961) starring Anthony Quinn, The Police Commissioner (1962), Mafioso (1962), The Teacher from Vigevano (1963), The

Victor de la Fuente

vertising artist in South America in the 1950s. He returned to Europe by the end of the decade, where he illustrated war and western comics for British publishers Fleetways and D.C. Thompson. He created the Sunday western series with writer Victor Mora in 1968, and drew several tales for Warren’s Eerie and Creepy magazines. He was best known for his art on such western series as Amargo, Mortimer, Los Gringos, and Tex Willer, and the heroic fantasy Haggarth. DE LA TORRE, RAUL Argentine film director Raul de la Torre died in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on March 19, 2010. He was 72. De la Torre was born in Zarate, Argentina, on February 19, 1938. He directed over a dozen films from the late 1960s including Juan Lamaglia y Senora (1970), Cronica de una Senora (1971), Heroina (1972), La Revolucion (1973), Sola (1976), El Infierno tan Temido (1980), Pubis Angelical (1982), Pobre

Raul de la Torre

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100

Thursday (1963), The Hours of Love (1963), To Bed or Not to Bed (1963), Corpse for the Lady (1964), My Wife (1964), The Flying Saucer (1964), Thrilling (1965), Menage Italian Style (1965), Our Agent Tiger (1965), Battle of the Bulge (1965), Kiss the Girls and Make Them Die (1966), The Bible: In the Beginning… (1966), Navajo Joe (1966), Vietnam Guerra Senza Fronte (1967), The Witches (1967), Matchless (1967), The Stranger (1967), Danger: Diabolik (1968), The Adventures of Ulysses (1968), The Violent Four (1968), Anzio (1968), Roger Vadim’s Barbarella (1968) starring Jane Fonda, Bandits in Rome (1968), Fraulein Doktor (1969), The Bandit (1969), Attraction (1969), Barbagia (1969), A Brief Season (1969), Waterloo (1970), A Man Called Sledge (1970), The Deserter (1971), Liberation (1971), The Valachi Papers (1972), Cause of Divorce (1972), Boccaccio (1972), The Scopone Game (1972), and Chino (1973). De Laurentiis frequently utilized American actors and directors in his European productions, and he moved his studios to the United States by the mid–1970s. He produced several successful crime dramas and thrillers during the decade with such credits as Serpico (1973), Crazy Joe (1974), Death Wish (1974) starring Charles Bronson, Turn the Other Cheek (1974), Mandingo (1975), Three Days of the Condor (1975), Lipstick (1976), Buffalo Bill and the Indians, or Sitting Bull’s History Lesson (1976), and Drum (1976). De Laurentiis produced a big budget remake of the classic film King Kong in 1976, starring Jessica Lange and Jeff Bridges, and dealt with larger than life creatures in the 1977 mystical western The White Buffalo and the Jaws-inspired killer whale epic Orca (1977) starring Richard Harris and a young Bo Derek. He also produced the films The Serpent’s Egg (1977) The Brink’s Job (1978), King of the Gypsies (1978), the disaster film Hurricane (1979), the bright and flashy 1980 remake of the Flash Gordon serials starring Sam Jones, Ragtime (1981), Conan the Barbarian (1982) starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, Amityville II: The Possession (1982), 1984’s The Bounty starring Mel Gibson and Anthony Hopkins, the sequel Conan the Destroyer (1984), David Lynch’s 1984 adaptation of Frank Herbert’s science fiction classic Dune, Year of the Dragon (1985), Lynch’s Blue Velvet (1986), Tai-Pan (1986), and the ill-fated sequel King Kong Lives (1986). De Laurentiis began a long association with horror writer Stephen King as executive producer for 1983’s The Dead Zone, that continued

Dino de Laurentiis

with such King film adaptations as Cat’s Eye (1985), Silver Bullet (1985), Maximum Overdrive (1986) which marked King’s foray as a director, and the tele-film Sometimes They Come Back (1991). De Laurentiis’ 1986 film Manhunter, based on Thomas Harris’ novel Red Dragon, introduced Hannibal Lecktor to the annals of film villainy as portrayed by Brian Cox. His other production credits include the films Desperate Hours (1990), Once Upon a Crime… (1992), the cult horror classic Army of Darkness (1992) starring Bruce Campbell, Body of Evidence (1993) starring Madonna, the tele-film Solomon & Sheba (1995), Assassins (1995), Slave of Dreams (1995), Unforgettable (1996), Breakdown (1997), and U-571 (2000). He returned to everyone’s favorite cannibal, producing the 2001 sequel to Silence of the Lambs, Hannibal, starring Anthony Hopkins, who reprised the role in the 2002 remake of Red Dragon. De Laurentiis also produced 2007 film about the young Dr. Lecktor, Hannibal Rising, and the historical epics The Last Legion (2007) and Virgin Territory (2007). He was awarded the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award at the Academy Awards in 2001. He was married to actress Silvana Mangano from 1949 until shortly before her death in 1989, and to producer Martha Schumacher from 1990 until his death. His son, Federico de Laurentiis, worked with his father as a producer on several films before his death in a plane crash in 1981. He also had three daughters with Mangano, actress Veronica, and producers Raffaella and Francesca. He had two daughters with his second wife, Carolyna and Dina, who were featured onscreen in the 2000 film U-571.

DELONG, THOMAS Thomas A. DeLong II, who penned several books on film, television, and music, died of a stroke in Florida on July 12, 2010. He was 75. DeLong was born in Freeport, New York, in 1935. He was a corporate communications officer for such businesses as Olin Corp. and Pfizer. He was the author of ten books, including biographies of bandleader Paul Whiteman, singer Frank Munn, actor turned politician John Davis Lodge, and Chinese first lady Madame Chiang Kai-shek. He served as chairman of the board of trustees for the Westport, Connecticut, School of Music, and wrote Stars in Our Eyes, a compendium of stage and screen figures from Westport. DeLong also provided in depth articles on such actors as Dolores Hart, Alan Baxter, and Peter Chong for Classic Images. DEL POGGIO, CARLA Italian actress Carla Del Poggio died in Rome on October 14, 2010. She was 84. She was born Maria Luisa Attanasio in Naples, Italy, on December 2, 1925. She trained in modern dance and drama in Rome while in her teens, and she made her film debut as the star of Vittorio De Sica’s 1940 film Maddalena, Zero in Condotta (1940). She continued to star in such films as La Boca Sulla Strada (1941), La Scuola dei Timidi (1941), C’e Sempre un Ma! (1942), Un Garibaldino al Convento (1942), Signorinette (1942), Incontri di Notte (1943), Tre Ragazze Cercano Marito (1944), Humanity (1946), Angel and the Devil (1946), The Bandit (1946), Lost Youth (1947), Caccia Tragica (1947), Senza Pieta (1948), The Mill on the Po (1949), Sigillo Rosso (1950), and Cavalcata d’Eroi (1950). She married direc-

101 tor Alberto Lattuada in 1945, and performed frequently on stage. She starred as Liliana Antonelli in Federico Fellini’s feature film debut Variety Lights (Luci del Va-

Carla Del Poggio

rieta) in 1950, and appeared in the films The Naked and the Wicked (1951), Wolves Hunt at Night (1952), Rome 11:00 (1952), Tormento del Passato (1952), Melodie Immortali — Mascagni (1953), Bufere (1953), Les Revoltes de Lomanach (1954), The Secret of Helene Marimon (1954), and I Girovaghi (1956). She retired from the screen by the end of the decade, to raise a family with her husband. She and Lattuada remained married until his death in 2005.

DELVY, RICHARD Surf-rock musician and composer Richard Delvy died after a long illness in a West Hills, California, hospital on February 6, 2010. He was 67. He was born Richard Delvecchio in Bridgeport, Connecticut, on April 20, 1942. He moved to Southern California in the late 1950s, where he was a drummer for the early surf-rock band the Bel-Airs. They had a minor hit with the instrumental “Mr. Moto” in the early 1960s. Delvy subsequently formed the Challengers, and produced their 1963 debut album Surf beat. He also acquired the rights to such popular songs as “Wipe Out” and “Chick-A-Boom (Don’t Ya Jes’ Love It).” He produced albums for the Outsiders and the Chamber Brothers later in the decade. Delvy

Richard Delvy

2009 • Obituaries

composed the theme song for the 1968 cult sci-fi film The Green Slime. He also contributed music for such animated series as Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids, My Favorite Martian, The Archies, and The Groovy Ghoulies. Delvy later served as an executive at such recording companies as MGM Music and Carousel Records, and was musical director and arranger for tours by Tony Orlando and Dawn and David Cassidy.

D ENAULT, E DWARD Television executive Edward Denault, who was a production manager at CBS and Lorimar, died of complications from Alzheimers disease and heart failure in Mission Viejo, California, on August 21, 2010. He was 86. He worked as a flight instructor in Santa Monica, California, before breaking into films and television as an assistant director in the early 1950s. He worked on the films Teenage Thunder (1957), The Bachelor Party (1957), and Kings Go Forth (1958). He also served as assistant director for episodes of such series as State Trooper, Yancy Derringer also directing several episodes, Mike Hammer, Twilight Zone also directing many of Rod Serling’s introductions and closings, Johnny Ringo, Dante, Michael Shayne, The Rifleman, Zane Grey Theater, Wanted: Dead or Alive, and The Dick Powell Theatre. Denault served as production manager on the series The Wild Wild West, Gilligan’s Island, Gunsmoke, Flamingo Road, Eight Is Enough, Hawaii 5 –0, The Waltons, Dallas, Valerie’s Family, She’s the Sheriff, Our House, Max Headroom, Perfect Strangers, Knots Landing, and Falcon Crest. He also worked on the tele-films Sole Survivor (1970), Hunters Are for Killing (1970), The Brotherhood of the Bell (1970), Night Chase (1970), A Step Out of Line (1971), Goodbye, Raggedy Ann (1971), A Death of Innocence (1971), Mongo’s Back in Town (1971), Killer by Night (1972), Something Evil (1972), Welcome Home, Johnny Bristol (1972), Horror at 37,000 Feet (1973), I Want to Keep My Baby! (1976), Mary and Joseph: A Story of Faith (1979), Rape and Marriage: The Rideout Case (1980), A Matter of Life and Death (1981), Our Family Business (1981), Killjoy (1981), Desperate Lives (1982), Two of a Kind (1982), One Shoe Makes It Murder (1982), The Winter of Our Discontent (1983), Spraggue (1984), Master Harold … and the Boys (1985), Gulag (1985), A Death in California (1985), Our Family Honor (1985), Blood and Orchids (1986), The Deliberate Stranger (1986), Warm Hearts, Cold Feet (1987), and The Two Mrs. Grenvilles (1987). D ENNISON, MICHAEL Film costume designer Michael Dennison died of a brain aneurysm in a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, hospital while on location for the film One for the Money, on September 2, 2010. He was 58. Dennison was born Baton Rouge, Louisiana, on March 21, 1952. He moved to New York City after graduating from the University of Houston and began his career designing costumes and jewelry for the New York stage. He was working in films by the late 1970s as a costume designer or supervisor. His film credits include The Wanderers (1979), Cruising (1980), Oh Heavenly Dog (1980), Rollover (1981), Grease 2 (1982), The World According to Garp (1982), Sophie’s Choice (1982), The Survivors (1983), Moscow on the

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Hudson (1984), The Falcon and the Snowman (1985), Turk 182! (1985), Jagged Edge (1985), Maxie (1985), Heartburn (1986), The Mosquito Coast (1986), The Morning After (1986), Moon Over Parador (1988), Beaches (1988), Immediate Family (1988), Immediate

Escape (2006). She starred in the short film Allison (2006), and was featured on television in episodes of Shark, Entourage, and My So Called Life. She also appeared in various commercials and music videos.

D ERRICK, D EWEY Film collector Dewey Derrick, whose love of B western films from the 1940s and 1950s helped keep them alive for later generations, died after a long illness in North Little Rock, Arkansas, on February 3, 2010. He was 84. Derrick was born in Scott, Arkansas, on March 20, 1925. He served in the

Michael Dennison

Family (1989), the tele-film Trenchcoat in Paradise (1989), Jacob’s Ladder (1990), Basic Instinct (1992), Chaplin (1992), the 1997 television production of Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Cinderella, Starship Troopers (1997), Snow Falling on Cedars (1999), Almost Famous (2000), What Women Want (2000), America’s Sweethearts (2001), Rat Race (2001), Unfaithful (2002), Auto Focus (2002), Mona Lisa Smile (2003), The Chronicles of Riddick (2005), World Trade Center (2006), King of California (2007), Married Life (2007), Martian Child (2007), The Eye (2008), Mirrors (2008), Oliver Stone’s W. (2008), The Spirit (2008), the television production Georgia O’Keeffe (2009) which earned him an Emmy Award nomination, The Book of Eli (2010), Eat Pray Love (2010), and One for the Money (2011).

DE ROGATIS, TARA Actress Tara De Rogatis died suddenly at her home in Hollywood, California, on March 23, 2010. She was 30. De Rogatis was born in Livingston, New Jersey, on June 4, 1979, and was raised in Pacific Palisades, California. She trained as an actress and appeared in a small role in the 2006 film

Tara De Rogatis

Dewey Derrick

Pacific with the U.S. Navy during World War II and served with the Arkansas Air National Guard. He was an avid collector of 16mm films featuring such cowboy stars as Bob Steele, Ken Maynard, and Tim McCoy. He hosted monthly gatherings at his home where he would screen films in his converted garage, complete with theater seats and cowboy movie posters papering the walls. He was active in the Memphis Film Festival from the early 1980s, and loaned many of his films for screenings at the annual gathering.

DERRINGER, BILL Actor William Derringer died of lung cancer in Albuquerque, New Mexico, on June 7, 2010. He was 69. Derringer was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on October 30, 1940. He began his career on the local stage in the early 1960s, and was soon appearing in Off-Broadway productions. He moved to Los Angeles later in the decade, where he wrote, directed, and appeared in numerous plays. He also appeared in small roles in several films including Barefoot in the Park (1967), Rosemary’s Baby (1968), Goodbye, Columbus (1969), and The Dark (1979). Derringer later settled in Albuquerque, where he remained a leading figure in local theater. DE SELA, LHASA Singer Lhasa de Sela died of breast cancer at her home in Montreal, Canada, on January 1, 2010. She was 37. De Sela was born in Big Indian, New York, on September 27, 1972, the daughter of a Mexican father, Spanish teacher Alex Sela, and Jewish-American mother, photographer and actress Alexandra Karam. She spent her early life traveling across the United States and Mexico in a converted school bus. She began singing in San Francisco in a

103 Greek cafe at the age of 13. She moved to Montreal in the early 1990s, where she continued to perform at local nightclubs. She recorded her first album, La Llorona, in Canada in 1997, and toured North America and Europe over the next two years. She went to France in

2010 • Obituaries

(1967), The Gendarme Gets Married (1968), The Spat (1978), and The Other One’s Mug (1979). He was also seen on television in productions of La Drame de Sainte-Helene (1961), Vincent Scotto (1962), Garantua (1962), Thierry la Fronde (1964), L’Amour en Papier (1966), and Sacre Farceur (1978).

DEUTER, JAMES Actor James Deuter, who was a fixture on the Chicago stage for many years, died of congestive heart failure and circulatory disease at his home in Edgewater, Chicago, on August 28, 2010. He was 71. Deuter was born in Chicago on March 19, 1939. He studied drama in college and worked at various odd jobs before gaining attention for a comic rendition of Hamlet’s soliloquy at a local comic hangout in the 1970s. He soon became a popular performer on the local stage, and appeared in television productions of

Lhasa de Sela

1999, joining her sister in a theatrical circus company. She resumed writing songs in Marseille in the early 2000s, and returned to Montreal to record The Living Road in 2003. The album included songs in Spanish, English, and French. Lhasa spent the next several years in concert tours, and was a guest artist on songs with Stuart Staples and Tindersticks. She also composed music for the films The Fatalist (2005) and The House (2007). Her last album, Lhasa, was released in April of 2009.

DESTAIN , ROBERT French actor Robert Destain died in France on December 20, 2010. He was 93. Destain was featured in such films as Crazy Show (1949), We Will All Go to Paris (1950), Bernard and the Lion (1951), His Father’s Portrait (1953), Les Deux Font la Paire (1954), Peek-a-Boo (1954), My Seven Little Sins (1954), La Madelon (1955), Fernandel the Dressmaker (1956), Vines of the Lord (1958), Arretez le Massacre (1959), Tete Folle (1960), La Belle Americaine (1961), The Counterfeit Constable (1964), The Gorillas (1964), What’s Cooking in Paris (1966), The Exchange Student

Robert Destain

James Deuter

Will: The Autobiography of G. Gordon Liddy (1982), Vital Signs (1986), Under the Biltmore Clock (1986), Charley Hannah (1986), and Mario and the Mob (1992). He was also featured in episodes of the series Missing Persons and Cupid, and played the recurring role of Boswell in Early Edition from 1996 to 1997. Deuter had small roles in several films during his career including Weeds (1987), A Night in the Life of Jimmy Reardon (1988) with River Phoenix, Major League (1989), Only the Lonely (1991), The Babe (1992), Mo’ Money (1992), The Hudsucker Proxy (1994), With Honors (1994), Richie Rich (1994), and Payback (1999).

DEVI , SANTHA Veteran Indian Malayalam actress Santha Devi died after a long illness in a private hospital in Kozhikode, Kerala, India, on November 20, 2010. She was 82. She was born in Kozhikode in 1927 and began performing on stage in the mid–1950s. She made her film debut several years later in 1957’s Minnaminungu. She remained a leading actress for over 50 years, and was featured in nearly 500 films. Her numerous film credits include Awal (1967), Ithu Bhoomiyanu (1978), Inquilabinte Makkal (1978), Thakara (1980), Chaakara (1980), Angaadi (1980), Anu Bandham (1985), Wandering Wind (1987), Dhinarathrangal (1988), Chanakyan (1989), Aakasha Kottayile Sultan (1991), Yamanam (1992), Magrib (1993), Aagneyam (1993), Madamma (1996), Suvarna Simhaasanam

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(1997), Irattakuttikalude Achan (1997), Mizhi Randilum (2003), Ammakilikkoodu (2003), Freedom (2004),

Santha Devi

Ullam (2005), Thalappavu (2008), Vilapangalkkappuram (2008), and Kerala Cafe (2009).

DEVON, RICHARD Character actor Richard Devon died of vascular disease on February 26, 2010. He was 83. Devon was born in Glendale, California, on December 11, 1926. Devon worked his way through drama school in Los Angeles performing chores in lieu of paying tuition. He also worked in early local television in Los Angeles and played a recurring character in the juvenile science fiction program Space Patrol. He made his film debut in the early 1950s and, with his dark hair and piercing eyes, was a menacing screen presence in two dozen films. Devon was seen in Scorching Fury (1952), The Prodigal (1955), Roger Corman’s The Undead (1957) as Satan, The Buckskin Lady (1957), 3:10 to Yuma (1957), Teenage Doll (1957), Escape from San Quentin (1957), Blood of Dracula (1957) as Det. Sgt. Stewart, Corman’s The Saga of the Viking Women and Their Voyage to the Waters of the Great Sea Serpent (1957) as King Stark of the Grimolts and, War of the Satellites (1958) as Dr. Pol Van Ponder, Machine-Gun Kelly (1958), Badman’s Country (1958), The Badlanders (1958), Money, Women and Guns (1959), Gunfighters of Abilene (1960), Battle of Blood Island (1960), The Co-

Richard Devon

mancheros (1961), Kid Galahad (1962) with Elvis Presley, Cattle King (1963), The Three Stooges Go Around the World in a Daze (1966) as the Maharajah, The Silencers (1966), Three Guns for Texas (1968), and Magnum Force (1973) with Clint Eastwood. Devon was off-screen for over a decade before he made his final film appearance as a Cardinal in the horror feature The Seventh Sign in 1988. He was also a prolific television actor from the mid–1950s, appearing in episodes of Space Patrol, Highway Patrol, The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin, Frontier, Noah’s Ark, The George Sanders Mystery Theater, Navy Log, The Ford Television Theatre, Dragnet, Zane Grey Theater, The 20th Century–Fox Hour, The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp, Wagon Train, Sergeant Preston of the Yukon, M Squad, Boots and Saddles, State Trooper, Tales of Wells Fargo, Trackdown, Wanted: Dead or Alive, Peter Gunn, The Loretta Young Show, Richard Diamond, Private Detective, Zorro, 77 Sunset Strip, One Step Beyond, The D.A.’s Man, Yancy Derringer in the recurring role of Jody Barker, The Rough Riders, The Rifleman, Law of the Plainsman, Johnny Ringo, Colt .45, The Detectives Starring Robert Taylor, The Texan in the recurring role of Tim Craven, Mr. Lucky, Riverboat, The Rebel, Hotel de Paree, Bonanza, Sugarfoot, Philip Marlowe, Target: The Corruptors, Laramie, Overland Trail, The Tall Man, The Islanders, Stagecoach West, The Untouchables, The Twilight Zone, Death Valley Days, Gunsmoke, The Virginian, Perry Mason, Destry, Breaking Point, Burke’s Law, Daniel Boone, The Fugitive, A Man Called Shenandoah, Ben Caesy, The Big Valley, Laredo, Lassie in the recurring role of Merle Dixon, Mission: Impossible, The Iron Horse, The Monkees, The F.B.I., The High Chaparral, Mannix, The Guns of Will Sonnett, Get Smart, Lancer, Planet of the Apes, Quark, Matt Houston, and Midnight Caller. Devon was largely retired by the early 1990s.

DEVRIM, IHSAN Veteran Turkish actor Ihsan Devrim died in Istanbul on January 6, 2010. He was 95. Devrim was born in Istanbul on January 1, 1915. He began his career on stage in the late 1930s. He was featured in the 1961 film Gonulden Gonule, and appeared on television in productions of Donemec (1988), Yeni Hayat (2001), Zeybek Atesi (2002), and Seytam Ayrintida Gizlidir (2004). Devrim starred as grandfather

Ihsan Devrim

105 Yakup Cavus on the television series Super Baba from 1993 to 1997.

DEXTER, ROSEMARY British actress Rosemary Dexter, who starred in numerous European films in the 1960s and 1970s, died after a long illness in Via Leopardi, Recanati, Italy, on September 8, 2010. She was 66. Dexter was born to British parents in Quetta, Pakistan, on July 19, 1944. She moved to Italy in the

Rosemary Dexter

late 1950s, where she soon embarked on a career as an actress. She made her film debut in the 1963 sci-fi/comedy Omicron. She was also featured in the films Desideri d’Estate (1964), Riccardo Freda’s 1964 production of Romeo and Juliet as Juliet, All the Other Girls Do! (1964), Male Companion (1964), Casanova 70 (1965), Highest Pressure (1965), Sergio Leone’s spaghetti western classic For a Few Dollars More (1965) starring Clint Eastwood, Un Uomo a Meta (1966), Gente d’Onore (1967), Big Ripoff (1967), For Love … for Magic (1967), The Sex of Angels (1968), House of Cards (1968), Partner (1968), The Shoes of the Fisherman (1968), Ruggero Deodato’s spaghetti western In the Name of the Father (1969), Deadly Sanctuary (1969), Blow Hot, Blow Cold (1969), My Mao (1970), Mazzabubu … Quante Corna Stanno Quaggiu? (1971), Come Together (1971), I Figli Chiedono Perche (1972), Sarah’s Last Man (1972), Lui per Lei (1972), Eye in the Labyrinth (1972), Sette Ore di Violenza per una Soluzione Imprevista (1973), Catene (1974), La Minorenne (1974), Mio Dio Come Sono Caduto in Basso! (1974), and Povero Cristo (1975). Dexter also appeared on British television in episodes of The Man Who Never Was and The Saint before retiring from acting in the mid–1970s.

DICENZO, GEORGE Character actor George DiCenzo died after a long illness in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, on August 9, 2010. He was 70. DiCenzo was born in New Haven, Connecticut, on April 21, 1940. He began his career in television as an associate producer for the Gothic soap opera Dark Shadows in the late 1960s. He also served as an assistant to the producer for the 1970 feature film House of Dark Shadows, and made his onscreen debut in the small role of a deputy. He soon began working primarily in front of the cameras, appearing in the films Going Home (1971),

2010 • Obituaries

Across 110th Street (1972), Shoot It Black, Shoot It Blue (1974), Las Vegas Lady (1975), Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977) as Major Benchley, The Choirboys (1977), The Frisco Kid (1979), The Ninth Configuration (1980), Gangster Wars (1981) as Arnold Rothstein, Breach of Contract (1982), Back to the Future (1985) as Sam Baines, The Longshot (1986), About Last Night… (1986), Walk Like a Man (1987), 18 Again! (1988), The New Adventures of Pippi Longstockings (1988), Face of the Enemy (1989), Sing (1989), The Exorcist III (1990), Gypsy Eyes (1992), Lesser Prophets (1997), Illuminata (1998), It Had to Be You (2000), Tempted (2001), Hotel (2001), Stateside (2004), and A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints (2006). He was a familiar face on television from the early 1970s, with roles in such tele-films as The Invasion of Carol Enders (1973), The Night Strangler (1973), The Norliss Tapes (1973), The Blue Knight (1973), Last Hours Before Morning (1975), Helter Skelter (1976) as Manson prosecutor Vince Bugliosi, The Hostage Heart (1977), Aspen (1977), To Kill a Cop (1978), The Jordan Chance (1978), High Midnight (1979), Reunion (1980), The Night the City Screamed (1980), The Gangster Chronicles (1981), Rivkin: Bounty Hunter (1981), Killing at Hell’s Gate (1981), Starflight: The Plane That Couldn’t Land (1983), Cowboy (1983), The Tom Swift and Linda Craig Mystery Hour (1983), If Tomorrow Comes (1986), Warm Hearts, Cold Feet (1987), Memories of Mannon (1988), Perry Mason: The Case of the Fatal Fashion (1991), Down, Out & Dangerous (1995), and Hustle (2004) as baseball commissioner A. Bartlett Giamatti. He was featured as Lt. DeNisco in the television series McClain’s Law from 1981 to 1982, and was Charles Dalton in the prime-time soap opera Dynasty from 1984 to 1985. DiCenzo also starred as D.A. Arnold Bach on Equal Justice from 1990 to 1991, and was Stan on Joe’s Life in 1993. His other television credits include roles in such series as The Delphi Bureau, Chase, Doc Elliot, Ironside, The F.B.I., The Rockford Files, Kung Fu, The Manhunter, Gunsmoke, Cannon, Baretta, Swiss Family Robinson, S.W.A.T., Kojak, The Streets of San Francisco, Most Wanted, Hunter, Space Academy, Police Story, How the West Was Won, The Waltons, Hawaii 5 –0, Magnum, P.I., E/R, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Wildfire, Spenser: For Hire, The Equalizer, Matlock, Guns of Paradise, In the Heat of the Night, Jake

George DiCenzo

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and the Fatman, Bodys of Evidence, M.A.N.T.I.S., Murder, She Wrote, Courthouse, NYPD Blue, Law & Order, New York Undercover, Wonderland, Law & Order: Criminal Intent, and Judging Amy. He was a featured as a voice actor in numerous commercials, books on tape, and animated productions including the film The Secret of the Sword (1985). He also voice characters in such television cartoon series as Space Sentinels, SpiderMan and His Amazing Friends as Captain America, Blackstar as John Blackstar, He-Man and the Masters of the Universe and She-Ra: Princess of Power as Bow and Hordak, Galtar and the Golden Lance, Rock ’n’ Wrestling as Captain Lou Albano, Duck Tales, Animaniacs, and Batman: The Animated Adventures. DiCenzo was also a leading acting coach in New York City.

DIETL, ROBERT Austrian actor Robert Dietl died on October 5, 2010. He was 78. Dietl was born in Salzburg, Austria, on August 7, 1932. He trained as an actor in Salzburg and began his stage career with the Schauspielhaus Dusseldorf in the late 1940s. He made his film debut several years later and was seen in such features as Der Engel mit dem Flammenschwert (1954), The High Life (1960), Miracle of the White Stallions (1963), Liselotte von der Pfalz (1966), Ich bin ein Elefant, Madame (1969), Diary of a Lover (1976), Egon Schiele — Exzesse (1981), Five Days One Summer (1982), Viadukt (1983), Forbidden (1984), Singing the Blues in Red (1986), Reunion (1989), The Seventh Continent (1989), Abrahams Gold (1990), and Harry and Harriet (1990). He also appeared frequently on television from the 1950s, with roles in such productions as Die Fee (1957), Mein Sohn, der Herr Minister (1958), Die Chinesische Mauer (1958), Alpenkonig und Menschenfeind (1962), Das Marchen (1966), Die Begnadigung (1968), Der Auftrag (1968), Berliner Antigone (1968), Der Senator (1968), Bend Sinister (1970), Doppelganger (1971) as Dr. Werner Kaiser, Die Abenteuer des Braven Soldaten Schwejk (1972), The Devil’s Lieutenant (1983), and Via Mala (1985). Dietl’s other television credits include episodes of Oberinspektor Marek, Das Kriminalmuseum, John Klings Abenteuer, Sprungbrett, Dem Tater auf der Spur, Sonderdezernat K1, Hamburg Transit, Ein Fall fur Stein, Ich Heirate eine Familie, The Adventures of Dr. Bayer, Detektivburo Roth, Tatort, Liebling Kreuzberg,

Robert Dietl

Coplan, Drei Damen vom Grill, Der Hausgeist, Kommissar Rex, and Im Namen des Gesetzes.

DI FOLCO, MARCELLO Italian actor Marcello Di Folco died at a hospice in Bentivoglio, near Bologna, Italy, after a long illness on September 7, 2010. He was 67. Di Folco was born in Rome on March 7, 1943. He made his film debut in Federico Fellini’s Satyricon (1969) and was also featured as Prince Umberto of Savoy in Fellini’s Amarcord (1973). His other

Marcello Di Folco

film credits include In the Name of the Italian People (1971), The Lusty Wives of Canterbury (1972), Decameron No. 2 — Le Altre Novelle di Boccaccio (1972), Shoot First, Die Later (1974), While There Is War There’s Hope (1974), Mondo Candido (1975), Todo Modo (1976), Squadra Antigangsters (1979), Fellini’s City of Women (1980), and I Carabbinieri (1981). Di Folco starred as Cosimo de Medici in Robert Rossellini’s 1973 tele-film The Age of the Medici, and was featured in the television productions Cartesius (1974) and Josephine ou la Comedie des Ambitions (1979). He was active in the Italian Transsexual Movement from the early 1980s, becoming known as Marcella Di Folco. She served on the municipal council in Bologna, Italy, and was a candidate the Italian Parliament.

D IGBY, KRISTIAN British television host Kristian Digby was found dead at his home in

Kristian Digby

107 Newham, East London, with a plastic bag over his head on March 1, 2010. He was 32. There was no evidence of foul play or intentional suicide, and his death was ruled a death by misadventure, presuming he accidentally suffocated while attempting auto-erotic asphyxiation. Digby was born in Torquay, Devon, England, on June 24, 1977. He directed several short films in the late 1990s including Words of Deception (1997) and Double Agents, Living in the Sun (1998). He worked with the BBC from the early 2000s, and hosted That Gay Show in 2001. He was best known for his hosting the BBC real estate reality shows Open House, Buy It, Sell It, Bank It, and 2008’s To Build or Not to Build, with Digby designing and contracting the building of his own house. He was also featured in Simon Fanshawe’s 2006 documentary The Trouble with Gay Men.

DIO, RONNIE JAMES Heavy metal singer Ronnie James Dio, who was best known for replacing Ozzy Osbourne on vocals for Black Sabbath in 1979, died of complications from stomach cancer in Houston, Texas, on May 16, 2010. He was 67. He was born Ronald James Padavona in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, on July 10, 1942. He began his musical career at an early age, and was performing with local band The Vegas Kings in his teens. He soon became lead singer of the band that had become Ronnie and the Redcaps when they recorded their first single in 1958. He took the name Ronnie Dio leading the Prophets in 1961, and the group released several singles before disbanding in 1967. He continued his association with Prophets guitarist Nick Pantas, forming the band the Electric Elves, which became Elf in 1969. He joined with Deep Purple guitarist Ritchie Blackmore in the band Rainbow in 1975, and they recorded the albums Rising and Long Live Rock ’n’ Roll. Dio was brought in to Black Sabbath to replace Ozzy Osbourne in 1979, and they recorded the albums Heaven and Hell (1980) and Mob Rules (1981). Dio and Black Sabbath drummer Vinny Appice formed the band Dio in 1982, and recorded the hit album Holy Diver the following year. The band continued to record and perform over the next two decades with numerous changes in its lineup, and Dio himself being the only constant. Their other albums include The Last in Line (1984), Sacred Heart (1985), Dream

Ronnie James Dio

2010 • Obituaries

Evil (1987), Lock Up the Wolves (1990), Strange Highways (1994), Angry Machines (1996), Magica (2000), Killing the Dragon (2002), and Master of the Moon (2004). Dio briefly reunited with Black Sabbath in the early 1990s to record the album Dehumanizer, and they recorded the album The Devil You Know as Heaven and Hell in 2009. A concert tour was scrapped when Dio was diagnosed with stomach cancer.

DJIJI, EITAN Young New Zealand actor Eitan Djiji died in a Los Angeles hospital on August 13, 2010, of injuries he received in a fire at his home in Sherman Oaks, California, three days earlier. He was 14. Djiji

Eitan Djiji

was raised in Christchurch, New Zealand, on June 26, 1996. He came to the United States with his parents at the age of 10 to pursue a career as an actor and singer. He was featured as Teddy in the 2009 film My Homework Ate My Dog.

DLOUHY, VLADIMIR Czech actor Vladimir Dlouhy died after a brief illness in Prague, Czech Republic, on June 20, 2010. He was 52. Dlouhy was born in Prague, Czechoslovakia, on January 10, 1958. He began his film career at the age of 12 in 1970’s Jumping Over Puddles. He was seen in numerous films over the next 40 years including Die Gestohlene Schlacht (1972), Pockam, az Zabijes (1973), Kvocny a Kral (1974), Na Startu je Delfín (1974), Osud jmenem Kamila (1974), Robinsonka (1974), Plaveni Hribat (1976), Anna, Sestra Jany (1976), Sestapadesat Neomluvenych Hodin (1977), Konecne si Rozumime (1977), Hop … and There Is Anthropoid (1978), Indiani z Vetrova (1979), Neco je ve Vzduchu (1980), Posledni Vlak (1982), Laska z Pasaze (1984), Give the Devil His Due (1984), An Uncertain Season (1988), Faithfulness We Pledge (1989), Babochki (1991), Malostranske Humoresky (1996), Edgar (1996), Boomerang (1997), Wonderful Years That Sucked (1997), The Button-Pushers (1997), Zitra Vystoupim v Trondheimu (1998), A Time of Debts (1998), The Conception of My Younger Brother (2000), One Hand Can’t Clap (2003), Lovers & Murderers (2004), Maly Svet (2004), Non Plus Ultras (2004), Shadows of the Deceased (2005), Guard No. 47 (2008), and My Husband’s Women (2009). He was also featured in television productions of Island of the Silver Herons (1976), Vyhoda (1980),

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Mezicas (1981), Bylo nas Sest (1985), Zla Krev (1986), Zalety Konskeho Handlire (1991), Stribrny a Rysavec (1998), Ex Offo (1999), Jistota (1999), O Princezne z Rimini (1999), Obeti: Prepadeni (2000), Cestujici bez Zavazadel (2000), Prizraky mezi Nami (2001), Elixir a Halibela (2001), Den, Kdy Nevyslo Slunce (2002), Ta

the University of Oregon, before pursuing a career in filmmaking. Her first major documentary was 1993’s Cuba Va: The Challenge of the Next Generation, and she also made the 2007 documentary Summer of Love, about San Francisco in 1967.

DOLMAN, NANCY Canadian actress Nancy Dolman, the wife of comedian Martin Short, died of cancer in Pacific Palisades, California, on August 23, 2010. She was 58. Dolman was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, on September 26, 1951. She began her career on stage in the early 1970s, touring with the Canadian Rock Theatre’s production of Jesus Christ Superstar. She met actor Martin Short while performing in a Toronto production of Godspell in 1972 and they were married in 1980. Dolman was featured in the re-

Vladimir Dlouhy

Treti (2002), Pohadka o Houslich a Viole (2005), Rana z Milosti (2005), Hranice (2006), Swingtime (2007), Vlna (2008), and Aljona (2009). He was Libor in the series Dobra Voda in 1982, and was Dr. Holoubek in Sanitka in 1984. He also starred as Petr on Arabela se Vraci in 1994. His other television credits include episodes of Arabela, Doktor z Vejminku, Slavne Historky Zbojnicke, Druhy Dech, Adventure of Criminalistics, Hrichy pro Patera Knoxe, Cerni Andele, O Ztracene Lasce, and Hrabenky. Dlouhy had completed filming the 2010 film Kajinek before his death.

DOLGIN, GAIL Documentary filmmaker Gail Dolgin, who earned an Academy Award nomination for her 2002 film Daughter from Danang reuniting a mother and daughter separated at the end of the Vietnam War, died of breast cancer in Berkeley, California, on October 7, 2010. She was 65. Dolgin was born on Great Neck, Long Island, New York, on April 4, 1945. She earned a bachelor’s in art history from the University of Pennsylvania, and a master’s in education from

Gail Dolgin

Nancy Dolman (with husband Martin Short)

curring role of Annie Selig in the television sit-com Soap from 1980 to 1981. She was also featured in an episode of Making a Living and the 1982 tele-film Family in Blue. She performed in the SCTV Channel variety series in 1984, and appeared with her husband in the 1985 comedy special Martin Short: Concert for the North Americas. She subsequently retired from acting to raise a family.

DONNADIEU, BERNARD-PIERRE French actor Bernard-Pierre Donnadieu died of cancer in Versailles, France, on December 27, 2010. He was 61. Donnadieu was born in Paris on July 2, 1949. He began his film career in the mid–1970s, appearing in small roles in the thrillers Body of My Enemy (1976), Joseph Losey’s Mr. Klein (1976), and Roman Polanski’s The Tenant (1976). His numerous film credits also include Mon Premier Amour (1978), Judith Therpauve (1978), Coup de Tete (1979), Such a Lovely Town (1979), Twice a Woman (1979), Bolero (1981), The Professional (1981), The Return of Martin Guerre (1982) in the title role, L’Indic (1983), Life Is a Bed of Roses (1983), La Mort de Mario Ricci (1983), Liberty Belle (1983), Barbarous Street (1984), Urgence (1985), Max My Love (1986), Trade Secrets (1986), L’Intruse (1986), Les Fous de Bassan (1987), Beatrice (1987), the original Dutch version of the thriller The Vanishing (1988) as the killer Raymond Lemorne, Christian (1989), Una Vita Scellerata (1990), Connemara (1990), Miracle of Marcellino (1991), Blanc

109

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d’Ebene (1992), Szwadron (1992), Shadow of the Wolf (1992), Rosenemil (1993), Justinien Trouve, ou le Batard de Dieu (1993), Mauvais Garcon (1993), Caboose (1996), BTK — Born to Kast (2000), The Gaul (2001), Antonio Vivaldi, un Prince a Venise (2006), and Paris 36 (2008). Donnadieu was also a prolific television actor, appearing in productions of Nick Verlaine ou Comment voler la Tour Eiffel (1976), Douze Heures pour Mourir (1978),

Donal Donnelly

Gaston Phoebus (1978), Le Temps des As (1978), Les Uns et les Autres (1981), L’Ennemi de la Mort (1981), Le France de Josephine (1982), Il n’y a Plus d’Innocents (1982), Machinations (1984), Double Face (1985), Mariage Blanc (1986), L’Argent du Mur (1988), Les Lutteurs Immobiles (1988), Les Jupons de la Revolution (1989), Mary de Cork (1989), Mit den Clowns Kamen die Tranen (1990), L’Alerte Rouge (1991), La Scene Finale (1992), L’Affaire Dreyfus (1995), Le Poteau d’Aldo (1996), La Fine Equipe (1997), Le Pantalon (1997), The Sands of Time (1998), Jeanne et le Loup (1998), Le Causse d’Aspignac (2000), Jean Moulin (2002), Orages (2003), Les Passeurs (2004), Clochemerle (2004), Un Petit Garcon Silencieux (2004), Jusqu’au bout (2005), Allons Petits Enfants (2005), Beau Masque (2006), Austerlitz, la Victoire en Marchant (2006), How Much We Hated Each Other (2007), A Droite Toute (2008), L’Affaire Salengro (2009), Du Cristal a la Fumee (2010), and Jeanne Devere (2010). His other television credits include episodes of A Dossiers Ouverts, Commissaire Moulin, Les Cinq Dernieres Minutes, Les Heritiers, Medcins de Nuit, Le Juge est une Femme, Vertiges, and S.O.S. 18.

The Mind of Mr. Soames (1970), and Waterloo (1970). He appeared on television in productions of This Day in Fear (1958), Rest in Violence (1958), The Iron Harp (1958), Playboy of the Western World (1958), Sergeant Musgrave’s Dance (1961), A Lily in Little India (1962), Application Form (1965), The Retreat (1966), The Drummer and the Bloke (1968), and The Venetian Twins (1976). He was also seen in episodes of The New Adventures of Charlie Chan, International Detective, The Avengers, The Sentimental Agent, Espionage, First Night, No Hiding Place, Out of the Unknown, Department S, Z Cars, and Great Mysteries. He starred as Matthew Browne in the series Yes, Honestly from 1976 to 1977. Donnelly made his Broadway debut in the 1966 production of Brian Friel’s Philadelphia, Here I Come!, earning an Emmy Award nomination for his performance. He continued his career on Broadway in replacement roles in such plays as A Day in the Death of Joe Egg, Sleuth, and The Elephant Man. He also appeared in productions of Friel’s Faith Healer (1979), Dancing at Lughnasa (1991), and Translations (1995). He largely settled in the United States in the 1980s, and was featured in John Huston’s film adaptation of James Joyce’s The Dead (1987) as Freddy Malins. His other film credits include Twister (1989), The Godfather: Part III (1990) as Archbishop Gildey, Red Riding Hood (1992) as the narrator, Words Upon the Window Pane (1994), Mesmer (1994), Squanto: A Warrior’s Tale (1994), Korea (1995), Love and Rage (1998), and This Is My Father (1998). He also appeared on television in episodes of Spenser: For Hire, Love & Order, and DDU.

DONNELLY, DONAL Irish actor Donal Donnelly died of cancer in Chicago on January 4, 2010. He was 78. Donnelly was born in Bradford, Yorkshire, England, on July 6, 1931, and was raised in Dublin, Ireland. He began his career on stage in Dublin at the Gate Theater. He also appeared on London’s West End stages in productions of J.M. Synge’s Playboy of the Western World and Sean O’Casey’s Shadow of a Gunman in the 1950s. Donnelly was also seen in the films The Rising of the Moon (1957), Gideon of Scotland Yard (1958), Shake Hands with the Devil (1959), I’m All Right Jack (1959), The Informers (1963), Up Jumped a Swagman (1965), The Knack … and How to Get It (1965),

DONNER, CLIVE British film director Clive Donner died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease in London on September 6, 2010. He was 84. Donner was born in London on January 21, 1926. He began making short films while in school, and found work as an assistant editor at Denham Studios after graduation. He was soon editing films at Denham and, later, Pinewood, working on such features as Oliver Twist (1948), One Woman’s Story (1949), Madeleine (1950), Pandora and the Flying Dutchman (1951), A Christmas Carol (1951), The Promoter (1952), Tonight at 8:30 (1952), Genevieve (1953), Man with a Million (1954), The Purple Plain (1954), and I Am a Camera (1955). He

Bernard-Pierre Donnadieu

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made his directorial debut with 1957’s The Secret Place, and also helmed the films Heart of a Child (1958) and Some People (1962). Donner worked in television, directing episodes of Danger Man, The Edgar Wallace Mystery Theatre, and Sir Francis Drake. He scored a major hit with his 1963 film adaptation of Harold Pinter’s play The Caretaker, starring Alan Bates, and followed with the successful satire Nothing but the Best (1964). His next film was the hit comedy What’s New Pussycat? (1965), starring Peter Sellers, Peter O’Toole, and Woody Allen. He stayed in Hollywood to helm the comedy Luv (1967) starring Jack Lemmon and Peter Falk. Donner returned to England, where he directed Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush (1968). His 1969 Daisy d’Ora

Verschwundene Testamant (1929), Der Mann der Nicht Liebt (1929), Hungarian Nights (1929), Die Halbwuchsigen (1929), Freiheit in Fesseln (1930), and Nur am Rhein (1930). She was Miss Germany of 1931, and modeled during the 1930s. She soon married diplomat Otto Schlitter, and they remained together until his death in 1970.

Clive Donner

historical epic Alfred the Great, starring David Hemmings and Michael York, was a commercial misfire and his directing career suffered in its wake. He directed television commercials and stage plays over the next several years before returning to the screen with the 1974 horror comedy Old Dracula (aka Vampira) starring David Niven. His later films included the 1980 Get Smart feature The Nude Bomb, Charlie Chan and the Curse of the Dragon Queen (1981), Stealing Heaven (1988), and Arrivederci Roma (1990). He worked frequently in television from the late 1970s, helming such productions as Rogue Male (1976), Spectre (1977), The Three Hostages (1977), She Fell Among Thieves (1978), The Thief of Baghdad (1978), Oliver Twist (1982), The Scarlet Pimpernel (1982), To Catch a King (1984), A Christmas Carol (1984), Arthur the King (1985), Agatha Christie’s Dead Man’s Folly (1986), Babes in Toyland (1986), Not a Penny More, Not a Penny Less (1990), Terror Stalks the Class Reunion (1992), and Charlemagne (1993). Donner was married to costume designer Jocelyn Rickards until her death in 2005. D’ORA, DAISY German actress Daisy d’Ora, who was featured in the 1929 film classic Pandora’s Box, died in a Munich, Germany, retirement home on June 12, 2010. She was 97. Daisy, Baroness von Freyberg, was born in Potsdam, Germany, on February 2, 1913. She began her career in silent films in the late 1920s, appearing in G.W. Pabst’s Pandora’s Box (1929) with Louise Brooks. Her other film credits include Das

D ORTORT, D AVID Television producer David Dortort, who created the hit 1960s western series Bonanza, died at his apartment in Westwood, California, on September 5, 2010. He was 93. Dortort was born on October 23, 1916. He attended New York’s City College and began his career working at the public radio station WNYC. He served in the military during World War II. He wrote the popular juvenile delinquency novel Burial of the Fruit in 1947, and he also wrote the 1949 novel The Post of Honor. He began writing for film and television in the early 1950s, co-scripting Nicholas Ray’s western The Lusty Men and Fritz Lang’s melodrama Clash by Night in 1952. He also penned episodes of such television series as Racket Squad, The Public Defender, Fireside Theatre, Screen Directors Playhouse, Lassie, Panic!, and Studio 57. He earned Emmy Award nominations for his script for a 1954 episode of Climax! and the 1956 television adaptation of The Ox-Bow Incident for The 20th Century– Fox Hour. He also wrote the films A Cry in the Night

David Dortort

111 (1956), Reprisal! (1956), The Big Land (1957), and A Gift for Heidi (1958). Dortort was a writer and producer for the western series The Restless Gun starring John Payne from 1957 to 1959. He was head writer and producer for the popular NBC western series Bonanza from 1959 through 1970s. The saga of the Cartwright family was one of television’s most popular shows throughout the 1960s. He also produced the western The High Chaparral from 1967 to 1971 and was executive producer for the series The Cowboy in 1974 and the mini-series The Chisholms in 1979. Dortort was also executive producer for the 1987 comedy film Going Bananas starring Dom DeLuise. He returned to the Cartwright family as a producer for the sequel telefilms Bonanza: The Next Generation (1988), Bonanza: The Return (1993), and Bonanza: Under Attack (1995). He also was executive producer for the short-lived 2001 prequel series of Cartwright’s early days, Ponderosa, for PAX TV.

DOUGLAS, PHYLLIS Actress Phyllis Douglas, who was featured as a child in the film classic Gone with the Wind, died in Palm Springs, California, on May 12, 2010. She was 73. She was born Phyllis Callow in Hollywood on July 24, 1936, the daughter of leading second unit director Ridgeway Callow and Ziegfeld showgirl Margaret Watts. She made her screen

2010 • Obituaries

debut as a child, playing Bonnie Blue Butler, the daughter of Rhett and Scarlett, in the classic Gone with the Wind in 1939. She was featured onscreen atop a horse in a scene with Clark Gable. She returned to the screen in the 1948 western Canon City, and appeared in small roles in the features The Joker Is Wild (1957), Raintree County (1957), Until They Sail (1957), Handle with Care (1958), Andy Hardy Comes Home (1958), Night of the Quarter Moon (1959), The Beat Generation (1959), Girls Town (1959), Cimarron (1960), and Atlantis, the Lost Continent (1961). Douglas was featured on television as Josie Miller in a 1967 episode of Batman with the Joker. She was Yeoman Mears in the 1967 Star Trek episode “The Galileo Seven,” and appeared in a small role in the 1969 episode “The Way to Eden.” She largely retired from the screen by the early 1970s, with her final film appearance in 1971’s Wild Rovers.

DOUKISSA Greek singer Doukissa Fotara died after a long battle with cancer in Athens, Greece, on September 30, 2010. She was 69. She was born in Piraeus, Greece, on February 8, 1941. She began her career as a dancer at the age of 12, and she was a leading

Doukissa

Phyllis Douglas (as a baby with Clark Gable from Gone with the Wind )

Phyllis Douglas (from Star Trek)

singer by the 1960s. She was also featured in over 20 films including Thysiastika gia to Paidi Mou (1960), Kosmos kai Kosmakis (1964), Kathe Kaimos kai Dakry (1964), I Modistroula (1964), Thyella se Paidiki Kardia (1965), Exileosi (1965), The Siblings (1966), Syntrimia ta Oneira Mas (1967), Tha Kano petra tin Kardia Mou (1968), Katarameni Ora (1968), Elpides pou Navagisan (1968), Dakrya kai Diplopennies (1969), Enas Hippys me Filotimo (1970), and Pou pas Horis Agapi (1970). She remained a leading recording artist and performer of Greek folk music and popular songs.

DOW, HAROLD Television news correspondent Harold Dow, who frequently contributed to the CBS-TV investigative news series 48 Hours, died of complications from asthma in a Ridgewood, New Jersey, hospital on August 21, 2010. He was 62. Dow was born in Hackensack, New Jersey, on September 24, 1947. He graduated from the University of Nebraska at Omaha and began his career as a local news reporter for stations in Omaha, Paterson, New Jersey, Santa Monica, California, and Los Angeles. He began working

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with CBS News as a correspondent in Los Angeles in the early 1970s. He reported for the CBS Evening News and CBS News Sunday Morning. He was a contributing correspondent for the 1986 television documentary 48 Hours on Crack Street, which evolved into the weekly

Roscoe, Brother, Cry for Me (1970), The Red, White, and Black (1970), Swamp Girl (1971), and Superchick (1973). He also appeared on television in episodes of Highway Patrol, World of Giants, Lock Up, Colt .45, Assignment: Underwater, Miami Undercover, Emergency!, and The Six Million Dollar Man.

D RIVER, S TEVE Stephen Clancy Hill, an adult film actor under the name of Steve Driver, died when he fell from a cliff in Los Angeles after being tasered by a SWAT team on June 5, 2010. He was 34. Hill had killed fellow porn actor Herbert Wong with a sword after being fired from a project with Ultima DVD. He was located by police several days later, and was still brandishing a sword when he was tasered. Hill was born in Riverdale, Maryland, on May 8, 1976. He had been charged with assault with a deadly weapon while a student at the University of Maryland in 1998.

Harold Dow

series 48 Hours in 1988. Dow became a leading contributor to the series, and was the first network journalist to interview O.J. Simpson after the murder of his wife. He also covered the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center in 2003, and narrowly escaped being killed in the collapse of the towers.

DREXEL, STEVE Actor Steve Drexel died of lung and bone cancer in Quartz Hill, Lancaster, California, on April 17, 2010. He was 78. He was born Ernest Joseph Caringi in Mechanicville, New York, on December 23, 1931. He served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War. He and his parents owned and operated the Hollywood supper club Panzas Lazy Susan in the 1950s and 1960s. He began appearing in films and television in the late 1950s as Steve Drexel. He was featured in such films as the Lon Chaney bio-pic Man of a Thousand Faces (1957), The Tarnished Angels (1958), Badman’s Country (1958), Hot Rod Gang (1958), The Big Beat (1958), All the Young Men (1960), the horror film Terrified (1963) with Rod Lauren, Movie Star, American Style or; LSD, I Hate You (1966) as Dr. Oscar

Steve Drexel

Steve Driver

He began working in adult films in the mid–2000s, with roles in the films series 5 Guy Cream Pie (2007), 10 Man Cum Slam (2007), and She Is Half My Age (2008). He was living at the Ultima DVD warehouse when he was asked to leave and subsequently assaulted three employees with a sword, with Wong perishing in the attack.

DUBAY, BILL Bill DuBay, the longtime writer and editor of Warren Publishing’s comic magazine line and co-creator of the time-traveling series The Rook, died of colon cancer in Portland, Oregon, on April 15, 2010. He was 62. DuBay was born in San Francisco, California, on January 11, 1948. He became interested in comics at an early age and was contributing art to fanzines by the early 1960s. He was illustrating satiric stories for Charlton Comics’ Go-Go and Marvel’s Not Brand Echh later in the decade. DuBay was hired by Warren in 1970, writing and drawing tales for the titles Creepy, Eerie, and Vampirella. He became editor of the Warren comic titles in 1972, a position he retained with several intermissions until the line folded in 1983. DuBay co-created time-traveling adventurer Restin Dane, known as the Rook, in a story for Eerie in 1978, and oversaw the character’s short-lived solo series. He joined Archie Comics after the demise of Warren and presided over an unsuccessful attempt to resurrect their

113 super-hero line. He also edited several issues of Western Publishing’s Bold Adventures, utilizing many of the artists he had worked with during his tenure at Warren. DuBay was hired by Stan Lee as senior writer and

Bill DuBay

2010 • Obituaries

C. Scott and Obsessed (1992) with William Devane. He served as co-executive producer for the 2010 Hallmark tele-film When Love Is Not Enough: The Lois Wilson Story, starring Winona Ryder and Barry Pepper.

D UFFIN, SHAY Irish-born character actor Shay Duffin died of complications from heart surgery in a Los Angeles hospital on April 23, 2010. He was 79. Duffin was born in Dublin, Ireland, on February 26, 1931. He began performing while in his teens, singing in a local dance hall. He moved to Toronto, Canada, in 1960, where he sang with the Irish Players. Duffin also wrote and starred in the one-man play Confessions of an Irish Rebel, about acclaimed Irish poet and drunkard Brendan Behan, in the late 1960s. He did more than 5,000 performances of the play over the next three decades. He also appeared in stage productions of James Joyce’s The Dead and The Importance of Being Irish. He made his film debut in 1977’s The White Buffalo and was seen in such features as Butch and Sundance: The Early Days (1979), The Main Event (1979),

studio art director for Marvel Productions animation department in 1984. He left Marvel to work for 20th Century–Fox’s Fox Kids programming.

DUBE, RANI Indian actress and producer Rani Dube, who worked in films and television in England from the 1960s, died on April 18, 2010. She was 72. Dube was born in Meerut, Uttar Pradesh, India, on October 21, 1937, the daughter of writer and Indian independence activist Ram Saran Sharma. Rani began performing on radio as a child with All India Radio and Voice of America. She came to England in 1957 and began working for the BBC Hindi Service in the early 1960s. She was soon appearing on television in episodes of The Archers, Mogul and The Doctors. She was seen as a swimmer in the opening credits of the 1964 James Bond film Thunderball. She worked as a script editor for the BBC drama series Theatre 625 in the 1960s and moved into production in the 1970s. She oversaw the architectural documentary series Heritage of Danger. Dube was instrumental in securing the initial financing in India for Richard Attenborough’s Oscar-winning bio-film Gandhi in 1982. She was credited as coproducer of the film and was actively involved during the production. She also served as producer for the television productions Q.E.D. (1984) and Man-Eaters of India (1986). DUCHOW, PETER Television producer Peter K. Duchow died of complications from emphysema in Santa Monica, California, on June 23, 2010. He was 82. Duchow was born on September 7, 1927. He worked in sales promotion for Capitol Records and was an executive with Revue Studios before moving into films. Duchow teamed with actor James Garner to produce the Emmy Award–winning 1986 Hallmark Hall of Fame production Promise, which starred Garner and James Woods. He also produced the 1989 Hallmark production of My Name Is Bill W, with Garner and Woods starring. Duchow was also producer for the television productions Finding a Way Home (1991) starring George

Shay Duffin

The Frisco Kid (1979), The Baltimore Bullet (1980), Raging Bull (1980), 10 to Midnight (1983), Memoirs of an Invisible Man (1992), Newsies (1992), The Public Eye (1992), Leprechaun (1993) as Dan O’Grady, Number One Fan (1995), Precious Find (1996), Head Above Water (1996), Titanic (1997), Seabiscuit (2003) as horse trainer Sunny Fitzsimmons, The Departed (2006), Still Life (2007), and Beowulf (2007). He was also featured in the tele-films Law and Order (1976), The Amazing Howard Hughes (1977), Captains Courageous (1977), The Other Side of Hell (1978), Mother, Juggs & Speed (1978), Marciano (1979), Mary and Joseph: A Story of Faith (1979), Three Sovereigns for Sarah (1985), and J. Edgar Hoover (1987). His other television credits include episodes of Switch, Dynasty, Cagney & Lacey, Murder, She Wrote, and Star Trek: The Next Generation as Ned Quint in the 1994 episode “Sub Rosa.” He was featured in the recurring role of Sean in the 1990 series City and was Father Behan in several episodes of Due South in 1995.

DUFFY, BRIAN British photographer Brian Duffy died of degenerative lung disease in England on May 31, 2010. He was 76. Duffy was born in London on June 15, 1933. He began working as a fashion de-

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signer on the early 1950s and worked as a fashion artist for Harper’s Bazaar from 1955. He soon began training as a photographer’s assistant and joined British Vogue in 1957. He worked with some of the top models of the period over the next several years including Jean Shrimpton, Joy Weston, and Paulene Stone. He was instrumental in creating the image of Swinging London in the 1960s, with his images appearing in such publications as Glamour, Esquire, and Queen Magazine. He was also a contract photographer for French Elle from 1963 to 1968 and from 1971 to 1979. He also created the

a stroke in a Los Angeles hospital on July 2, 2010. He was 59. Duffy was born in Springfield, Pennsylvania, on August 29, 1950. He studied at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York City in the late 1960s and moved to Los Angeles in 1970. He appeared on television in episodes of such series as Bonanza, The Virginian, The Bold One: The Senator, Barnaby Jones, and A Time for Love, and was featured in the 1973 film The Mad Bomber. Duffy worked frequently on stage productions in Los Angeles as actor and director. He began working with art director Richard Amend in the early 1980s, becoming assistant art director on numerous productions.

DUFORT, JOSHUA Aspiring actor and comedian Joshua Dufort was found beaten to death on a roadside in Henderson, Nevada, on November 8, 2010. He was 23. A native of Dansville, Michigan, he moved

Brian Duffy

artwork for several David Bowie album covers and photographed advertising campaigns for Smirnoff and Benson & Hedges. He teamed with author Len Deighton to form the Deighton Duffy film production company in 1967, and they produced the 1968 adaptation of Deighton’s Only When I Larf. They also produced the 1969 musical Oh! What a Lovely War. Duffy abandoned photography in the late 1970s, burning many of his negatives. He returned to photography 30 years later with an exhibition in 2009, taking current pictures of those he had filmed in the 1960s and 1970s. His return to the photographic scene was documented in the 2010 documentary The Man Who Shot the 60s.

Joshua Dufort

to Nevada three years earlier to pursue a career as an actor and improv comic. He had a small role in an episode of the television series Scoundrels, and was featured as a teenager in Ted V. Mikels’ sci-fi/horror film Astro Zombies: M3 — Cloned (2010).

DUFFY, JAMES STUART Actor and art director James Stuart Duffy died of complications from

D UKE, D EBORAH CALLOWAY Actress Deborah Calloway Duke died in Atlanta, Georgia, on October 12, 2010. She was 59. She was born in Albany, Georgia, on October 26, 1950. She appeared frequently

James Stuart Duffy

Deborah Calloway Duke

115 in films and television from the 1990s, with roles in the tele-films Web of Deceit (1990), Nightjohn (1996), The Price of Heaven (1997), The Wedding (1998), Freedom Song (2000), Boycott (2001), a modern updating of Frankenstein (2004), and Warm Springs (2005). She was also seen in episodes of such series as In the Heat of the Night, I’ll Fly Away, and Tyler Perry’s Meet the Browns. Duke was featured in character roles in over a dozen films including A Simple Twist of Fate (1994), Nandi (1998), We Three Kings (2001), Nowhere Road (2002), The Kudzu Christmas (2002), Juwanna Mann (2002), Sweet Home Alabama (2002), The Fighting Temptations (2003), Black Aura on an Angel (2004), Venom (2005), Give Us This Day (2006), 20 Years After (2008), Crystal River (2008), Grilling Bobby Hicks (2009), and Dear Willie (2010).

DUNCAN, LESLEY English singer and songwriter Lesley Duncan died of cerebrovascular disease in Salen, Isle of Mull, Scotland, on March 12, 2010. She was 66. Duncan was born in Stockton-on-Teas, Durham, England, on August 12, 1943. She began her career in the early 1960s, and was featured in the 1963 film

Lesley Duncan

What a Crazy World. She was best known for her songs “Everything Changes,” “Sing Children Sing,” and “Love Song,” which she recorded and performed with Elton John. She was a backing vocalist for Dusty Springfield and Pink Floyd and sang lead on the Alan Parsons Project recording “If I Could Change Your Mind” in 1979.

DUNLAP, PAUL Composer Paul Dunlap, who was best known for scoring numerous horror films and westerns in the 1950s and 1960s, died in Palm Springs, California, on March 11, 2010. He was 90. Dunlap was born in Springfield, Ohio, on July 19, 1919. He began working in films in the early 1950s, composing scores for over 200 features and television productions over the next 20 years. His numerous film credits include The Baron of Arizona (1950), Hi-Jacked (1950), All That I Have (1951), The Steel Helmet (1951), Cry Danger (1951), Little Big Horn (1951), Lost Continent (1951), Journey into Light (1951), The Living Bible (1952), The San Francisco Story (1952), Breakdown (1952), Park Row (1952), Big Jim McLain (1952), Hellgate (1952), Fort

2010 • Obituaries

Vengeance (1953), Hannah Lee: An American Primitive (aka Outlaw Territory) (1953), The Royal African Rifles (1953), Combat Squad (1953), Jack Slade (1953), Duffy of San Quentin (1954), Dragonfly Squadron (1954), Loophole (1954), The Gambler from Natchez (1954), Fangs of the Wild (1954), Ring of Fear (1954), Return from the Sea (1954), Shield for Murder (1954), Cry Vengeance (1954), Black Tuesday (1954), Big House, U.S.A. (1955), Stranger on Horseback (1955), Finger Man (1955), Robbers’ Roost (1955), Desert Sands (1955), The Return of Jack Slade (1955), Fort Yuma (1955), Last of the Desperados (1955), Shack Out on 101 (1955), The Deserter (1956), Walk the Dark Street (1956), Three Bad Sisters (1956), The Wild Dakotas (1956), Crime Against Joe (1956), Ghost Town (1956), The Come On (1956), The Broken Star (1956), The Three Outlaws (1956), Frontier Gambler (1956), Magnificent Roughnecks (1956), Stranger Intruder (1956), The Cruel Tower (1956), Emergency Hospital (1956), Stagecoach to Fury (1956), Abbott & Costello’s Dance with Me, Henry (1956), The Brass Legend (1956), The Women of Pitcairn Island (1956), The Quiet Gun (1957), Guns Don’t Argue (1957), Crime of Passion (1957), Curfew Breakers (1957), Dragoon Wells Massacre (1957), Lure of the Swamp (1957), God Is My Partner (1957), Apache Warrior (1957), Portland Expose (1957), Under Fire (1957), Rockabilly Baby (1957), Young and Dangerous (1957), Oregon Passage (1957), Gun Fever (1958), Toughest Gun in Tombstone (1958), Gang War (1958), Wolf Larsen (1958), Frontier Gun (1958), Stump Run (1959), Lone Texan (1959), The Rebel Set (1959), Here Come the Jets (1959), The Oregon Trail (1959), Five Gates to Hell (1959), The Purple Gang (1959), The Rookie (1959), Gunfighters of Abilene (1960), Twelve Hours to Kill (1960), Walk Like a Dragon (1960), Desire in the Dust (1960), The Crowning Experience (1960), Seven Women from Hell (1961), Decision at Midnight (1963), Law of the Lawless (1964), Stage to Thunder Rock (1964), Naked Kiss (1964), Young Fury (1965), Operation C.I.A. (1965), The Sweet and the Bitter (1967), and The Money Jungle (1967). Dunlap was likely best known for scoring horror and science fiction films for Allied Artists, United Artists, and American International Pictures including Target Earth (1954), I Was a Teenage Werewolf (1957), I Was a Teenage Frankenstein (1957), Blood of Dracula (1957), How to Make a Mon-

Paul Dunlap

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ster (1958), Frankenstein —1970 (1958), Invisible Invaders (1959), The Four Skulls of Jonathan Drake (1959), Angry Red Planet (1959), Shock Corridor (1963), and Black Zoo (1963). He also scored several of the Three Stooges final films including The Three Stooges in Orbit (1962), The Three Stooges Meet Hercules (1962), The Three Stooges Go Around the World in a Daze (1963), and The Outlaws Is Coming (1965). Dunlap also worked in television on such series as This Is the Life, The Man Behind the Badge, Mike Hammer, Soldiers of Fortune, The Millionaire, Studio 57, Crusader, Schlitz Playhouse of Stars, The Gray Ghost, Tales of Wells Fargo, The Restless Gun, Cimarron City, Gunsmoke, and Have Gun — Will Travel. He provided music for a handful of United film sci-fi/horror thrillers in the 1960s including Cyborg 2087 (1966), Destination Inner Space (1966), Dimension 5 (1966), Castle of Evil (1966), The Destructors (1968), and Panic in the City (1968). He also scored the 1977 documentary Bruce Lee, the Legend, and the 1980 television documentary Sharks: The Death Machine. His final film credit was the off-beat comedy film GORP in 1980. Dunlap’s other musical compositions include a piano concerto and the choral piece, Celebration.

DUNN , R ICHARD Richard Dunn, who starred as a talk show host on the off-beat comedy series Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job!, died of complications from a stroke in a Hollywood, California, hospital on June 4, 2010. He was 74. Dunn was born on December 18, 1935. He was featured as the

David Durston

tional programs as the early science fiction series Tales of Tomorrow, Kraft Theater, Studio One, Rheingold Playhouse, Danger, Studio One, and Navy Log. He wrote and directed the films Felicia (1964), The Love Statue (aka The Love Drug) (1966), and Blue Sextet (aka Leap into Hell ) (1970). He directed segments added to the 1964 Turkish film Susuz Yaz (aka Dry Summer) for its U.S. release as Reflections in 1971. Durston was best known as the auteur behind 1970’s I Drink Your Blood, about a Manson-esque gang of Satanic hippies who become bloodthirsty maniacs after being fed rabiestainted meat pies. He was also featured onscreen as Dr. Oakes. He produced, directed, and scripted 1972’s Stigma and the 1975 adult film Boy-napped under the names Spencer Logan and David Ransom. Durston was also involved in providing commentary for the recent DVD releases of I Drink Your Blood and Stigma.

EATON, DORIS Silent screen actress Doris Eaton Travis, who was believed to be the youngest and last surviving Ziegfeld Girl, died of an aneurysm in Commerce, Michigan, on May 11, 2010. She was 106. Eaton was born in Norfolk, Virginia, on March 14, 1904. She made her professional debut in a performance of The Blue Bird at the age of five. She and her sisters, Mary and Pearl, were soon appearing on stage. Doris and Mary toured with a later production of The Blue Bird in starring roles in 1915 and appeared with Richard Dunn

often erratic talk show host on Tim and Eric from 2007 to 2010. He also appeared on television in episodes of Derek and Simon: The Show as Sir, The Tonight Show with Conan O’Brien, Jimmy Kimmel Live!, and Parks and Recreation as 100-year-old man. Dunn was seen in several films including Love Chronicles (2003), The Hunted: Terms of Extermination (2009), and Robbin’ in da Hood (2009).

DURSTON , DAVID Filmmaker David E. Durston, who wrote and directed the 1970 cult horror film I Drink Your Blood, died on May 6, 2010. He was 88. Durston was born in Pennsylvania on September 10, 1921. He began working in local television in Chicago in the late 1940s. He was soon scripting for such na-

Doris Eaton (as Ziegfeld Girl)

117 the Eaton family on Broadway in Mother Carey’s Chickens. Older sister Pearl assisted Doris’ entrance into the Follies as a chorus girl in 1918 (under the name Doris Levant), shortly after she had completed eighth grade. She appeared in numerous Ziegfeld productions over the next two years, becoming a solo performer before leaving the stage to pursue a career in silent films. Eaton was featured in the films At the Stage Door (1921), The Call of the East (1922), Tell Your Children (1922), His Supreme Sacrifice (1922), The Broadway Peacock (1922), High Kickers (1923), Fashion Follies (1923), Taking the Count (1928), Street Girl (1929), The Very Idea (1929), and Reckless Decision (1933). She became a dance instructor with Arthur Murray after her performing career was over in the mid–1930s, and became manager

Doris Eaton (older)

of many of Murray’s dance schools over the next three decades. She later married one of her students, wealthy Ford automotive engineer Paul Travis, and they moved to Norman, Oklahoma, where they established a horse ranch before Travis’ death in 2000. Eaton returned to Broadway in 1998 to participate in the benefit for Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS. She was also featured in a small role in the 1999 Andy Kaufman biofilm Man on the Moon, starring Jim Carrey. She was also seen in several documentaries about the Ziegfeld Follies, the Eaton family, and her work in films in her later years.

EDWARDS, BLAKE Film producer, director and writer Blake Edwards died of complications from pneumonia in a Santa Monica, California, on December 15, 2010. He was 88. He was born William Blake Crump in Tulsa, Oklahoma, on July 26, 1922. He worked as a writer in radio in the late 1930s, with such credits as Orson Welles’ acclaimed 1932 production of The War of the Worlds. He served in the U.S. Coast Guard during World War II. He began working in films as an actor in a small role in 1942’s Ten Gentlemen from West Point. He was also seen in the films Lucky Legs (1942), A Guy Named Joe (1943), Ladies Courageous (1944), See Here, Private Hargrove (1944), The Eve of St. Mark (1944), Marine Raiders (1944), Marshal of Reno (1944), Wing and a Prayer (1944), In the Meantime, Darling (1944), My Buddy (1944), The Unwritten Code

2010 • Obituaries

(1944), Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo (1944), She’s a Sweetheart (1944), This Man’s Navy (1945), A Guy, a Gal and a Pal (1945), Gangs of the Waterfront (1945), What Next, Corporal Hargrove (1945), They Were Expendable (1945), Strangler of the Swamp (1946), Tokyo Rose (1946), From This Day Forward (1946), Till the End of Time (1946), The Strange Love of Martha Ivers (1946), The Best Years of Our Lives (1946), The Beginning or the End (1947), Big Town (1947), and Leather Gloves (1948). He teamed with John Champion to co-write and co-produce the 1948 western Panhandle, also appearing on screen as Floyd Schofield. He continued to script such films as Stampede (1949), Rainbow ’Round My Shoulder (1952), All Ashore (1953), Cruisin’ Down the River (1953), Drive a Crooked Road (1954), The Atomic Kid (1954), and My Sister Eileen (1955). Edwards worked frequently in television during the 1950s, producing, directing and writing for the series Mr. Lucky and Peter Gunn. He also wrote and directed for Four Star Playhouse and The Dick Powell Theatre and scripted episodes of The Mickey Rooney Show, Chevron Hall of Stars, The Ford Television Theatre, Meet McGraw, and Richard Diamond, Private Detective. He wrote and directed the films Bring Your Smile Along (1955), He Laughed Last (1956), Mister Cory (1957), and This Happy Feeling (1958). He also directed The Perfect Furlough (1958), Operation Petticoat (1959), and High Time (1960), and he scripted Operation Mad Ball (1957), The Couch (1962), The Notorious Landlady (1962), Soldier in the Rain (1963), and The Tamarind Seed (1974). He helmed the 1961 romantic comedy Breakfast at Tiffany’s starring Audrey Hepburn and the 1962 thriller Experiment in Terror starring Glenn Ford and Lee Remick. He also directed The Days of Wine and Roses, starring Jack Lemmon and Lee Remick, in 1962. Edwards was best known for his creation of the bumbling French detective, Inspector Clouseau, portrayed by Peter Sellers in the 1963 crime caper comedy The Pink Panther. The film also introduced the animated Pink Panther in the opening title sequence. Edwards also directed the sequels A Shot in the Dark (1964), The Return of the Pink Panther (1975), The Pink Panther Strikes Again (1976), and Revenge of the Pink Panther (1978). Sellers died before the completion of Trail of the Pink Panther (1982) and Curse of the Pink Panther (1983), which included numerous clips from previous films and Roger Moore in a cameo as Clouseau. Edwards resurrected the character for 1993’s Son of the Pink Panther, starring Robert Begnini as Clouseau’s son. Inspector Clouseau returned in the guise of Steve Martin in a 2006 film The Pink Panther, though Edwards was not directly involved in the production. He also directed the popular films The Great Race (1965) starring Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis, What Did You Do in the War, Daddy? (1966), Gunn (1967), the farce The Party (1968) starring Peter Sellers, and Darling Lili (1970), starring Julie Andrews, who Edward had married in 1969 and worked with frequently for the remainder of his career. He continued to helm such films as Wild Rovers (1971), The Carey Treatment (1972), 10 (1979) starring Dudley Moore and Bo Derek in her breakthrough role, the Hollywood satire S.O.B. (1981), 1982’s Victor Victoria which earned him an Academy

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Award nomination for best screenplay, The Man Who Loved Women (1983), Micki + Maude (1984), A Fine Mess (1986), That’s Life! (1986), Blind Date (1987), Skin Deep (1989) starring John Ritter, and Switch (1991). He also wrote and directed the tele-films Justin Case (1988)

dhist, changing his name to Pramada. He later accompanied stage shows and performed with the Devon Baroque Orchestra.

EILER, JIM Jim Eiler, who crafted musicals for young audiences as the founder of the Prince Street Players in the mid–1960s, died at his home in Boca Raton, Florida, on July 20, 2010. He was 83. Eiler was born in Granite City, Illinois, on April 6, 1927. He appeared in stock and touring productions of such plays

Blake Edwards

and Peter Gunn (1989) starring Peter Strauss, and produced and directed the short-lived 1992 sit-com Julie, starring wife Julie Andrews. He adapted his earlier film Victor/Victoria as a Broadway musical in 1995, which was also filmed for television, with Andrews reprising her starring role.

Jim Eiler

as Kismet, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, and Finian’s Rainbow as Og the leprechaun. He began creating musical productions for young people in 1965 with the Prince Street Players. Several of his works were aired on CBS television as Emmy Award–winning specials including Pinocchio (1965), Jack and the Beanstalk (1965), The Emperor’s New Clothes (1967) for which he also performed the role of Emperor Maximillian the Most, and Aladdin (1967). Eiler also wrote and scored musical productions of Alice in Wonderland, Cinderella, A Pocketful of Rhymes, Snow White Goes West, Treasure Island, and The Wizard of Oz, which have been performed in venues throughout the world.

EDWARDS, MIKE British cellist Mike Edwards, who was a member of Electric Light Orchestra (ELO) in the early 1970s, was killed when a huge cylindrical hay bale rolled out of a field and crashed on the roof of his van while he was driving in Devon, England, on September 3, 2010. He was 62. Edwards was born in Ealing, London, England, on May 31, 1948. He trained at the Royal Academy of Music, and began performing with ELO from their first concert in 1972. His unorthodox style, which included bizarre costumes and using grapefruits or oranges to play the cello, made him a popular performer at live events. Edwards performed with ELO on the albums ELO II, On the Third Day, The Night the Light Went On (In Long Beach), and Eldorado. He left the group in 1975 to become a Bud-

EJMONT, BOHDAN Polish actor Bohdan Ejmont died in Warsaw, Poland, on February 28, 2010. He was 82. Ejmont was born in Dolhinowie, Poland, on January 18, 1928. He trained at the Academy of Dra-

Mike Edwards

Bohdan Ejmont

119 matic Arts in Warsaw and began his career on stage in the late 1940s. He appeared in numerous films from the early 1950s including Unvanquished City (1950), The Crew (1952), The Epopee of Warsaw (1953), Career (1955), The Hours of Hope (1955), The Case of Pilot Maresz (1956), Shadow (1956), Two Gentlemen ’N’ (1962), Manhunter (1964), Adam’s Two Ribs (1964), The Unknown (1964), Three Steps on Earth (1965), Westerplatte (1967), How I Unleashed World War II (1970), Polish Album (1970), It’s Spring, Sergeant (1974), Pictures from Life (1975), Leaves Have Fallen (1975), The Scar (1976), The Gorgon Case (1977), Passion (1978), Coup d’Etat (1980), Salty Rose (1983), Sins of the Childhood (1984), Soccer Poker (1989), A Tale of Adam Mickiewicz’s “Forefathers’ Eve” (1989), The Night Time Guest (1989), and Europa Europe (1990). He also appeared on Polish television as Oberst Balkownik in the 1980 series Archiv des Todes.

2010 • Obituaries

revivals of Ibsen’s A Doll’s House and Hedda Gabler in the early 1970s. He also produced the films A New Leaf (1971) starring Walter Matthau, A Doll’s House (1973) starring wife Bloom, Richard Pryor: Live in Concert (1979), and An Evening with Quentin Crisp (1981). He was featured onscreen as Hilly Burr in the 1983 telefilm Princess Daisy. Elkins also produced films and documentaries for television including Deadly Game (1972), The Meeting (1989), Father & Son: Dangerous Relations (1993), Ray Alexander: A Taste for Justice (1993), A Father for Charlie (1995), Ray Alexander: A Menu for Murder (1995), Run for the Dream: The Gail Devers Story (1996), Inside (1996), the Emmy Award–winning In His Father’s Shoes (1997), Stander (2003), Steve McQueen: The Essence of Cool (2005), and Sex, Censorship and the Silver Screen (2007).

ELKINS, HILLARD Talent manager and producer Hillard Elkins, who produced the counterculture hits Oh! Calcutta! for the Broadway stage and Alice’s Restaurant for film, died of a heart attack in a Los Angeles hospital on December 1, 2010. He was 81. Elkins was born in Brooklyn, New York, on October 18, 1929. He began his career working at the William Morris talent agency as an office boy in 1950. He opened his own management firm several years later, where he represented such stars as Sammy Davis, Jr., James Coburn, Robert Culp, Steve McQueen, and Mel Brooks. He produced the 1962 Broadway production of Garson Kanin’s Come on Strong and the 1964 Broadway musical Golden Boy, starring Sammy Davis, Jr. He was best known for bringing the 1969 comedy Oh! Calcutta! to Broadway, which broke barriers with its frequent nudity and profanity. The play ran on Broadway for 20 years and was adapted for a film co-produced by Elkins in 1972. He also produced the 1969 film based on Arlo Guthrie’s semi-autobiographical anti-war song Alice’s Restaurant, directed by Arthur Penn. His other Broadway credits include The Rothschilds (1970), An Evening with Richard Nixon and His Friends (1972), and Sizwe Banzi Is Dead (1974). He was married six times, including one with actress Claire Bloom from 1969 to 1974, and he produced her starring roles in Broadway

E LLENSTEIN, R OBERT Veteran character actor Robert Ellenstein died in a nursing home near his home in Culver City, California, on October 28, 2010. He was 87. Ellenstein was born in Newark, New Jersey, on June 18, 1923, where his father served as mayor during the 1930s. Robert attended New York University and the University of Iowa, where he earned a degree in theater. He served in the military during World War II and earned a Purple Heart in the Netherlands. He embarked on an acting career after his discharge and was appearing frequently on television by the early 1950s. He was featured in the 1954 pilot for a Mandrake the Magician series starring Coe Norton and Woody Strode. His numerous television credits include episodes of The Pepsi-Cola Playhouse, Soldiers of Fortune, The Whistler, The Philco-Goodyear Playhouse, Crusader, Omnibus, Robert Montgomery Presents including a two-part version of The Hunchback of Notre Dame as Quasimodo in 1954, The Big Story, Gunsmoke, Telephone Time, The United States Steel Hour, Lux Video Theatre, The Walter Winchell File, Climax!, The Californians, The Court of Last Resort, The Adventures of Jim Bowie, Schlitz Playhouse of Stars, Zane Grey Theater, Man with a Camera, Wanted: Dead or Alive, Alcoa Theatre, The Rifleman, Behind Closed Doors, Richard Diamond, Private Detective, Steve Canyon, Mike Hammer, The D.A.’s Man, Rawhide, The Man from Blackhawk, Captain David Grief, One Step Beyond, The Lineup,

Hillard Elkins

Robert Ellenstein

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Peter Gunn, Perry Mason, Riverboat, Michael Shayne, The Islanders, Boris Karloff ’s Thriller, The Lawless Years, Assignment: Underwater, Hawaiian Eye, Ben Casey, Cain’s Hundred, Checkmate, The Beachcomber, Tales of Wells Fargo, The Law and Mr. Jones, 77 Sunset Strip, G.E. True, The Dakotas, Alcoa Premiere, The Untouchables, Channing, The Defenders, Kraft Suspense Theatre, The Rogues, The Donna Reed Show, Get Smart, Combat!, Bonanza, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., The Virginian, Hallmark Hall of Fame’s 1967 production of A Bell for Adano, The Wild Wild West, Death Valley Days, Mannix, It Takes a Thief, Paris 7000, Ironside, Mission: Impossible, Columbo, Marcus Welby, M.D., The Rookies, The Rockford Files, S.W.A.T., McCloud, The Bionic Woman, Switch, Quincy, Hawaii Five-0, A Man Called Sloane, CHiPs, Magnum, P.I., Lottery!, V, Moonlighting, Murder, She Wrote, Hooperman, Star Trek: The Next Generation, and CBS Summer Playhouse. Ellenstein also appeared in the tele-films Wheeler and Murdoch (1973), Breaking Up Is Hard to Do (1979), and Run Till You Fall (1988). Ellenstein was featured in a handful of films during his long career including Rogue Cop (1954), Illegal (1955), The Garment Jungle (1957), 3:10 to Yuma (1957), The Young Lions (1958), Too Much, Too Soon (1958), Alfred Hitchcock’s North by Northwest (1959), The Gazebo (1959), Pay or Die (1960), King of the Roaring 20’s: The Story of Arnold Rothstein (1961), Deathwatch (1966), The Legend of Lylah Clare (1968), Love at First Bite (1979), and Brewster’s Millions (1985). He was featured as the Federation Council President in the 1986 film Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home and had a small role in an episode of television’s ER in 1998. He worked frequently on stage throughout his career and was the first artistic director of the Los Angeles troupe Company of Angels, co-founder and artistic director for the Los Angeles Repertory Company and a founding member of Theatre West in Hollywood. Ellenstein worked on stage productions with his son, Peter, who was artistic director for the William Inge Center for the Arts in Kansas, and son David, artistic director for the North Coast Repertory Theater in Solana Beach. He is also survived by his wife of 58 years, the former Lois Stang, and their daughter.

ELLIS, HERB Jazz guitarist Herb Ellis died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease at his home in Los Angeles on March 28, 2010. He was 88. Ellis was born in Farmersville, Texas, on August 4, 1921. He began playing musical instruments as a child and was proficient with the guitar by his teens. He studied music at North Texas State Teachers College before joining Glen Gray and the Casa Loma Orchestra in 1943. He was soon touring and recording with Jimmy Dorsey’s band before joining with violinist Johnny Frigo and pianist Lou Carter as the Soft Winds trio in 1947. Ellis was best known for his time with the Oscar Peterson Trio from 1953 to 1958. They served as Verve Records’ house band, recording with such artists as Louis Armstrong, Roy Eldridge, and Ben Webster. Ellis toured and recorded with vocalist Ella Fitzgerald from 1958 to 1962. He settled in Los Angeles in the 1960s, where he performed in house bands for such television

Herb Ellis

stars as Steve Allen, Regis Philbin, Red Skelton, Merv Griffin, Della Reese, and Joey Bishop. Ellis teamed with guitarists Barney Kessel and Charlie Byrd as the Great Guitars in 1973 and performed and recorded with them over the next two decades.

ELLIS-TROY, SANDRA Actress Sandra EllisTroy died suddenly while visiting family in Pleasanton, California, on December 4, 2010. She was 68. She was born in Joplin, Missouri, on February 14, 1942, and studied drama and dance at Oklahoma State University. She moved to California in the late 1960s, settling

Sandra Ellis-Troy

in Vista by 1990. She began her acting career late in life and became a popular figure on the local stage in Vista. She was also featured in several films including 29th and Gay (2005) and Ready? OK! (2008).

ELLISON, DAVID British actor David Ellison died in Beer, Devon, England, on June 20, 2010. He was 71. Ellison was born in Stalybridge, Lancashire, England, in 1939. He appeared frequently on British television from the late 1950s, with roles in such series as War of the Roses, You Can’t Win, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Wednesday Play, ITV Playhouse, Champion House, The First Lady, The Gold Robbers, Catweazle, Doctor in Charge, Public Eye, The Pearcross Girls, Z Cars, Shoulder to Shoulder, You’re on Your Own, Space: 1999, The Onedin Line, Star Maidens, Out, The Sweeney, The

121

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Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin, Ripping Yarns, The Enigma Files, Goodbye, Mr. Kent, Last of the Summer Wine, Boon, Casualty, All Creatures Great and Small, The Darling Buds of May, Coronation Street, Waiting for God, The Bill, Wycliffe, and Heartbeat. Ellison starred as Sergeant Joseph Beck in the television series Juliet

Richard Elmore

David Ellison

Bravo from 1980 to 1985 and was featured in television productions of Big Day at Dream Acres (1987) and The Franchise Affair (1988). He also appeared in several films during his career including Work Is a 4-Letter Word (1968), Roman Polanski’s Macbeth (1971), and Stanley’s Dragon (1994). Ellison retired from the screen in the mid–1990s.

ELLSWORTH , D AVID Actor David H. Ellsworth died of cancer at his home in Osterville, Massachusetts, on August 8, 2010. He was 80. Ellsworth was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, on June 25, 1930. He appeared frequently on the local stage and starred as the voice of Captain Waverly Underhill on the Cape Cod Radio Mystery Theater. He was also featured on the daytime soap operas As the World Turns and All My Children. Ellsworth appeared in a handful of films including Fingers (1978), Rollover (1981), the tele-film Concealed Enemies (1984), Unconditional Love (1994), and Badge of Fear (1997). ELMORE, RICHARD Stuntman Richard Elmore was killed in a single-car accident in Oceanside, California, on January 22, 2010. He was 95. Elmore was born on Staten Island, New York, on December 10, 1914. He began traveling the country on railroad cars while in his teens. He began working in films while in Los Angeles in 1937, when he appeared as a background skater in the 1937 Sonja Henie feature Thin Ice. He was featured in small roles in several other films including Thunder Afloat (1939) and Reap the Wild Wind (1942). Elmore served as a paratrooper during World War II, but his refusal to carry a weapon or kill led to his discharge. He returned to Hollywood after the war, where he continued to work in films as a stuntman and bit player. Elmore’s film credits include O.S.S. (1946), Unconquered (1947), Force of Evil (1948), The Desert Fox: The Story of Rommel (1951), Around the World in Eighty Days (1956), The Enemy Below (1957), In Love

and War (1958), The Buccaneer (1958), Spartacus (1960), and Hell Is for Heroes (1962). He also worked in television on such series as Highway Patrol, The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet, Bonanza, Get Smart, Green Acres, and Wagon Train. Elmore continued to perform stuntwork in film through the early 1980s, with his later credits including The Concorde … Airport ’79 (1979), How to Beat the High Co$t of Living (1980), and Dreamscape (1984).

EMMONS, WAYNE Wayne Emmons, a minister, lawyer, stand-up comic, and occasional actor, died of complications from pneumonia in a Memphis, Tennessee, hospital on September 10, 2010. He was 72. Emmons was born in Sheffield, Alabama, on November 26, 1937, and claimed to be raised in Ash Flat, Arkansas. He was a Church of Christ minister before becoming a lawyer. He was district attorney for Lake and Dyer counties in Tennessee from 1978 to 1980 and subsequently became a leading defense lawyer. His massive girth and gregarious personality made him a larger than life personality in the courtroom and on the stage, when he turned to stand-up comedy in the 1990s as country comedian Cousin Bubba. Emmons was cast as topless club owner Prince Thomas in Francis Ford Coppola’s 1997 film adaptation of John Grisham’s bestseller The Rainmaker. He was also featured as a judge in Billy Bob Thornton’s 2001 black comedy Daddy and

Wayne Emmons

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Them. He filmed an unsold pilot as Judge Bubba for a proposed reality series, Justice for Y’All, which was described as a combination of People’s Court and HeeHaw.

Rapid Fire (1992), Nemesis (1992), Robot Wars (1993), Hot Shots! Part Deux (1993), Last Action Hero (1993), Demolition Man (1993), The Criminal Mind (1993), Point of No Return (1993), The Getaway (1993), the tele-film Full Eclipse (1993), On Deadly Ground (1994), Chasers (1994), Baby’s Day Out (1994), Pentathlon (1994), The Shadow (1994), True Lies (1994), Clear and Present Danger (1994), In the Army Now (1994), The Puppet Masters (1994), A Low Down Dirty Shame (1994), Deadly Target (1994), Grumpier Old Men (1995), Se7en (1995), Waterworld (1995), Bad Boys (1995), Just Cause (1995), Heat (1995), Devil in a Blue Dress (1995), Fled (1996), Executive Decision (1996), Lawnmower Man 2: Beyond Cyberspace (1996), The Richman’s Wife (1996), D3: The Mighty Ducks (1996), Star Trek: First Contact (1996), My Fellow Americans (1996), Red Corner (1997), Most Wanted (1997), Speed 2: Cruise Control (1997), Batman & Robin (1997), Dante’s Peak (1997), Enemy of the State (1998), Blade (1998), The Negotiator (1998), Lethal Weapon 4 (1998), Armageddon (1998), Godzilla (1998), The Odd Couple II (1998), The Mod Squad (1999), Payback (1999), Blue Streak (1999), Charlie’s Angels (2000), Partners (2000), Gone in Sixty Seconds (2000), The Kid (2000), The Cell (2000), Brother (2000), Town & Country (2001), The Fast and the Furious (2001), Rush Hour 2 (2001), The Last Castle (2001), Beat the Devil (2002), Austin Powers in Goldmember (2002), Showtime (2002), Slackers (2002), The Mothman Prophecies (2002), The Cat in the Hat (2003), Daredevil (2003), Paparazzi (2004), Collateral (2004), Criminal (2004), Deja Vu (2006), The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift (2006), and The Shagg y Dog (2006). He also worked on television in the series Run for Your Life, Daniel Boone, Here’s Lucy, Kung Fu, The Six Million Dollar Man, The Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew Mysteries, The Fall Guy, Bring ’Em Back Alive, Simon & Simon, Jake & the Fatman, and Pacific Blue. His other television credits include the tele-films Buck Rogers in the 25th Century (1979), Girls of the White Orchard (1983), and K-900 (1991), and the 1988 miniseries War and Remembrance.

ENDOSO, KENNY Stuntman and actor Kenny Endoso died of cancer in Los Angeles on August 10, 2010. He was 70. Endoso was born in Hilo, Hawaii, on July 22, 1940. He began his career in Hollywood in the late 1960s, performing stunts and appearing in small roles in film and television productions. His many film credits include The President’s Analyst (1967), Project X (1968), The Great Bank Robbery (1969), Che! (1969), Earthquake (1974), Blazing Saddles (1974), Freebie and the Bean (1974), Gone with the West (1975), Zebra Force (1976), The Gumball Rally (1976), Go Tell the Spartans (1978), The Electric Horseman (1979), The Last Word (1979), Meteor (1979), Angels’ Brigade (1979), The Exterminator (1980), Herbie Goes Bananas (1980), Serial (1980), In God We Tru$t (1980), Alligator (1980), The Stunt Man (1980), The Blues Brothers (1980), Windwalker (1981), The Entity (1981), Charlie Chan and the Curse of the Dragon Queen (1981), Demonoid: Messenger of Death (1981), A Time to Die (1982), TAG: The Assassination Game (1982), The Sword and the Sorcerer (1982), Blue Thunder (1983), Fire and Ice (1983), Private Schools (1983), The Star Chamber (1983), Uncommon Valor (1983), The Ice Pirates (1984), Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (1984), Joy of Sex (1984), Cloak & Dagger (1984), The Wild Life (1984), Beverly Hills Cop (1984), Into the Night (1985), Warning Sign (1985), To Live and Die in L.A. (1985), Kidnapped (1986), Big Trouble in Little China (1986), Modern Girls (1986), Streets of Gold (1986), No Man’s Land (1987), The Hanoi Hilton (1987), Real Men (1987), The Presidio (1988), Die Hard (1988), I’m Gonna Git You Sucka (1988), Kinjite: Forbidden Subjects (1989), Out Cold (1989), Police Academy 6: City Under Siege (1989), Lethal Weapon 2 (1989), Black Rain (1989), Vietnam, Texas (1990), Total Recall (1990), Ghost Dad (1990), Die Hard 2 (1990), The Adventures of Ford Fairlane (1990), Death Warrant (1990), The Rookie (1990), The Perfect Weapon (1991), Thelma & Louise (1991), Mobsters (1991), Dead Again (1991), Ricochet (1991), The Last Boy Scout (1991), Nervous Ticks (1992), Kuffs (1992), Patriot Games (1992),

ENZO Enzo, the Jack Russell terrier who replaced his father, Moose, as the Crane family’s beloved Eddie on the sit-com Frasier, died on June 23, 2010. He

Kenny Endoso

Enzo

123 was 14. Enzo was born in July of 1995 and was trained as his father’s possible replacement from an early age. He performed as a stunt double as Moose grew older and replaced him as Eddie in 2000. He continued in the role through the end of the series in 2004. He also starred in the title role of the 2000 film My Dog Skip and was featured as Boodles in 2001’s See Spot Run.

EPPER, ANDREW Stuntman and actor Andrew Epper died in California on June 9, 2010. He was 66. He was born on December 9, 1943, the son of stuntman John Epper. His siblings Margo, Tony, Jeannie, Gary, and Stephanie also did stunt work in films and television. Andrew began his career in the late 1960s, performing stunts and appearing in small roles in such films as Coogan’s Bluff (1968), Blazing Saddles (1974), Phantom of the Paradise (1974), The Killer Elite (1975), Bound for Glory (1976), Eaten Alive (1977), Every Which Way But Loose (1978), Tilt (1979), Wholly Moses (1980), Smokey and the Bandit II (1980), Cutter’s Way (1981), The Legend of the Lone Ranger (1981), Deathtrap (1982), The Sword and the Sorcerer (1982), Fighting Back (1982), Baby: Secret of the Lost Legend (1985), Choke Canyon (1986), Never Too Young to Die (1986), A Fine Mess (1986), Heat (1986), Million Dollar Mystery (1987), Survival Game (1987), The Hidden (1987), Action Jackson (1988), Big Business (1988), Bulletproof (1988), Dead Heat (1988), Rambo III (1988), Die Hard (1988), Vibes (1988), Why Me? (1990), The Perfect Weapon (1991), Deep Cover (1992), Boris and Natasha (1992), Toys (1992), Last Action Hero (1993), Striking Distance (1993), The Mask (1994), The Glimmer Man (1996), Star Trek: First Contact (1996), and Panic Room (2002). He also worked on television in such series as Vega$, Knight Rider, Riptide, Hunter, and The A-Team. ERWIN , B ILL Veteran character actor Bill Erwin died at his home in Studio City, California, on December 29, 2010. He was 96. Erwin was born in Honey Grove, Texas, on December 2, 1914. He trained as an actor at the Pasadena Playhouse in the late 1930s and began his career on stage with the Laguna Beach Playhouse and La Jolla Playhouse in 1940. He toured the country as a stage manager with ventriloquist Edgar Bergen in 1941. He served as a captain in the Army Air Force during World War II. He resumed his acting career after the war and was appearing regularly in films by the end of the decade. His numerous film credits include The Velvet Touch (1948), Easy Living (1949), Battleground (1949), Double Dynamite (1951), Holiday for Sinners (1952), Man from Del Rio (1956), Fight for the Title (1957), The Shadow on the Window (1957), The Night Runner (1957), House of Numbers (1957), Jet Pilot (1957), Gun Fever (1958), The Cry Baby Killer (1958), The Buccaneer (1958), Terror at Black Falls (1962), Under the Yum Yum Tree (1963), The Brass Bottle (1964), and Counterpoint (1967). Erwin was a prolific television actor from the early 1950s, appearing in episodes of The Silver Theatre, The Stu Erwin Show, Fireside Theatre, Lux Video Theatre, Hallmark Hall of Fame, The Philco-Goodyear Television Playhouse, Studio 57, Highway Patrol, Sheriff of Cochise, Alfred Hitchcock Presents,

2010 • Obituaries

Cheyenne, Screen Directors Playhouse, Science Fiction Theatre, Big Town, Crusader, The Man Called X, I Love Lucy, Telephone Time, Panic!, Richard Diamond, Private Detective, Whirlybirds, State Trooper, Code 3, Colt .45, Trackdown, The Danny Thomas Show, The Walter Winchell File, Sea Hunt, Colgate Theatre, Man with a Camera, Sugarfoot, Lawman, The Rifleman, Wagon Train, Tales of Wells Fargo, G.E. True Theater, Leave It to Beaver, The David Niven Show, Bat Masterson, Black Saddle, Markham, Johnny Ringo, Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse, Bachelor Father, M Squad, Law of the Plainsman, Rescue 8, The Texan, COronado 9, Have Gun — Will Travel, The Andy Griffith Show, Michael Shayne, Rawhide, Mister Ed, Outlaws, Zane Grey Theater, Maverick, Follow the Sun, 87th Precinct, Lassie, Ben Casey, My Three Sons, Twilight Zone, The Untouchables, The Dakotas, Burke’s Law, The Virginian, Kraft Suspense Theatre, Death Valley Days, The Big Valley, Perry Mason, Laredo, The Fugitive, The Invaders, The Guns of Will Sonnett, The Wild Wild West, Get Smart, Mannix, Here Come the Brides, Mayberry R.F.D., Dan August, The F.B.I., Barnaby Jones, Cannon, Gunsmoke, The Rookies, Lou Grant, the short-lived horror comedy Struck by Lightning as Glenn Diamond, Eight Is Enough, The Waltons, The Dukes of Hazzard, Dallas, The Jeffersons, The Optimist, Voyagers!, Hart to Hart, Falcon Crest, E/R, ABC Weekend Specials, Silver Spoons, Roxie, Punky Brewster, Who’s the Boss, Highway to Heaven, Married … with Children, Moonlighting, Just the Ten of Us, Star Trek: The Next Generation, Uncle Buck, Growing Pains, Quantum Leap, Full House, Knots Landing, The Golden Girls, Seinfeld earning an Emmy Award for his guest role as Sid Fields, Fallen Angels, The John Larroquette Show, Against the Grain, Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman, The Mommies, Pig Sty, Living Single, High Sierra Search and Rescue, Live Shot, The Jeff Foxworthy Show, The Louie Show, Cybil, Suddenly Susan, Grace Under Fire, The Drew Carey Show, The Naked Truth, Mad About You, The Michael Richards Show, Just Shoot Me!, The West Wing, So Little Time, Monk, The King of Queens, Everwood, and My Name Is Earl. His television credits include the tele-films How Awful About Allan (1970), Hunter (1973), Huckleberry Finn (1975), Tarantulas: The Deadly Cargo (1975), The Brady Girls Get Married (1981), Moonlight (1982), Drop-

Bill Erwin

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Out Father (1982), Lone Star (1983), Ghost Dancing (1983), Hard Knox (1984), Invitation to Hell (1985), Generation (1985), On Fire (1987), The Entertainers (1991), The Webbers (1993), Search and Rescue (1994), Boycott (2001), and the 2002 comedy special Comedy Central Thanxgiveaway: Turkey vs. Pilgrims. Erwin also continued to appear frequently in films throughout his career with roles The Christine Jorgensen Story (1970), Candy Stripe Nurses (1974), Sixth and Main (1977), the romantic science fiction feature Somewhere in Time (1980) as hotel porter Arthur Biehl, with Christopher Reeve and Jane Seymour, Dream On! (1981), The Taming of the Shrew (1983), The Bear (1984), Stewardess School (1986), Planes, Trains & Automobiles (1987), She’s Having a Baby (1988), Silent Assassins (1988), Home Alone (1990), The Willies (1990), Night of the Warrior (1991), Unbecoming Age (1992), Dennis the Menace (1993), The Color of Evening (1994), Naked Gun 33 1/3: The Final Insult (1994), Things to Do in Denver When You’re Dead (1995), Just Your Luck (1996), Menno’s Mind (1997), Art House (1998), Chairman of the Board (1998), Forces of Nature (1999), Inferno (1999), Down ’n Dirty (2000), A Crack in the Floor (2000), Stanley’s Gig (2000), and Cahoots (2001).

Papa, and starred as Matias in the series Makinavaja from 1995 to 1997.

ESCARCELLER, LLATZER Spanish character actor Llatzer Escarceller died in Barcelona, Spain, on October 26, 2010. He was 96. Escarceller was born in Ribes de Freser, Catalonia, Spain, on September 30, 1914. He settled in Barcelona, where he ran a small candy stand for over 40 years. He was hired by director Francesc Betriu for a small role in the 1974 film Furia Espanola. He appeared frequently in character roles in film and television over the next three decades. His film credits include Los Bingueros (1979), Stigma (1980), Los Fieles Sirvientes (1980), Going to Spain (1980), La Cripta (1981), La Rebelion de los Pajaros (1982), Asalto al Banco Central (1983), Un Genio en Apuros (1983), La Senyora (1987), Scent of a Crime (1988), El Nino de la Luna (1989), Makinavaja —‘El Ultimo Choriso’ (1992), Don Jaume, el Conquistador (1994), Adios, Tiburon (1996), and Los Porretas (1996). He appeared on television in episodes of Galeria Oberta, Filiprim, El Bigote de Babel, 13 ¥ 13, Miguel Servet, la Sangre y la Ceniza, Olimpicament Mort, and

Mike Esposito

ESTADELLA, JORDI Spanish television personality and voice actor Jordi Estadella died of liver cancer in a Barcelona, Spain, hospital on April 30, 2010. He was 61. Estadella was born in Barcelona on November 11, 1948. He began his career on radio, creating such characters as Tato Ganduxer and Tito B. Diagonal. He served as host of the popular television gameshow Un, Dos, Tres … Responda Otra Vez from 1991 to 1993 and hosted Esto no es lo que Parece from 1994 to 1995. He also hosted El Semaforo from 1995 to 1997. His other television credits include Grand Slam

Llatzer Escarceller

Jordi Estadella

ESPOSITO, MIKE Comic book artist Mike Esposito died in Long Island, New York, on October 24, 2010. He was 83. Esposito began working at Fox Periodicals after World War II as an artist. He later worked for Timely and DC Comics, often inking longtime friend Ross Andru’s pencils. He worked as an

inker on numerous titles at DC from the 1950s including Robin Hood, Showcase, Star Spangled War Stories, Wonder Woman, Flash, Metal Men, and Rip Hunter, Time Master. He also worked at Marvel from the 1960s, inking Tales of Suspense, Tales to Astonish, Thor, The Amazing Spider-Man, The Avengers, The Incredible Hulk, Iron Man, Sub Mariner, and Marvel Team-Up.

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(1994), 39 Premis Sant Jordi de Cinematografia (1995), Perdona Nuestros Pecados (1998), and La Rentadora (2006). He was the frequent Spanish dubbing voice for such actors as Groucho Marx and Jerry Lewis. He also provided the Spanish voice for Inspector Gadget and Captain Needa in The Empire Strikes Back, and dubbed such films as Airplane, Taxi Driver, Rocky II, and Gosford Park.

EVANS, BARBARA British actress and dancer Barbara Evans died at her home in Martin Hussingtree, Worcestershire, England, after a long illness on July 4, 2010. She was 78. Evans was born in Birmingham, England, in 1932, and trained as a dancer from an early age. She began touring on stage at the age of 16 and Shirley Evans

EVERITT, DAVID Author David S. Everitt, who was an editor of the horror film magazine Fangoria in the early 1980s, died of complications from Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in Huntington, New York, on May 7, 2010. He was 57. Everitt was born on December 19, 1952. He joined Bob Martin as co-editor on Fangoria in 1981 and was responsible for numerous movie reviews (often under the pseudonym Dr.

Barbara Evans

made her film debut as a dancer in Gene Kelly’s 1956 film Invitation to the Dance. She danced with Tony Hancock and Sid James on television in Hancock’s Half Hour’s production of The Ladies’ Man in 1960. She was also featured in the 1968 film Carry On… Up the Khyber, and on television in episodes of Ghost Squad, The Third Man, Not So Much a Programme, More a Way of Life with David Frost, The Man in Room 17, Thirty Minutes Worth, and Reg Varney. Evans later moved to Worcester, where she founded a leading dance academy.

EVANS, SHIRLEY British accordionist Shirley Evans, who appeared with the Beatles in the 1967 film Magical Mystery Tour, died of breast cancer in a South Florida hospital on July 10, 2010. She was 78. Evans was born in Birkenhead, Merseyside, England, on January 29, 1932. She played the piano and accordion from an early age and was performing at Butlin holiday camps in the 1950s. She toured the world over the next decade and was photographed playing “On Top of Old Smokey” while clad in a bikini atop Japan’s Mount Fuji. She accompanied such artists as Cliff Richard, Engelbert Humperdinck, and Liberace, and starred as Mabel the barmaid in television commercials for Carling Black Label. She was featured in the Beatles’ 1967 film Magical Mystery Tour, leading a sing-a-long on the bus. Lennon also wrote an instrumental for her, “Shirley’s Wild Accordion,” which was cut from the final film. She continued to perform and tour, settling in the United States in the mid–1970s.

David Everitt

Cyclops), editorials, photo captions, and interviews (with such genre legends as Dick Smith, Richard Gordon, Anthony Perkins, and Dick Miller). He left the magazine in 1985. Everitt was also the co-author of several books including A Shadow of Red: Communism and the Blacklist in Radio and Television, Legends: The Story of Wyatt Earp, Human Monsters: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the World’s Most Vicious Murderers, Film Tricks, and The Manly Handbook.

EVISON, PAT New Zealand actress Pat Evison died in Wellington, New Zealand, on May 30, 2010. She was 85. She was born Patricia Blamires in Masterton, New Zealand, on June 2, 1924. She studied theater in New Zealand and at the Old Vic Theatre School in London. She became a popular stage performer with the Downstage Theatre in Wellington. She also appeared on television in New Zealand and Australia and was featured as storekeeper Phyllis Telford in the drama

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series Pukemanu from 1971 to 1972. She was also featured in episodes of Division 4, Matlock Police, Solo One, The Emigrants, Pig in a Poke, Close to Home, Carson’s Law, and The Ray Bradbury Theater. Evison also appeared in several films during her career including Landfall (1975), Caddie (1976), Tim (1979) as the mother of the title character played by Mel Gibson, The Earthling (1980), Bad Blood (1981), Starstruck

& Abilities (2004) and By the Throat (2009). He also contributed to the albums This Is Where We Were (2006) by Face Candy and The Some of All Things or: The Healing Power of Scab Picking (2007) by Carbon Carousel.

FALKENSTEIN, GLENN Magician and mentalist Glenn Falkenstein died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease in an assisted living facility in San Antonio, Texas, on July 4, 2010. He was 78. Falkenstein was born on February 3, 1932. He became noted for his blindfold mind-reading act, and performed frequently at Hollywood’s Magic Castle. He was featured as the opening act for such stars as Marty Robbins and AnnMargret, and appeared on television’s That’s Incredible!,

Pat Evison

(1982), The Clinic (1982), The Silent One (1984), A Street to Die (1985), Emma’s War (1986), What the Moon Saw (1990), and My Grandpa Is a Vampire (1991). She was also seen in the television productions A Town Like Alice (1981) and Hanging Together (1985). She starred as Violet Carnegie in the Australian series The Flying Doctors from 1985 to 1991 and was Jessie Windom in Prisoner in 1986.

Glenn Falkenstein

The Merv Griffin Show, and The Tonight Show. He and his wife, Frances Willard, daughter of magician Harry “Willard the Wizard” Willard, teamed in the late 1970s for the “Spirit Cabinet” act that Frances’ father and mother and performed for many years.

EYEDEA Rapper Micheal Larsen, who was known on stage as Eyedea, was found dead at his home in St. Paul, Minnesota, on October 17, 2010. He was 28. Larsen was born in St. Paul on November 9, 1981. He began touring the rap and hip hop circuit as a battle emcee in 1997 and won the HBO Blaze Battle that aired on cable in 2000. He frequently teamed with his friend DJ Abilities, releasing First Born in 2001. He recorded the 2002 album The Many Faces of Oliver Hart and reteamed with DJ Abilities on the albums Eyedea

FANNING, GENE Actor Eugene L. Fanning died in Holbrook, Massachusetts, on November 25, 2010. He was 82. Fanning was featured as Leo Kurtz in the daytime soap opera Somerset from 1972 to 1973, and was Professor Gene Connolly in Another World in 1976. He was also seen in the films The Yum-Yum Girls (1976) and Model Behavior (1984).

Eyedea

Gene Fanning

127 FANSHAWE, DAVID British composer and ethnomusicologist David Fanshawe died of complications from a stroke in a Swindon, England, hospital on July 5, 2010. He was 68. Fanshawe was born in Paignton, Devon, England, on April 19, 1942. He began working as a musician and film editor for documentary films in the late 1950s. He toured throughout Europe

2010 • Obituaries

Came Back (1951), Talk About a Stranger (1952), Scandal at Scourie (1953), and Yankee Pasha (1954). The brothers also excelled at track and field in high school and college, and Warren coached the track program at Kennedy High School in Granada Hills, California, from 1971 through the mid–1990s.

FARRELL, BOBBY Aruban dancer and singer Bobby Farrell, who was the flamboyant lead male singer for the European pop group Boney M., was found dead from heart failure in his hotel room in Saint Petersburg, Russia, on December 30, 2010. He was 61. Farrell was born on the island of Aruba, in the Netherlands Antilles, on October 6, 1949. He moved to northern Europe while in his teens and worked as a disc jockey in the Netherlands and Germany. German record producer Frank Farian cast him in the disco group Boney M. in 1975. Farian sang much of the group’s first album, Take the Heat Off Me (1976), himself, with Farrell and a trio of females fronting for television and live

David Fanshawe

and the Middle East in the 1960s, and began recording the traditional music he heard during his travels. He was best known for his 1972 composition African Sanctus, which incorporated Latin hymns with Sudanese war drums and a Ugandan dance number. His tribal compositions were heard on numerous film and television soundtracks, including 1990’s Mountains of the Moon. He began a quest to record the music and oral histories of the Pacific islands of Polynesia, Micronesia, and Melanesia in the late 1970s, which he incorporated in his Pacific Odyssey.

FARLOW, WARREN Former child actor Warren Farlow died of cancer at a Van Nuys, California, hospital on March 12, 2010. He was 69. Farlow was born in California on July 24, 1940. He appeared in a handful of films as a child, frequently with his twin brother, Wayne Farlow. His film credits include the short Movies Are Adventures (1948), Father Is a Bachelor (1950), Her First Romance (1951), The Guy Who

Warren Farlow

Bobby Farrell

performances. The group had such hits as “Daddy Cool” and “Sunny” from the album, and Farrell did sing with the group in concerts and on television. Farrell continued with Boney M. with the albums Love for Sale (1977), Nightflight to Venus (1978), Oceans of Fantasy (1979), and Boonoonoonoos (1981). He left the group the following year, though he fronted several later versions of the group in concert tours over the past three decades.

FAULKNER, MAX British actor and stuntman Max Faulkner, who worked frequently in the Doctor Who series in the 1970s, died in England on February 13, 2010. He was 78. Faulkner was born in England in 1931. He appeared in small roles and worked as a stuntman for numerous films and television productions from the late 1950s. His film credits include I Was Monty’s Double (1958), Breakout (1959), The Giant Behemoth (1959), The Third Alibi (1961), Dr. Crippen (1962), Crosstrap (1962), Gang War (1962), The Silent Invasion (1962), From Russia with Love (1963), That Kind of Girl (1963), The Ipcress File (1963), Far from the Madding Crowd (1967), Bedazzled (1967), Salt and Pepper (1968), Where Eagles Dare (1968), Perfect Friday (1970), See No Evil (1971), The Day of the Jackal (1973),

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Carry on Dick (1974), A Dirty Knight’s Work (1976), The Bawdy Adventures of Tom Jones (1976), Krull (1983), Willow (1988), Clive Barker’s Nightbreed (1990), Far and Away (1992), and GoldenEye (1995). Faulkner also worked on such British television series as The Adventures of Sir Lancelot, The Buccaneers, The Vise, White Hunter, O.S.S., Ivanhoe, ITV Play of the Week, Rendezvous, Dial 999, Private Investigator, International

Max Faulkner

Detective, The Four Just Men, The Adventures of Robin Hood, Deadline Midnight, The Saint, Richard the Lionheart, Court Martial, The Prisoner, My Partner the Ghost, The First Churchills, Manhunt, Colditz, New Scotland Yard, Arthur of the Britons, The Rivals of Sherlock Holmes, The Adventures of Black Beauty, The Protectors, Poldark, The Prince and the Pauper, Space: 1999, Lorna Doone, The Expert, Little Lord Fauntleroy, Warship, Survivors, Z Cars, Treasure Island, The Goodies, Disraeli: Portrait of a Romantic, Robin’s Nest, Secret Army, Enemy at the Door, Blakes 7, God’s Wonderful Railway, the 1981 mini-series The Day of the Triffids, The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, and Robin of Sherwood. Faulkner worked frequently on the Doctor Who series during the 1970s, appearing with the 3rd Doctor, Jon Pertwee, in the episodes “The Ambassador of Death,” “The Monster of Peladon,” and “Planet of the Spiders.” He was also seen in episodes with the 4th Doctor, Tom Baker, including “Genesis of the Daleks,” “The Hand of Fear,” “The Android Invasion,” and “The Invasion of Time.”

FEATHER, JIM Canadian actor Jim Feather died in Barrie, Ontario, Canada, on August 6, 2010. He was 90. He was born Frederick James Feather in Accrington, Lancashire, England, on June 21, 1920. He served in the British military during World War II before immigrating to Canada in 1948. He worked as an engineer in the aircraft industry on the Avro Arrow and the Canada Space Arm. He also performed on the local stage, and began appearing in character roles in films and television in the 1990s. He was seen in episodes of such television series as Avonlea, Rin Tin Tin: K-9 Cop, Street Legal, Due South, Wind at My Back, and Monk. He also appeared in the tele-films Jack Reed: Death and Vengeance (1996), Salem Witch Trials (2002), and Com-

fort and Joy (2003). Feather was also featured in a handful of films during his career including Boulevard (1994), Mrs. Winterbourne (1996), Johnny Shortwave (1996), Angel Eyes (2001), Welcome to Mooseport (2004), and Aurora Borealis (2005) as Mr. Gunderson.

F EHMIU, B EKIM Kosovar Albanian actor Bekim Fehmiu, who starred as Dax Xenos in the 1969 film version of Harold Robbins’ best-seller The Adventurers, committed suicide at his apartment in Belgrade, Serbia, on June 15, 2010. He was 74. Fehmiu was born in Sarajevo, Yugoslavia (now Bosnia and Herzegovina) on June 1, 1936. He studied theater in Belgrade and began performing on stage with the Pristina Theatre in 1955. Fehmiu became a leading actor in Yugoslavian films, and was also featured in several international productions. His film credits include Sasa (1962), Under the Same Sky (1964), The Enemy (1965), Klakson (1965), The Girl (1965), Roj (1966), Morgan: A Suitable Case for Treatment (1966), Feverish Years (1966), and Protest (1967). He starred in the 1967 film I Even Met Happy Gypsies, which was nominated for an Academy Award for best foreign-language film. He starred in The Adventurers in 1969, which despite an all-star cast that included Olivia de Havilland, Candice Bergen, Ernest Borgnine, and Rossano Brazzi, proved a critical and financial failure. Fehmiu’s other film credits include Do Not Mention the Cause of Death (1968), Klopka za Generala (1971), The Deserter (1971), The Last Snows of Spring (1973), Cagliostro (1974) in the title role, Deps (1974), Silence the Witness (1974), The Wind (1974), Pavle Pavlovic (1975), Libera, My Love (1975), Permission to Kill (1975), Salon Kitty (1976), Ready for Anything (1977), John Frankenheimer’s Black Sunday (1977) as the terrorist Fasil, Special Education (1977), Arrive Before Daybreak (1978), The Partisan Squadron (1979), Siroko je Lisce (1981), Sarab (1982), Pavilon Seliem (1982), The Voice (1982), Crveni i Crni (1985), and Balkan Island: The Last Story of the Century (1997). Fehmiu starred as Ulysses in the 1968 Italian television mini-series adaptation of The Odyssey. He also starred in television productions of I Vecchi e i Giovani (1979), A Child Called Jesus (1987) as Joseph, Poslednja Prica (1987), Disperatamente Giulia (1989), and Heart and Sword (1998).

Bekim Fehmiu

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FELDNER, SHELDON Actor and playwright Sheldon Feldner died in San Francisco, California, on August 11, 2010. He was 74. Feldner was born in Chicago, Illinois, on March 16, 1936, and raised in San Francisco. He was a popular performer on the local stage, and was featured in small roles in several films including The Friends of Eddie Coyle (1973), Escape from Alcatraz (1979), Cardiac Arrest (1980), Second Thoughts (1983), The Star Chamber (1983), The Woman in Red (1984), Light Blast (1985), Monster in the Closet (1986),

Allyn Ferguson

Sheldon Feldner

Howard the Duck (1986), and Murder in the First (1995). Feldner guest-starred on television in episodes of Tenspeed and Brown Shoe, Soap in the recurring role of Deputy Perkins, Three’s Company, Too Close for Comfort, CHiPs, Hill Street Blues, Father Murphy, Falcon Crest, Partners in Crime, Hunter, and Midnight Caller He was also seen in the tele-films Revenge of the Stepford Wives (1980), Prime Suspect (1982), The Day the Bubble Burst (1982), The Secret Life of Kathy McCormick (1988), and From the Dead of Night (1989). He starred as Raoul in the television comedy series Good Grief from 1990 to 1991.

FERGUSON, ALLYN Emmy Award–winning composer Allyn Ferguson, who co-wrote the theme songs for the hit television series Charlie’s Angels and Barney Miller, died at his home in Westlake Village, California, on June 23, 2010. He was 85. Ferguson was born in San Jose, California, on October 18, 1924. He studied music at San Jose State University, and trained under Nadia Boulanger and Aaron Copland. He moved to Hollywood in the late 1950s and was an arranger for such artists as Sarah Vaughan, Stan Kenton, and Andy Williams. He scored a handful of low budget films in the early 1960s including The Devil’s Hand (1962), The Magic Tide (1962), Terror at Black Falls (1962), Airborne (1962), and Sofi (1968). He frequently teamed with composer Jack Elliott during the 1970s, creating the themes to the series Charlie’s Angels, Barney Miller, Lotsa Luck, and Big Hawaii. He was orchestrator for the 1970 cult classic film Myra Breckinridge, and worked in the films Support Your Local Gunfighter (1971), Get to Know Your Rabbit (1972), The Legend of Earl Durand (1974), Avalanche Express (1979), Little Lord Fauntleroy

(1980), Dune (1984) providing additional orchestration, and Back to the Secret Garden (2001). Ferguson was best known for his work in television, earning an Emmy Award for scoring the 1984 Hallmark Hall of Fame production of Camille. He also earned Emmy nominations for his work on such productions as Ivanoe (1982), The American Movie Awards (1982), Master of the Game (1984), The Kennedy Center Honors: A Celebration of the Performing Arts (1985), The Last Days of Patton (1986), Hallmark’s April Morning (1988), and Pancho Barnes (1988). He also scored episodes of such television series as Bewitched, The Monkees, The Everly Brothers Show, The Funny Side, The Good Life, Banacek, The Burns and Schreiber Comedy Hour, Get Christie Love!, The New Dick Van Dyke Show, The Harlem Globetrotters Popcorn Machine, Big Eddie, The Rookies, Starsky and Hutch, Gibbsville, Busting Loose, Fish, A.E.S. Hudson Street, Big Hawaii, The Comedy Shop, Husband, Wives & Lovers, Free Country, Turnabout, Diagnosis Murder, and Murder, She Wrote. His numerous television credits also include such tele-films and mini-series as Three for Tahiti (1970), The Feminist and the Fuzz (1971), Playmates (1972), Every Man Needs One (1972), Birds of Prey (1973), The Bait (1973), Jarrett (1973), The Man Without a Country (1973), Hijack (1973), What Are Best Friends For? (1973), The Girl Who Came Gift-Wrapped (1974), Bobby Parker and Company (1974), Ann in Blue (1974), Only with Married Men (1974), Roll, Freddy, Roll! (1974), The Count of Monte Cristo (1975), The Four Feathers (1977), The Man in the Iron Mask (1977), Roger & Harry: The Mitera Target (1977), Danger in Paradise (1977), Delta County, U.S.A. (1977), The Magnificent Magical Magnet of Santa Mesa (1977), Captains Courageous (1977), A Guide for the Married Woman (1978), Les Miserables (1978), The New Adventures of Heidi (1978), All Quiet on the Western Front (1979), Sanctuary of Fear (1979), The Gossip Columnist (1980), Cry of the Innocent (1980), Beulah Land (1980), Pleasure Palace (1980), A Tale of Two Cities (1980), The Night the City Screamed (1980), Terror Among Us (1981), Elvis and the Beauty Queen (1981), Peter and Paul (1981), Big Bend Country (1981), Red Flag: The Ultimate Game (1981), Computercide (1982), Romance on the Orient Express (1985), The Corsican Brothers (1985), The Christmas Gift (1986), Stone Fox (1987),

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Angel in Green (1987), The Woman He Loved (1988), The Lookalike (1990), Ironclads (1991), Shadow of a Doubt (1991), Against Her Will: An Incident in Baltimore (1992), Love, Honor & Obey: The Last Mafia Marriage (1993), While Justice Sleeps (1994), Trick of the Eye (1994), The Haunting of Helen Walker (1995), What Love Sees (1996), Best Friends for Life (1998), and High Noon (2000). Ferguson also taught a film music composition course at the Grove School of Music in Van Nuys from the late 1980s through the early 1990s.

FERNANDES, ARY Brazilian actor and filmmaker Ary Fernandes died of complication from a stroke in a Sao Paulo, Brazil, hospital on August 29, 2010. He was 79. Fernandes was born in Sao Paulo on March 31, 1931. He began working in films in the early 1950s as a production assistant on Song of the Sea (1952), A Real Woman (1954), O Grande Desconhecido (1957), and Die Windrose (1957). He also appeared onscreen in the films Quem Matou Anabela? (1956), Aguias em Patrulha (1969), Sentinelas do Espaco (1969), O Super-

Ary Fernandes

manso (1974), and O Leito da Mulher Amada (1975). He was a writer, director, and producer for the television series Vigilante Rodoviario and Aguias de Fogo in the early 1960s. He also directed, and frequently wrote and produced, the films O Vigilante e os Cinco Valentes (1964), O Misterio do Taurus (1965), Aguias em Patrulha (1969), Uma Pistola para Djeca (1969), Sentinelas do Espaço (1969), Marcado Para o Perigo (1970), Panico no Imperio do Crime (1972), O Supermanso (1974), Sexo Selvagem (1979), Essas Deliciosas Mulheres (1979), Orgia das Libertinas (1980), Cassino das Bacanais (1981), As Vigaristas do Sexo (1982), A Fabrica das Camisinhas (1982), Taras Eroticas (1983), and Elas So Transam no Disco (1983). He largely retired from film and television in the early 1980s.

F ERNANDEZ, F ERNANDO Spanish comic book artist Fernando Fernandez died in Barcelona, Spain, on August 9, 2010. He was 70. Fernandez was born in Barcelona on February 7, 1940. He began drawing for French and British comic book publishers in the 1950s and was illustrating numerous war tales for Fleetway by the end of the decade. He concentrated on advertising illustrations and painting in the 1960s, before

Fernando Fernandez

returning to comics in 1970. He drew the Mosca comic strip from 1970 to 1973 and wrote and illustrated numerous stories for Warren’s Vampirella comic magazine from 1973 to 1975. He later drew educational comics for French and Spanish publishers, and his work on the series Circulos and Zora y los Hibernatas were reprinted in Heavy Metal magazine in the early 1980s. He also illustrated a comic version of Dracula for the Spanish edition of Creepy in 1982, and adapted several of Isaac Asimov’s stories to comics.

FERNANDEZ, PETER Peter Fernandez, who provided the voice for the U.S. version of the classic anime character Speed Racer, died of complications from lung cancer at his home in Pomona, New York, on July 15, 2010. He was 83. Fernandez was born in New York City on January 29, 1927. He was a model for the John Robert Powers Agency from the age of 7, and appeared on the Broadway stage in the play Whiteoaks in 1938. He also performed on a local children’s radio program and was heard on episodes of The Sea Hound as Jerry, The Aldrich Family as George Bigelow, Mr. District Attorney, Let’s Pretend, Gangbusters, My Best Girls, Superman, Suspense, and numerous soap operas. After serving in the U.S. Army, he returned to radio in 1946, writing for Suspense and When a Girl Marries. He was featured in the 1949 film City Across the River, and appeared on television in episodes of Captain Video and His Video Rangers, Suspense, Leave It to Papa, Kraft Theatre, Armstrong Circle Theatre, Joseph Schildkraut Presents, Hallmark Hall of Fame as Donalbain in a 1954 production of Macbeth, and Crunch and Des. Fernandez began directing the dubbing of U.S. releases of foreign-language films in the late 1950s. He began working in anime in the early 1960s when he was hired to write English dialogue for the Japanese cartoon series Astro Boy. He was soon writing and dubbing for such imports as Gigantor and Space Giants. He worked in dubbing as a voice and director for U.S. releases on such films as Alakazam the Great (1960), Mothra (1961), Buddha (1961), Apache Gold (1963), Last of the Renegades (1964), That Man from Rio (1964), Assassination in Rome (1965), Kidnapped to Mystery Island (1965), The Dirty Girls (1965), Godzilla Versus the Sea Monster (1966), and The Killing Bottle (1967).

131 He was best known for his work on the Speed Racer cartoon series (known in Japan as Mach Go Go Go). Fernandez wrote and directed the dubbing for many of the episodes, and provided the voice of Speed Race, the mysterious Racer X, and other characters. He also provided the American lyrics for the theme song —“Go Speed Racer, Go!” He continued to work as a voice/dialogue director on such film and television imports and home-grown productions as The Aeronauts (1967), Marine Boy (1968), Ultraman (1972), Love and Anarchy (1973), All Screwed Up (1974), Return of the Street Fighter (1974), Stravinsky… (1974), Sister Street Fighter (1974), L’Anticristo (aka The Tempter) (1974), InfraMan (1975), Fear Over the City (1975), Flatfoot in Hong Kong (1975), House of Pleasure for Women (1976), Puss ’N Boots Travels Around the World (1976), The Black Corsair (1976), In a Wild Moment (1977), A Simple Story (1978), Lupin the 3rd: The Movie —The Secret of Mamo (1978), Star Blazers (1979) also voicing the role of Mark

2010 • Obituaries

FERRARO, JOHN Actor and director John A. Ferraro died of colon cancer in a Los Angeles hospital on December 7, 2010. He was 64. Ferraro was born in Patterson, New Jersey, on April 5, 1946. He began his theatrical career in New York, performing with the

John Ferraro

Shakespeare Festival. He directed episodes of the PBS children’s series Sesame Street and Shining Time Station. He directed the Off-Broadway comedy Saved from Obscurity (1988), and the 1992 Broadway production of Crazy He Calls Me. Ferraro helmed episodes of The Higgins Boys and Gruber from Comedy Central, and Smart Guy and Reno: In Rage and Rehab for WB. He also taught at USC’s School of Cinematic Arts from 2003.

Peter Fernandez

Venture, Choice of Arms (1981), Hit the Bank (1981), Clean Slate (1981), Skokie (1981), Dogs of Hell (1982), Thunderbirds 2086 (1982), Grand Pardon (1982), A Question of Silence (1982), Blood Link (1982), The Tin Flute (1983), For Those I Loved (1983), 2019: After the Fall of New York (1983), Swann in Love (1984), The Enchanted Journey (1984), Ciske the Rat (1984), Dangerous Moves (1984), Silent Madness (1984), The Elm Chanted Forest (1986), Castle in the Sky Laputa (1986) as the Narrator, The Adventures of the Galaxy Rangers (1986), Gandahar (aka Light Years) (1988), Cinema Paradiso (1988), Al Andalus (1989), Woof! (1989), Tokyo Decadence (1992), What’s Eating Gilbert Grape (1993), The Gods Must Be Crazy V (1994), Jalna (1994), Princess Guinevere and the Jewel Riders (1995), Christmas in Cartoontown (1996), Ace Ventura: Pet Detective (1996), The Amazing Feats of Young Hercules (1997), The Secret of Anastasia (1997), The Secret of Mulan (1998), Moses: Eg ypt’s Great Prince (1998), Angel of the Night (1998), Cradle Will Rock (1999), Courage the Cowardly Dog (1999), Obie and Bingie (2002), and Kenny the Shark (2003). He was a local race announcer in the 2008 live action Speed Racer film, and voiced Spritle in episodes of 2009’s Speed Racer: The Next Generation.

FERRAZ, BUZA Brazilian actor Buza Ferraz died of heart failure in a Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, hospital on April 3, 2010. He was 59. Ferraz was born in Rio de Janeiro on May 1, 1950. He appeared frequently on Brazilian television from the early 1970s, appearing in episodes of Selva de Pedra, O Rebu, Brilhante, Voce Decide, and O Amor E Nosso. He was also featured in television productions of Romeu e Julieta (1980), Quem Ama Nao Mata (1982), Final Feliz (1982), Marquesa de Santos (1984), Santa Marta Fabril (1984), De Quina pra Lua (1985), Helena (1987), Kananga do Japao (1989), Republica (1989), Meu Marido (1991), Pedra Sobre Pedra

Buza Ferraz

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(1992), Despedida de Solteiro (1992), Historia de Amor (1995), and Labirinto (1998). He was featured as Ivan in the series Paginas da Vida from 2006 to 2007, and guest-starred in episodes of Casos e Acasos and Faca Sua Historia. Ferraz was also seen in several films during his career including Beloved Country Brazil (1984), O Pais dos Tenentes (1987), the comedy For All: Springboard to Victory (1997) which he also wrote and directed, Vox Populi (1998), Brave New Land (2000), Viva Sapato! (2002), Vestido de Noiva (2006), and Elvis & Madona (2008).

FIALKOVA, DRAHOMIRA Czech character actress Drahomira Fialkova died on November 11, 2010. She was 87. Fialkova was born in Susice, Czechoslovakia, on November 8, 1923. She performed on stage and screen from the late 1940s, appearing in the 1949 film The Green Notebook. She also appeared in the films Morgiana (1972) and A Girl Fit to Be Killed (1976), and

Gerlach Fiedler

Pilz & Dreizehn Stuhle, Hoopers Letzte Jagd, Kara Ben Nemsi Effendi, PS — Geschichten ums Auto, and Der Landarzt.

FIEGER, DOUG Doug Fieger, the lead singer of the band the Knack and co-writer of the 1979 hit “My Sharona,” died of cancer at his home in Woodland Hills, California, on February 14, 2010. He was 57. Fieger was born in Oak Park, Michigan, on August 20, 1952. He played bass and sang with the band Sky in the early 1970s. He moved to Los Angeles later in the decade, where he teamed with lead guitarist and key-

Drahomira Fialkova

was Sister Libertine in the 1979 television Hallmark Hall of Fame production of All Quiet on the Western Front. She also starred as the Fremen’s Reverend Mother Ramallo in the 2000 television mini-series adaptation of Frank Herbert’s sci-fi classic Dune. Her other film credits include An Uncertain Season (1988), The Last Butterfly (1991), Bonhoeffer: Agent of Grace (2000), The Zookeeper (2001), Love on the Tram (2003), and The Brothers Grimm (2005) as the Grandmother.

F IEDLER, G ERLACH German voice actor Gerlach Fiedler died in Hamburg, Germany, on September 15, 2010. He was 85. Fiedler was born in Mannheim, Germany, on June 27, 1925. He began working in radio in Germany in the late 1940s as a director, and was soon lending his deep voice to radio dramas. He was also the German dubbing voice for numerous films and television productions, including Sesame Street’s Cookie Monster in the early 1970s. Fiedler appeared onscreen in several films during his career including By a Nose (1949), Das Gluck Lauft Hinterher (1963), Destination Death (1964), St. Pauli Nachrichten: Thema Nr. 1 (1971), and Jagger und Spaghetti (1984). He was also featured on German television in episodes of such series as Gestatten — Mein Name ist Cox, Intercontinental Express, Gertrud Stranitzki, Rabe,

Doug Fieger

boardist Berton Averre, bassist Prescott Niles and drummer Bruce Gary to form the Knack. Their first album, Get the Knack, was a hit in 1979, and the albums …But the Little Girls Understand (1980) and Round Trip (1981) soon followed. The group disbanded at the end of 1981, but reunited several years later. They continued to tour and perform until Fieger was diagnosed with brain tumors and lung cancer in 2007.

FIERA, LA Arturo Casco Hernandez, who was a leading professional wrestler in Mexico over the past two decades, died in a hospital in Mexico on September 12, 2010, of injuries he received in an assault the previous day when he was stabbed five times. He was 49. Casco was born in a small town in Puebla, Mexico, on March 17, 1961. He was the son of wrestler Her-

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cules Poblano, and began his career in the ring in 1977. He was a leading competitor by the early 1980s under the name La Fiera (The Wild Animal), holding the NWA welterweight and middleweight championship

Dave Fisher

La Fiera

while wrestling with EMLL. He continued to compete through the 1990s, holding the CMLL World Trios Championship with Dos Caras and Hector Garza in 1996. La Fiera was involved with drugs later in his career and spent some time in prison. He was largely retired from the ring by the early 2000s.

F INNELL , MAURICE Leading vocal coach Maurice Finnell, who taught such stars as Tony Bennett and Bette Midler, died of complications from a fall in New York City on January 5, 2010. He was 93. Finnell was born in Trenton, New Jersey, on July 16, 1916, and began began singing as a child. He performed on the radio in New York and Philadelphian the 1930s,

Maurice Finnell

and sang with the Trenton Opera Company in 1941. He served as a music instructor for the Army during World War II. He began teaching voice and music at the American Theatre Wing in 1947, and continued until his death. His notable students also include Warren Beatty, Paul Sorvino, and Tyne Daly.

FISHER, DAVE Dave Fisher, the lead singer of the 1960s folk group the Highwaymen, died of com-

plications from the blood disease myelofibrosis at his home in Rye, New York, on May 7, 2010. He was 69. Fisher was born in New Haven, Connecticut, on July 19, 1940. He began singing while in high school, and formed the group that became the Highwaymen in 1958 while attending Wesleyan University. The folk group included Bob Burnett, Steve Butts, Chan Daniels, and Steve Trott, and they scored a hit with their recording of “Michael, Row the Boat Ashore.” They recorded eight albums and were featured on The Ed Sullivan Show before breaking up in 1964. Fisher continued the group with a new line-up for several more years. The original Highwaymen reunited in 1987 (without Daniels, who died in 1975), and continued to perform a handful of concerts over the next 20 years. They also recorded the album When the Village Was Green in 2007.

FISHER, EDDIE Singer Eddie Fisher died of complications from a recent hip surgery in Berkeley, California, on September 22, 2010. He was 82. Fisher was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on August 10, 1928. He began singing from an early age, and was performing regularly on local radio by his teens. He soon began touring with the bands of Buddy Morrow and Charlie Ventura. He was given national exposure on Eddie Cantor’s radio program in 1949, and was soon signed to a recording contract by RCA. He joined the U.S. Army during in 1951, and entertained the troops on armed forces radio during the Korean War. He also appeared in recruitment films, and was the official vocal soloist for the United States Army Band. He also recorded such hit songs as “Any Time,” “Tell Me Why,” “I’m Yours,” “Wish You Were Here,” and “I’m Walking Behind You” while in the army. He starred in the NBC television variety series Coke Time with Eddie Fisher from 1953 to 1957, and hosted NBC’s The Eddie Fisher Show from 1957 to 1959. He also guested on such television series as The Perry Como Show, The Chesterfield Supper Club, The George Jessel Show, The Colgate Comedy Hour, The Gisele MacKenzie Show, The Jackie Gleason Show, The Steve Allen Plymouth Show, and The George Gobel Show. He also recorded such hit songs as “Oh, My Pa-pa,” “Lady of Spain,” and “Count Your Blessings,” before rock ’n’ roll took over the charts.

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Fisher married actress Debbie Reynolds in September of 1955, and the couple starred together in the 1956 comedy film Bundle of Joy. He and Reynolds were close friends of producer Mike Todd, and his wife, actress Elizabeth Taylor. When Todd was killed in an airplane crash in 1958, Fisher’s consolation of Todd’s widow led to an affair that ended his marriage to Reynolds. He

surgery in Los Angeles on October 1, 2010. He was 85. Flaum was born in Brooklyn, New York, on September 13, 1925. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II, and studied acting at the University of Iowa after his discharge. He performed on the Broadway stage in productions of Romeo and Julie (1950) and Julius Caesar (1951) while studying under Lee Strasberg. He began working as a story editor and writer for the CBS television documentary series Twentieth Century in 1957, hosted by Walter Cronkite, and shared an Emmy Award for his work. He moved to Los Angeles in the early 1960s where he joined David Wolper’s production company. His documentary features The Yanks Are Coming (1963) and Let My People Go: The Story of Israel (1965) earned Academy Award nominations. Flaum also helmed the documentaries Hollywood: The Great Stars (1963), Escape to Freedom (1963), December 7th —The Day of Infamy (1963), Ten Seconds That Shook the World (1963), The American Woman in the 20th Century (1963), The Rise and Fall of American Communism (1964), Berlin — Kaiser to Khrushchev (1964), The

Eddie Fisher

married Elizabeth Taylor in May of 1959 shortly after the divorce from Reynolds was final. The resultant scandal took a heavy toll on his career, losing his television show and recording contract. He appeared with Taylor in the 1960 film BUtterfield 8, but she soon became enamored with Richard Burton while filming Cleopatra. Their subsequent divorce in March of 1964 garnered him little sympathy, as public opinion still felt he had betrayed Reynolds. Fisher continued to perform in nightclubs from New York to Las Vegas, and had a minor hit with is 1966 album Games That Lovers Play. He was also married to actress and singer Connie Stevens from 1967 to 1969, and appeared on television in The Ed Sullivan Show, The Hollywood Palace, The Andy Williams Show, and The Dean Martin Comedy Hour. Fisher later acknowledged that he had a longstanding addiction to drugs and gambling that siderailed any attempt at a comeback and resulted in a bankruptcy in 1972. After another failed marriage to beauty queen Terry Richards from 1975 to 1976, Fisher entered rehab in the late 1980s. He subsequently resumed his singing career with a concert at the Plaza Theatre in Palm Springs in 1990, and soon became a familiar face on television talk shows, recounting his addictions. Ex-wives Reynolds and Taylor resumed their friendship in a 2001 tele-film These Old Broads (co-written by Fisher and Reynolds’ daughter Carrie of Star Wars fame), with their shared ex-husband being the brunt of much of the humor. Fisher penned an autobiography, Eddie: My Life, My Loves, in 1981, and published a revised, and more salacious, version in 1999, Been There, Done That. His final marriage was in 1993 to Chinese-born businesswoman Betty Lin, who died in 2001.

F LAUM, MARSHALL Documentary filmmaker Marshall Flaum died of complications from hip

Marshall Flaum

Battle of Britain (1964), Trial at Nuremberg (1964), the National Geographic Special Miss Goodall and the Wild Chimpanzees (1965), Hollywood: The Selznick Years (1969), Tribute to Bogart (1972), Bing Crosby: The Untold Story (1978), Dorothy Stratten: The Untold Story (1985), A Yabba-Dabba-Doo Celebration!: 50 Years of Hanna-Barbera (1989), and The Desilu Story (2003). Flaum also earned Emmy nominations for producing Jane Goodall and the World of Animal Behavior: The Wild Dogs of Africa (1973), and several segments of The Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau in the early 1970s.

FLEISCHMAN , SID Novelist and children’s writer Sid Fleischman died of cancer at his home in Santa Monica, California, on March 17, 2010. He was 90. He was born Albert Sidney Fleischman in Brooklyn, New York, on March 16, 1920. He was fascinated with magic as a child, and his first book was a collection of magic tricks published in 1939. He served in the Navy Reserves aboard a destroyer escort during World War II. He attended San Diego State University after his discharge, graduating in 1949. He worked as a journalist before becoming a full-time fiction writer in the

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early 1950s. He adapted his novel Blood Alley for the screen in 1955, and also penned the films Good-bye, My Lady (1956) and Lafayette Escadrille (1958). His Cold War thriller Counterspy Express (1954) was adapted for the 1958 film Spy in the Sky, and he also wrote the 1961 feature The Deadly Companions. He wrote his first children’s story, Mr. Mysterious and Company, about a magician traveling the Old West with his family, in 1962. Another western tale, By the Great Horn Spoon! (1963), was adapted for the 1967 film The Adventures of Bullwhip Griffin. His 1965 book, Ghost in the Noonday Sun,

Tom Fleming

Age of Kings (1960) as King Henry IV, Rob Roy (1961) in the title role, Weir of Hermiston (1973), and Reith (1983). Fleming also appeared in the films King Lear (1971), Mary, Queen of Scots (1971), and Meetings with Remarkable Men (1979). He served as a commentator for numerous BBC telecasts including the broadcasts of the Edinburgh Military Tattoo from 1966 until 2008.

Sid Fleischman

was filmed in 1973, and Fleischman co-scripted the 1973 film Scalawag, starring Kirk Douglas. He wrote over thirty children’s books, including the McBroom and Bloodhound Gang series, and earned a Newberry Medal for his 1987 work The Whipping Boy. He also scripted the 1995 tele-film version under the name Max Brindle. Fleischman wrote a 1993 collections of magic tricks, The Charlatan’s Handbook, for professional magicians, and penned his autobiography for younger readers The Abracadabra Kid: A Writer’s Life, in 1996. His later works include several biographies for a young audience, The Trouble Begins at 8: A Life of Mark Twain in the Wild, Wild West, Escape! The Story of the Great Houdini, and the forthcoming Sir Charlie, about comedian Charles Chaplin. His survivors include his son, poet and author Paul Fleischman, who was also a Newberry Medal winner in 1989 for Joyful Noise: Poems for Two Voices.

FLEMING, TOM Scottish actor Tom Fleming died in an Edinburgh, Scotland, hospital after a long illness on April 18, 2010. He was 82. Fleming was born in Edinburgh on June 29, 1927. He began his career on stage in 1945, and was co-founder of the Gateway Theatre in Edinburgh in 1953. He joined the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1962, and formed the Royal Lyceum Theatre in Edinburgh in 1965. He was featured in television productions of Black Eye (1952), Jesus of Nazareth (1953) as Jesus, It Is Midnight, Doctor Schweitzer (1953), Witch Wood (1954), Little Women (1958), The Other Dear Charmer (1959), The Highlander (1959), Spindrift (1959), Redgauntlet (1959), MacAdam and Eve (1960), Glorious Morning (1960), An

FLOYD, ROXANNA Celebrity makeup artist Roxanna Floyd died in her sleep at her home in Manhattan, New York, on January 28, 2010. She was 49. Floyd was born in Brooklyn on September 23, 1960. She was a consultant for such beauty products as Fashion Fair Cosmetics, Avon, Mary Kay, and CoverGirl Queen Collection. She was makeup artist for such stars as Whitney Houston, Ashanti, Mary J. Blige, Lauryn

Roxanna Floyd

Hill, Angela Bassett, Halle Berry, and Queen Latifah. Floyd worked on such films as Waiting to Exhale (1995), Contact (1997), The Score (2001), Brown Sugar (2002), Masked and Anonymous (2003), Scary Movie 3 (2003), Beauty Shop (2005), Last Holiday (2006), Life Support (2007), and Hairspray (2007).

FOOT, GEOFFREY British film editor Geoffrey Foot died in London on September 9, 2010. He was 95. Foot was born in Putney, South-West London, on May 19, 1915. He began working in film at Ealing Studios in 1934, and was soon serving as an assistant

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editor on such films as Sing as We Go (1934), Topaze (1935), The Beloved Vagabond (1936), Whom the Gods Love (1936), The Divorce of Lady X (1938), St. Martin’s Lane (1938), and Alfred Hitchcock’s Jamaica Inn (1939). Foot served in the Crown Film Unit during World War II, working on documentary and training films. He returned to features after the war, and made his editing debut with 1947’s Take My Life. He was considered one of England’s finest editors over the next 30 years, working on productions for David Lean, Walt Disney, and Peter Sellers. His film credits include One Woman’s Story (1949), Madeleine (1950), The Galloping Major (1951), Lean’s acclaimed 1952 film Breaking the Sound Barrier, Innocents in Paris (1953), Disney’s Rob Roy, The Highland Rogue (1953), Trouble in Store (1953), One Good Turn (1955), Value for Money (1955), She Played with Fire (1957), Blue Murder at St. Trinian’s (1957), Another Time, Another Place (1958), The Bridal Path (1959), Killers of Kilimanjaro (1959), Jazz Boat (1960), The Trials of Oscar Wilde (1960), In the Nick (1960), Mr. Topaze (1961) directed by Peter Sellers, Johnny Nobody (1961), Postman’s Knock (1962), The Main Attraction (1962), Summer Flight (1963), The Long Ships (1964), Genghis Khan (1965), The Great St. Trinian’s Train Robbery (1966), The Yellow Hat (1966), Hammerhead (1968), The Desperados (1969), Run Wild, Run Free (1969), Sudden Terror (1970), Man in the Wilderness (1971), Raw Meat (1972), The Legend of Hell House (1973), Confessions of a Pop Performer (1975), Confessions of a Driving Instructor (1976), Confessions of a Summer Camp Councillor (1977), Stand Up, Virgin Soldiers (1977), Rosie Dixon — Night Nurse (1978), Sunburn (1979), and The Watcher in the Woods (1980). Foot also edited episodes of the 1956 television series Colonel March of Scotland Yard and Patrick McGoohan’s landmark 1967 series The Prisoner, and the tele-film The Sign of Four (1983) and Black Arrow (1985).

peared as a bald inhabitant of a repressive future society in George Lucas’ first film, THX 1138, in 1971. She was also seen in the films The Limit (1972), Henry Jaglom’s Sitting Ducks (1980), Heartbeeps (1981) as the party maid robot, National Lampoon’s Movie Madness (1982), Communion (1989), Bride of the Re-Animator (1990), Ricochet (1991), Dangerous Touch (1994), Babyfever (1994), and Wolf (1994). She was also seen on television in the tele-film Intimate Strangers (1977), and episodes of Fame, Life Goes On, L.A. Law, Dead by Sunset, and Temporarily Yours. She was casting director for the 1989 sci-fi television series Alien Nation, and the subsequent tele-film sequels Alien Nation: Dark Horizon (1994), Alien Nation: Body and Soul (1995), Alien Nation: The Enemy Within (1996), Alien Nation: Millennium (1996) also appearing as a Wacko Human, and Alien Nation: The Udara Legacy (1997). She also cast the tele-films Night Walk (1989), Sex, Love and Cold Hard Cash (1993), Another Midnight Run (1994), Midnight Runaround (1994), Midnight Run for Your Life (1994) also appearing in a small role, A Wrinkle in Time (2003), Stephen King’s Kingdom Hospital (2004), and Inseparable (2008). Forrest served as casting director on several feature films including Pulse (1988), Meet the Hollowheads (1989), Playing by Heart (1998), Without Charlie (2001), Masked and Anonymous (2003), and Light and the Sufferer (2004) for which she was also an executive producer.

FORRESTER, MAUREEN Canadian operatic contralto Maureen Forrester died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease in Toronto, Canada, on June 16, 2010. She was 79. Forrester was born in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, on July 25, 1930. She trained as a singer and was performing in concert in the early 1950s. She toured throughout Canada, and made her New York

FORREST, IRENE Actress turned casting director Irene Forrest died of a brain tumor in Providence, Rhode Island, on July 25, 2010. She was 65. Forrest was born on December 15, 1944. She began her acting career in the 1960s, and performed on stage in New York and Los Angeles. She was featured in an episode of Felony Squad on television in 1968, and ap-

Maureen Forrester

Irene Forrest

debut in 1956. She performed with the New York City Opera in Handel’s Giulio Cesare in 1966, and sang with the Metropolitan Opera in productions of Das Rheingold and Siegfried in the mid–1970s. She also starred in television productions of The Medium (1977) and Iolanthe (1984), and was the voice of Bianca Castafiore in the English-language version of the animated series The Adventures of Tintin in the early 1990s.

137 FORSELIUS, EMIL Swedish actor Emil Forselius was found dead at his apartment in Stockholm, Sweden, of an apparent suicide on March 1, 2010. He was 35. Forselius was born in Vastgervik, Sweden, on November 23, 1974. He made his film debut as Lasse the Skinhead in 1997’s Tic Tac. He was also seen in the

Emil Forselius

films The Last Contract (1998), White Water Fury (2000), Naked (2000), The Bomber (2001), Make Believe (2003), and Virus (2006). He was also seen frequently on Swedish television in episodes of Beck, St Mikael, Brottsvag, Belinder Auktioner, and Hombres, and productions of Stora Teatern (2002) and Deadline Torp (2005).

FORSYTHE, JOHN Leading actor John Forsythe, who starred as oil tycoon Blake Carrington on the 1980s prime-time soap opera Dynasty and was the voice of Charlie in Charlie’s Angels, died of complications from pneumonia after a long bout with cancer at his home in Santa Ynez, California, on April 1, 2010. He was 92. He was born John Lincoln Freund in Penn’s Grove, New Jersey, on January 28, 1918, and was raised in Brooklyn, New York. He attended the University of North Carolina on an athletic scholarship, and worked as the public address announcer for Brooklyn Dodgers games at Ebbets Field in 1936. He began performing on stage later in the decade, and toured the country with a children’s theatre troupe. He also worked in radio, and made his Broadway debut in a small role in the 1942 play Yankee Point. He also had small roles in the Warner Bros. films Northern Pursuit (1943) and Destination Tokyo (1943). Forsythe served in the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II, and appeared in Moss Hart’s Broadway production, Winged Victory, from 1943. He also worked with injured soldiers who had developed speech problems during the war. He studied at the Actors Studio after his discharge, and continued to perform on stage and early television. He was featured in the Broadway productions of Yellow Jack (1944), It Takes Two (1947), and The Teahouse of the August Moon. He also took over from Henry Fonda for the touring production of Mister Roberts. He was featured in a 1948 television production of Wuthering Heights for Kraft Television Theatre, and was seen in

2010 • Obituaries episodes of Actor’s Studio, NBC Presents, The Ford Theatre Hour, Robert Montgomery Presents, Starlight Theatre, Cosmopolitan Theatre, Lights Out, Pulitzer Prize Playhouse, Curtain Call, Suspense, The Philco Television Playhouse, Danger, The U.S. Steel Hour, The Elgin Hour, Studio One, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Playwrights ’56, Goodyear Television Playhouse, Zane Grey Theatre, The Ed Sullivan Show, The Jack Benny Program, General Electric Theater, Climax!, Schlitz Playhouse of the Stars, The Bell Telephone Hour, Lux Playhouse, and Sunday Showcase. Forsythe also starred in a handful of films during the 1950s including The Captive City (1952), It Happens Every Thursday (1953), The Glass Web (1953), John Sturges’ western Escape from Fort Bravo (1953) with William Holden, Alfred Hitchcock’s 1955 dark comedy about a missing body, The Trouble with Harry, opposite Shirley MacLaine, The Ambassador’s Daughter (1956), Everything but the Truth (1956), and Dubrowsky (1959). He starred as Bentley Gregg, a Hollywood lawyer who becomes guardian of his teenage niece, in the television comedy Bachelor Father. The series debuted on CBS in 1957, and was aired on NBC and ABC before ending in 1962. He was also featured in episodes of The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, Alcoa Premiere, The Dick Powell Show, Kraft Mystery Theater, Kraft Suspense Theatre, ABC Stage 67, Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre, Insight, Run for Your Life, and The Red Skelton Show. He starred with Ann-Margret in the 1964 film Kitten with a Whip, and appeared opposite Lana Turner in the 1966 melodrama Madame X. He starred as Alvin Dewey, the Kansas Bureau of Investigation detective investigating the brutal murders in the 1967 film adaptation of Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood. Forsythe also appeared in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1969 espionage thriller Topaz, and Richard Brooks’ drama The Happing Ending (1969) opposite Jean Simmons. He starred as retired Air Force Major John Foster, who inherits an exclusive San Francisco girls’ school in the short-lived television sit-com The John Forsythe Show from 1965 to 1966, and was widower Michael Endicott, who takes his three daughters to Italy after taking a teaching assignment there in the series To Rome with Love from 1969 to 1971. He also appeared in numerous tele-films including A Bell for Adano (1967), the nearfuture political drama Shadow in the Land (1968), Mur-

John Forsythe

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der Once Removed (1971), The Letters (1973), Lisa, Bright and Dark (1973), Cry Panic (1974), The Healers (1974), Terror on the 40th Floor (1974), The Deadly Tower (1975), Amelia Earhart (1976), Tail Gunner Joe (1977), Never Con a Killer (1977), Emily, Emily (1977), Cruise into Terror (1978), With This Ring (1978), The Users (1978), A Time for Miracles (1980), Sizzle (1981), Mysterious Two (1982), On Fire (1987), and Opposites Attract (1990). His other television credits include episodes of Police Story, Medical Story, Hallmark Hall of Fame, The Feather and Father Gang, and The Love Boat. He also served as narrator for the classic documentary wildlife series The World of Survival from 1971 to 1977. Forsythe also lent his distinctive voice to the role of never-seen Charles Townsend, who sent an array of lovely agents on various cases in the Charlie’s Angels television series from 1976 to 1981. The Angels originally included Farrah Fawcett, Kate Jackson, and Jaclyn Smith, and were later joined by Cheryl Ladd, Shelley Hack, and Tanya Roberts. He reprised his role for feature film adaptations twenty years later, Charlie’s Angels (2000) and Charlie’s Angels: Full Throttle (2003), starring Cameron Diaz, Drew Barrymore, and Lucy Liu as a new generation of beautiful detectives. He appeared in the 1977 Italian film thriller Goodbye and Amen as the American Ambassador, and was Judge Henry T. Fleming in the courtroom drama …And Justice for All (1979) with Al Pacino. Forsythe became a silver-haired sex symbol in his sixties, when he starred as ruthless oil tycoon Blake Carrington in the ABC prime-time soap opera Dynasty from 1981 to 1989. He frequently found himself at the center of a romantic triangle with scheming ex-wife Alexis, played with relish by Joan Collins, and his new wife, Krystle, portrayed by Linda Evans. He also appeared in several episodes of the short-lived spin-off series The Colbys in 1985, and returned for the 1991 tele-film Dynasty: The Reunion. The cast was again reunited in the 2006 television special Dynasty Reunion: Catfights & Caviar. Forsythe had a small role in the 1988 comic retelling of A Christmas Carol, Scrooged, starring Bill Murray, and was featured in the 1992 film Stan and George’s New Life. He starred as Senator William Franklin Powers in the short-lived political sit-com The Powers That Be from 1992 to 1993, and hosted the NBC reality series I Witness Video from 1993 to 1994. He also supplied the voice to animated characters in episodes of the cartoon series Gargoyles and Adventures from the Book of Virtues. Forsythe married actress Parker McCormick in 1939, and they had a son, Dall, before divorcing in 1943. He married actress Julie Warren in 1943, and they had two daughters together, Page and Brooke. The remained together until Warren’s death in 1994. Forsythe married Nicole Carter in 2002, and is survived by her and his three children.

FOUNTAS, GIORGOS Greek actor Giorgos Fountas, who was featured as Tonio in the 1960 comedy film Never on Sunday, died in Athens, Greece, in November 28, 2010. He was 86. Fountas was born in Mavrolithari, Fokida, Greece, in 1924. He trained in drama in Athens and began his stage career in the early

Giorgos Fountas

1940s. He made his film debut in Heirokrotimata in 1944, and continued his career over the next fifty years. His other film credits include The Raid of the Aegean (1946), Dead City (1951), Mavri Gi (1952), Open Sea (1954), The Magic City (1954), Women Without Men (1954), The Girl in the Neighbourhood (1954), Wind of Hate (1954), The Shepherdess’ Lover (1955), Stella (1955), A Girl in Black (1956), Gerakina (1958), Galini (1958), I Zavoliara (1959), Antio Zoi (1960), Take Me Away, My Love (1960), Jules Dassin’s international hit Never on Sunday (1960) with Dassin and Melina Mercouri, The Promise (1961), Betrayed Love (1962), Dawn on the Third Day (1962), Zileia (1963), Katharma (1963), Anemostrovilos (1964), I Krahtis (1964), Kravgi (1964), Zorba the Greek (1964) with Anthony Quinn, O Espanastatis (1965), With Glittering Eyes (1966), Fish-Kettle John (1966), Touba ’67 (1967), The Asphalt Fever (1967), O Prosfygas (1969), O Antartis tou Valtou (1969), I Leoforos tis Prodosias (1969), Exodos Kindynou (1980), 17 Bullegts for an Angel (1981), and To Koritsi tis Manis (1986). Fountas also appeared on Greek television in the series O Hristos Xanastavronetaqi (1975), Galini (1976), and Gova Stileto (1993).

F OX, N ORMAN C HANDLER Television writer Norman Chandler Fox died of complications from Parkinson’s disease in Los Angeles on July 13, 2010. He was 71. Fox was born on September 22, 1938.

Norman Chandler Fox

139 He began his career as an advertising copywriter in New York City, before moving to Los Angeles to work for Universal Television. He was an associate producer for the tele-films Tail Gunner Joe (1977), Black Beauty (1978), and Once Upon a Family (1980). He also wrote episodes of several television series include Fame, Three’s a Crowd, Cagney & Lacey, and The Quiz Kids Challenge. Fox later wrote travel columns for Los Angeles Magazine and Copley News Service, and penned articles for such publications as The Hollywood Reporter, Travel & Leisure, and Bon Appetit. He also worked in radio, hosting Travel Talk on KTMS-AM in Santa Barbara, and the call-in show Traveling with Norm Fox, for KABC-AM.

2010 • Obituaries

in the 1950s, and joined the announcing staff at ABC in New York in 1960. He also served as announcer and commercial spokesman for The Dick Cavett Show, and several gameshows. He was narrator for the ABC radio series Voices in the Headlines and Theatre 5, and various documentary specials before retiring in the early 1980s. He published his autobiography, Fred Foy from XYZ to ABC: A Fond Recollection, in 1986. Foy was inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame in 2000, and received the Golden Boot Award for his work in westerns in 2004.

FOY, FRED Radio announcer Fred Foy, who provided the classic opening narration for the popular western series The Lone Ranger, died at his home in Massachusetts on December 22, 2010. He was 89. Foy was born in Detroit, Michigan, on March 27, 1921, and began working in local radio in the late 1930s. He served in the armed forces during World War II with the 14th Special Service Company, and delivered news and programming to Allied Forces in Cairo with the Egyptian State Broadcasting. He also served as announcer for numerous USO shows, and created entertainment programs for servicemen throughout the war. He returned to Detroit radio after his discharge. He was best known for his long association with The Lone Ranger, providing the opening narration on radio from 1948 through 1954. Foy’s recitation of the lead-in, which generations of listeners and viewers could recite from memory opened with “Hi-Yo, Silver! A fiery horse with the speed of light, a cloud of dust and a hearty ‘Hi-Yo Silver’ … The Lone Ranger! With his faithful Indian companion, Tonto, the daring and resourceful masked rider of the plains led the fight for law and order in the early West. Return with us now to those thrilling days of yesteryear. From out of the past come the thundering hoof-beats of the great horse Silver. The Lone Ranger rides again!” Foy also filled in for the title role once when voice actor Brace Beemer was ill. He was also heard on such radio programs as Challenge of the Yukon and The Green Hornet. Foy reprised his opening narration for The Lone Ranger television series

F RAKER, WILLIAM A. Cinematographer William A. Fraker, who earned six Academy Award nominations for his work on such films as Heaven Can Wait and Looking for Mr. Goodbar, died of cancer in a Los Angeles hospital on May 31, 2010. He was 86. Fraker was born in Los Angeles on September 29, 1923. He served in the U.S. Navy in the Pacific during World War II. He studied at the USC School of Cinema and worked as a photographer’s assistant. He began working as a camera operator for television in the early 1960s on the sit-com The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet. He served as a cinematographer for the obscure television production The Ghost of Sierra de Cobre (aka The Haunted ) (1964) for director Joseph Stefano, and for Leslie Stevens’ off-beat Esperanto-language horror film Incubus (1965) starring William Shatner. He also worked as a camera operator on the films Father Goose (1964), Wild Seed (1965), Morituri (1965), and The Professionals (1966). He was cinematographer on the films Games (1967), The Fox (1967), The President’s Analyst (1967), Roman Polanski’s Rosemary’s Baby (1968), Bullitt (1968), and Paint Your Wagon (1969). He also photographed the 1960s television series Daktari, and the 1968 tele-film Fade-In. He also directed several films including the western Monte Walsh (1970) with Lee Marvin, the psychological horror film A Reflection of Fear (1973), and The Legend of the Lone Ranger (1981) starring Klinton Spilsbury. Fraker also helmed episodes of such television series as J.J. Starbuck, Unsub, B.L. Stryker, Wiseguy, The Flash, and Walker, Texas Ranger. He continued to work primarily as a cinematographer, shooting such films as Dusty and Sweets McGee (1971) for which he also appeared onscreen in a small roles as

Fred Foy

William A. Fraker

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the cellist, The Day of the Dolphin (1973), Rancho Deluxe (1975), Aloha Bobby and Rose (1975), Coonskin (1975), One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975) providing additional photography, Gator (1976), Lipstick (1976), The Killer Inside Me (1976), Exorcist II: The Heretic (1977), and Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977) shooting additional photography. He received an Academy Award nomination for 1977’s Looking for Mr. Goodbar, and earned subsequent nominations for Heaven Can Wait (1978), Steven Spielberg’s 1941 (1979), WarGames (1983), and Murphy’s Romance (1985). His numerous film credits also include American Hot Wax (1978), Old Boyfriends (1979), The Hollywood Knights (1980), Divine Madness (1980), Sharky’s Machine (1981), The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (1982), Irreconcilable Differences (1984) also appearing onscreen in a small role, Protocol (1984), Fever Pitch (1985), SpaceCamp (1986), Burglar (1987), Baby Boom (1987), Chances Are (1989), An Innocent Man (1989), The Freshman (1990), Memoirs of an Invisible Man (1992), Honeymoon in Vegas (1992), Tombstone (1993) for which he was also an associate producer, There Goes My Baby (1994), Street Fighter (1994), the tele-film Death in Small Doses (1995), Father of the Bride Part II (1995), The Island of Dr. Moreau (1996), Vegas Vacation (1997), Rules of Engagement (2000), Town & Country (2001), and Waking Up in Reno (2002). He served as president of the American Society of Cinematographers between 1979 and 1992.

F RANCHETTI, R INA Italian actress Rina Franchetti died in Formello, Italy, on August 18, 2010. She was 102. She was born Ester Girgenti in Naples, Italy, on December 23, 1907. She made her film debut in 1932’s Due Cuori Felici, and appeared in numerous films over the next 60 years. Her numerous film credits include Frontier (1934), A Night in May (1938), Peddler and the Lady (1943), Heart and Soul (1948), The King’s Guerrillas (1950), The Wayward Wife (1953), I Always Loved You (1953), These Phantoms (1954), Magic Village (1955), L’Angelo Bianco (1955), L’Ultime Amante (1955), Blood Feud (1960), The Itchy Palm (1960), La Dolce Vita (1960), Atom Age Vampire (1960), Gioventu di Notte (1961), Barabbas (1961), Il Treno del Sabato (1964), Tre Notti d’Amore (1964), Massacre Time (1966),

Rina Franchetti

The Head of the Family (1967), Gunman Sent by God (1968), Mother’s Heart (1969), Cross Current (1971), Italian Graffiti (1973), When Love Is Lust (1973), Ricco (1973), Unholy Convent (1973), Delitto d’Amore (1974), Le Sauvage (1975), La Verginella (1977), Adelmo (1988), and Basta! Adesso Tocca a Noi (1990). She also performed frequently on stage, television, and radio, and was a dubbing voice for imported films.

FRANCIS, DICK British mystery writer Dick Francis, who was noted for his numerous thrillers set in the world of horse racing, died at his home in George Town, the Cayman Islands, on February 14, 2010. He was 89. Francis was born in Tenby, Pembrokeshire, Wales, on October 31, 1920, the son of a steeplechase rider and stable manager. Francis served in the Royal Air Force as a fighter pilot during World War II. He became one of England’s premiere jockeys after the war, winning over 350 races. He spent four seasons as a jockey to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, from 1953 through 1957. Francis rode in eight Grand National Steeplechases, and was close to victory in 1956 when his horse, the Queen Mother’s Devon

Dick Francis

Loch, suddenly collapsed on the track. Francis, who had suffered numerous injuries during his long career as a jockey, retired from the track the following year. He subsequently joined the staff of the Sunday Express of London as a racing correspondent. He wrote his autobiography, The Sport of Queens, which was published in 1957. He soon began work on his first novel, Dead Cert, which was released in 1962, and adapted for film by Tony Richardson in 1974. Francis wrote over 40 novels during his career, most centered in the world of horse racing, with a jockey or former jockey as the main protagonist. His works were often noted for their frequent episodes of violence against both man and beast. He earned the Edgar Award from the Mystery Writers of America three times, and was made a grand master in 1996. He also received the Diamond Dagger Award, the highest honor of the Crime Writers Association of Great Britain, in 1990. His many novels include Nerve (1964), For Kicks (1965), Odds Against (1965) which introduced ex-jockey turned private investigator Sid Halley, Flying Finish (1966), Blood Sport (1967), Forfeit

141 (1968) which earned him his first Edgar Award, Enquiry (1969), Bonecrack (1971), Rat Race (1972), Smokescreen (1972), Slay Ride (1973), Knockdown (1974), High Stakes (1975), In the Frame (1976), Risk (1977), Trial Run (1978), Whip Hand (1979) which received a second Edgar Award, Reflex (1980), Twice Shy (1981), Banker (1982), The Danger (1983), Proof (1984), Breakin (1985), Bolt (1987), Hot Money (1987), The Edge (1988), Straight (1989), Longshot (1990), Comeback (1991), Driving Force (1992), Decider (1993), Wild Horses (1994), Come to Grief (1995) which garnered him another Edgar, To the Hilt (1996), 10-lb. Penalty, Second Wind (1999), and Shattered (2000). Francis also wrote the 1986 biography Jockey’s Life: The Biography of Lester Piggott, and numerous short stories, many of which were collected in 1998’s Field of Thirteen. Several of his novels featuring Sid Halley were adapted for the British television series The Dick Francis Thriller: The Racing Game, starring Mike Gwilym in 1979, and were aired in the United States as part of the PBS Mystery! series. Ian McShane starred as Jockey Club security director David Cleveland in the tele-film adaptations of In the Frame (1989), Blood Sport (1989), and Twice Shy (1989). Francis’ wife, Mary, frequently assisted him with his writings until their 53 years of marriage ended with her death in 2000. He expressed doubts that he would pen another novel, but returned with Under Orders in 2006. He subsequently teamed with his son, Felix Francis, on the novels Dead Heat (2007), Silks (2008), Even Money (2009), and the forthcoming Crossfire.

F RANCMAN, R YSZARD Polish stuntman Ryszard Francman was killed when he was struck by a train while standing on the track in Wroclaw, Poland, on January 4, 2010. He had been suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. He was 66. Francman began working in films in the late 1960s, performing stuntwork and appearing in small roles in such films as Colonel Wolodyjowski (1969), The Nest (1974), Nights and Days (1975), Casimir the Great (1976), The Curve (1977), Valley of Happiness (1985), Tumor Witkacego (1985), Pan Samochodzik i Niesamowity Dwor (1987), New York, 4 A.M. (1988), Swan Song (1988), Kiler (1997), The Spring to Come (2001), The Hexer (2001), and The Pianist (2002).

Ryszard Francman

2010 • Obituaries

FRAZETTA, FRANK Legendary fantasy artist Frank Frazetta, whose illustrations graced comic books, magazines, movie posters, and paperback editions of Conan and Tarzan, died of complications from a stroke in Fort Myers, Florida, on May 10, 2010. He was 82. Frazetta was born in Brooklyn, New York, on February 9, 1928. He trained at the Brooklyn Academy of Fine Art from an early age, and was illustrating comic books stories by the mid–1940s. He worked at Bernard Bailey’s studio as an assistant for science fiction artist John Giunta, and his first published work was a Man in Black story for Tally Ho comics in 1944. He worked briefly at Fiction House, cleaning the work of such artists as Graham Ingels and George Evans. He worked primarily on funny animal stories for such titles as Coo Coo, Barnyard, and Supermouse for Standard for the remainder of the decade. He also supplied art for comics from Prize Publications, D.S. Publishing, and Magazine Enterprises’ A-1 line. Frazetta drew a handful of Shining Knight tales in DC’s Adventure Comics in 1950 and 1951, and worked on the Blackhawk and Tomahawk

Frank Frazetta

titles. He created Thun’da, King of the Congo for Magazine Enterprises in 1952, and subsequently was ghost artist on Dan Barry’s Flash Gordon newspaper strip. He also worked for EC, Toby Press, and Prize Publications, and was cover artist for the Buck Rogers features in Famous Funnies. He began working for Al Capp on the Li’l Abner comic strip in 1954, and assisted on the title through 1961. He also assisted on the Harvey Kurtzman Little Annie Fannie strip in Playboy, and provided cover art for such Warren magazines as Creepy and Eerie. Frazetta became best known in the 1960s for providing heroic fantasy cover art for Robert E. Howard’s Conan the Barbarian paperbacks and Edgar Rice Burrough’s Tarzan and John Carter of Mars novels. He was soon providing poster art for such films as What’s New Pussycat? (1965), The Secret of My Success (1965), After the Fox (1966), Hotel Paradiso (1966), The Busy Body (1967), The Fearless Vampire Killers (1967), Who’s Minding The Mint (1967), Yours, Mine and Ours (1968), Mad Monster Party (1969), The Night They Raided Minsky’s (1969), Mrs. Pollifax — Spy (1971), Luana (1973), and Clint Eastwood’s The Gauntlet (1977). He also painted several albums covers for such rock groups as Molly

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Hatchet and Nazareth. He was co-producer with Ralph Bakshi for the 1983 animated film Fire and Ice, which featured such Frazetta characters as Darkwolf, Nekron, and Teegra. He was the subject of the 2003 documentary feature Frank Frazetta: Painting with Fire. He had suffered several strokes in recent years that limited his artistic abilities. Eleanor Kelly “Ellie” Frazetta, his wife, partner and muse for 53 years died of cancer in July of 2009. The couple’s four children subsequently engaged in a legal struggle over their father’s estate which reportedly ended amicably shortly before their father’s death.

FREEDMAN, NANCY Novelist Nancy Freedman, who was best known for writing the best-seller Mrs. Mike, died of temporal arteritis in Greenbrae, California, on August 10, 2010. She was 90. She was born Nancy Mars in Evanston, Illinois, on July 4, 1920. Mrs. Mike (1947) was her first novel, which she co-wrote with her husband, Benedict Freedman. The popular

Nancy Freedman

book was adapted for film in 1949 starring Dick Powell and Evelyn Keyes. She also co-wrote The Apprentice Bastard (1966) with her husband, and penned the novels Mary, Mary Quite Contrary (1968), Joshua Son of None (1973) about a plan to clone President John Kennedy, The Immortals (1977), and Sappho: The Tenth Muse (1998). she and her husband collaborated with two later sequels to Mrs. Mike, The Search for Joyful (2002) and Kathy Little Bird (2003).

FREEMAN, JOHN Animator John H. Freeman died in Burbank, California, on January 1, 2010. He was 93. Freeman was born in Spokane, Washington, on December 14, 1916. He began his career at Walt Disney Productions in the late 1930s, and worked as an inbetweener on Fantasia (1940). He worked on numerous shorts at Disney over the next 16 years, and was a character animator for the 1955 animated feature Lady and the Tramp. He worked as an animator for television commercials from 1956, and was a story director for television episodes of Hanna-Barbera’s The Huckleberry Hound Show, The Yogi Bear Show, and Quick Draw McGraw in the early 1960s. He was an animator for such series as Super President, Bailey’s Comets, The Oddball Couple, The Kwicky Koala Show, Trollkins, Smurfs, The Plastic Man Comedy-Adventure Show, and

John Freeman

Fang Face, and directed episodes of Hot Wheels, Inhumanoids, The Pink Panther, My Little Pony ’n Friends, The Glo Friends, Moondreamers, G.I. Joe, Transformers, and Jem. He also worked on the television specials It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown (1966), Dr. Seuss On The Loose (1973), The Incredible, Indelible, Magical, Physical Mystery Trip (1973), The Puppy’s Great Adventure (1979), The Puppy’s Amazing Rescue (1980), and The Trouble with Miss Switch (1980), and the films The Nine Lives of Fritz the Cat (1974) and Heidi’s Song (1982).

FREEMAN, LEE Lee Freeman, rhythm guitarist and vocalist for the 1960s pop group Strawberry Alarm Clock, died of complications from cancer in a San Bruno, California, hospice on February 14, 2010. He was 60. Freeman was born in Burbank, California, on November 8, 1949. He was a founding member of the group, originally known as Thee Sixpence, in 1966. Their first single, “Incense and Peppermints,” became their biggest hit in 1967. It also was the title of their debut album, and Wake Up … It’s Tomorrow (1968) and The World in a Sea Shell (1968) soon followed. Freeman was featured with the Strawberry Alarm Clock in the films Psych-Out (1968) and Beyond the Valley of the Dolls (1970). They were also seen on television in episodes of American Bandstand, Happening ’68, The Jonathan Winters Show, The Steve Allen Show, and Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In. He remained with the band through several line-up changes before the group

Lee Freeman

143 broke up in 1971. Freeman was part of the reunited Strawberry Alarm Clock in 1982, and continued to play concert appearances with them until poor health forced his retirement in 2008.

F REEMAN, MICKEY Veteran comedian Mickey Freeman, who was best known for his role as Private Zimmerman in the 1950s television sit-com The Phil Silvers Show, died in New York City on September 28, 2010. He was 93. Freeman was born on February 12, 1917. He performed frequently in the Catskills during his career. He was Pvt. Fielding Zimmerman in

Mickey Freeman

The Phil Silvers Show (aka You’ll Never Get Rich) from 1955 to 1959. He was also featured on television in episodes of Inner Sanctum, The Lloyd Bridges Show, Naked City, Lancer, and The Equalizer. He also appeared in small roles in the 1982 tele-film Born Beautiful, and the features Shamus (1973) and Karaoke Knight (1998). Freeman was a member of the New York comedy society The Friars Club from 1987.

2010 • Obituaries

peared in several films in Switzerland including Bieder der Fliger (1941), Liebe ist Zollfrei (1941), and Wilder Urlaub (1943). He continued his film career after the war with such credits as Weisses Gold (1949), Decision Before Dawn (1951), Das Dorf unterm Himmel (1953), Circus of Love (1954), Macumba (1954), Der Schweigende Engel (1954), The Plot to Assassinate Hitler (1955), Magic Fire (1955), Der Erste Fruhlingstag (1956), The Perjured Farmer (1956), Heisse Ernte (1956), The Big Chance (1957), Auferstehung (1958), SOS Glacier Pilot (1959), William Tell (1960) in the title role, The Last Chapter (1961), The Longest Day (1962), The Great Escape (1963) as Captain Posen, Nea: The Young Emmanuelle (1976), and Wild Geese II (1985). Freitag appeared frequently on German television from the 1950s with roles in such productions as Jean (1957), Waldchausstrasse 20 (1960), Die Kollektion (1962), Der Fall Sacco und Vanzetti (1963), In der Sache J. Robert Oppenheimer (1964), Wahn Oder Der Teufel in Boston (1965), Der Kreidegarten (1967), Das Hohere Leben (1968), Berlin Tunnel 21 (1981), A Song for Europe (1985), Der Schiedsrichter (1985), Der Goldene Schnitt (1991), Donauprinzessin (2992), Der Clan der Anna Voss (1995), and Die Liebenden vom Alexanderplatz (2001). His other television credits include episodes of Der Kommissar, Der Millionenbauer, and Tatort. He was married to actress Maria Becker from 1945 until their divorce in 1966, and to actress Maria Sebaldt from 1966 until his death.

FREIWALD, ERIC Film and television writer Eric Freiwald died in Prescott, Arizona, on January 29, 2010. He was 82. Freiwald was born in Detroit, Michigan, on September 24, 1927. He served in the Navy during World War II, and began his career as a writer after the war. He began writing for television in the

F REITAG , ROBERT Austrian actor Robert Freitag died in Munich, Germany, on July 8, 2010. He was 94. He was born Robert Peter Freytag in Vienna, Austria, on April 7, 1916, the son of Swiss opera singer Otto Freitag. He trained as an actor at Vienna’s Max Reinhardt Studio, and performed on stage in Switzerland after the Nazi occupation of Austria. He also ap-

Eric Freiwald

Robert Freitag

early 1950s, often teaming with partner Robert Schaefer. He scripted the 1950 film Raiders of Tomahawk Creek and the 1958 feature version of The Lone Ranger and the Lost City of Gold. He also penned episodes of The Range Rider, The Adventures of Kit Carson, Hopalong Cassidy, The Gene Autry Show, The Millionaire, Buffalo Bill, Jr., Sgt. Preston of the Yukon, The Adventures of Champion, Science Fiction Theatre, Tales of the Texas Rangers, Annie Oakley, Whirlybirds, Conflict, The

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Lone Ranger, Colt .45, Adventures of Wild Bill Hickok, Maverick, The Man from Blackhawk, Wichita Town, Straightaway, The Beverly Hillbillies, Lassie, and Salty. Freiwald also wrote numerous comic book stories for Western Publishing’s Dell and Gold Key imprints including such titles as Magnus, Robot Fighter, Aliens, 77 Sunset Strip, and Disney’s The Legend of Lobo. He began writing scripts for the daytime soap opera The Young and the Restless in 1980 and remained connected with the show until his death.

FRENCH, LARRY Actor Larry French died of a heart attack at his home in New York City on May 28, 2010. He was 58. French was born in Dallas, Texas, on November 4, 1951. He was featured in several films including The Daring Dobermans (1973), Baby Needs a New Pair of Shoes (1974), From Noon Till

James Freud

the dance band Beatfish in the early 1990s, and led the band Moondog in 1996. Freud’s problems with alcohol damaged his career, as he recounted in his 2002 memoir I Am the Voice Left from Drinking, and the sequel I Am the Voice Left from Rehab (2007). His sons, Jackson and Harrison, led the band Attack of the Mannequins in the 2000s, and Freud assisted as their manager.

Larry French

Three (1976), the tele-film Intimate Strangers (1977), and Every Girl Should Have One (1978). He also appeared on television in episodes of The Invisible Man, The Bionic Woman, Quark, Dallas, and The Incredible Hulk. He moved to New York in the late 1970s to pursue his acting career on stage, and appeared on Broadway in the 1980 revival of Brigadoon, and The Pirates of Penzance in 1981. He also performed in touring and regional productions throughout the country, often with his wife of thirty years, actress Jeanne Lehman French, who survives him.

FREUD, JAMES Australian rock musician and songwriter, who was a member of the 1980s band the Models, committed suicide at his home in Melbourne, Australia, on November 4, 2010, after a long battle with alcohol addiction. He was 51. He was born Colin Joseph McGlinchey in Melbourne on June 29, 1959. He began his music career at the age of 16 with the band Sabre with guitarist Sean Kelly, and led Teenage Radio Stars in 1977. He recorded his first album Breaking Silence, with James Freud & the Radio Stars in 1980. He reteamed with Kelly in 1982 with the Models as bass guitarist, and sometimes vocalist and songwriter. His songs “Barbados” and “Out of Mind, Out of Sight,” topped the charts in Australia. Freud resumed his solo career after the Models disbanded in 1988, and released the 1989 album Step into the Heat. He recorded with

FROELICK, ANNE Screenwriter Anne Froelick Taylor died in a nursing home in Los Angeles on January 26, 2010. She was 97. Froelick was born in Hinsdale, Massachusetts, on December 8, 1912, and was raised in Princeton, New Jersey. She moved to New York in the early 1930s to embark on a career as an actress and model. She began working as a secretary for writer Howard Koch in 1938. She assisted him in writing his scripts for Orson Welles’ landmark radio program The Mercury Theatre on the Air, including his adaptation of H.G. Wells’ The War of the Worlds, which entered radio history with its Halloween broadcast in 1938. She accompanied Koch to Hollywood, where she assisted him in scripting the 1940 crime drama The Letter, starring Bette Davis. Froelick was soon signed by Warner as a screenwriter, and co-wrote Shining Victory with Koch in 1941. She also scripted the films The Master Race (1944), Miss Susie Slagle’s (1946), and Easy Come, Easy Go (1947). She co-scripted Harriet Craig,

Anne Froelick

145

2010 • Obituaries

the 1950 film adaptation of George Kelly’s play Craig’s Wife, starring Joan Crawford. Froelick’s opposition to fascism and support of such issues as unionization and desegregation led her to join the Communist Party in the 1940s. That decision cost her greatly in the 1950s, when her husband, Philip Taylor, lost his job at Lockheed, and writing assignments became scarce as a result of the McCarthy era blacklist. She wrote several locally produced plays and co-wrote the 1956 comic novel Press On Regardless. She later worked as anonymously as a writer and editor on television soap operas.

FROLAND, DAG Norwegian entertainer Dag Froland died at his home in Oslo, Norway, on January 26, 2010. He was 64. Froland was born in Volda, Norway, on September 16, 1945. He performed on

David Froman

Froman appeared regularly as Lt. Bob Brooks in the television Matlock with Andy Griffith from 1986 through 1994.

Dag Froland

radio at the age of seven, and made his stage debut in his teens. He became a leading performer on the Norwegian cabaret circuit. He also appeared in several films including Norske Byggeklosser (1972), Einar Schankes Gledeshus (1975), and Pa Stigende Kurs (1987). Froland also performed often on Norwegian Broadcasting (NRK).

FROMAN, DAVID Character actor David Froman, who starred as Gunther Wagner on the daytime soap opera The Edge of Night in the early 1980s, died of cancer in Miami, Oklahoma, on February 8, 2010. He was 71. Froman was born in Miami, Oklahoma, on December 31, 1938. He served on the faculty of Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College as a speech and drama teacher in the 1960s. He was also active in local theater, particularly the Miami Little Theatre. He joined the cast of The Edge of Night as burley Gunther Wagner in 1980. His character was killed in 1981, but was resurrected as a kinder twin brother from 1982 to 1984. Froman appeared in small roles in the films Hanky Panky (1982) and Steele Justice (1987), and the tele-film Blind Justice (1986). His other television credits include episodes of Scarecrow and Mrs. King, Cover Up, Hill Street Blues, Foley Square, Stingray, Trapper John, M.D., Our House, Werewolf, Simon & Simon, Star Trek: The Next Generation as Klingon Captain K’Nera in the 1988 episode “Heart of Glory,” Supercarrier, 21 Jump Street, Hunter, Generations, Cheers, and Diagnosis Murder.

F UJITA, M AKOTO Japanese actor Makoto Fujita died of a ruptured artery and complications from esophageal cancer at Osaka University Hospital in Suita, Osaka Prefecture, Japan, on February 17, 2010. He was 76. He was born Makoto Harada in Tokyo on April 13, 1933, the son of silent film actor Rintaro Fujima. Makoto starred as a traveling yakuza in the popular television comedy series Tenamonya Sandogasa from 1962 to 1968. He also appeared in numerous films from the early 1960s including Shin Meoto Zenzai (1963), Akumyo Hatoba (1963), Tenya Wanya Jirocho Docho (1963), Akumyo Ichiba (1963), Jirocho Sangokushi Daiichibu (1963), Horafuki Taikoki (1964), Geisha Gakko (1964), Nishi no Osho, Higashi no Taisho (1964), Akai Daiya (1964), Tale of a Carpenter (1965), Nippon ichi no Goma Suri Otoko (1965), Kigeki Ekimae Keiba (1966), Tenamonya Tokaido (1966), Un ga Yokerya (1966), Nippon ichi no Gorigan Otoko (1966), Monsieur Zivaco (1967), Ghost Story of Two Travelers at Tenamonya (1967), Zatoichi’s Cane-Sword (1967), Bakumatsu: Tenamonya Daizodo (1967), Hymn to a Tired Man (1968), Mexican Free-for-All (1968), Kigeki Ekimae Kaiun (1968), Imaginary Paradise (1968), Hi! London (1969), Kureji no Daibakuhatsu (1969), Ai no Kizuna

Makoto Fujita

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(1969), Nippon ichi no Yakuza Otoko (1970), Kigeki Dorobo Daikazoku: Tenka o Toru (1972), Crest of the Wolf (1973), Osho (1973), Okinawa ju-nen Senso (1978), Hunter in the Dark (1979), Ana no Kiba (1979), My Son! My Son! (1979), The Wicked (1980), Mayonaka no Shotaijo (1981), Yaju-deka (1982), Tsumiki Kuzushi (1983), Hissatsu!: Sure Death! (1984), Sure Death! Brown, You Bounder! (1985), Sure-Fire Death 4: We Will Avenge You (1987), Hagure Keiji: Junjoha (1989), Sure Fire 5 (1991), Spain Kara no Tegami — Benposta no Kodomotachi (1993), Onihei’s Detective Records (1995), Totsunyuseyo! Asama Sanso Jiken (2002), O-oku: The Movie (2006), Best Wishes for Tomorrow (2007), Tsubaki Sanjuro (2007), and Rasuto Gemu: Saigo no Sokeisen (2008). Fujita also remained a popular performer on Japanese television throughout his career, appearing in such productions as Hissatsu Shiokinin (1973), Fufu Tabi Nikki Saraba Ronin (1976), Hissatsu Shigotonin V (1985), Hagure Keiji: Junjoha (1988), Shigotonin VS Shigotonin (1989), Kyoto Satsujin Annai 16: Fukushu no Gyakuten Hotei (1990), Jirocho Sangokushi (1991), Hagure Keiji: Australia (1999), Musashi (2003), Yakusha Damashii! (2006), Oitsumeru (2006), Hotei Arashi Bengoshi Inukai Bunsuke (2007), Kenkyaku Shobai: Haru no Arashi (2008), and Damashie Utamaro (2009).

FULLILOVE, ERIC Australian television producer and director Eric Fullilove died in Naremburn, Australia, on October 24, 2010. He was 85. Fullilove was born in London, England, on February 5, 1925. He served in the British army during World War II, and worked as an editor and assistant director with the Crown Film Unit at Denham Studios after the war. He

Leona Gage

Miss USA in 1957, died in Los Angeles on October 5, 2010. She was 71. Gage was born in Longview, Texas, on April 8, 1939. She represented the state of Maryland when she won the Miss USA pageant in 1957, but was stripped of the title after a day when it was learned that she was married with two children and had lied about her age. She subsequently appeared on television’s The Ed Sullivan Show, and attempted a career in films. She was featured in Bells Are Ringing (1960), the 1962 horror film Tales of Terror as Morella in the segment of the Edgar Allan Poe story of the same name, A House Is Not a Home (1964), Scream of the Butterfly (1965), and The Oscar (1966). Gage also performed as a showgirl at the Hotel Tropicana in Las Vegas, worked as a model, and appeared in television commercials.

GALKIN, VLADISLAV Russian actor Vladislav Galkin died of a heart failure at his home in Moscow on February 25, 2010. He was 38. He was born Vladislav Sukhachev in Leningrad, Soviet Union (now St. Petersburg, Russia), on December 25, 1971. He was featured in several films as a child including Neznayka s Nashego Dvora (1983), Etot Negodyay Sidorov (1983), Gruz bez Markirovki (1984), Zolotaya Tsep (1986), Aborigin (1987), and Na Svoey Zemle (1987). He studied acting at the Shchukin School from 1988 to 1992, and trained as a director at the Russian State Film Institute in Moscow in the 1990s. Galkin was also seen in the

Eric Fullilove

worked frequently in documentaries over the next decade and filmed the first British atomic bomb detonation with the Royal Navy off the West Australian Coast in 1952. Fullilove settled in Australia in the early 1960s, where he became active in the film and television industry. He was best known for his work on the popular television series Skippy, the Bush Kangaroo in the 1960s. He also worked on the series Barrier Reef, Boney, Catch Kandy, Song for Melbourne, and The Evil Touch.

GAGE, LEONA Actress and beauty pageant contestant Mary Leona Gage, who briefly served as

Vladislav Galkin

147 films 22 Iyunya, Rovno v 4 Chasa (1992), Igra (1994), The Rifleman of the Voroshilov Regiment (1999), In August of 1944 (2001), 72 Meters (2004), A Hot November (2006), Dikari (2006), and An Imperfect Woman (2008). He starred as Senior Lieutenant Urmanov on the television series Spetsnaz (2002) and Spetsnaz II (2003), and was featured in television productions of Kamenskaya: Igra na Chuzhom Pole (2000), Rostov-Papa (2001), Dalnoboyshchiki (2001), Po Tu Storonu Volkov (2002), Nevestka (2003), and The Slky and the Earth (2004). He was Grigori Kaltygin in the 2004 mini-series Diversant, and the 2007 sequel Diversant 2: Konets Voyny. He also starred in the mini-series Kazaroza (2005), The Fall of the Empire (2005), and The Master and Margarita (2005) as Ivan Bezdomny. Galkin broke his leg while filming for television in the mid–2000s, and underwent several surgeries. He subsequently became dependant on painkillers, and suffered from depression and problems with alcohol. He was arrested after drawing a weapon during a fight in a Moscow bar, but avoided a prison sentence. He was hospitalized in December of 2009 for pancreatic disease and other ailments.

GALLOWAY, MICHAEL Actor Michael Galloway, who starred as Lt. Russ McDonald in the television series The Blue Angels in the early 1960s, died in Los Angeles on October 12, 2010. He was 85. Galloway was born in Boise, Idaho, on May 7, 1925. He served in the U.S. Army Air Force during World War II, and became interested in acting while attending the University of Idaho and USC. He began appearing on television in the early 1950s in episodes of such series as

2010 • Obituaries

Madrid, Spain, hospital on July 26, 2010. He was 76. Gamero was born in Madrid on March 2, 1934. He began a career in films in the late 1960s, after studying law and working for Spain’s telephone company. He made his film debut in 1969’s History of the Life of Snow White, and appeared in more than 100 films over the next forty years. His many film credits include Labelecialalacio (1970), Loco por Machin (1971), The Lonely Heart (1973) Speak, Little Mute Girl (1974), La Mortaja (1974), Country, S.A. (1975), The Power of Desire (1975), El Love Feroz (1975), Poachers (1975), A Dog Called… Vengeance (1976), Quiero ser Mayor (1976), Vuelve, Querida Nati (1976), And They Lived Happily Ever After (1976), Foul Play (1977), Los Placeres Ocultos (1977), Unfinished Business (1977), Chely (1977), Wifemistress (1977), Gusanos de Seda (1977), The Creature (1977), El Hombre que yo Quiero (1978), Red Gold (1978), Casa de Citas (1978), Trout (1978), A Man Called Autumn Flower (1978), The Priest (1978), Fury (1978), Tigers in Lipstick (1979), Tic Tac Toe (1979), El Dia del Presidente (1979), Everybody Calls Me The Cat (1980), El Poderoso Influjo de la Luna (1980), Their Golden Years (1980), La Vida, el Amor y la Muerte (1980), The Prick (1980), The Semester We Loved Kim Novak (1980), Me Olvide de Vivir (1980), Cronicas del Bromuro (1980), Los Liantes (1981), Gay Club (1981), Kargus (1981), La Mujer del Ministro (1981), Tragala, Perro (1981), Que Vienen los Socialistas! (1982), Las Locuras de Parchís (1982), El Cabezota (1982), El Gran Mogollon (1982), En Busca del Huevo Perdido (1982), Cristobal Colon, de Oficio… Descubridor (1982), Buscando a Perico (1982), La Cancion de los Ninos (1982), Geminis (1982), Los Caraduros (1983), Percusion (1983), Y del Seguro… Libranos Senor! (1983), Vivir Manana (1983), Truhanes (1983), Operacion Mantis (1984), La Lola nos Lleva al Huerto (1984), La Mujer del Juez (1984), A Tope (1984), Crimen en Familia (1984), Cafe, Coca y Puro (1985), The Heifer (1985), Bohemian Nights (1985), La Corte de Faraon (1985), The Bastard Brother of God (1986), Futuro Perfecto (1986), Hay que Deshacer la Casa (1986), Voyage to Nowhere (1986), El Bosque Animado (1987), La Estranquera de Vallecas (1987), Madrid (1987), Suffer, You Prick (1987), Divine Words (1987), Jarrapellejos (1988), Contra la Pared (1988), Pasodoble (1988), Soldadito Espanol (1988), Scent of a Crime

Michael Galloway

Suspense, Medic, Telephone Time, Zane Grey Theater, Dragnet, The 20th Century–Fox Hour, Broken Arrow, Steve Canyon, Maverick, Frontier Doctor, The Texan, and Men into Space. He was also featured in several films including With a Song in My Heart (1952), Battle Circus (1953), House of Numbers (1957), and In Love and War (1958). He starred in the syndicated television series The Blue Angels, about the U.S. Navy’s group of precision flyers, from 1960 to 1961.

GAMERO, ANTONIO Spanish actor Antonio Gamero died after a long respiratory illness in a

Antonio Gamero

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148

(1988), Amanece, Que no es Poco (1989), Loco Veneno (1989), El Rio que nos Lleva (1989), Ni se te Ocurra… (1990), Don Juan, My Dear Ghost (1990), Yo soy Esa (1990), La Taberna Fantastica (1991), Offsides (1991), La Marrana (1992), Madregilda (1993), Todos a la Carcel (1993), Dos Hombres y una Mujer (1994), How to Be Miserable and Enjoy It (1994), Alone, at Last! (1994), Suspiros de Espana (y Portugal) (1995), On Earth As It Is in Heaven (1995), La Ley de la Frontera (1995), Manolito Four Eyes (1999), Pidele Cuentas al Rey (1999), The Green March (2002), First and Last Love (2002), Hotel Danubio (2003), Moscow Gold (2003), Two Tough Guys (2003), Trileros (2003), Desede que Amanece Apetece (2005), and Born to Suffer (2009). Gamero also appeared frequently on Spanish television, appearing in such productions as Plinio (1971), Earthquake in Chile (1975), El Camino (1978) as Don Jose, Cosas de Dos (1984) as Padre de Lola, La Huella del Crimen: Jarabo (1985), El Rey y la Reina (1986), La Mujer de tu Vida: La Mujer Infiel (1990), Don Quijote de la Mancha (1991), and La Mujer de tu Vida 2: La Mujer Cualquiera (1994). He was also seen in such series as El Quinto Jinete, Los Libros, Curro Jimenez, Teatro Estudio, Teatro Breve, La Mascara Negra, Estudio 1, Un Encargo Original, El Eden, Escrito Para TV, Pagina de Sucesos, Tarde de Teatro, Sara y Punto, Tercera Planta, Inspeccion Fiscal, Farmacia de Guardia, Truhanes, Los Ladrones Van a la Oficina as Ramirez, Hermanos de Leche, Colegio Mayor, La Casa de los Líos, La Banda de Perez as Eulogio, Jacinto Durante, Representante, Manos a la Obra, Manolito Gafotas, and Martes de Carnaval.

GAMMON, J AMES Character actor James Gammon, who was known for his gravelly voice and weather-beaten features, died of cancer at his daughter’s home in Costa Mesa, California, on July 16, 2010. He was 70. Gammon was born in Newman, Illinois, on April 20, 1940. He made his film debut in 1967’s Cool Hand Luke. He appeared in numerous films over the next forty years including Journey to Shiloh (1968), The Thousand Plane Raid (1969), A Man Called Horse (1970), Macho Callahan (1970), Cry for Me, Billy (1972), Zandy’s Bride (1974), Macon County Line (1974), The Wild McCullochs (1975), Bobbie Jo and the Outlaw (1976), The Pom Pom Girls (1976), Black Oak

James Gammon

Conspiracy (1977), The Greatest (1977), On the Nickel (1980), Urban Cowboy (1980) as Steve Strange, It’s My Turn (1980), Clint Eastwood’s Any Which Way You Can (1980), Below the Belt (1980), Vision Quest (1985), Sylvester (1985), Silverado (1985), Steven King’s Silver Bullet (1985), Hard Traveling (1986), Stacking (1987), Made in Heaven (1987), Ironweed (1987), The Milagro Beanfield War (1988), Major League (1989) as Coach Lou Brown, Revenge (1990), Coupe de Ville (1990), I Love You to Death (1990), Leaving Normal (1992), Criss Cross (1992), Running Cool (1993), Painted Desert (1993), The Adventures of Huck Finn (1993), Cabin Boy (1994), Major League II (1994), Hard Vice (1994), Wyatt Earp (1994), Natural Born Killers (1994), Wild Bill (1995), Traveller (1997), The Apostle (1997), The Man in the Iron Mask (1998), Point Blank (1998), Love from Ground Zero (1998), The Hi-Lo Country (1998), One Man’s Hero (1999), The Cell (2000), Life or Something Like It (2002), Cold Mountain (2003) as Esco Swanger, Silver City (2004), Don’t Come Knocking (2005), Outlaw Trail: The Treasure of Butch Cassidy (2006), The Far Side of Jericho (2006), Altered (2006), The Final Season (2007), Appaloosa (2008), In the Electric Mist (2009), Otis E. (2009), and The New Daughter (2009). He was also a familiar face and voice in television from the mid–1960s, often cast in westerns. Gammon was seen in episodes of such series as The Wild Wild West, The Monroes, Captain Nice, Bonanza, The Road West, The Invaders, Batman, Felony Squad, The Virginian, Lancer, The High Chaparral, Dusty’s Trail, Gunsmoke, The F.B.I., Kung Fu, The Streets of San Francisco, Barnaby Jones, Cannon, Petrocelli, Monster Squad, Most Wanted, Charlie’s Angels, Lou Grant, The Master, Cagney & Lacey, Murder, She Wrote, The Equalizer, Crime Story, In the Heat of the Night, Midnight Caller, The Young Riders, The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles, Middle Ages, L.A. Law, Tracey Takes On…, LAX, Crossing Jordan, Monk, and Grey’s Anatomy. Gammon was featured as recurring character Zack Rosswell in The Waltons from 1973 to 1975, and was Rudy in comedy series Bagdad Cafe from 1990 to 1991. He was Coach Zelnick in Homefront from 1992 to 1993, and was Nick Bridges, the father of Don Johnson’s character, in Nash Bridges from 1996 to 2001. He also appeared in the tele-films Intruders (1970), The F.B.I. Story: The FBI Versus Alvin Karpis, Public Enemy Number One (1974), The Kansas City Massacre (1975), The Sacketts (1979), Rage! (1980), The Big Black Pill (1981), The Ballad of Gregorio Cortez (1982), Deadly Encounter (1982), M.A.D.D.: Mothers Against Drunk Drivers (1983), Women of San Quentin (1983), Noon Wine (1985), Hell Town (1985), The Long Hot Summer (1985), Laguna Heat (1987), Lincoln (1988) as General Ulysses S. Grant, Roe vs. Wade (1989), Conagher (1991), Stranger at My Door (1991), Criminal Behavior (1992), Men Don’t Tell (1993), Truman (1995) as Sam Rayburn, Streets of Laredo (1995), Two Mothers for Zachary (1996), Logan’s War: Bound By Honor (1998), You Know My Name (1999), Monty Walsh (2003), Paradise (2004), What I Did for Love (2006), and Jesse Stone: Sea Change (2007). He was a voice performer in the animated films The Iron Giant (1999) and The Country Bears (2002), and the television cartoon

149

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series Fillmore! Gammon also appeared on stage, and was nominated for a Tony Award for his performance in the 1996 Broadway revival of Buried Child.

GANS, RONALD Actor Ronald Gans, who was best known for his voice roles in animated productions, died of complications from pneumonia in Los Angeles on June 29, 2010. He was 79. Gans was born in Chicago on August 9, 1931, and moved to California with his family in his early teens. He began his career as an actor after serving in the U.S. Navy. He worked in film and television from the early 1960s, appearing in small roles in the films The Raw Ones (1965), Mondo Keyhole (1966), The St. Valentine’s Day Massacre (1967), The Wild Racers (1968), Tarzan and the Jungle Boy (1968), The Gay Deceivers (1969), The Curious Female (1970), The Student Nurses (1970), Runaway, Runaway

Ronald Gans

(1971), Sexual Liberty Now (1971), Night Call Nurses (1972), Bonnie’s Kids (1973), Group Marriage (1973), Coffy (1973), Delinquent School Girls (1975), Revenge of the Cheerleaders (1976), The Kentucky Fried Movie (1977), Hell Night (1981), Heartbeeps (1981), and Not of This Earth (1988). Gans was featured in various alien voice roles in the television science fiction series Lost in Space in the mid–1960s. He was also seen on episodes of It Takes a Thief and Quincy, and had a voice role in a 1988 episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation. He performed voice work in numerous animated productions including Meatballs and Spaghetti, Welcome to Pooh Corner as Kanga and Roo, Dumbo’s Circus, Rock ’n’ Wrestling as Nikolai Volkov, The Transformers as Dragstrip, and Captain Planet and the Planeteers. He was also featured in the 1976 animated film The Smurfs and the Magic Flute, and was the voice of Magneto in the 1989 tele-film Pryde of the X-Men.

GARBUGLIA, MARIO Italian production designer Mario Garbuglia died after a long illness in Civitano Marche, Italy, on March 30, 2010. He was 82. Garbuglia was born in Fontespina, Italy, on May 27, 1927. He began his career in the early 1950s, and worked on numerous features with such directors as Luchino Visconti and Nikita Mikhalkovy. His many film credits include Women Without Names (1950), Too Bad She’s Bad (1954), Desert Warrior (1957), The Great

Mario Garbuglia

War (1959), Under Ten Flags (1960), Rocco and His Brothers (1960), The Best of Enemies (1961), Boccaccio ’70 (1962), The Leopard (1963), The Organizer (1963), Casanova 70 (1965), Sandra of a Thousand Delights (1965), After the Fox (1966), Kiss the Girls and Make Them Die (1966), The Witches (1967), The Stranger (1967), Barbarella (1968), Waterloo (1970), Brancaleone at the Crusades (1970), Lady Liberty (1971), The Valachi Papers (1972), The Battle of Stujeska (1973), Chino (1973), Conversation Piece (1974), End of the Game (1975), The Innocent (1976), Orca (1977), Wifemistress (1977), La Cage aux Folles (1978), Lady of the Camelias (1981), Lion of the Desert (1981), The World of Don Camillo (1983), Woman of Wonders (1985), Mussolini and I (1985), Beethoven’s Nephew (1985), Julia and Julia (1987), Dark Eyes (1987), The Siege of Venice (1991), The Night Before Christmas (1994), and The Sky Is Falling (2000).

GARCIN, GINETTE French actress and singer Ginette Garcin died of cancer in Nanterre, France, on June 10, 2010. She was 82. Garcin was born in Marseille, France, on January 4, 1928. She began her career on stage in 1946, performing in musicals and revues. She was featured in numerous films from the early 1970s including The Black Flag Waves Over the Scow (1971), Killer (1972), Le Gang des Otages (1973), Me, I Want to Have Dough (1973), Juliette and Juliette (1974),

Ginette Garcin

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150

How to Make Good When One Is a Jerk and a Crybaby (1974), The Common Man (1975), Cousin Cousine (1975), Forget Me, Mandoline (1976), Le Pays Bleu (1977), Don’t Cry (1978), Charles and Lucie (1979), Bolero (1981), La Gueule du Loup (1981), Edith and Marcel (1983), American Dreamer (1984), Slices of Life (1985), Partir, Revenir (1985), Paris Minuit (1986), Rouget le Braconnier (1989), The Professional Secrets of Dr. Apfelgluck (1991), Mother (1992), L’Homme de ma Vie (1992), My Man (1996), Les Bidochon (1996), Deuxieme Vie (2000), Entre Deux Rails (2001), Transfixed (2001), The Dope (2003), Les Dalton (2004), Terre de Sang (2005), The Invisible Woman (2009), and Tresor (2009). She appeared frequently on television in such productions as Pierrot My Friend (1979), Docteur Teyran (1980), Ce Fut un Bel Ete (1982), Lace (1984), Un Garcon de France (1985), Sins (1986), Le Loufiat (1988), Le Negre (1989), La Bonne Adresse (1990), Mother (1993), Dans un Grand Vent de Fleurs (1996), Mistinguett, la Derniere Revue (2001), Le Don Fait a Catchaires (2003), La Tete Haute (2005), Concours de Danse a Piriac (2006), La Boite a Images (2007), and Famille Decomposee (2010). She was also featured in episodes of Messieurs les Jures, Maigret, Les Amours Romantiques, L’Heure Simenon, Imogene, L’Instit, Pere et Maire, Marc Eliot, and Camping Paradis. She starred as Jeanne Ferriere in the series Famille d’Accueil from 2001 until her death.

GARDNER , JIMMY British actor Jimmy Gardner died in England on May 3, 2010. He was 85. Gardner was born in Newmarket, Suffolk, England, on August 24, 1924. He had a long career on stage, screen and television. He was featured in such films as The Curse of the Mummy’s Tomb (1964), He Who Rides the Tiger (1965), The Murder Game (1965), The Specialist (1966), The Committee (1968), Take a Girl Like You (1970), Up the Chastity Belt (1971), Say Hello to Yesterday (1971), 10 Rillington Place (1971), The Magnificent Six and 1 ⁄ 2: Up for the Cup (1971), Ooh … You Are Awful (1972), Alfred Hitchcock’s Frenzy (1972), Take Me High (1973), 11 Harrowhouse (1974), Flame (1975), Short Ends (1976), Tess (1979), The Company of Wolves (1984), Mountains of the Moon (1990), Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves (1991), Thin Ice (1995), and Gunslinger’s Re-

Jimmy Gardner

venge (1998). Gardner was a familiar face on British television from the early 1960s, appearing in such series as Stranger in the City, Boyd Q.C., The Villains, Crossroads, The Human Jungle, The Saint, Thursday Theatre, ITV Play of the Week, Orlando, No Hiding Place, King of the River, The Forsyte Saga, Theatre 625, Man in a Suitcase, Doctor Who, Z Cars, Dixon of Dock Green, Spindoe, The Gamblers, Detective, The Avengers, The Jazz Age, The First Lady, The Expert, The Wednesday Play, Here Come the Double Deckers!, Paul Temple, Softly Softly, Albert!, New Scotland Yard, Fish in the recurring role of Mr, Barnes, The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club (1973), Menace, Thirty-Minute Theatre, Spring and Autumn, Play for Today, Crown Court, Churchill’s People, Village Hall, The XYY Man, The Devil’s Crown, Coronation Street, The Onedin Line, Cribb, The Bill, Casualty, The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles, London’s Burning, EastEnders, My Hero, Down to Earth, Doc Martin, and Eyes Down. He was featured as Mr. Beaver in the 1967 television production of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. His other television credits include such productions as The Elusive Pimpernel (1969) as Robespierre, the 1974 Thriller segment Sign It Death, A Moment Time (1979), The Dick Francis Thriller: The Racing Game (1979), The Old Curiousity Shop (1979), Antony & Cleopatra (1981), Cyrano de Bergerac (1985), Agatha Christie’s Dead Man’s Folly (1986), Martin Chuzzlewit (1994), Lord of Misrule (1996), Norman Ormal: A Very Political Turtle (1998), Births, Marriages and Deaths (1999), and The Sleeper (2000). He continued to appear on screen in his later years, and was Ernie Prang, the bespectacled driver of the double decker bus in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. He was also seen in Finding Neverland (2004) and Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo (2005).

GARRETT, EDDIE Actor Eddie Garrett died in Palm Desert, California, on May 13, 2010. He was 82. Garrett was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on November 19, 1927. He was raised in Hollywood by relatives after the death of his parents at the age of 13. He began his career as an entertainer in nightclubs, working as an impressionist. He appeared in supporting roles in episodes of various television series from the 1960s including Batman, The Fugitive, The Man from

Eddie Garrett

151 U.N.C.L.E., Ironside, Medical Center, Man from Atlantis, and You Again. He appeared in several episodes of the comedy series The Odd Couple in 1974, and was featured in the regular role of Ed in the series Quincy with Jack Klugman from 1973 to 1983. Garrett also appeared in several films during his career including Speedway (1968), Dirty Harry (1971), Once Is Not Enough (1975), New York, New York (1977), and Looking for Mr. Goodbar (1977) as the bartender.

GARY, ROBERT Television script supervisor Robert Gary, who worked on most of the Star Trek series, died in Los Angeles on May 3, 2010. He was 90. Gary was born in Illinois in 1920. He was an aspiring actor before taking a job as a script supervisor on John Ford’s 1956 western classic The Searchers. He worked on set continuity on the films Friendly Persuasion (1956) and Quantrill’s Raiders (1958). Gary served as script supervisor on The Magic Sword (1962), What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962), 4 for Texas (1963), The Strangler (1964), Hush … Hush … Sweet Charlotte (1964), The Flight of the Phoenix (1965), Big Daddy (1969), and The Grissom Gang (1971). He also worked frequently in television from the 1960s on such shows as Perry Mason, The Outer Limits, Star Trek, Lassie, The Waltons, Trapper John, M.D., Falcon Crest, Dynasty, CHiPs, Square Pegs, Fame, Highway to Heaven, Matlock, ER, and the 1987 mini-series Nutcracker: Money, Madness & Murder. Gary also taught a course in script supervision at UCLA’s School of Theater, Film and Television from the late 1980s until a stroke forced his retirement several years before his death. GATES, DARYL F. Daryl F. Gates, the sometimes-controversial chief of the Los Angeles Police Department from 1978 to 1992, died of complications from bladder cancer at his home in Dana Point, California, on April 16, 2010. He was 83. Gates was born in Glendale, California, on August 30, 1926. He joined the U.S. Navy during World War II, and saw action in the Pacific. He attended Pasadena City College and the University of Southern California after his discharge, and joined the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) in 1949. He was mentored by Chief William Parker and rose through the departments ranks. He was an inspector by the time of the Watts riots in 1965. Gates

Daryl F. Gates

2010 • Obituaries

also oversaw such high profile investigations as the Tate/LaBianc murders by the Manson family and the Hillside Strangler case. He became Chief of the Los Angeles Police Department on March of 1979. Gates was considered a guiding force behind the creation of SWAT (Special Weapons And Tactics), designed to deal with hostage situations and stand-offs with heavily armed assailants. He was instrumental in insuring the safety of the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics, and created the LAPD’s popular Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE) program for youth. Though well-liked by his men, the out-spoken chief also became the target of the ire of Black and Hispanic activists, who viewed the LAPD’s policies as biased. Gates’ department came under criticism in the wake of the Rodney King incident in March of 1991, when LAPD officers were videotaped beating a suspect after a car chase. The officers involved in the beating where tried and acquitted on charges of brutality in April of 1992, sparking the Los Angeles riots. Gates, under heavy fire by the press and the administration of Mayor Tom Bradley, resigned on June 28, 1992. His autobiography, Chief: My Life in the LAPD, was published in 1992. He joined with the video game company Sierra Entertainment, Inc. to create the adventure game Daryl F. Gates’ Police Quest: Open Season (1993) and the tactical simulator Daryl F. Gates’ Police Quest: SWAT (1995). He was also briefly a radio talk show host. Gates was featured as himself in several episodes of the television police series Hunter from 1989 to 1991, and hosted episodes of the Behind Bars series in 1994. He also had small roles in the films The Secret Wish (2007) and Street Kings (2008).

GAZE , GWEN Actress Gwen Gaze died in Seattle, Washington, on August 29, 2010. She was 94. Gaze was born in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, on August 30, 1915. She graduated from the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts in London and Pasadena College in California, and settled in the United States. She appeared on the New York stage in The Women, and began her film career in the late 1930s. Gaze was featured in the films I Cover the War (1937), Partners of the Plains (1938), The Secret of Treasure Island (1938), Bar 20 Justice (1938), Women in War (1940), West of Pinto Basin

Gwen Gaze

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152

(1940), Wrangler’s Roost (1941), Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1941) with Spencer Tracy, Underground Rustlers (1941), House of Errors (1942), Two Fisted Justice (1943), Thumbs Up (1943), and Appointment in Berlin (1943). She largely retired in the early 1940s to marry and raise a family.

GEAS, T HOMAS Character actor Thomas Geas died in Los Angeles on April 8, 2010. He was 75. Geas was born in Fitchburg, Massachusetts, on November 25, 1934. He served in the military during the Korean War and headed to Los Angeles after his discharge to become an actor. He was featured on television in episodes of such series as Perry Mason, The Flying Nun, Wild Wild West, Mannix, The D.A., Mission: Impossible, O’Hara, U.S. Treasury, Cannon, Ironside, Medical Center, The Magician, Adam-12, The Invisible Man, The Blue Knight, CHiPs, The Rockford Files, Simon & Simon, and Hunter. Geas was also featured in a cameo role in the 1992 film Lethal Weapon 3. He owned and operated the popular hamburger stand Bud’s Red Hots until the early 1990s. GEESINK , ANTON Dutch judo champion Anton Geesink died in a Utrecht, the Netherlands, hospital after a long illness on August 27, 2010. He was 76. Geesink was born in Utrecht on April 6, 1934. He trained in judo and began competing for the European Championship in 1951. He won his first European title the following year and earned 20 more championships through 1967. He became the first non–Japanese to win the World Championship in 1961, and held the world title again in 1964 and 1965. He also earned a gold medal at the Tokyo Olympics in 1964. Geesink also appeared in several European films in the early 1960s including Rififi in Amsterdam (1962) and Great Leaders

1978. Geesink was a member of the International Olympic Committee from 1987 until his death.

GERBER, DAVID Television producer David Gerber, who brought such series as Police Story and Police Woman to prime time in the 1970s, died of heart failure in Los Angeles on January 2, 2010. He was 86. Gerber was born in Brooklyn, New York, on July 25, 1923. He served in the military as a radio gunner during World War II, and was a prisoner of war after his airplane was shot down over Germany. After his release and discharge, he graduated from the University of the Pacific in Stockton, California. He worked in advertising and as a talent agent before becoming a television producer in the late 1960s. He was executive producer for the 1969 supernatural romance series The Ghost Mrs. Muir, and also served as producer for the series Cade’s County, Nanny and the Professor, and Born Free. Gerber formed his own production company, and was also a production executive at Columbia Pictures and MGM. He was executive producer for numerous tele-films over the next three decades, including Prudence and the Chief (1970), The Night the Animals Talked (1970), Oh, Nurse! (1972), Incident on a Dark Street (1973), Jarrett (1973), The Police Story (1973), The Girl on the Late, Late Show (1974), Nakia (1974), To Sir, with Love (1974), Ernie, Madge and Artie (1974), The Turning Point of Jim Malloy (1975), Medical Story (1975), The Lindbergh Kidnapping Case (1976), Cry for Justice (1977), Cover Girls (1977), The Magnificent Magical Magnet of Santa Mesa (1977), A Killing Affair (1977), Keifer (1978), Doctors’ Private Lives (1978), To Kill a Cop (1978), The Courage and the Passion (1978), Pleasure Cove (1979), The Billion Dollar Threat (1979), Power (1980), Once Upon a Spy (1980), Beulah Land (1980), The Night the City Screamed (1980), Revenge of the Gray Gang (1981), Terror Among Us (1981), Elvis and the Beauty Queen (1981), Cry for the Strangers (1982), The Neighborhood (1982), Women of San Quentin (1983), The Last Days of Pompeii (1984), George Washington (1984), Lady Blue (1985), George Washington II: The Forging of a Nation (1985), Dirty Dozen: The Deadly Mission (1987), Police Story: The Freeway Killings (1987), The Man Who Fell to Earth (1987), The Heat (1989), Royce (1994), Nothing Lasts Forever (1995), The Run-

Anton Geesink

of the Bible (1965) as Samson. Some sources credit him as star of the 1965 spaghetti western The Man from Oklahoma under the pseudonym Rick Horn, but there remains some doubt. Geesink later worked as a wrestler for Giant Baba’s All Japan Pro Wrestling from 1973 to 1978, competing against such leading wrestlers as Bruno Sammartino, Dick Murdock, Dory Funk, Jr., and Gorilla Monsoon. He appeared on Dutch television as Kletser in the series Pipo en de Noorderzon in

David Gerber

153 aways (1995), The Price of Love (1995), We the Jury (1996), On the Line (1997), The Sky’s on Fire (1998), The Lost Battalion (2001), Probable Cause: The Human Factor (2003), Probably Cause: Mechanic of Failure (2003), and Flight 93 (2006). Gerber was also involved in the production of several landmark police drama series for television including Police Story (1974), Police Woman (1974), and Joe Forrester (1975). He was also executive producer for such series as Gibbsville, The Quest, Quark, David Cassidy — Man Undercover, Eischied, Riker, Walking Tall, Today’s F.B.I., Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, Jessie, The Adventures of Sinbad, Tarzan, and Kids Are in Charge: Family Vacation. Gerber’s survivors include his wife of 39 years, actress Laraine Stephens.

GIERING, FRANK German actor Frank Giering, who starred in the 1997 psychological thriller Funny Games, was found dead at his apartment in Berlin, Germany, on June 23, 2010. He was 38. Giering was born in Magdeburg, East Germany, on November 23, 1971. He studied acting in Bochum and Potsdam, and began his career on stage. He began his film career in the early 1990s, making his debut in 1993’s Ebbies Bluff. He was best known for his work with director Michael Haneke, starring in his 1997 adaptation of Kafka’s The Castle, and portraying murderous sociopath Peter in Funny Games. Giering’s other films credits include Sentimental Education (1998), Hundred Years of Brecht (1998), Caipiranha — Vorsicht, Bissiger Nachbar! (1998), The Strange Behaviour of Sexually Mature City Slickers at Mating Season (1998), Love Your Female Neighbor! (1998), Absolute Giganten (1999), Ebene 9 (2000), Bloody Weekend (2000), Marmor, Stein & Eisen (2000), Exit to Heaven (2000), Die Aufschneider (2000), Gran Paradiso (2000), Baader (2002) in the title role of the fictionalized account of the West German terrorist Andreas Baader, Gangster (2002), Dirty Sky (2003), Grossglocknerliebe (2003), The Curve (2003), Anatomy 2 (2003), Hierankl (2003), Die Nacht Singt ihre Lieder (2004), Black Sheep (2006), Esperanza (2006), Bittersusses Nichts (2007), Free to Leave (2007), and Jerry Cotton (2010). Giering was also a familiar face on German television, appearing in productions of Die Halbstarken (1996), Opera Ball (1998), Und Alles Wegen Mama (1998), Der Gerechte Richter (2000), Ein

Frank Giering

2010 • Obituaries

Morderischer Plan (2001), Clowns (2001), Hannas Baby (2002), Dienstreise —Was fur eine Nacht (2002), Der Fall Gehring (2003), Klassentreffen (2004), Die Kirschenkonigin (2004), Die Rosenzuterin (2004), Erinnere Dich, Wenn du Kannst! (2005), Die Spielerin (2005), Stortebeker (2006), Tod Einer Freundin (2006), Der Tote in der Mauer (2008), Keine Angst (2009), and Die Bremer Stadtmusikanten (2009). He was also featured in episodes of Der Konig, Sophie — Schlauer als die Polizei Erlaubt, Sardsch, Wolffs Revier, Der Alte, Der Letzte Zeuge, Zwei Brüder, Siska, Die Cleveren, Rosa Roth, Im Visier der Zielfahnder, Ein starkes Team, Ein Fall fur Zwei, Die Kommissarin, Blond: Eva Blond! as Dr. Smek, Die ProSieben Marchenstunde, SOKO Leipzig, Polizeiruf 110, Tatort, and Lasko — Die Faust Gottes. Giering starred as Kriminalkommissar Henry Weber in the series Der Kriminalist from 2006 until 2010.

GILBERT, STEPHEN Northern Irish novelist Stephen Gilbert, who was best known for his 1968 book Ratman’s Notebook, which was immortalized on screen several years later as the cult classic Willard, died in Whiteabbey, Northern Ireland, on June 23, 2010. He was 97. Gilbert was born in Newcastle, County Down, Northern Ireland, on July 22, 1912. He worked as a newspaper reporter in the early 1930s, before taking a position with his family’s business, McCausland’s tea and seed company. He also became a friend of established writer Forrest Reid, who encouraged him to pursue his talents as a writer. Gilbert’s first novel was the mythical tale of talking dragons, The Landslide, published in 1943. His military service during World War II, which centered in France and ended with Dunkirk, inspired his 1944 novel Bombardier. He also penned Monkeyface (1948), about an ape-boy relocated from the jungle to Belfast, and The Burnaby Experiments, about psychic translocation. Gilbert spent the next two decades primarily working at McCausland’s, leading it to become Great Britain’s premier seed company. His final novel, Ratman’s Notebook (1968), about a repressed young man who becomes the leader of a horde of rats, was adapted for a 1971 horror film, Willard, starring Bruce Davison. A sequel, Ben, was released the following year, and a remake starring Crispin Glover emerged in 2003.

Stephen Gilbert

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154

GILES, DAVID British television director David Giles died in London on January 6, 2010. He was 83. Giles was born in Shipley, Yorkshire, England, on October 18, 1926. He began directing for British television in the early 1960s, helming productions of The Old Wives’ Table (1964), Vanity Fair (1967), Diary of an Encounter (1968), Resurrection (1968), The Dance of Death (1969), The First Churchills (1969), Thursday’s Child (1970), Hamlet (1970), Sense and Sensibility (1971), The Strauss Family (1972), The Recruiting Officer

Jackson Gillis

David Giles

(1973), Twelfth Night (1974), The Captain of Kopenick (1975), When We Are Married (1975), The Winslow Boy (1977), The Mayor of Casterbridge (1978), King Richard II (1978), Henry IV, Part I (1979), Henry IV, Part II (1979), Henry V (1979), Airport Chaplain (1980), Fame Is the Spur (1982), The Barchester Chronicles (1982), Mansfield Park (1983), The Life and Death of King John (1984), Agatha Christie’s Miss Marple: A Murder Is Announced (1985), The Fools on the Hill (1986), Dummonds (1987), Forever Green (1989), and Night of the Golden Brain (1993). Giles also directed episodes of such series as Compact, The Forsyte Saga, A Family at War, Country Matters, The Emigrants, London Embassy, Hannay, The Bill, The Darling Buds of May, Just William, and Hetty Wainthropp Investigates.

GILLIS, JACKSON Radio and television writer Jackson Gillis died of pneumonia in Moscow, Idaho, on August 19, 2010. He was 93. Gillis was born in Kalama, Washington, on August 21, 1916, and moved to California with his family while in his teens. He performed on stage from the late 1930s, and served as a U.S. Army intelligence officer in the Pacific during World War II. He began writing for radio after the war, penning episodes of such series as The Whistler and Let George Do It. He moved to television in the early 1950s, writing for the series Racket Squad, I’m the Law, The Millionaire, Lassie, and numerous episodes of The Adventures of Superman. Gillis also wrote segments of The Adventures of Spin and Marty, The Hardy Boys and Zorro for Walt Disney. His other television credits include episodes of Bronco, Sugarfoot, The Four Just Men, Perry Mason, The Fugitive, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., The Girl from U.N.C.L.E., Tarzan, I Spy, Irwin Allen’s Lost

in Space, The Wild Wild West, Mannix, The Mod Squad, Bonanza, Ironside, My Friend Tony, Land of the Giants, Hawaii Five-0, Cade’s County, O’Hara, U.S. Treasury, Medical Center, Mission: Impossible, Longstreet, The F.B.I., Barnaby Jones, The Snoop Sisters, Cannon, Caribe, Police Woman, Starsky and Hutch, Wonder Woman, Big Shamus, Little Shamus, Jason of Star Command, Paris, Columbo which earned him an Emmy Award nomination in 1971, Code Red, Knight Rider, and Murder, She Wrote. Gillis also penned the tele-films Assault on the Wayne (1971), The Man Who Died Twice (1973), Time Travelers (1976), and A Stoning in Fulham County (1988). He retired to Idaho in the early 1990s. He was married to stage actress Patricia Cassidy from 1941 until her death in 2003.

GILLIS, JAMIE Adult film actor Jamie Gillis, who starred as Count Dracula in the soft-core classic Dracula Sucks in 1979, died of cancer in New York City on February 19, 2010. He was 66. Gillis was born in New York on April 20, 1943. He trained as a stage actor in the late 1960s, and found himself involved as a performer in pornographic films by the early 1970s after answering an ad for a nude model. He was a popular and prolific performer in the industry for over 30 years. He also appeared in smaller roles in several mainstream films during his career, including Night of the Zombies (1981), Nighthawks (1981) with Sylvester Stallone, and

Jamie Gillis

155 Alien Space Avenger (1989). During his long career he was credited under many pseudonyms including Al Cianelli, Derald Delancey, Peter Frederick, Jamey Gurman, Buster Hymen, James Kleeman, Ronny Morgan, Gil Muncy, Dorian Patch, and Jamie Rugman. His numerous adult films include Sexual Customs in Scandinavia (1972), Rosebud (1972), Forbidden Under Censorship of the King (1972), Dynamite (1972), The Trials of Chickie Tetrazzini (1972), Deep Sleep (1972), Fongaluli (1973), It Happened in Hollywood (1973), High Rise (1973), Devil’s Due (1973), Over Sexposure (1973), Joe Rock Superstar (1973), Street Girls of New York (1973), New Comers (1973), Hypnorotica (1973), Road Service (1973), Come and Be Purified (1973) as Father Sexus, Sleepy Head (1973), Prurient Interest (1973), Linda Can’t Stop (1973), Like Mother … Like Daughter (1973), All in the Sex Family (1973), Madame Zenobia (1973), Wild Girls (1974), Barbie’s Fantasy (1974), Sweet & Sour (1974), Illusions of a Lady (1974), Deep Throat Part II (1974), Teenage Cheerleader (1974), Lady on the Couch (1974), The Likes of Louise (1974), Teenage Nurses (1974), Come Fly with Us (1974), The Birthday Bail (1974), The Seduction Lyn Carter (1974), Teenage StepMother (1974), The Love Bus (1974), Fantasy Girls (1974), Portrait (1974), Angel Number 9 (1974), The Private Afternoons of Pamela Mann (1974), Wild Pussycats (1975), Keep on Truckin’ (1975), The Defiance of Good (1975), Two Senoritas (1975), Sometime Sweet Susan (1975), The Big Con (1975), Boy-napped (1975), The Hot Oven (1975), Night After Night (1975), The Passions of Carol (1975), Slip Up (1975) as Dr. Charles Cherrypopper, To Man, from Woman (1975), Heavy Load (1975), Sex Fantasies (1975), When a Woman Calls (1975), Sixteen (1975), The Mount of Venus (1975) as Jupiter, The Fireworks Woman (1975), Oriental Blue (1975), Every Inch a Lady (1975), The Secret Garden (1975), Illusion of Love (1975), Baby Oil (1975) as the Sexalviania Ambassador, Wet Rocks (1975), Couples (1975), Too Many Pieces (1975), The Story of Joanna (1975), Kathy’s Graduation Present (1975), One Last Fling (1976), Los Banditos (1976), Patty (1976), Midnight Desires (1976), Seduction (1976), The Opening of Misty Beethoven (1976) as Dr. Seymour Love, Dominatrix Without Mercy (1976), Winter Heat (1976), Through the Looking Glass (1976), The Lady from Reno (1976), The Double Exposure of Holly (1976), Saturday Night Special (1976), Misty (1976), Blowdry (1976), The Vixens of Kung Fu (A Tale of Yin Yang ) (1976), The Enema Bandit (1977) in the title role, Obsessed (1977), Little Orphan Sammy (1977), Captain Lust (1977) as Captain Surecock, Sharon (1977), The Violation of Claudia (1977), Sweet Wet Lips (1977), Teenage Bikers (1977), Lustful Feelings (1977), Big Thumbs (1977), Barbara Broadcast (1977), A Coming of Angels (1977), the sci-fi porn Invasion of the Love Drones (1977) the Drone Mass Leader, The Ganja Express (1978), The Final Test (1978), People (1978), Manhole (1978), Hot Honey (1978), Carnal Encounters of the Barest Kind (1978), Slave of Pleasure (1978), Skin-Flicks (1978), Fiona on Fire (1978), The Sensuous Detective (1979), The Ecstasy Girls (1979), Serena, an Adult Fairy Tale (1979), Sensual Fire (1979), Screwples (1979), Fulfilling Young Cups (1979), and For

2010 • Obituaries

the Love of Pleasure (1979). Gilles starred as the vampire count in the 1979 cult classic Dracula Sucks, which was also released in a hard core version under the title as Dracula’s Bride. He continued to perform in such releases as Bound (1979), 800 Fantasy Lane (1979), Summer Heat (1979), The Little Blue Box (1979), Heavenly Desire (1979), More Than Sisters (1979), Pleasure Palace (1979), N.Y. Babes (1979), Bang Bash (1979), Taxi Girls (1979), Extreme Close-Up (1979), All About Gloria Leonard (1980), Ultra Flesh (1980), The Seduction of Cindy (1980), Night Flight (1980), Midnight Blue 2 (1980), Hot Love (1980), High School Memories (1980), Chained (1980), Submission of Serena (1980), Blue Ecstasy (1980), A Woman’s Dream (1980), Aunt Peg (1980), Co-Ed Fever (1980), Dracula Exotica (1980) again as Count Dracula, Undulations (1981), Tara Tara Tara Tara (1981), the Swedish Erotica series from 1981, Sexual Heights (1981), Roommates (1981), Pandora’s Mirror (1981), Beauty (1981), Amanda By Night (1981), Blonde Ambition (1981), Vista Valley PTA (1981), Neon Nights (1981), Marathon (1982), Wanda Whips Wall Street (1982), The Starmaker (1982), All About Annette (1982), Captives (1983), Blue Voodoo (1983), A Taste of Money (1983), Virginia (1983), The Dark Angel (1983), That’s Outrageous (1983), San Fernando Valley Girls (1983), Pleasure Zone (1983), Naughty Girls Need Love Too (1983), My Sinful Life (1983), Girlfriends (1983), Feels Like Silk (1983), Corruption (1983), Coffee, Tea or Me (1983), Midnight Heat (1983), Flesh and Laces (1983), Hot Dreams (1983), Up and Away (1984), Running Wild (1984), On Golden Blonde (1984), Night of Loving Dangerously (1984), Hot Ones (1984), Cherry-ettes for Hire (1984), Breaking It … A Story About Virgins (1984), Talk Dirty to Me Part III (1984), Trinity Brown (1984), Soft as Silk Sweet as Honey (1984), Samurai Dick (1984), Oriental Temptations (1984), One Night at a Time (1984), Nasty Lady (1984), L’Amour (1984), Golden Girls: The Movie (1984), For Your Thighs Only (1984), Dirty Girls (1984), Chocolate Cream (1984), Ball Busters (1984), Insatiable II (1984), Fooling Around (1984), Girls on Fire (1984), Working Girls (1985), With Love, Loni (1985), With Love, Annette (1985), Wild Things (1985), Thought You’d Never Ask (1985), The Erotic World of Crystal Lake (1985), Thrill St. Blues (1985), The Lusty Adventurer (1985), Nasty (1985), Illusions of Ecstasy (1985) as Merlin, Hot Wire (1985), Golden Gate Girls (1985), Erotic Zone (1985), Ten Little Maidens (1985), Squalor Motel (1985), Slip into Silk (1985), Showdown (1985), Private Practice (1975), New Wave Hookers (1985), Hot Nights at the Blue Note Cafe (1985), Diary of a Bad Girl (1985), Debbie Does ’Em All (1985), Corporate Assets (1985), Cock-Tales (1985), Blue Ice (1985), Awesome Assets (1985), A Coming of Angels: The Sequel (1985), Too Naughty to Say No (1985), Young Nurses in Love (1986), Turkish Delight (1986), The Bigger the Better (1986), Terms of Endowment (1986), Sweet Revenge (1986), Street Heat (1986), Sexy Delights (1986), Secret Loves (1986), Lust on the Orient Xpress (1986), If Looks Could Kill (1986), Erotic City (1986), Ecstasy Girls II (1986), Beverly Hills Cox (1986), Baby Face 2 (1986), A Thousand and One Erotic Nights Part II: The Forbidden Tales (1986), 52 Pick-Up (1986), W-PINK II (1986),

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Women in Uniform (1986), Taxi Girls Part II: In Search of Toni (1986), Sweat (1986), Sex Asylum II (1986), Please Don’t Stop (1986), Getting L.A.’d (1986), DreamGirls (1986), Blame It on Ginger (1986), Behind Blue Eyes (1986), Porn in the U.S.A. II (1987), Dangerous Women (1987), Afro Erotica 17 (1987), Ginger & Spice (1987), Raw Talent II (1987), Pure Honey (1987), Let’s Get It On (1987), Honey Buns (1987), Deep Throat II (1987) as Senator Liplock, Bad Attitude (1987), Too Hot to Touch (1987), Deranged (1987), Who Dun Who (1988), Sex and the Secretary (1988), Rhine Waltz (1988), Mrs. Robbins (1988), Dy-nasty (1988), Cab-o-lay (1988), The Hottest Ticket (1988), Romeo and Juliet Part II (1988), Robo Fox II: The Collector (1988), Black Widow (1988), Trouble (1989), The Bitter End (1989), Tales of Taija Rae (1989), Slick Honey (1989), More Dirty Debutantes (1989), Leather and Lace (1989), Dirty Lingerie (1989), Tran Europe Express (1989), The Whore (1989), The Phantom of the Cabaret (1989) as the Phantom, The Adventures of Buttman (1989), Second Skin (1989), Phantom X (1989), Midnight Baller (1989), Loose Ends VI (1989), Last Rumba in Paris (1989), Journey into Bondage (1989), Hot Scalding (1989), Head Lock (1989), Enrapture (1989), Diaries of Fire & Ice (1989), Clinique (1989), Blackman (1989), All the Pornies (1989), The Naked Truth (1990), The Casting Whip (1990), Playin’ Dirty (1990), Mummy Dearest (1990), Midnight Woman (1990), Meltdown (1990), Live Bi Me (1990), Juicy Lucy (1990), Abused Husband (1990), Walking Toilet Bowl (1990), Vogue (1990), The Last Resort (1990), Silver Tongue and Hot Rod (1990), Princess of the Night (1990), Pretty Peaches and the Quest (1990), Ginger Then and Now (1990), Fantasy Nights (1990), The Tasting (1991), She Had It Coming (1991), On the Prowl Again (1991), Dr. Butts (1991), Dances with Foxes (1991), Bad (1991), Anal Starlet (1991), Postcards from Abroad (1991), Fixation (1991), Curse of the Cat Woman (1991), Anal Madness (1992), Teaching Her a Lesson (1992), Sin City: The Movie (1992), Leather Belt, Red Cheeks (1992), Hardline Sessions (1992), Domestic Training (1992), Captain Butt’s Beach (1992), Bruised Buns (1992), Blue Angel (1992), Angels (1992), Anal Inferno (1992), The Rehearsal (1993), Slave to Love (1993), Dog Walker (1994), Kink: Police Chronicle (1995), Hot Crotch Coochies (1995), Fresh Meat (1995), Virgin Dreams (1996), Golden Rod (1996), Dirty Bob’s Xcellent Adventures 27 (1996), Bobby Sox (1996), Forever Night (1998), Back on the Prowl (1998), Freak (1998), Torment 1 (1999), Secrets of the Flesh (1999), Devious Old Gilles (1999), Dark Garden (1999), Humiliation of Heidi (2000), Edge Play (2001), and Sunset Stripped (2002). Gilles also filled in as an assistant director on some of the films he appeared in from the late 1970s, including Dracula Sucks. He was helming adult features by the late 1980s, with such credits as On the Prowl (1989), Take Out Torture (1990), Punished Sex Offenders (1990), Nothing But Contempt (1990), Daddy Gets Punished (1990), Abused Husband (1990), On the Prowl Again (1991), On the Prowl in Paris (1992), Back on the Prowl (1998), and Devious Old Gilles (1999). Gilles was featured as Stavros in Caleb Emerson’s 2005 film Die You Zombie Bastards!, which was touted as “The World’s First EVER Serial

Killer Superhero Rock ’n’ Roll Zombie Road Movie Romance!”

GILMORE, ART Art Gilmore, a leading announcer and voice actor in radio, television and films from the 1930s, died in Irvine, California, on September 25, 2010. He was 98. Gilmore was born in Tacoma, Washington, on March 18, 1912. He began working in radio as a staff announcer for Warner Brothers’ Hollywood station KFWB in 1936, and soon became a news reader at CBS’s KNX. He served in the Navy aboard an aircraft carrier in the Pacific during World War II. He was a familiar voice on radio as an announcer for such programs as Amos ’n Andy, The Adventures of Frank Race, Dr. Christian, and The Sears Radio Theater. He continued his announcing duties on television , where he was narrator for such 1950s series as Highway Patrol, Mackenzie’s Raiders, and Men of Annapolis. He was also announcer for numerous variety series including The George Gobel Show, The Red Skelton Show, and An Evening with Fred Astaire. He was the voice of Franklin Roosevelt in the films Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942) and Action in the North Atlantic (1943). He was the narrator for the popular 1940s George O’Hanlon comedy shorts that included So You Want to Give Up Smoking (1942), So You’re Going to Be a Father (1947), and So You Want to Be a Detective (1948), and was a voice performer in the films The Lone Wolf Takes a Chance (1941), Saboteur (1942), Mission to Moscow (1943), Rendezvous 24 (1946), Deadline for Murder (1946), The Man Who Dared (1946), Blue Skies (1946), Backlash (1947), The Unsuspected (1947), The Big Clock (1948), The Strange Mrs. Crane (1948), Jungle Man Killers (1948), Treachery Rides the Trail (1949), My Dream Is Yours (1949), the serial King of the Rocket Men (1949), The Girl from Jones Beach (1949), Montana (1950), Tea for Two (1950), Valentino (1951), A Place in the Sun (1951), When Worlds Collide (1951), Sunny Side of the Street (1951), The Winning Team (1952), The Story of Will Rogers (1952), Barbed Wire (1952), It Should Happen to You (1954), Susan Slept Here (1954), Rear Window (1954), Dragnet (1954), Tobor the Great (1954), Silver Blades (1955), Unchained (1955), The Eternal Sea (1955), City of Shadows (1955), Francis in the Navy (1955), Three Stripes in the Sun (1955), The Court-Martial of Billy Mitchell (1955),

Art Gilmore

157 The Killing (1956), A Cry in the Night (1956), Around the World in Eighty Days (1956), The Boss (1956), the Japanese monster film Rodan (1956) as the narrator of the U.S. version, Fear Strikes Out (1957), The Narcotics Story (1958), Suicide Battalion (1958), Who Was That Lady? (1960), The Gallant Hours (1960), The Nutty Professor (1963), and Johnny Cool (1963). Gilmore was the announcer for Herbert and Garner Ted Armstrong’s religious television program The World Tomorrow for many years. His other television credits include episodes of Boston Blackie, Waterfront, Captain Midnight, The Whistler, Dragnet in the recurring role of Captain Harry Didion, The Adventures of Fu Manchu, Shower of Stars, Climax!, The New Breed, Dragnet 1967, The Red Skelton Hour, Mary Tyler Moore, Emergency, Adam-12, The Waltons, and the 1977 tele-film The Amazing Howard Hughes. Gilmore was also the voice for numerous documentaries, movie trailers, and advertising promotions during his long career.

GINSBERG , F RANCES Operatic soprano Frances Ginsberg, who performed frequently with the New York City Opera in the 1980s, died of brain and spinal cancer in the Riverdale, New York, on December 24, 2010. She was 55. Ginsberg was born in St. Louis, Missouri, on March 11, 1955. She trained at the

Frances Ginsberg

University of Kansas and the Center for American Artists in Chicago. She made her debut with the City Opera in 1986, and sang in such productions as Mefistofele as Margherita and Elena, Puccini’s Boheme as Mimi, Mozart’s Don Giovanni, and Verdi’s Traviata as Violetta. She also appeared with opera companies in San Diego, Pittsburgh, Houston, Cincinnati, and Fresno.

GIORDANO, DICK Comic book artist and editor Dick Giordano, who worked at Charlton and DC Comics during his long career, died of complications of pneumonia while being treated for leukemia at a Daytona Beach, Florida, hospital on March 27, 2010. He was 77. Giordano was born in Lower East Side of Manhattan on July 20, 1932. He became fascinated with comics from an early age, and studied at the School of Industrial Art in Manhattan in his teens. He joined Charlton Comics as a freelance artist in 1952,

2010 • Obituaries

Dick Giordano

drawing numerous covers and working as an inker. He rose to the position of editor-in-chief by 1965, where he oversaw the creation or revitalization such characters as Captain Atom, Blue Beetle, the Question, Thunderbolt, and the Peacemaker as part of the company’s Action Hero line. He moved to DC in 1967, where he worked as an editor and artist. He edited such titles as Secret Six, Beware the Creeper, Bomba the Jungle Boy, Deadman, The Spectre, Blackhawk, The Witching Hour, Hot Wheels, and The Hawk and the Dove, and helped revamp Teen Titans, Aquaman, House of Secrets, and All-Star Western. Though most of the titles had only marginal success, Giordano was admired for his ability to put together a team of creative talents that included Neal Adams, Alex Toth, Rick Estrada, Nick Cardy, Len Wein, Steve Skeates, and Jim Aparo. He also continued to work as an artist, penciling Adams’ acclaimed Green Lantern/Green Arrow series. Giordano left DC in 1971 to work with Neal Adams’ Continuity Associates studios, providing art for such publishers as Charlton and Marvel. He also continued to freelance, inking numerous Batman and Wonder Woman stories for DC, and illustrating the Sons of the Tiger series for the Marvel comic magazine The Deadly Hands of Kung Fu. He also inked the first DC/Marvel crossover Superman vs. the Amazing Spider-Man in 1976, and the special Superman vs. Muhammad Ali in 1978. He returned to DC full-time as editor of the Batman titles in 1980, and became managing editor the following year. He was promoted to Vice President and Executive Editor in 1983. Giordano was instrumental in overseeing the development of such landmark series as George Perez’s reboot of the DC comic universe in Crisis on Infinite Earths, John Byrne’s revamp of Superman in The Man of Steel, Frank Miller’s depiction of an aging Batman in a futuristic world in The Dark Knight Returns, and Alan Moore’s Watchmen, a tale of flawed heroes (based on many of Giordano’s Charlton characters) in a dystopian world on the brink of nuclear disaster. He also penned a monthly news and information column, “Meanwhile…,” which appeared in most DC titles. He retired from DC in 1993, though continued to work as an occasional artist and inker. He adapted Peter O’Donnell’s Modesty Blaise for a graphic novel from DC in 1994, and worked with Bob Layton on the short-lived Future

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Comics line in 2002. He also wrote and illustrated the 2005 book Drawing Comics with Dick Giordano, and provided cover and interior art for an issue of Jonah Hex in 2010.

GIRALDO, GREG Comedian Greg Giraldo, who was noted for his insults and tirades at celebrity roasts, died in a New Brunswick, New Jersey, hospital from an accidental overdose of prescription medication on September 28, 2010. He was 44. He had been found in a coma in his hotel room after missing a performance, and spent five days in a coma before his family agreed to remove him from life support. Giraldo was born in the Bronx, New York, on December 10, 1965. He graduated from Columbia University and earned a Bernard Giraudeau

Greg Giraldo

degree in law from Harvard University. After a year practicing law, he embarked on a career as a stand-up comic, performing regularly at Manhattan’s Comedy Cellar. He starred as John Alvarez in the short-lived comedy series Common Law in 1996. He was a regular guest on The Late Show with David Letterman, Late Night with Conan O’Brien, and The Howard Stern Show. He was a regular panelist and writer for Colin Quinn’s Tough Crowd television series in the early 2000s, and had several comedy specials on Comedy Central. He hosted Friday Night Stand-Up with Greg Giraldo with the network from 2005 to 2006. He also released the comedy CD Good Day to Cross the River in 2006. Giraldo also appeared frequently on Comedy Central’s roasts of such celebrities as William Shatner, Pam Anderson, Jeff Foxworthy, Joan Rivers, and David Hasselhoff. He was a regular guest on Lewis Black’s Root of All Evil in 2008, and a judge for the seventh season of the NBC reality series Last Comic Standing in 2010. Giraldo was also featured in small roles in several films including Game Day (1999) and Eventual Wife (2000).

GIRAUDEAU, BERNARD French actor Bernard Giraudeau died of cancer in a Paris hospital on July 17, 2010. He was 63. Giraudeau was born in La Rochelle, France, on June 18, 1947. He began his career as an actor in the mid–1960s after serving in the French navy. He appeared frequently in films and television from the early 1970s, with roles in such films as Blood in the Streets (1973), Two Men in Town (1973),

La Petite Gare (1975), The Gypsy (1975), Nevermore, Forever (1976), Judge Fayard Called the Sheriff (1977), Moi, Fleur Bleue (1977), Bilitis (1977), Et la Tendresse? (1979), The Medic (1979), The Party (1980), Croque la Vie (1981), Passione d’Amore (1981), Viens chez moi, j’Habite chez une Copine (1981), Meurtres a Domicile (1982), Hecate (1982), Le Grand Pardon (1982), Gramps Is in the Resistance (1983), Le Ruffian (1983), Barbarous Street (1984), L’Anee des Meduses (1984), Les Specialistes (1985), Bras de Fer (1985), Moi Vouloir Toi (1985), Les Loups entre Eux (1985), Jeux de Societe (1986), Les Longs Manteaux (1986), Killing Time (1987), L’Homme Voile (1987), Vent de Paniqaue (1987), The White Queen (1991), Le Coup Supreme (1991), Apres l’Amour (1992), Droles d’Oiseaux (1993), A New Life (1993), Elles ne Pensent au’a Ca (1994), Le Fils Prefere (1994), Unpredictable Nature of the River (1996) which he also directed, Ridicule (1996), Marianna Ucria (1997), Marquise (1997), Marthe (1997), TGV (1998), Le Double de la Moitie (1999), A Matter of Taste (2000), Water Drops on Burning Rocks (2000), International (2003), Little Lili (2003), That Day (2003), Lost Seamen (2003), The Hook (2004), and Chok-Dee (2005). Giraudeau also appeared on television in productions of La Porteuse de Pain (1973), L’Eloignement (1973), Les Mohicans de Paris (1973), Arsene Lupin (1973), Les Oisaux de Meiji Jingu (1974), Pourquoi la Robe d’Anna ne Veut pas Redescendre (1975), Histoire de Rire (1976), L’Equipage (1978), Louis XI ou Le Pouvoir Central (1979), Blanc, Bleu, Rouge (1981), La Face de l’Ogre (1988), La Grande Cabriole (1989), Confession Secrete (1995), Saint-Exupery: La Derniere Mission (1996) as Antoine de SaintExupery, L’Ex (1996), Si Je t’Oublie Sarajevo (1997), La Poursuite du Vent (1998), Nana (1999), Une Fille dans l’Azur (2001), La Mort est Rousse (2002), Mata Hari, la Vraie Histoire (2003), Leclerc, un Rewve d’Indochine (2003), Dans la Tete du Tueur (2004), and L’Empire du Tigre (2005). His survivors include his wife, actress Anny Duperey, and daughter, actress Sara Giraudeau.

GIUFFRE, ALDO Italian actor Aldo Giuffre, who was best known in the U.S. for his role as the alcoholic Union Army officer in Sergio Leone’s spaghetti western The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, died of peritonitis in Rome on June 26, 2010. He was 86. Giuffre

159 was born in Naples on April 10, 1924. He began his film career in the late 1940s with roles in Scarred (1948), The Emperor of Capri (1949), Side Street Story (1950), Toto Tarzan (1950), Filumena Marturano (1951), Toto the Third Man (1951), Guardie e Ladri (1951), Il Padrone del Vapore (1951), The Lucky Five (1952), Captain Phantom (1953), Neapolitan Turk (1953), I Always Loved You (1953), It Happened in the Park (1953), Il Medico dei Pazzi (1954), Le Signorine dello 04 (1955), Toto al’Inferno (1955), Roman Tales (1955), Malafemmena (1957), Rascel Marine (1958), The Magliari (1959), Juke Box Urli d’Amore (1959), Pleasures of Saturday Night (1960), Il Carabiniere a Cavallo (1961), Black City (1961), The Best of Enemies (1961), The Four Days of Naples (1962), I Cuori Infranti (1963), The Shortest Day (1963), Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow (1963), Hercules, Samson and Ulysses (1963), Toto vs. the Black Pirate (1964), I Marziani Hanno Dodici Mani (1965), Two Gangsters in the Wild West (1964), Love and Marriage (1964), Latin Lovers (1965), Made in Italy (1965), Spiaggia Libera

2010 • Obituaries Il Morso del Serpente (1999) and Suherio (2004), and the 2003 film La Repubblica di San Gennaro.

GLATZER, ROBERT Film critic Robert Glatzer, who reviewed films for NPR for many years, died of complications from a stroke in Spokane, Washington, on October 15, 2010. He was 78. Glatzer was born in New York City in 1932. He formed his own production company in 1964 to create television commercials and industrial films. He also directed the 1968 episode

Robert Glatzer

Aldo Giuffre

(1966), Les Combinards (1966), The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966), No Diamonds for Ursula (1967), Ghosts — Italian Style (1967), La Pou Bella Coppia del Mondo (1968), Certain, Very Certain, As a Matter of Fact … Probable (1969), Check to the Queen (1969), When Women Had Tails (1970), When Women Played Ding Dong (1961), Ettore the Trunk (1972), La Violenza: Quinto Potere (1972), The Heroes (1973), My Pleasure Is Your Pleasure (1973), Il Brigadiere Pasquale Zagaria ama la Mamma e la Polizia (1973), Pasqualino Cammarata … Capitano di Fregata (1974), Il Testimone deve Tacere (1974), Italian Sex (1974), Love Angels (1974), Colpo in Canna (1975), The Flower in His Mouth (1975), Chi Dice Donna, Dice Donna (1976), Sweet Teen (1976), La Prima Notte di Nozze (1976), Oh, Serafina! (1976), Tre Sotto il Lenzuolo (1979), Ciao Marziano (1980), Zappatore (1980), Carcerato (1981), Per Favore, Occupati di Amelia (1982), Mi Manda Picone (1984), L’Ultima Scena (1988), Mortacci (1989), and Street Kids (1989). He was also seen frequently on Italian television, starring as Steni in the 1965 series La Avventure di Laura Storm, and appearing in episodes of La Figlia del Capitano, Nero Wolfe, and International Airport. Largely retired by the late 1980s, he returned to appear in the tele-films

“Inquisition” of the television science fiction series The Invaders. Glatzer moved to Spokane, Washington, in the early 1970s, where he served as director of the Expo 74 Folklife Festival and World’s Fair. He subsequently formed an advertising agency, and was film critic for Spokane Public Radio KPBX. Glatzer was also the author of several books including The New Advertising: The Great Campaigns from Avis to Volkswagen and Beyond Popcorn: A Critic’s Guide to Looking at Films, and hosted the website “Movies101.com.”

GODEMANN, W ERNER German actor Werner Godemann died in Leipzig, Germany, on November 28, 2010. He was 86. Godemann was born in Satow, Germany, on March 25, 1924. Godemann appeared frequently in films from the 1960s, with roles in Schwarzer Samt (1964), Nelken in Aspik (1976), The Incorrigible Barbara (1977), Anton the Magician (1978),

Werner Godemann

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Schatzsucher (1979), Addio, Piccola Mia (1979), P.S. (1979), Until Death Do Us Part (1979), Einfach Blumen Aufs Dach (1979), Fariaho (1983), Wo Andere Schweigen (1984), My Wife Inge and My Mistress Schmidt (1985), The House on the River (1986), Wengler & Sons (1987), Mit Leib und Seele (1987), Interrogating the Witness (1987), Fallada: The Last Chapter (1988), Last Jack (1988), Ruckwarts Laufen Kann ich Auch (1990), Farssmann or on Food up a Blind Alley (1991), Trillertrine (1991), and Vaterland (1992). He was also featured on television in productions of Jugendweihe (1978), Familie Rechlin (1982), Heisse Ware in Berlin (1984), and Sachsens Glanz und Preussens Gloria: Grafin Cosel (1985). He starred in the recurring role of Major Jager in the series Polizeiruf 110 from 1988 to 1990, and guest starred in episodes of Der Staatsanwalt hat das Wort and Tatort.

(1988) and The Incident (1990), and the features Summerspell (1983), Drugstore Cowboy (1989), After Dark, My Sweet (1990), December (1991), and A Dangerous Woman (1993).

GONZALEZ, CARMELITA Mexican actress Carmelita Gonzalez died of complications from pneumonia in a Mexico City hospital on April 30, 2010. She was 81. Gonzalez was born in Mexico City on July 11, 1928. She made her film debut in the mid–1940s, and appeared in more than 100 films during her 60 year career. Her many film credits include Camino de Sacramento (1945), Marina (1945), El Ropavejero (1947), Twilight on the Rio Grande (1947), May God Forgive Me

GOLDEN , MIRIAM Ballet dancer Miriam Golden died in Los Angeles on September 30, 2010. She was 90. She was born Miriam Goldstein in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on January 5, 1920. She trained as a dancer while in her teens, and performed with the local Littlefield Ballet, and danced with Lincoln Kirstein’s Ballet Caravan in the late 1930s. She was a principal dancer with the newly formed American Ballet Theatre in 1940, performing in productions of Anthony Tudor’s Dark Elegies (1940) and Romeo and Juliet

Carmelita Gonzalez

Miriam Golden

(1943). She moved to Los Angeles in the mid–1940s, where she played a dancer in Republic’s ballet-set murder mystery Specter of the Rose (1946). She also became one of MGM’s Goldwyn Girls, dancing in the musical Show Boat (1951), and serving as a rehearsal partner for such dancers as Fred Astaire, Gene Kelly, and Cyd Charisse. She was later the co-founder of the Los Angeles Junior Ballet.

GOLDSMITH, MARGARET Film set decorator Margaret Goldsmith died of ovarian cancer in Los Angeles on August 11, 2010. She was 55. Goldsmith was born in Los Angeles on April 30, 1955. She began working in films as a production assistant on the films The Entity (1981), Private Lessons (1981), and Wavelength (1983). She worked as a set dresser in music videos in the mid–1980s, and on the 1987 film Less Than Zero. Goldsmith was set decorator for the tele-films Glitz

(1948), Casbah (1948), Se la Llevo el Remington (1948), El Charro Negro en el Norte (1949), La Trinca del Aire (1951), The Insanities of Tin Tan (1952), Mexican Bus Ride (1952), The Children of Maria Morales (1952), the lucha libra classic Huracan Ramirez (1953), Cradle Song (1953), Two Careful Fellows (1953), La Ladrona (1954), El Hombre que Quiso ser Pobre (1956), Michael Todd’s all-star classic Around the World in Eighty Days (1956), S.O.S. Abuelita (1959), The Man Who Lost the Train (1960), Espiritismo (1962), The Misterio de Huracan Ramirez (1962), El Senor Doctor (1965), El Hijo de Huracan Ramirez (1966), La Venganza de Huracan Ramirez (1967), Lotacao Esgotada (1962), Just Peter (1972), Lerpar (1975), Love Letters of a Nun (1978), La Pachanga (1981), El Torito de Tepito (1982), El Judicial (1984), La Divina Lola (1984), Motel (1984), El Cachas de Oro (1986), El Vergonzoso (1988), Terror, Sexo y Brujeria (1989), Noche de Panico (1990), Bestia Nocturna (1990), Pedro Infante Vive? (1991), Las Paradas de los Choferes (1991), AR-15: Comando Implacable (1992), Amor que Mata (1994), and Reclusorio III (1999). She was also seen in numerous television productions, with roles in such series as El Ojo de Vidrio (1969), Los Hermanos Coraje (1972), Rosalia (1978), El Medio Pelo (1980), Angeles Blancos (1989), Cuando Ilega el Amor (1990), Volver a Empezar (1994), La Sombra del Otro (1996), El Secreto de Alejandro (1997), Navidad sin Fin (2001), and Mujer Casos de la Vida Real (2004).

GONZALEZ, JORGE “GIANT” Professional wrestler Jorge “Giant” Gonzalez died of died of com-

161 plications from diabetes and other health issues in San Martin, Argentina, on September 22, 2010. He was 44. Gonzalez was born in El Colorado, Argentina, on January 31, 1966. He was over 7 feet tall by his early teens, and soon became a leading basketball star in Argentina. He was drafted for the Atlanta Hawks basketball team in 1988, but was physically unable to compete with the NBA. Hawks’ owner Ted Turner subsequently offered

2010 • Obituaries

vember 3, 2010. He was 69. GoodKnight was born in Los Angeles on October 1, 1941. He became a fan of the works of Tolkien and C.S. Lewis in high school, and formed the Mythopoeic Society while a history major at Cal State L.A. in 1967. He founded the society’s journal, Mythlore, in 1969, and served as editor through the late 1990s.

GOODMAN, AL R&B singer Al Goodman, whose vocals helped elevate the Moments’ “Love on a Two-Way Street” to the top of the charts, died of heart failure and complications from surgery in a Hackensack, New Jersey, hospital on July 26, 2010. He was 67. Goodman was born in Jackson, Mississippi, on March 30, 1943. He sang while in high school, and went to New York in the early 1960s to work as a sound mixer

Jorge “Giant” Gonzalez

Gonzalez a job with his wrestling promotion, World Championship Wrestling (WCW), and he competed as El Gigante in the WCW in the early 1990s. He entered the World Wrestling Federation (WWF/now WWE) as the Giant Gonzalez, clad in a furry airbrushed body suit, in 1993’s Royal Rumble. Managed by Harvey Wippleman, Gonzalez spent the next year feuding with the Undertaker. He also wrestled in Japan with the New Japan and WAR promotions, before retiring from the ring in 1995. He appeared on television in episodes of Baywatch, Swamp Thing, and Hulk Hogan’s action series Thunder in Paradise. Gonzalez was also featured as Eryz the Boxer in the 1994 tele-film Hercules in the Underworld with Kevin Sorbo.

GOODKNIGHT, GLEN Glen GoodKnight, the founder of the Mythopoeic Society dedicated to the works of J.R.R. Tolkien and other fantasy literature, died at his home in Monterey Park, California, on No-

Glen GoodKnight

Al Goodman (center)

at All Platinum Studios. He caught the attention of singer and producer Sylvia Robinson, who teamed him with Billy Brown and Johnny Moore as The Moments. The trio had a major hit with “Love on a Two-Way Street” in 1970. Moore was soon replaced by Harry Ray, and the new lineup recorded the hits “All I Have” and “Sexy Mama” under the Stang recording label. They left Stang in 1979, and continued to record and perform under the name Ray, Goodman & Brown. They soon had another hit with “Special Lady,” from Polydor Records. The trio performed and recorded together over the next decade, and Harry Ray was replaced by Kevin “Ray” Owens after his death in 1992.

GORDON, CARL Actor Carl Gordon, who was best known for his role as Andrew Emerson, Charles S. Dutton’s father, in the 1990s Fox sit-com Roc, died of non–Hodgkin’s lymphoma in Richmond, Virginia, on July 20, 2010. He was 78. Gordon was born in Richland, Virginia, on January 20, 1932. He graduated from New York’s Brooklyn College, and studied at the Gene Frankel Theatre Workshop. He performed frequently on the New York stage, and was featured in Broadway productions of The Great White Hope (1969) and Ain’t Supposed to Die a Natural Death (1971). Gordon appeared as Mr. Robinson in the children’s television series Sesame Street in the late 1960. He was featured as Luther the Pimp in the 1973 film Gordon’s War, and was a thug in The Bingo Long Traveling

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All-Stars & Motor Kings (1976). He was also seen in the films Violated (1984), The Brother from Another Planet (1984), No Mercy (1986), and Better Than Ever (1997). Gordon was featured in the tele-films Disaster on the Coastliner (1979), The Murder of Mary Phagan (1988), The Piano Lesson (1995) reprising his role as Doaker

Carl Gordon

from the Broadway production, The Wedding (1998), and Love Songs (1999). He reunited with The Piano Lesson star Charles S. Dutton for the television comedy series Roc from 1991 to 1994. Gordon was also seen in episodes of such series as Due South, Burke’s Law, New York News, Hangin’ with Mr. Cooper, Malcolm & Eddie, The Practice, Felicity, ER, Nash Bridges, JAG, Law & Order, and Whoopie. He returned to Broadway in the 2003 revival of the musical Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom.

GORDON, MARK Veteran actor Mark Gordon, who was featured as Chuckles the Clown in an episode of Mary Tyler Moore, died of lung cancer in New York City on August 12, 2010. He was 84. Gordon was born in New York on May 19, 1926. He appeared frequently on the Broadway stage from the early 1950s with roles in such productions as Desire Under the Elms (1952), Compulsion (1957), The Devils (1965), and the 1974 revival of Of Mice and Men with James Earl Jones. He also was seen in numerous regional and touring productions, and acted in and directed plays

Mark Gordon

Off-Broadway. He was a frequent member of Chicago’s Compass Players, which became Second City, for many years. Gordon appeared often on television from the early 1960s, with roles in episodes of such series as East Side/West Side, Hawk, Hallmark Hall of Fame’s production of A Christmas Masque, the soap operas The Edge of Night and Where the Heart Is, The F.B.I., Mary Tyler Moore as one of the actors who played the illfated Chuckles the Clown, Kojak, Lotsa Luck, Hawaii Five-0, The New Dick Van Dyke Show, Cannon, McCoy, Petrocelli, Most Wanted, The Andros Targets, Starsky and Hutch, Dear Detective, Day by Day, I’ll Fly Away, the soap All My Children, and Ed. Gordon was featured in a handful of films during his career including the Woody Allen comedy Take the Money and Run (1969), Don’t Drink the Water (1969), Allen’s Sleeper (1973), The Nickel Ride (1974), Twinkle, Twinkle, Killer Kane (aka The Ninth Configuration) (1980), the tele-film Dreams Don’t Die (1982), Dogs of Hell (1982), Static (1985), Looping (1991), Freejack (1992), and Alien Force (1996).

GORDON, PHIL Actor Phil Gordon died in Mobile, Alabama, on June 15, 2010. He was 94. He was born Phil Gulley in Meridian, Mississippi, on May 5, 1916. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II, and performed with the USO to entertain the troops. He toured as a jazz musician in the 1940s and 1950s, before settling in California to work in film and television later in the decade. Gordon worked with Jack Webb on the series Dragnet and Pete Kelly’s Blues, and appeared in small roles in the films -30- (1959) and The Last Time I Saw Archie (1961). He was also seen on television in episodes of Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Mona McCluskey, and The Honeymooners. Throughout the 1960s, he worked frequently on Paul Henning’s rural sitcoms The Beverly Hillbillies, Petticoat Junction, and Green Acres as a dialog coach and actor. He was best known for his recurring role of Jasper “Jazzbo” Depew, the ukulele-strumming beau of Hooterville’s Jethrine Bodine, Jethro’s twin sister, also played by Max Baer, Jr. Gordon later hosted children’s variety series in New Orleans and Mobile in the 1960s. GORI, DAISUKE Japanese anime voice actor Daisuke Gori was found dead in a Nakano, Tokyo,

Daisuki Gori

163 street, having slit his wrists in an apparent suicide, on January 17, 2010. He was 57. He was born Yoshio Nagahori in Koto, Japan, on February 8, 1952. He was a leading voice actor in anime films, television, and video games, from the 1970s, noted for his deep voice. His best known roles include Umigame, Gyuumao and Mister Satan in the Dragon Ball series, Robin Mask in Kinnikuman, Dozle Sabi and Bask Om in Gundam, Edge Master in Soulcalibur, Hiromi Yamazaki in Patlabor, and Heihachi Mishima in Tekken. He also provided the Japanese dubbing voice for numerous imported films and television productions.

GORING, H ELGA German actress Helga Goring died of heart failure in a Berlin hospital on October 3, 2010. She was 88. She was born Helga Bonett in Meissen, Germany, on January 14, 1922. She studied drama at the Academy of Music and Theatre in Dresden in the late 1930s, and performed on stage in Frankfurt, Stendal, and Dresden over the next decade. She was featured in over sixty films from the early 1950s including Das Verurteilte Dorf (1952), Castles and Cottages (1957), Barenburger Schnurre (1957), Sheriff Teddy (1957), Die Premiere Fallt Aus (1959), Erich Kubak (1959), Hochmut Kommt vor dem Knall (1960), Minna von Barnhelm (1962), Just Don’t Think I’ll Cry (1965), The Adventures of Werner Holt (1965), The Trace of Stones (1966), Bread and Roses (1967), The Shield and the Sword (1968), Mord am Montag (1968), Netzwerk (1970), Wolf-Life and Illusion of a German Anarchist (1974), Eine Handvoll Hoffnung (1978), Jorg Ratgeb — Painter (1978), Scenes of Fires (1978), Marta, Marta (1979), Nicht Verzagen, Trudchen Fragen (1980), Der Hut des Brigadiers (1986), Danke fur die Blumen (1988), Linda (1991), Edgar (1997), K (1997), No Place to Go (2000), Karamuk (2002), Gregor’s Greatest Invention (2001), Fragile (2003), and Der Dolch des Batu Khan (2004). Goring was also seen in television productions of Gerichtet bei Nacht (1960), Die Rote Kamille (1963), Die Mutter und das Schweigen (1965), Irrlicht und Feuer (1966), Emilia Galotti (1967), Die Pferdekur (1969), Jeder Stirbt fur sich Allein (1970), Die Regentrude (1976), Das Rad (1980), Die Gaste der Mathilde Lautenschlager (1981), Das Wirkliche Blau (1986), Konig Karl (1986), Weihnachtsgeschichten (1986), Maxe Baumann aus Berlin

Helga Goring

2010 • Obituaries

(1987), Die Glucke (1988), Die Hunde sind Schuld (2001), Der Fremde Gast (2007), and Einmal Dieb, immer Dieb (2007). Her other television credits include episodes of Blaulicht, Eva und Adam, Das Unsichtbare Visier as Mutter Bredebusch, Rentner haben Niemals Zeit as Anna Schmidt, Ferienheim Bergkristall, Treffpunkt Flughafen, Der Staatsanwalt hat das Wort, Drei Reizende Schwestern as Mathilde Lehmberg, Spreewaldfamilie, A.S., St. Angela, Wolff ’s Turf, Unser Charly, SOKO Leipzig, Tatort, Polizeiruf 110, Kanzleramt, and Der Landarzt.

GORINTIN , ESTHER Polish actress Esther Gorintin died in Paris, France, on January 11, 2010. She was 96. Gorintin was born in Sokolka, Poland, on January 24, 1913. She settled in Paris in the late 1940s. She made her acting debut as Vera in Emmanuel Finkiel’s film Voyages in 1999. She continued appearing in films

Esther Gorintin

over the next decade, with such credits as Wimbledon Stage (2001), Imago (2001), Carnage (2002), L’Ombre des Fleurs (2003), Depuis qu’Otar est Parti… (2003), The Grand Role (2004), Some Kind of Blue (2005), Roots (2005), Hell (2005), Call Me Agostino (2006), L’Homme qui Revait d’un Enfant (2006), Resistance aux Tremblements (2007), and Drole de Noel! (2008).

GORMAN, BUDDY Actor Charles J. “Buddy” Gorman, who was best known for his role as Butch in a handful of Bowery Boys film in the early 1950s, died in Webster, New York, on April 1, 2010. He was 88. Gorman was born in Manhattan, New York, on September 2, 1921. He went to Hollywood in the early 1940 to pursue a career in film. He was seen in numerous features, often cast as a newsboy or messenger. His many film credits include Hi Diddle Diddle (1943), Mr. Muggs Steps Out (1943), Whistling in Brooklyn (1943), Higher and Higher (1943), Million Dollar Kid (1944), The Heavenly Body (1945), And the Angels Sing (1944), Meet the People (1944), Follow the Leader (1944), Since You Went Away (1944), I Love a Soldier (1944), Till We Meet Again (1944), The Very Thought of You (1944), Bowery Champs (aka Mr. Muggs Meets a Deadline) (1944), Thoroughbreds (1944), Roughly Speaking (1945), Docks of New York (1945), It’s a Pleasure (1945), The Master Key (1945), Mr. Muggs Rides Again (1945), Come

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Out Fighting (1945), Meet Me on Broadway (1946), Cinderella Jones (1946), The Walls Came Tumbling Down (1946), Night and Day (1946), Bowery Bombshell (1946), Sing While You Dance (1946), The Jolson Story (1946), Wife Wanted (1946), The Perils of Pauline (1947), News Hounds (1947), Key Witness (1947), Her Husband’s Affairs (1947), The Babe Ruth Story (1948), Angels’ Alley (1948), Smugglers’ Cove (1948), Trouble Makers (1948),

Buddy Gorman

Fighting Fools (1949), Hold That Baby! (1949), It’s a Great Feeling (1949), White Heat (1949) with James Cagney, The Reckless Moment (1949), and A Modern Marriage (1950). Gorman appeared in several Dead End Kids and Bowery Boys films in small roles, but graduated to one of the leads when he replaced Bennie Bartlett as Butch in 1950. His Bowery Boys credits include Blonde Dynamite (1950), Lucky Losers (1950), Tripple Trouble (1950), Blues Busters (1950), Bowery Battalion (1951), Ghost Chasers (1951), and Let’s Go Navy (1951). Gorman retired from the screen after Bartlett resumed his role as Butch in 1951. He subsequently opened a novelty and magic store Fun-N-Stuff in Los Angeles, California, which he operated until retiring in 1991.

GOULD, HAROLD Veteran character actor Harold Gould died of complications from prostate cancer in Woodland Hills, California, on September 11, 2010. He was 86. He was born Harold Goldstein in Schenectady, New York, on December 10, 1923. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II, and resumed his education after the war to earn a degree from Albany’s Teacher’s College. He earned a master’s in drama from Cornell University, and a doctorate in 1953. He spent the next several years as a drama teacher at Randolph-Macon Woman’s College in Lynchburg, Virginia. He joined the drama department of the University of California, Riverside, as a professor in 1956. He abandoned academia for an acting career in 1960. He was soon appearing on television in episodes of such series as Cain’s Hundred, Shannon, Follow the Sun, National Velvet, The Donna Reed Show, Empire, The Untouchables, Dennis the Menace, The Lieutenant, Route 66, Twilight Zone, The Eleventh Hour, The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, Arrest and Trial, Channing, The Man from

U.N.C.L.E., Perry Mason, The Jack Benny Program, Dr. Kildare, Mister Ed, Hazel, 12 O’Clock High, The Virginian, The Farmer’s Daughter, Convoy, That Girl originating the role of Marlo Thomas’ father in the pilot, The Long, Hot Summer in the recurring role of Bowman Chamberlain, Love on a Rooftop, Get Smart, The Green Hornet, The Fugitive, Run for Your Life, Felony Squad, The Red Skelton Show, The Invaders, Garrison’s Gorillas, Daktari, Daniel Boone, He & She, The Flying Nun, Judd for the Defense, The Wild Wild West, The Big Valley, The Debbie Reynolds Show, Mission: Impossible, I Dream of Jeannie, Here Come the Brides, Lancer, The Mod Squad, Hogan’s Heroes, The High Chaparral, Columbo, The F.B.I., Love, American Style (as Howard Cunningham, the father of Richie [Ron Howard], in a Happy Days pilot), The Delphi Bureau, Mannix, and The Partridge Family. Gould also began appearing in small roles in films from the early 1960s including The Couch (1962), Two for the Seesaw (1962), The Yellow Canary (1963), The Satan Bug (1965), and Inside Daisy Clover (1965). He soon moved up to supporting roles, often playing authority figures in such films as Harper (1966), An American Dream (1966), Project X (1968), The Arrangement (1969), The Lawyer (1970), Mrs. Pollifax-Spy (1971), and Where Does It Hurt? (1972). He was also seen in the tele-films A Death of Innocence (1971), Murdock’s Gang (1973), and Bachelor-at-Law (1973), Gould was featured as Kid Twist in George Roy Hill’s 1973 caper film The Sting, starring Paul Newman and Robert Redford. His performance led to other character parts in the films The Front Page (1974), The Strongest Man in the World (1975), Love and Death (1975), Silent Movie (1976), The Big Bus (1976), Gus (1976), and The One and Only (1978). He also gueststarred in episodes of The New Dick Van Dyke Show, Ironside, Lotsa Luck, Needles and Pins, Chase, The Streets of San Francisco, Dirty Sally, Gunsmoke as Colonel Lucius Shindrow in “The Guns of Cibola Blanca” twopart episode, Cannon, The Bob Crane Show, Medical Story, Insight, Hawaii Five-0 as Honore Vashon in a 1972 trilogy, The Rookies, Petrocelli, and Police Story which earned him an Emmy Award nomination. He was also featured in the tele-films Double Solitaire (1974), Judgment: The Trial of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg (1974), Flannery and Quilt (1976), and How to

Harold Gould

165 Break Up a Happy Divorce (1976). He starred as Martin Morgenstern, Rhoda’s father, in several episodes of Mary Tyler Moore from 1972, and was a regular in Valerie Harper’s subsequent spin-off series from 1974 to 1978, garnering another Emmy nomination. He starred as con-man Harry Danton, with Stefanie Powers as his lawyer daughter, in the 1976 tele-film Never Con a Killer, and the subsequent short-lived series The Feather and Father Gang from 1976 to 1977. Gould played Barney Gerber on several episodes of the comedy series Soap in 1977, and guested on Family, Grandpa Goes to Washington, The Rockford Files, Lobo, Lou Grant, and Park Place in the recurring role of David Ross. He was featured in the 1977 mini-series Washington: Behind Closed Doors and the television productions Have I Got a Christmas for You (1977) on Hallmark’s Hall of Fame, Actor, the Paul Muni Story (1978), Better Late Than Never (1979), 11th Victim (1979), Hallmark’s Aunt Mary (1979), The Man in the Santa Claus Suit (1979), King Crab (1980), and Kenny Rogers as The Gambler (1980). Gould earned another Emmy nomination for his role as studio head Louis B. Mayer in 1980’s Moviola: The Scarlett O’Hara War. He was also seen in the tele-films Born to Be Sold (1981), Help Wanted: Male (1982), The Skin of Our Teeth (1983) as Mr. Antrobus, Kenny Rogers as The Gambler: The Adventure Continues (1983), The Red-Light Sting (1984), The Fourth Wise Man (1985), Mrs. Delafield Wants to Marry (1986) earning another Emmy nomination, Tales from the Hollywood Hills: Closed Set (1988), Get Smart, Again! (1989), the American Playhouse production of The Sunset Gang (1991), For Hope (1996), The Love Bug (1997), and McBride: Anybody Here Murder Marty? (2005). He starred as Jonah Foot in the short-lived television series Foot in the Door in 1983, and was Ben Sprague in Spencer in 1985. He also guest-starred in episodes of Webster, Finders of Lost Love, St. Elsewhere, Trapper John, M.D., Scarecrow and Mrs. King, L.A. Law, Night Court, CBS Summer Playhouse, Empty Nest, Midnight Caller, Dallas, the short-lived sit-com Singer & Sons as Nathan Singer in 1990, and Dinosaurs as the voice of the Dinosaur Chief. He was featured in the recurring role of Miles Webber, Betty White’s boyfriend, in episodes of The Golden Girls and The Golden Palace in the early 1990s, and earned another Emmy nod for his role in the 1992 episode of The Ray Bradbury Theater, “Colonel Stonesteel and the Desperate Empties.” He also guested in episodes of Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman as the Prankster’s father, The Outer Limits, Felicity, Pacific Blue, The King of Queens, The Fearing Mind, Touched by an Angel, Judging Amy, Cold Case, and Nip/Tuck. Gould remained a popular character on the silver screen with roles in Seems Like Old Times (1980), The Dream Chasers (1982), Playing for Keeps (1986), Romero (1989), Birch Street Gym (1991), Lover’s Knot (1996), My Giant (1998), Beloved (1998), Patch Adams (1998), Brown’s Requiem (1998), Stuart Little (1999) as Grandpa Little, Dying on the Edge (2001), The Master of Disguise (2002) as Grandfather Disguisey, Loyalties (2003), Freaky Friday (2003) with Jamie Lee Curtis and Lindsay Lohan, the animated Brother Bear (2003) as the voice of Old Denahi, En-

2010 • Obituaries glish as a Second Language (2005), and The Day the Music Died (2010).

GOWLAND, PETER Glamour photographer Peter Gowland, whose photographs pin-ups and stars graced over 1,000 magazine covers, died of complications from a fall in Los Angeles on March 17, 2010. He was 93. Gowland was born in Los Angeles on April 3, 1916, the son of silent screen star Gibson Gowland and actress Sylvia Andrew. The younger Gowland made his screen debut at the age of six weeks in the 1916 film The Small Magnetic Hand, scripted by his mother. He was

Peter Gowland

fascinated by photography from his youth, and learned his technique by watching his father’s movies being filmed. Peter was featured onscreen in small roles or as a stand-in in such films as The Adventures of Frank Merriwell (1936), The Great Ziegfeld (1936), Cain and Mabel (1936), These Three (1936), Dodsworth (1936), Born to Dance (1936), The Road Back (1937), Hot Water (1937), Wuthering Heights (1939), Orson Welles’ Citizen Kane (1941), 13 Rue Madeleine (1947), The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (1947), Joan of Arc (1948), and You’re My Everything (1949). He was best known for his pin-up photography from the 1950s and 1960s, whose subject included Jayne Mansfield, Yvette Mimieux, Julie Newmar, Raquel Welch, and Ann-Margret. He also created innovative photographic techniques and designed the twin-lens Gowlandflex camera, which used 4-by-5 inch film for high-quality pictures. He authored over two dozen books including How to Photograph Women (1953) and Figure Photography (1954), and his photos graced covers of such magazines as Playboy, Modern Photography, and Rolling Stone. He was also featured onscreen as a photographer in the 1966 film The Swinger.

GRABBERT, GUNTHER German actor Gunther Grabbert died of a heart attack in a Leipzig, Germany, hospital on December 15, 2010. He was 79. Grabbert was born in Schwerin, Germany, on January 15, 1931. He appeared frequently in films and television from the 1950s. His many film credits include Der Teufelskreis (1956), Das Lied der Matrosen (1958), Im Sonderauftrag (1959), Einer von Uns (1960), Arzte (1961), Der Fremde (1961), Professor Mamlock (1961),

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Beschreibung eines Sommers (1963), The Divided Heaven (1964), The Girl on the Board (1967), Weil ich dich Liebe (1970), Hut ab, Wenn du Kusst! (1971), …Verdammt, ich bin Erwachsen (1974), Johannes Kepler (1974), Requiem fur Hans Grundig (1975), Graureiher (1977), Achillesferse (1978), Die Stunde der Tochter (1981), Victory (1985), and The Cloud Sheep (1993). Grabbert also appeared in television productions of Das Risiko (1965),

Martin Grace

Gunther Grabbert

Dr. Schluter (1965), Columbus 64 (1966), Ein Sonderbares Madchen (1967), Kein Mann fur Camp Detrick (1970), Die Verschworenen (1971), Der Regimentskommandeur (1972), Anfang am Ende der Welt (1972), Die Lindstedts (1976), Glucksperlen (1978), Tull (1979), Fruher Sommer (1980), Ernst Thalmann (1986), Rapunzel oder Der Zauber der Tranen (1988), Die Glaserne Fackel (1989), Eine Frau wird Gejagt (1995), Das Geheimnis meiner Mutter (2002), and Sehnsucht nach Liebe (2004). He starred as Major Walter Reinhardt in the 1969 series Drei von der K, and was Kundschafter Dohmke in Das Unsichtbare Visier in 1973. His other television credits include episodes of Polizeiruf 110, Zahn um Zahn — Die Praktiken des Dr. Wittkugel, Hotel Elfie, Bella Block, Freundschaft mit Herz as Dr. Konig, and In aller Freundschaft.

GRACE, MARTIN British stuntman Martin Grace, who was Roger Moore’s stunt double on the James Bond films, died of an aneurysm at a hospital in Spain on January 27, 2010. He had been hospitalized with a fractured pelvis in November of 2009 after a cycling accident, and was readmitted to the hospital after developing breathing problems shortly before his death. He was 67. Grace was born in Kilkenny, Ireland, on September 12, 1942. He began working in films in the mid–1960s, playing a Thal in the 1965 feature Dr. Who and the Daleks with Peter Cushing. He worked on all of Roger Moore’s James Bond outings, and doubled the actor in his non–Bond films as well. Grace worked on numerous features, performing stunts, and occasionally appearing in small roles. His many credits include You Only Live Twice (1967), Inadmissible Evidence (1968), Moon Zero Two (1969), Horror Hospital (1973), Live at Let Die (1973), The Man with the Golden Gun (1974), The Spy Who Loved Me (1977), The Wild Geese

(1978), Superman (1978), ffolkes (1979), Escape to Athena (1979), Moonraker (1979), The Sea Wolves (1980), Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981), For Your Eyes Only (1981), Victor/Victoria (1982), Who Dare Wins (1982), Curse of the Pink Panther (1983), Octopussy (1983) and was badly injured while filming an action sequence aboard a train, Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984), Top Secret! (1984), The Naked Face (1984), Ordeal by Innocence (1985), Brazil (1985), A View to a Kill (1985), Enemy Mine (1985), A Prayer for the Dying (1987), Pathfinder (1987), Willow (1988), High Spirits (1988), The Littlest Viking (1989), Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989), Erik the Viking (1989), A Handful of Time (1989), Nuns on the Run (1990), Shipwrecked (1990), The Neverending Story II: The Last Chapter (1990), A Kiss Before Dying (1991), Under Suspicion (1991), Afraid of the Dark (1991), Lethal Lies (1992), Patriot Games (1992), Head Above Water (1993), Map of the Human Heart (1993), A Man of No Importance (1994), Circle of Friends (1995), An Awfully Big Adventure (1995), North Star (1996), Chasing the Kidneystone (1996), The MatchMaker (1997), Robinson Crusoe (1997), The Boxer (1997), The Truman Show (1998), Dancing at Lughnasa (1998), Anna and the King (1999), Shallow Hal (2001), King Arthur (2004), and The Number 23 (2007). Grace also worked in television on the series The Onedin Line, The Fenn Street Gang, Special Branch, The Protectors, Space: 1999, Agatha Christie: Poirot, Boon, Between the Lines, and New Tricks. He also did stuntwork on the tele-films and mini-series Badger By Owl-Light (1982), War and Remembrance (1988), Robin Hood (1991), and The Bombmaker (2001).

GRAHAM, RANALD British television writer Ranald Graham, who scripted for such series as The Sweeney and The Professionals, died of motor neurone disease in England on August 29, 2010. He was 69. Graham was born to Scottish parents in Sandokan, North Borneo, on January 3, 1941. He and his family were interned there by the Japanese during World War II. He was educated in Scotland and at Trinity College in Dublin. He began working in television as a writer and researcher for the ITV documentary series Sports Arena. He wrote William Castle’s macabre fantasy film Shanks (1974), which starred mime artist Marcel Marceau in a

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dual role. He also scripted the 1975 tele-film Strange New World, and the 1980 Hammer House of Horror episode The Two Faces of Evil. He was best known for

Strange Adventures and House of Mystery. He became best known for his work on DC war comics including Star Spangled War Stories, G.I. Combat, Our Army at War, Our Fighting Forces, and All-American Men of War. He co-created the French resistance heroine Mlle. Marie with Robert Kanigher, and drew many of the Gunner and Sarge adventures. He was also noted for his wash-tone cover art, which gave a painted effect to various DC covers. Grandenetti also illustrated stories for Warren’s black-and-white comic magazines Creepy and Eerie from the mid–1960s through the early 1970s. He also continued his work at DC, drawing The Spectre, The Phantom Stranger, and Champion Sports, and co-creating the sword-and-sorcery character Nightmaster with Denny O’Neil, and Prez, the first U.S. teen president, with Joe Simon. He left comics in 1990 to work as art director at the Young & Rubicam advertising agency.

Ranald Graham

GRANDENETTI , JERRY Comic artist Jerry Grandenetti died of cardiopulmonary arrest and complications from cancer in a Bellport, New York, hospital on February 19, 2010. He was 83. He was born Charles J. Grandenetti in Bronxville, New York, on April 15, 1926. He trained as an artist at the Cartoonists and Illustrators School in Manhattan. She served in the U.S. Navy during World War II, and continued to train as an artist after leaving the service. He began working in comics as an art assistant for Will Eisner on The Spirit strip in the late 1940s. Grandenetti was largely illustrating the comic in the early 1950s. He was also drawing stories for Fiction House’s Ranger Comics and Fight Comics, and illustrated occasional tales for Lev Gleason, Prize Comics, and American Comics Group. He began a long career at DC Comics in 1951, drawing westerns for All-Star Western and Western Comics, crime thrillers for Gang Busters and Mr. District Attorney, and science fiction and horror tales for

GRANT, CY British West Indian actor Cy Grant, who was one of the first black performers to appear regularly on British television, died in London on February 13, 2010. He was 90. Grant was born in Beterverwagting, Demerara, British Guiana (now Guyana), on November 8, 1919. He one of the first West Indian recruits to serve with the Royal Air Force during World War II. He was serving as a navigator on a bombing mission when his aircraft was shot down over Holland in June of 1943. He spent the remainder of the war as a German POW until being liberated by Russian troops in 1945. Grant trained as a lawyer after the war, and passed the bar in 1950. He also began performing on stage, with roles in productions in London’s West End and New York City’s Zeigfeld Theatre. He became a popular cabaret artist when he began singing calypso tunes and playing the guitar. Grant was soon appearing on British television, with roles in productions of Trouble in the Sun (1953), A Man from the Sun (1956), and Home of the Brave (1957), and episodes of White Hunter and They Met in a City. He was also seen in small roles in several films including Safari (1956) and Sea Wife (1957), and starred in Calypso (1958), an Italian-French co-production filmed in Jamaica. He joined the BBC’s satirical current events program Tonight in 1957, where he gave a calypso rendition of the news

Jerry Grandenetti (self portrait)

Cy Grant

writing for television crime dramas as The Sweeney, The Professionals, Special Squad, and Dempsey and Makepeace. He also produced the 1990 crime series Yellowthread Street.

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events of the day. Grant left the popular program after three years, fearing he was being typecast. He recorded five albums in the 1960s including Cool Folk, Cy Grant, Cy & I, with Bill LeSage, Ballads, Birds & Blues, and Cy Grant Sings. He continued to perform on stage, and was featured as the voice of Lieutenant Green, the black defender of Earth, in Gerry Anderson’s ITV marionette series Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons from 1967 to 1968. He was also seen in several more films including the science fiction feature Journey to the Far Side of the Sun (aka Doppelganger) (1969), Shaft in Africa (1973) as Emir Ramila, and the 1976 adaptation of Edgar Rice Burroughs’ At the Earth’s Core as Ra. He was featured on television in episodes of ITV Play of the Week, The Persuaders!, Softly Softly, and Blakes 7. Gray founded England’s first black arts centre, Drum, in 1974, and directed the Concord Multicultural Festivals of the 1980s. He starred as Mr. Young in the 1981 children’s sci-fi television series Metal Mikey, about a magical robot who battled aliens, traveled through time, and performed household chores. He also wrote the memoirs A Member of the Royal Air Force of Indeterminate Race (2006) and Blackness and the Dreaming Soul: Race, Identity and the Materialistic Paradigm (2007).

Gorgeous George Grant

ter-known Gorgeous George Wagner, entering the ring as a curly-haired peroxide blonde in fancy robes and a cloud of perfume. Grant retired from the ring in 1963 and soon embarked on a second career as an evangelist out of York, South Carolina, and led revivals throughout the South for many years.

Grant died of complications from pancreatic cancer in Melbourne, Australia, on January 24, 2010. He was 50. Grant was a popular performer at local comedy clubs.

GRASSIA , NINI Italian film director Nini Grassia died in Castel Volturno, Caserta, Italy, on February 28, 2010. He was 65. Grassia was born in Naples, Italy, on March 31, 1944. He directed over 40 films from the early 1980s, which he also frequently wrote

Dave Grant

Nini Grassia

He also appeared frequently on television on such programs as Rove, Hey, Hey, It’s Saturday, The Footy Show, Stingers, Eagle & Evans, and Neighbours. Grant also starred in the 2008 short film The Un-Australian.

and composed music for. His film credits include Celebrita (1981), Lo Studernte (1983), The Motorcycle Murders (1984), Una Tenera Follia (1986), Act of Revenge (1989), Italian Gigolo (1989), Bambola (1990), Talent Agency (1993), First Action Hero (1994), Innamorata (1995), Annare (1998), Cient’ Anne (1999), and Il Latitante (2003).

GRANT, D AVE Australian comedian Dave

GRANT, G ORGEOUS GEORGE Wrestler turned evangelist Gorgeous George Grant, who was a popular ring villain in the 1950s, died in Columbia, South Carolina, on April 21, 2010. He was 85. Grant was born in Honey Grove, Texas, on August 14, 1924, and served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. He began his wrestling career after his discharge and originally competed as a bearded long-haired villain. While working for promoter Jack Pfeifer in Georgia in the early 1950s he lost a beard vs. mask match to the Green Hornet. He soon adopted the ring persona of the bet-

GRASSILLI, RAOUL Italian actor Raoul Grassilli, who was noted for his authoritative roles on stage, film, and television, died in Bologna, Italy, on July 24, 2010. He was 85. Grassilli was born in Bologna on October 25, 1924. He studied at the National Academy of Dramatic Arts in Rome, and became a leading figure on the stage in Bologna in the 1950s. He was also seen in a handful of films during his career including Lion

169 of Corsica (1961), Desert War (1962), Scorched Skin (1962), The Myth (1963), Catherine of Russia (1963) as Czar Peter III, Invasion 1700 (1963), The Head of the Family (1967), Infanzia, Vocazione e Prime Esperienze di Giacomo Casanova, Veneziano (1969), and Povero Cristo (1975). Grassilli also appeared on Italian television in

Raoul Grassilli

productions of Il Caso Maurizius (1961), Il Mondo e una Prigione (1962), Demetrio Pianelli (1963), Il Mulino del Po (1963), I Grandi Camaleonti (1964), Quinta Colonna (1966), Le Mie Prigioni (1968), La Fine dell’Avventura (1969), Delitto di Regime (1973), Sotto il Placido Don (1974), Murat— Generale Napoleonico (1975) as Napoleon Bonaparte, Rosso Veneziano (1976), Dopo un Lungo Silenzio (1978), Paura sul Mondo (1979), Bel Ami (1979), and Delitto di Stato (1982).

GRAVE, A LEKSANDR Russian actor Aleksandr Grave died in Moscow on March 5, 2010. He was 89. Grave was born in Moscow on September 8, 1920. He trained for the stage at the Shchukin Theatrical School at the Vakhtangov Theatre in the late 1930s. He served in the entertainment unit of the Red Army during World War II. He continued a career as an actor after the war, He appeared in numerous films during his career including Trouble Business (1946), They Were the First (1956), And Quiet Flows the Don (1957), Bessonnaya Noch (1960), Wind of Freedom (1961), Silence

Alexsandr Grave

2010 • Obituaries

(1964), Druzya i Gody (1965), Babe Tsarstvo (1967), Goal! Another Goal! (1968), Gold (1969), Moya Sudba (1970), Zemlya, do Vostrebovaniya (1973), U Opasnoy Cherty (1983), Konets Operatsil Rezident (1986), Koroli Rossiykogo syska: Ubiystva Buturlina (1994), Igra v Brasletakh (1998), Dva Tovarishcha (2001), and Smert v Pensne ili nash Chekhov (2010).

GRAVES, P ETER Actor Peter Graves, who starred as Jim Phelps, head of the top-secret Impossible Mission Force, in the television series Mission: Impossible from 1967 to 1973, died of a heart attack outside his home in Los Angeles on March 14, 2010. He was 83. He was born Peter Aurness in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on March 18, 1926. He worked as a radio announcer in Minneapolis while in his teens. Graves served in the U.S. Army Air Force toward the end of World War II. After his discharge he studied drama at the University of Minnesota, and performed on stage in summer stock productions. He followed his older brother, actor Jim Arness, to Hollywood in the early 1950s. Changing his name, he began his film career in a small role in the 1951 military comedy Up Front. He was also featured in the westerns Rogue River (1951) and Fort Defiance (1951), the baseball fantasy Angels in the Outfield (1951), and The Congregation (1952). He starred as Chris Cronyn in 1952’s Red Planet Mars, an earnest attempt to blend Cold War hysteria and Christian concepts into a science fiction feature. Graves was Price, the clean-cut all–American Nazi spy in the 1953 World War II prison camp drama Stalag 17 starring William Holden. He also appeared in the films War Paint (1953), East of Sumatra (1953), Beneath the 12-Mile Reef (1953), Black Tuesday (1954), The Yellow Tomahawk (1954), The Raid (1954), The Court-Martial of Billy Mitchell (1955), Fort Yuma (1955), The Naked Street (1955), The Night of the Hunter (1955) , Wichita (1955), Robbers’ Roost (1955), The Long Gray Line (1955), Canyon River (1956), and Hold Back the Night (1956). Graves also battled such menaces as bug-eyed aliens in Killers from Space (1954), fanged teepee-shaped Venusians in It Conquered the World (1956), and gigantic grasshoppers in Beginning of the End (1957). He starred in the 1957 feature Bayou, which was later released under the title Poor White Trash. He was also seen in the films Death in Small Doses (1957), Wolf Larsen (1958) with Barry Sullivan, and A Stranger in My Arms (1959). Graves was also a familiar face on television from the 1950s, guest-starring in episodes of Gruen Guild Playhouse, Where’s Raymond, Schlitz Playhouse of Stars, The Pepsi-Cola Playhouse, Biff Baker, U.S.A., Studio 57, TV Reader’s Digest, Hallmark Hall of Fame, The Ed Sullivan Show, Fireside Theater, Studio One, Celebrity Playhouse, Matinee Theatre, Cavalcade of America, The Millionaire, Lux Video Theatre, Climax!, and Cimarron City. Graves starred as Jim Newton, owner of the Broken Wheel Ranch, in the juvenile western series about a boy and his horse, Fury, from 1955 to 1960. He also starred as stagecoach owner Christopher Cobb in the Australian-set western series Whiplash from 1960 to 1961. He was also featured in episodes of Route 66, The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, The Farmer’s Daughter, The

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Virginian, The Great Adventure as Daniel Boone, Disney’s Gallegher Goes West, Laredo, Branded, Run for Your Life, Daniel Boone, 12 O’Clock High, The F.B.I., The Invaders, The Red Skelton Show, The Jonathan Winters Show, Funny Face, The Sonny and Cher Show, Dinah!, The Mike Douglas Show, and The Dean Martin Show. He also directed his brother in a 1966 episode of Gunsmoke. Graves starred as Major Frank Whittaker in the 1963 Kraft Suspense Theatre two-part episode The Case Against Paul Ryker, and remained in the role with the subsequent World War II military crime drama Court Martial from 1965 to 1966. He replaced Steven Hill as leader of the Impossible Mission Force after the first season of Mission: Impossible in 1967, and continued with the series as Jim Phelps through 1973. The covert operations would begin with a hidden tape recorder containing the message “Good Morning Mr. Phelps. Your mission, should you decide to accept it….” After the particular mission was explained the tape would end with “as always, should you or any of your IM force be caught or killed, the Secretary will disavow any knowledge of your actions.” The tape would then self-destruct in a cloud of smoke. He also directed an episode of the series in 1972. He reprised his role as Jim Phelps when Mission: Impossible returned to the air from 1988 to 1990 as a replacement series during a writer’s strike. Graves also starred in the tele-films Valley of Mystery (1967), Call to Danger (1968), Call to Danger (1973), The President’s Plane Is Missing (1973), Scream of the Wolf (1974), The Underground Man (1974), Where Have All the People Gone? (1974), Dead Man on the Run (1975), SST: Death Flight (1977), The Gift of the Mind (1978), The Rebels (1979) as George Washington, The Memory of Eva Ryker (1980), the comedy special Steve Martin: Comedy Is Not Pretty (1980), Three Hundred Miles for Stephanie (1981), Best of Friends (1981), the Hammer House of Mystery and Suspense ghost story Tennis Court (1985), If It’s Tuesday, It Still Must Be Belgium (1987), Three Old Broads (2001), and With You in Spirit (2003). Graves starred as Palmer “Fred” Kirby in the television mini-series The Winds of War in 1983, and the sequel War and Remembrance in 1988. He also appeared in the recurring role of John “the Colonel” Camden in the series 7th Heaven from 1997 to 2007. Graves hosted the A&E Network cable channel’s

documentary series Biography from 1987 through the early 2000s. His other television credits include episodes of Buck Rogers in the 25th Century, Matt and Jenny, Simon & Simon, Fantasy Island, Murder, She Wrote, Life with Lucy, The Love Boat, The Golden Girls, Burke’s Law, Diagnosis Murder, House, Minoriteam, and Cold Case. He was also a voice actor on episodes of the animated series Mickey Mouse Works, House of Mouse, The Angry Beavers, and American Dad. Graves continued to appear in the occasional film throughout his career, with roles in A Rage to Live (1965), The Ballad of Josie (1967), Sergeant Ryker (1968), The Five Man Army (1969), Sidecar Racers (1975), the Bigfoot documentary The Mysterious Monsters (1976) as the narrator, Missile X: The Neutron Bomb Incident (1978), High Seas Hijack (1978), Survival Run (1979), and the sci-fi film Parts: The Clonus Horror (1979). He spoofed his often stolid screen persona as Captain Clarence Oveur in the 1980 farce Airplane! and 1982’s Airplane II: The Sequel. He was also seen in The Guns and the Fury (1981), Savannah Smiles (1982), Mad Mission III: Our Man from Bond Street (1984), and Number One with a Bullet (1987). He also had cameo roles in the films Addams Family Values (1993), House on Haunted Hill (1999), Men in Black II (2002), and Looney Tunes: Back in Action (2003). Graves was honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in October of 2009. He was married to Joan Endress from 1950, and she and their three daughters survive him.

GRAY, P AUL Bassist Paul Gray, who was a founding member of the heavy metal band Slipknot, died of an accidental drug overdose in an Urbandale, Iowa, motel room on May 24, 2010. He was 38. Gray was born in Los Angeles on April 8, 1972, and moved

Paul Gray

to Des Moines, Iowa, with his family in his youth. He was a founding member of Slipknot in 1995, and soon began playing under a pig mask as #2. He played on the band hit recordings Wait and Bleed (2001), Left Behind (2002), My Plague (2003), Duality (2005), Vermilion (2005), the Grammy-winning Before I Forget (2006), and Psychosocial (2009). Peter Graves

GRAYSMARK, JOHN British film production designer and art director John Graysmark died in Santa

171 Monica, California, on October 10, 2010. He was 75. Graysmark was born in London, England, on March 26, 1935. He began his career in England in the mid–1950s, working on Anatole Litvak’s Anastasia (1956). He was a draughtsman over the next decade on such films as Lucky Jim (1957), Concrete Jungle (1960), Gorgo (1961), The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone (1961), David Lean’s Lawrence of Arabia (1962), Summer Holiday (1963), The Yellow Rolls-Royce (1964), The Liquidator (1965), Half a Sixpence (1967), and Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968). He also served as an art director for the British television series The Champions and Department S in the late 1960s. He was art director for the films The Walking Stick (1970) and The Devil’s Widow (1970), and earned an Academy Award nomination for his work on 1972’s Young Winston. He also worked on the films The Man with the Golden Gun (1974), The Big Sleep (1978), Escape to Athena (1979), and Flash Gordon (1980). He earned a second Oscar nomination as production designer for the 1981 film Ragtime. His other film credits include Firefox (1982), The Lords of Discipline (1983), The Bounty (1984), Lifeforce (1985), Club Paradise (1986), Duet for One (1986), Superman IV: The Quest for Peace (1987), Honor Bound (1988), Gorillas in the Mist (1988), the tele-film Women and Men: Stories of Seduction (1990), White Hunter Black Heart (1990), Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves (1991), White Sands (1992), So I Married an Axe Murderer (1993), Blown Away (1994), Courage Under Fire (1996), Down (2001), and Dominion: Prequel to the Exorcist (2005).

GRAYSON , KATHRYN Singer and actress Kathryn Grayson, who starred in MGM musicals in the 1940s and 1950s, died at her home in Los Angeles on February 17, 2010. She was 88. She was born Zelma Kathryn Hedrick in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, on February 9, 1922. She trained as a singer from an early age, and moved to Los Angeles with her family while in her teens. Though she aspired to be an opera singer, she was persuaded to sign a contract at MGM by Louis B. Mayer. She made her film debut starring opposite Mickey Rooney in 1941’s Andy Hardy’s Private Secretary. She was also seen in the films The Vanishing Virginian (1942), Rio Rita (1942) with Abbott and

Kathryn Grayson

2010 • Obituaries

Costello, Seven Sweethearts (1942), and the wartime revue Thousands Cheer (1943). Grayson was established as a star in the 1945 hit Anchors Aweigh, with Gene Kelly and Frank Sinatra. Over the next decade, she costarred with such leading men as Howard Keel, Mario Lanza, and Gordon MacRae. She was seen in the musicals and operettas as Ziegfeld Follies (1945), Two Sisters from Boston (1946), Till the Clouds Roll By (1946), It Happened in Brooklyn (1947), The Kissing Bandit (1948), That Midnight Kiss (1949), Some of the Best (1949), The Toast of New Orleans (1950), Grounds for Marriage (1951), Show Boat (1951), Lovely to Look At (1952), The Desert Song (1953), So This Is Love (1953), and Kiss Me Kate (1953). Grayson left MGM in 1953, returned to the screen at Paramount for 1956’s The Vagabond King. She abandoned films to concentrate on stage productions, touring in such musicals as The Merry Widow, Rosalinda, Naughty Marietta, Man of La Mancha, and Camelot. She was featured on television in the variety series The Bob Hope Show, The Bob Crosby Show, What’s My Line?, The Pat Boone–Chevy Showroom, The Ed Sullivan Show, The Perry Como Show, and The Dean Martin Show. Grayson was also featured on television in dramatic roles in the series General Electric Theater, Playhouse 90, Lux Playhouse, Baretta, and Murder, She Wrote in the recurring role of Ideal Molloy. Grayson was married to actor John Shelton from 1941 to 1946, and to actor Johnny Johnston from 1947 to 1951. She is survived by her only child, daughter Patricia Towers.

GREEN, A LEX Canadian stuntman Alex Green, who was noted for his prowess spinning guns and cracking bullwhips, died of liver cancer in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada on June 20, 2010. He was 68. Green was born in Australia on January 19, 1942, and moved to Vancouver in the 1960s. He worked in numerous film and television productions from the early 1970s. He performed stunt work and appeared in small roles in such films as Little Big Man (1970), The Groundstar Conspiracy (1972), Christina (1974), Russian Roulette (1975), Shadow of the Hawk (1976), Buffalo Bill and the Indians, or Sitting Bull’s History Lesson (1976), Prophecy (1979), Bear Island (1979), The Change ling (1980), Stir Crazy (1980), Death Hunt (1981), Firebird 2015 AD (1981), Mother Load (1982), First Blood (1982), Spacehunter: Adventures in the Forbidden Zone (1983), Superman III (1983), Certain Fury (1985), The Journey of Natty Gann (1985), Rainbow War (1985), Fire with Fire (1986), Malone (1987), Stakeout (1987), Shoot to Kill (1988), Watchers (1988), The Experts (1989), Who’s Harry Crumb? (1989), The Fly II (1989), Dead Bang (1989), Renegades (1989), Short Time (1990), Run (1991), Bingo (1991), Mystery Date (1991), Unforgiven (1992), Stay Tuned (1992), Jennifer Eight (1992), White Fang 2: Myth of the White Wolf (1994), Timecop (1994), Strange and Rich (1994), Power of Attorney (1995), Malicious (1995), Man of the House (1995), The Scarlet Letter (1995), Bounty Hunters (1996), Happy Gilmore (1996), Homeward Bound 2: Lost in San Francisco (1996), Carpool (1996), Romeo + Juliet (1996), Masterminds (1997), The Edge (1997), 2 Into 1 (1997),

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Hardball (1997), The Mask of Zorro (1998) as Anthony Hopkin’s stunt double, Wrongfully Accused (1998), Instinct (1999), Dudley Do-Right (1999), Final Destination (2000), Screwed (2000), The Last Stop (2000), Shanghai Noon (2000), Scary Movie (2000), Duets (2000), Chain of Fools (2000), Camouflage (2001), See Spot Run (2001), 3000 Miles to Graceland (2001), Exit Wounds (2001), Freddy Got Fingered (2001), Children of the Corn: Revelation (2001), Thir13en Ghosts (2001), D-Tox (2002), Lone Hero (2002), Ballistic: Ecks vs. Sever (2002), Trapped (2002), Deadly Little Secrets (2002), Slap Shot

GREEN, P AMELA British model Pamela Green, whose brief film career was most noted for her role as a scantily clad victim of the a homicidal photographer in Michael Powell’s classic 1960 thriller Peeping Tom, died of leukemia at her home on the Isle of Wight on May 7, 2010. She was 81. Green was born in Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey, England, on March 28, 1929. She began posing as a nude model while in her teens, and performed as a chorus dancer in West End show. She met theatrical photographer George Harrison Marks while working as a model in 1953. They soon teamed professionally and personally, producing provocative postcards for sale in shops in Soho. They published the racy magazine Kamera, which usually featured Green in various stages of undress. She and Marks also produced a series of 8mm films, with the blonde bombshell Green usually starring. She would sometimes change her look and name to become the raven-tressed Princess Sonmar and red-headed siren Rita Landre. Director Michael Powell cast her as the illfated Milly, a model for psychopathic photographer Karl Boehm, who used his camera tripod as a murder weapon to capture his subjects terror as he impaled them in the controversial thriller Peeping Tom (1960).

Alex Green

2: Breaking the Ice (2002), I Spy (2002), X-Men 2 (2003), Paycheck (2003), Freddy vs. Jason (2003), The Delicate Art of Parking (2003), Scooby Doo 2 Monsters Unleashed (2004), Catwoman (2004) as Haile Barry’s whip coach, The Perfect Score (2004), Underclassman (2005), Chaos (2005), Fido (2006), Deck the Halls (2006), Night at the Museum (2006), In the Name of the King: A Dungeon Siege Tale (2007), AVPR: Aliens vs. Predator — Requiem (2007), Whisper (2007), Postal (2007), The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (2007), BloodRayne: Deliverance (2007), Honeymoon (2007), Defunct (2008), Messages Deleted (2009), The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus (2009), Stan Helsing (2009), Rampage (2009), and Cats & Dogs: The Revenge of Kitty Galore (2010). Green worked frequently in television on such series as Airwolf, Bordertown, 21 Jumpstreet, Lonesome Dove: The Series, No Adults Allowed, Poltergeist: The Legacy, First Wave, Dark Angel, Freedom, Andromeda, Just Cause, Peacemakers, Battlestar Galactica, Smallville, Dead Zone, and Psych. He also worked on the tele-films Gunsmoke: Return to Dodge (1987), The Gunfighters (1987), Silent Motive (1991), Double, Double, Toil and Trouble (1993), The Adventures of Captain Zoom in Outer Space (1995), Deadlocked: Escape From Zone 14 (1995), The Limbic Region (1996), The Escape (1997), The Spree (1998), Heaven’s Fire (1999), The Man Who Used to Be Me (2000), Becoming Dick (2000), Death Train to the Pacific (2001), Class Warfare (2001), Monte Walsh (2003), The Cult (2005), Painkiller Jane (2005), Kraken: Tentacles of the Deep (2006), The Andromeda Strain (2008), Kiss Me Deadly (2008), Stargate: Continuum (2008), and The Gambler, The Girl and the Gunslinger (2009).

Pamela Green

Green was featured in a small role in the 1961 sci-fi disaster film The Day the Earth Caught Fire, and in 1963’s The Chimney Sweeps. She was also on display in the nudie films Naked as Nature Intended (1961) and The Naked World of Harrison Marks (1965). She split with Marks in 1967, and soon began working with photographer Douglas Webb. She assisted him as a still photograph assistant on several films over the next decade, and had a small role in the 1975 Tyburn horror film Legend of the Werewolf. She and Webb retired to the Isle of Wight in the mid–1980s, where he died in 1996.

GREENING, JACK Actor Jack Greening died in Toledo, Ohio, on September 29, 2010. He was 88. Greening was born in London, England, on April 7, 1922. He served with the British Royal Marines during World War II, and settled in Canada in 1949. He performed on stage and live television in Toronto, and continued his acting career after moving to Los Angeles in the early 1960s. He appeared in small roles in the

173 films The Three Stooges Go Around the World in a Daze (1963), What a Way to Go! (1964), Quick Before It Melts (1964), My Fair Lady (1964), and Where Love Has Gone

Jack Greening

(1964). Greening was also seen on television in episodes of Encounter, Alcoa Premiere, King of Diamonds, Thriller, The Gallant Men, and 12 O’Clock High. He left acting to take a job with the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company.

2010 • Obituaries the 1977 television docu-drama Wilma, starring Shirley Jo Finney as Olympic medalist Wilma Rudolph and featuring Denzel Washington in an early role. He created a series of short vignettes highlighting sports events in history with This Day in Sports, Olympic Moments, and Olympic Events. He also crafted documentary compilations of many of the Summer and Winter Olympic competitions of the 1980s and 1990s.

GREYTAK, GENE Gene Greytak, a retired real estate broker whose resemblance to Pope John Paul II gave him a career as a papal impersonator in films, television, and public appearances, died of cancer at his home in North Tustin, California, on February 28, 2010. He was 84. Greytak was born in Trumbull, Connecticut, in November 14, 1925. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II, and was wounded in action during the Battle of the Bulge. He and his family moved to California in 1958, where he embarked on a career in real estate. His remarkable likeness to the new pontiff, John Paul II, who took office in 1978, brought him offers as a celebrity impersonator. Greytak, who

GREENSPAN, BUD Documentary filmmaker Jonah “Bud” Greenspan died of complications from Parkinson’s disease at his home in New York City on December 25, 2010. He was 84. Greenspan was born in New York City on September 18, 1926. He began his career in radio as a sportscaster with New York’s station WMGM in 1947. He produced the 1952 documentary short, The Strongest Man in the World, about weightlifter John Davis. He also wrote magazine artiGene Greytak

Bud Greenspan

cles and produced television commercials in the 1950s. He achieved recognition with his television documentary Jesse Owens Returns to Berlin, about the legendary Olympic runner’s return visit to the scene of the triumphs at the 1936 Olympics. Greenspan continued to produce documentaries about Olympic athletes, and earned an Emmy Award in 1976 for his series of specials, The Olympiad. He also produced and directed

was a devout Catholic, debated for several years whether he wished to pursue the opportunity, wanting to insure that he did nothing inappropriate while playing his famous look-alike. He impersonated the Pope on latenight television shows with Johnny Carson, Jay Leno, and Arsenio Hall. He was also featured in episodes of such series as Night Court, ALF, Just the Ten of Us, The Golden Girls, Murphy Brown, Picket Fences, The Wayans Bros., and Ally McBeal. He also played John Paul II in such films as Wishful Thinking (1990), Repossessed (1990), Hot Shots! (1991), Sister Act (1992), Naked Gun 33 1/3: The Final Insult (1994), Just the Ticket (1999), and Miss Cast Away (2004).

GRIFFITHS, CHUCK Vice Admiral Charles Henry Griffiths, who was featured in the 1955 sci-fi film It Came from Beneath the Sea, died of cancer in Annapolis, Maryland, on April 1, 2010. He was 88. Griffiths was born in Franklin, Pennsylvania, on March 15, 1922. He attended the U.S. Naval Academy during World War II, graduating in 1946. He joined the submarine corps, serving on the USS Cochino, USS Sablefish, USS Hammerhead, and the USS Tang. He

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was executive officer aboard the Hammerhead when he was asked to play Lt. Griff, Kenneth Tobey’s executive officer, in the 1955 classic It Came from Beneath the Sea. He subsequently took command of the USS Wahoo.

It Rich, The Big Payoff, Wheel of Fortune, Choose Up Sides, To Tell the Truth, Two for the Money, Supermarket Sweep, Fractured Phrases, What’s My Line?, and I’ve Got a Secret.

GROSSMANN, S UZANNE Stage actress Suzanne Grossmann died of complications from chronic obstructed pulmonary disorder (COPD) in Los Angeles on August 19, 2010. She was 72. Grossmann was born in Basel, Switzerland, on December 21, 1937. She was featured as the French Princess Alais in the original Broadway production of A Lion in Winter in 1966. Her other Broadway credits include the 1968 revival of Cyrano de Bergerac as Roxane, The Show Off (1968), and Private Lives (1969). She was also featured in a 1967 television version of The Diary of Anne Frank, and the 1967 Canadian film Don’t Let It Kill You. She was Cleopatra in the documentary short subjects Shaw vs. Shakespeare in 1970. Grossmann was also a noted Chuck Griffiths

Griffiths was soon trained to serve on nuclear submarines, becoming commander of the US Simon Bolivar in 1964. He continued to rise through the ranks, becoming Rear Admiral in 1971. He held numerous positions with the navy and was a Vice Admiral and Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Submarine Warfare in Washington, D.C., when he retired in 1980.

GROSS, L LOYD Television director Lloyd Gross, who directed numerous gameshows from the 1950s through the 1980s, died in an Anderson, South Carolina, hospice on October 16, 2010, Gross was born in Weehawken, New Jersey, and was raised in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. He served with distinction in the U.S. Army during World War II, earning a Silver Star during the Battle of the Bulge. He began working for CBS television after the war, where he was soon directing such series as The Perry Como Show, The Mel Torme Show, Tonight on Broadway, and I Remember Mama. He also directed early television productions of The Miss America Pageants and the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parades. He was best known as director for numerous television gameshows including Beat the Clock, Strike

Lloyd Gross

Suzanne Grossmann

playwright, adapting There’s One in Every Marriage (1972) and Chermin de Fer (1973) for the Broadway stage. She also wrote adaptations of such plays as A Flea in Her Ear, La Vie Parisienne, Alpha and Omega, and Number Our Days, which were staged in New York and Los Angeles. She also penned several tele-plays for the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. including Nellie, Showstopper, and Sarah, and wrote for the daytime soap opera Ryan’s Hope.

GROVES, H ERMAN Television writer Herman Groves died in Laguna Woods, California, on December 5, 2010. He was 73. Groves was born in Baltimore, Maryland, on September 21, 1927. He began working in television in the late 1950s as a production assistant on the series The Thin Man. He was soon scripting episodes of such series as The Restless Gun, Hotel de Paree, Tate, Bonanza, The Detectives Starring Robert Taylor, Have Gun —Will Travel, Surfside 6, The Rifleman, The Gallant Men, The Untouchables, The Travels of Jaimie McPheeters, The Lieutenant, The Greatest Show on Earth, Temple Houston, The Virginian, Mr. Novak, Rawhide, Daniel Boone, Lost in Space, Mister Roberts, Bewitched, The F.B.I., The Iron Horse, The Name of the Game, Bearcats!, O’Hara U.S. Treasury, Longstreet, Gunsmoke, Harry O, The Blue Knight, The

175 Fitzpatricks, The Bionic Woman, Battlestar Galactica, The Dukes of Hazzard, 240-Robert, Vega$, Fantasy Island, Airwolf, and Hunter. Groves also served as a producer on the series Daniel Boone, Hawaii Five-0, and Sword of Justice, and scripted numerous television productions for Disney. His tele-film credits include The Mystery of Edward Sims (1968), Secrets of the Pirates’ Inn

Herman Groves

(1969), The Secret of Boyne Castle (1969), Ride a Northbound Horse (1969), Strange Monster of Strawberry Cove (1971), Alvin the Magnificent (1973), The Whiz Kid and the Mystery of Riverton (1974), Return of the Big Cat (1974), and The Whiz Kid and the Carnival Caper (1976). He also wrote the 1975 Disney feature The Strongest Man in the World starring Kurt Russell.

GUCCIONE, B OB Bob Guccione, the erotique entrepreneur who founded Penthouse magazine, and produced the 1979 big-budget X-rated Roman Empire film epic Caligula, died of complications from lung cancer in a Plano, Texas, hospital on October 20, 2010. He was 79. Guccione was born in Brooklyn, New York, on December 17, 1930. He went to Europe in the 1950s, where he worked as a painter and greeting-card cartoonist. He began publishing Penthouse in England in 1965 as a low-brow competitor to Hugh Hefner’s Playboy. Guccione often photographed the nude models, or “Penthouse Pets,” in the early years himself, using

Bob Guccione

2010 • Obituaries

a diffused, soft focus-look that became the magazine’s trademark look. He also crafted a more exploitational editorial content, including the popular Penthouse Forum with purported letters from readers. Penthouse began being published in the United States in 1969, and Guccione challenged Hefner, offering more explicit photo layouts and content. The magazine’s publication of nude photos of the new Miss America, Vanessa Williams, in 1984, led to sold out issues, but resulted in Ms. Williams relinquishing her title. Forming General Media Inc., Guccione moved into films as producer of the multi-million dollar epic about Rome’s most infamous ruler, Caligula. The film boasted an impressive case, with Malcolm McDowell in the title role, Peter O’Toole as the Emperor Tiberius, and John Gielgud and Helen Mirren in leading roles. Gore Vidal wrote the screenplay and Italian director Tinto Brass was chosen to direct, but both men later disavowed their involvement. After three years of production, Guccione edited in more explicit footage of Penthouse models before the film’s release in 1979. It took a critical and financial drubbing, and an ill-fated Atlantic City casino project further depleted his revenue. Guccione was publisher of the digest Dear Penthouse featuring letters from readers, Viva with male nudes, and the racy comic book Penthouse Comix. He and his third-wife, long-time collaborator Kathy Keeton, also published the health magazine Longevity and the popular science fact/fiction publication Omni before her death from cancer in 1997. His financial empire crumbled in the 1980s and 1990s, as the internet supplanted the print media for adult content, and General Media filed for bankruptcy in 2003.

GUEST, DON Film production manager and producer Don Guest died in Tours, France, on April 23, 2010. He was 75. Guest was born in Oklahoma on July 16, 1934, and moved to Los Angeles with his family as a child. He began his career working with ZivTV, and early television syndication company, in the late 1950s. He worked in television as a production manager for the time-traveling comedy series It’s About Time in 1966. He also served as production manager for the films Michelangelo Antonioni’s Zabriskie Point (1970), Peter Bogdanovich’s The Last Picture Show (1971), Sam Peckinpah’s The Getaway (1972), Breakheart Pass (1975), Herbie Goes to Monte Carlo (1977), Second Thoughts (1983), The Osterman Weekend (1983), and At Close Range (1986). He was an associate producer for the 1974 film The White Dawn, and produced the films Blue Collar (1978), Hammett (1982), The Osterman Weekend (1983), Paris, Texas (1984), At Close Range (1986), and Shadow of China (1990). GUFFROY, PIERRE French art director Pierre Guffroy, who won an Academy Award for his work on Roman Polanski’s 1979 film Tess, died in Burgundy, France, on September 27, 2010. He was 84. Guffroy was born in Paris on April 22, 1926. He began working in films as an assistant art director in the late 1950s on such films as The Adventures of Arsene Lupin (1957), Louis Malle’s Frantic (1958), Tabarin (1958), Serenade of Texas (1958), The Hunchback of Paris (1959), Pick-

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pocket (1959), The Trial of Joan of Arc (1962), and Devil of Paris (1962). He served as production designer for Marcel Camus’ Oscar-winning film Black Orpheus, and Jean Cocteau’s experimental The Testament of Orpheus (1960). Guffroy worked on films for many of Europe’s leading directors of the 1960s with such credits as Robert Hossein’s The Vampire of Dusseldorf (1965), Jean Luc Godard’s Alphaville (1965) and Pierrot le Fou (1965), Raoul Levy’s The Defector (1966), Francois Truffaut’s The Bride Wore Black (1968), John Berry’s A Tout Casser (1968), Luis Bunuel’s The Milky Way (1969), Marc Allegret’s The Ball of Count Orgel (1970), and Marcel Camus’ Atlantic Wall (1970). His other film credits include Is Paris Burning? (1966), The Big Softie Don Guidice

York (1976), Tilt (1979), and Hard to Hold (1984). He was an assistant editor for the films Jeremiah Johnson (1972), Freebie and the Bean (1974), Bobby Deerfield (1977), Promises in the Dark (1979), Police Academy 2: Their First Assignment (1985), and Spirit of the Eagle (1991). He also worked on the tele-films I Take These Men (1983), The House of God (1984), Club Med (1986), Second Serve (1986), The Neon Empire (1989), The Court-Martial of Jackie Robinson (1990), Menu for Murder (1991), and Stranger in the Family (1991).

Pierre Guffroy

(1967), Rider on the Rain (1970), Who Cares: Anatomy of a Delivery Boy (1971), Love Me Strangely (1971), Cesare and Rosalie (1972), The Burned Barns (1973), Paul and Michelle (1974), Creezy (1974), La Gifle (1974), Bertrand Tavernier’s Let Joy Reign Supreme (1975), and Mado (1976). He was production designer for several more Bunuel films including The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972), The Phantom of Liberty (1974), and That Obscure Object of Desire (1977). He worked frequently with director Roman Polanski, teaming in The Tenant (1976), Tess (1979) which earned him another Oscar nomination, Pirates (1986), Frantic (1988), and Death and the Maiden (1994). Guffroy’s other film credits include Je Vous Aime (1980), Jamais Avant le Mariage (1982), L’Argent (1983), Costa-Gavras’ Hanna K. (1983), Max My Love (1986), Twist Again in Moscow (1986), The Unbearable Lightness of Being (1988), Milos Forman’s Valmont (1989), Henri Venreuil’s Mother (1991), Giorgino (1994), Portraits Chinois (1996), and Pop Corn (1998).

GUIDICE, DON Film and television editor Don Guidice died in Newport Beach, California, on March 11, 2010. He was 77. Guidice was born in Los Angeles on October 14, 1932. He worked as an assistant editor on the films It Happened at the World’s Fair (1963), The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965), and They Shoot Horses, Don’t They? (1969). He served as editor on the films A New Leaf (1971), The Yakuza (1974), Three Days of the Condor (1975), Harry and Walter Go to New

GUIOMAR , JULIEN French actor Julien Guiomar, who was featured as the police colonel in Costa-Gavras’ 1969 Greek political thriller Z, died in Monpazier, France, on November 22, 2010. He was 82. Guiomar was born in Morlaix, France, on May 3, 1928. He began his career on stage in the early 1950s and made his television debut later in the decade. He was featured in such television productions as Misere et Noblesse (1958), Quatre-Vingt-Treize (1962), Mon Oncle Benjamin (1963), Le Chavalier de Maison Rouge (1963), Woyzeck (1964), Les Cabinets Particuliers (1964), Une Nuit Sans Lendemain (1965), La Malade Imaginaire (1971), Bouvard et Pecuchet (1971), On l’Appelait Tamerlan (1973), La Famille Grossfelder (1974), Les Borgia ou le Sang Dore (1977), Le Sang des Atrides (1981), Le Secret des Andrones (1982), Les Joies de la Famille Pinelli (1982), Les Tribulations de Manuel (1982), Les Beaux

Julien Guiomar

177 Quartiers (1983), La Metamorphose (1983), Un Homme va Etre Assassine (1984), Stradivarius (1985), Commissaire Chabert: Le Tueur du Zodiaque (1991) as Chabert, Martineau … et le Portrait de Femme (1993), Si le Loup y Etait (1993), Cheques en Boite (1994), Commissaire Chabert: Mort d’Une Fugitive (1994), Le Malingot (1995), L’Audace d’y Croire (1995), Le Secret de Julia (1996), La Bastide Blanche (1997), Qui Mange Qui? (1998) as Rene, Ca Commence a bien Faire! (1998), La Nuit des Hulottes (1999), Le Secret de la Belle de Mai (2002), Qui Mange Quoi? (2002), Lagardere (2003), and Qui Mange Quand? (2004). Guiomar starred as Monseigneur Marguerite in Philippe de Broca’s 1966 anti-war surreal comedy film King of Hearts with Alan Bates and Genevieve Bujold. He also appeared in the films The Thief of Paris (1967), All Mad About Him (1967), Pour un Amour Lointain (1968), The Golden Claws of the Cat Girl (1968), Ballad for a Dog (1969), Z (1969), The Milky Way (1969), L’Auvergnant et l’Autobus (1969), A Very Curious Girl (1969), The Horse (1970), Borsalino (1970), The Married Couple, Year II (1971), Easy Down There! (1971), Decembre (1972), La Violenza: Quinto Potere (1972), The Strangler (1972), The Right of the Maddest (1973), Property Is No Longer a Theft (1973), The Edifying and Joyous Story of Colinot (1973), A Whale That Had a Toothache (1974), Tender Dracula (1974), Say It with Flowers (1974), Lucky Pierre (1974), Kisses Till Monday (1974), Aloise (1975), Section Speciale (1975), French Provincial (1975), Incorrigible (1975), The French Detective (1975), The Wing and the Thigh (1976), Mado (1976), Barocco (1976), L’Animal (1977), The Twisted Detective (1977), The Spat (1978), These Sorcerers Are Mad (1978), The Small Timers (1978), Je Vous Ferai Aimer la Vie (1979), Caro Papa (1979), Milo-Milo (1979), I’m Photogenic (1980), The Telephone Bar (1980), Inspector Blunder (1980), Est-ce Bien Raisonnable? (1981), Un Chien dans un Jeu de Quilles (1983), Equateur (1983), Gramps Is in the Resistance (1983), Carmen (1984), My New Partner (1984), L’Arbre sous la Mer (1985), Le Matou (1985), The Debutante (1986), Jubiaba (1987), Last Summer in Tangiers (1987), Flag (1987), The Two Crocodiles (1987), Terre Sacree (1985), Lucifer et l’Horloger (1989), African Timber (1989), Plein Fer (1990), Leolo (1992), Je m’Appelle Victor (1993), Violetta, the Motorcycle Queen (1997), Let There Be Light (1998), Smarten Up! (1999), J’ai Faim!!! (2001), Reptil (2002), and Clandestino (2003).

GUMMADI Indian character actor Gummadi, who was featured in over 500 Teluga language films during his 60 year career, died in Hyderabad, India, of complications from diabetes and heart disease on January 26, 2010. He was 84. He was born Gummadi Venkateswara Rao in Ravikampadu, Guntur, India, on July 9, 1925. He made his film debut in the early 1950s, and was best known for his depiction of Bheeshma, Dashratha and Balram in numerous mythological films, often co-starring with N.T. Rama Rao. His many film credits include Adrushta Deepudu (1950), Pitchi Pullaiah (1953), Thodu Dongalu (1954), Kanyasulkam (1955), M.L.A. (1957), Where Woman Rule (1958), Sabhash Ramudu (1959), The Loyal Servant (1959), Lord

2010 • Obituaries

Gummadi

Balaji (1960), The Story of Goddess Renuka (1960), Two Friends (1961), Mahamantri Timmarusu (1962), Kula Gothralu (1962), Light and Shadows (1964), Pandava Vanavasam (1965), Gopanna the Herdsman (1968), Bhale Rangudu (1969), The Truth of Lord Krishna (1971), Changed Times (1972), Jeevana Tarangalu (1973), Sita’s Wedding (1976), Jyothy (1977), Kalpana (1977), Nelavanka (1981), Maro Malupu (1982), Ekalavya (1982), Ee Charitra Ye Siraatho? (1982), Gaaju Bommalu (1983), Pelli Pusthakam (1991), Rajendrudru Gajendrudru (1993), Mutamestri (1993), Govindha Govindha (1993), Dharma Chakram (1995), and Repallelo Radjha (2001).

GURU Keith Edward Elam, who was known as the rap artist Guru when he teamed with DJ Premier as the hip-hop duo Gang Starr, died of cancer on April 19, 2010. He was 48. Elam was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts, on July 17, 1961. He began his career in rap under the name MC Keithy E, but became Guru when

Guru

he formed Gang Starr in 1987. He and DJ Premier recorded six popular albums over the next 15 years, including Moment of Truth (1998) and Full Clip: A Decade of Gang Starr (1999). Guru also released a series of four solo albums, Jazzmatazz, from 1993 through 2007. His final album, Guru 8.0: Lost and Found, was released in 2009.

GWENVER, MARGARET Actress Margaret Gwenver, who was featured in the recurring role of Dr.

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Margaret Sedgwick in the daytime soap opera The Guiding Light from 1982 through 1997, died in New York on October 18, 2010. She was 83. Gwenver was born on October 10, 1926. She began performing with the Margaret Webster Shakespeare Touring Company in the 1940s. She performed on the New York Stage and founded the Tanglewood Theater with her husband, John Sedwick. Billed as Margaret Gwenver, she was featured on The Guiding Light for more than 25 years. She also appeared in episodes of the soaps One Life to Live and Santa Barbara, and a 1987 episode of the sitcom Amen.

HADDON, C HARLES British pop singer Charles Haddon, the lead singer of the pop trio Ou Est Le Swimming Pool, died during the Belgian Pukkelpop rock festival in Hasselt, Belgium, when he climbed a telecommunications tower behind the main stage and leaped to his death in an apparent suicide, on August 20, 2010. He was 22. Haddon was born in Northamptonshire, England, in 1988. He moved to Camden,

Charles Haddon

North London, in 2008, where he teamed with Joe Hutchinson and Caan Capan to form the electro-pop group Ou Est Le Swimming Pool. They released their debut single, “Dance the Way I Feel” in 2009, and “These New Knights” and “Jackson’s Last Stand” in 2010. They also opened for the band La Roux on their United Kingdom tour. Their debut album, Christ Died for Our Synths, was scheduled for release in October of 2010.

HAGOPIAN, J. MICHAEL Armenian-American documentary filmmaker J. Michael Hagopian died at his home in Thousand Oaks, California, on December 10, 2010. He was 97. Hagopian was born in Kharpert, Western Armenia, on October 20, 1913. He survived a purge of Armenians by the Ottoman Empire that commenced in 1915 and reportedly resulted in the death of over a million of his countrymen. He came to the United States with his family in 1922. He graduated from UC Berkeley in 1937, and earned a master’s in political science the following year. He received a doctorate in international relations from Harvard in 1943. He served in the Army Air Force during World War II, and taught at various universities after his dis-

J. Michael Hagopian

charge. He began working in films as a documenatarian in the early 1950s, forming his own production company, Atlantis Films. He helmed over 70 educational films and documentaries during his career, including many that dealt with his Armenian heritage. He recorded the memories of many survivors of the era in Where Are My People? (1965) and the Emmy-nominated The Forgotten Genocide (1975). Many of his interviews were included in the trilogy Voices from the Lake (2000), Germany and the Secret Genocide (2003), and The River Ran Red (2008). Hagopian was also the founder of the Armenian Film Foundation in 1979, to preserve Armenian culture and heritage.

HAIM, COREY Actor Corey Haim, whose career peaked as a teen star in the 1980s, died of a likely drug overdose in a Burbank, California, hospital on March 10, 2010. He was 38. Haim was born in Toronto, Canada, on December 23, 1971. He began working in television commercials at the age of 10, and made his film debut in Firstborn in 1984. He starred as Larry in the television series The Edison Twins from 1984 to 1985, and was featured in the 1985 tele-film A Time to Live. He also starred as Matthew Wiggins in the shortlived comedy series Roomies in 1987. Haim was also seen in the films Secret Admirer (1985), the 1985 adaptation of Stephen King’s Silver Bullet, and Murphy’s Romance (1985). He starred in the title role in 1986’s Lucas

Corey Haim

179 with Charlie Sheen, and battled vampires with Corey Feldman in 1987’s The Lost Boys. He finished out the decade appearing in the popular features License to Drive (1988), Watchers (1988), Dream a Little Dream (1989), and Prayer of the Rollerboys (1990). Haim’s career was damaged by drug abuse, and many of his subsequent films were released straight to video. He continued to appear in such films as Fast Getaway (1991), Dream Machine (1991), Blown Away (1992), Oh, What a Night (1992), The Double-O Kid (1992), Anything for Love (1993), National Lampoon’s Last Resort (1994), Fast Getaway II (1994), Dream a Little Dream 2 (1995), Life 101 (1995), Demolition High (1996), Shooter on the Side (1996), Snowboard Academy (1996), Fever Lake (1996), Demolition University (1997), Busted (1997), Never Too Late (1997), and The Back Lot Murders (2002). He also appeared in the tele-films Merlin (1998) as Wilf, and Without Malice (2000). He guested on television episodes of PSI Factor: Chronicles of the Paranormal and Big Wolf on Campus. He was also a voice actor in an episode of Robot Chicken. Haim appeared in a cameo role in the 2003 comedy film Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star. He joined with longtime friend and frequent co-star Corey Feldman for the A&E reality show The Two Coreys, which aired for two seasons. Haim acknowledged that his dependence on drugs had damaged his career and life in numerous interviews in the 2000s. He had remained active in recent years, appearing in the films Universal Groove (2007), Lost Boys: The Tribe (2008) reprising his role as Sam Emerson, Crank: High Voltage (2009), and Shark City (2009). He had reportedly finished filming New Terminal Hotel, American Sunset, and Decisions, before his death.

HAINEY, BETTY JEAN Betty Turnbull, who appeared on stage and screen as child actress Betty Jean Hainey in the 1930s and 1940s, died in Corona del Mar, California, on October 20, 2010. She was 86. Hainey was born in Los Angeles on August 4, 1924, to a vaudeville family. She performed on stage from an early age, working with such comedy stars as Olsen and Johnson. She was featured in over a dozen films during her career including Mary Jane’s Pa (1935) with Guy Kibbee, Dinky (1935) with Jackie Cooper, I Live My Life (1935), Little Miss Nobody (1936) with Jane

Betty Jean Hainey

2010 • Obituaries

Withers, Dimples (1936) with Shirley Temple, Billy the Kid Returns (1938) with Roy Rogers, Everybody’s Hobby (1939), High School (1940), Star Dust (1940), All This, and Heaven Too (1940), The Courtship of Andy Hardy (1942) with Mickey Rooney, The Postman Didn’t Ring (1942), Calling Dr. Gillespie (1942), and Nobody’s Darling (1943). She left films during World War II to marry and raise a family. She studied art, and became noted for creating art exhibitions in the Newport Beach area from the late 1960s through the early 1980s. She was also co-owner of the TLK Gallery from 1982 to 1985.

HAISMAN, MERVYN British television writer Mervyn Haisman died in England on October 29, 2010. He was 82. Haisman was born in Woolwich, south London, England, on March 15, 1928. He began his career as an actor in the early 1960s, appearing in an episode of the television series No Hiding Place. He was best known for co-writing the three story arcs for the popular British science fiction series Doctor Who in 1967 and 1968, when Patrick Troughton starred as the Doctor. Haisman and Henry Lincoln (Henry Sosman) created the Yeti for the 1967 episode “The Abominable Snowmen.” They also scripted the Yeti’s return for the 1968 episode “The Web of Fear,” which also introduced

Mervyn Haisman

the recurring character Alistair Gordon LethbridgeStewart, frequently referred to as The Brigadier. Haisman and Lincoln’s final outing with Doctor Who was 1968’s “The Dominators,” which featured the alien villains the Quarks, though disagreements with the producers led to the episode being credited to the pseudonym Norman Ashby. The duo also scripted an episode of Emergency Ward 10, and co-wrote the 1968 horror film The Crimson Cult (aka Curse of the Crimson Altar), one of Boris Karloff ’s final films. Haisman also wrote episodes of such series as Dr. Finlay’s Casebook, The Inside Man, The Expert, Codename, Ryan International, Hadleigh, The Intruder, Crown Court, The Carnforth Practice, Warship, Oil Strike North, Jubilee, The Onedin Line, Squadron, Jane which was adapted for the 1987 adventure film Jane and the Lost City, The Pyrates, Howards’ Way, and A Twist in the Tale.

HALLBERG, NILS Swedish actor Nils Hallberg, whose film career began as a child in the 1930s

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and continued through character roles in the 1970s, died in Sweden on October 8, 2010. He was 89. Hallberg was born in Stockholm, Sweden, on September 18, 1921. He began his career as a child actor in such films as Anderssonskans Kalle (1934), The Girls’ Alfred (1935), Alla tiders Karlsson (1936), and We at Solglantan (1939). He graduated to supporting roles in the 1940s, with roles in Froken Kyrkratta (1941), Sun Over Klara (1942), My People Are Not Yours (1944), The People of Hemso (1944), Jagad (1945), You Who Are About to Enter (1945), The Girls in Smaland (1945), Harald Handfaste (1946), Lazy Lena and Blue Eyed Per (1947), The People

Tony Halme

Nils Hallberg

from Simlangs Valley (1947), Dynamite (1947), Maria (1947), Soldier’s Reminder (1947), Two Women (1947), Port of Call (1948), Private Bom (1948), The Street (1949), Father Bom (1949), Customes Officer Bom (1951), One Summer of Happiness (1951), Bom the Flyer (1952), Cafe Lunchrasten (1954), Storm over Tjuro (1954), Salka Valka (1954), Time of Desire (1954), The People of Hemso (1955), Nattbarn (1956), Lille Fridolf och Jag (1956), The Master Detective Lives Dangerously (1957), Mannequin in Red (1958), Lend Me Your Wife (1959), Ryttare i Blatt (1959), Ticket to Paradise (1962), Lady in White (1962), The Yellow Car (1963), Wild West Story (1964), Sailors (1964), Tofflan (1967), Firmafesten (1972), Brollopet (1973), and The Last Adventure (1974).

HALME, TONY Finnish boxer, actor, politician and professional wrestler Tony Halme, who was known as Ludvig Borga when he competed in the World Wrestling Federation (WWF/WWE), was found dead of a self-inflicted gunshot wound at his apartment in Helsinki, Finland, on January 10, 2010. He was 47. The coroner report indicated that he had been dead for two days before his body was discovered. Halme was born in Helsinki, on January 6, 1963. He was trained as a wrestler by Verne Gagne, and made his pro debut as The Viking with the Universal Wrestling Federation (UWF) in 1990. He spent the next several years competing in Japan, where he often teamed with Scott Norton. He was also featured as the Viking (Viikinki) in the Finnish version of the television series American Gladiators (Gladiaattorit) in the early 1990s. He joined the WWF in July of 1993 as Ludvig Borga,

where he battled such superstars as Lex Luger, Tatanka, and Razor Ramon. He suffered an ankle injury in early 1994, and left the WWE soon after. He subsequently competed with the Catch Wrestling Association, where he briefly held the World Heavyweight Championship. Halme shifted from wrestling to Mixed Martial Arts, where he had the distinction of being the first opponent to lose to Ultimate Fighting Championship legend Randy Couture in 1997. He also appeared in small roles a handful of action films including Death Match (1994), Fist of the North Star (1995), Die Hard: With a Vengeance (1995), American Tigers (1996), Whatever It Takes (1998), and Ponterosa (2001). He turned to politics in the early 2000s, where his right-wing libertarian views earned him a seat in the Finnish Parliament in 2003 as a candidate of the True Finns party. His controversial politics were compounded by his frequent legal difficulties resulting from drug and alcohol abuse. His mental and physical health continued to deteriorate and he was committed to a mental hospital in March of 2006. He completed his term with the Finnish Parliament later in the year and was granted a disability pension.

HAMER, JOSEPH Actor Joseph Hamer died in East Hampton, New York, on October 15, 2010. He was 78. Hamer was born in Dayton, Ohio, on July 29, 1932. He studied acting while in college, and was fea-

Joseph Hamer

181

2010 • Obituaries

tured in numerous radio and television commercials. He appeared frequently on the New York stage from the early 1960s, and made his Broadway debut in The Great White Hope in 1968. He also appeared on television in episodes of The Corner Bar, the soap opera Ryan’s Hope as a private detective in 1977, ABC Afterschool Specials, and Split Ends. Hamer was also featured in small roles in the films The Sentinel (1977), It’s My Turn (1980), Paternity (1981), *batteries not included (1987), and Driving Me Crazy (1988).

HAMPLE , STUART Cartoonist and playwright Stuart Hample died of cancer at his home in Manhattan, New York, on September 19, 2010. He was 84. Hample was born in Binghamton, New York, on January 6, 1926. He served in the Submarine Service with the U.S. Navy during World War II, and began working in advertising after the war. He developed a routine as a musical cartoonist, sketching cartoons to music for children’s programs for symphony orchestras. He was soon hosting the Buffalo, New York, children’s television programs Cartoon Capers and Junior Jamboree. He became a regular performer on the CBS

Stuart Hample

children’s program Captain Kangaroo as Mister Artist in the mid–1950s. He subsequently served as an assistant to cartoonist Al Capp from 1955 to 1956 before embarking on a career in advertising. He began illustrating the syndicated comic strip Rich and Famous in the mid–1970s. Hample created the comic strip Inside Woody Allen with the support and approval of the Oscar-winning comedian, which ran from 1976 to 1984. He soon began writing plays, with his Alms for the Middle Class premiering in Pittsburgh and Ro chester, New York. His final work, All the Sincerity in Hollywood, about radio comedian Fred Allen, was completed shortly before his death.

HANEEFA, C OCHIN Indian Malayalam comic character actor Cochin Haneefa died of complications from kidney and liver related ailments in a Chennai, India, hospital in February 2, 2010. He was 58. He was born Saleem Ahmed Ghoush in Kochi, Kerala, India, on April 22, 1951. He began his film career in the late 1970s, and soon became a leading comic actor in Malayalam films. He also appeared in Tamil

Cochin Haneefa

and Hindi features, and directed a handful as well. He appeared in nearly 400 film during his forty year career including Aavesham (1979), Mamangam (1979), Sakthi (1980), Raktham (1981), Bhookambam (1983), Piriyilla Naam (1984), Ente Upasana (1984), Inakkilly (1984), Makan Ente Makan (1985), Mazha Peyyunnu Maddalam Kottunnu (1986), Aankiliyude Tharattu (1987), Oru Sindoora Pottinte Ormaykku (1987), Cheppu (1987), Devasuram (1993), Mahanadi (1993), Bheesmacharya (1994), Mannar Mathai Speaking (1995), Thacholi Varghese Chekavar (1995), Hitler (1996), Azhakiya Ravanan (1996), Kala Pani (1996), Kaliveedu (1996), Aaram Thamburan (1997), Aniyathi Pravu (1997), Lelam (1997), Nagarapuranam (1997), Newspaper Boy (1997), Superman (1997), The Truth (1998), Harikrishnans (1998), Mangalya Pallakku (1998), Punjabi House (1998), Crime File (1999), Friends (1999), Njangal Santhushtaranu (1999), Udayapuram Sulthan (1999), Mr. Butler (2000), Citizen (2001), One Man Show (2001), Soothradharan (2001), Bamboo Boys (2002), Pranyamanithooval (2002), C.I.D. Moosa (2003), Satyaghath: Crime Never Pays (2003), Youth Festival (2004), Runway (2004), Anandabhadram (2005), Nerariyan CBI (2005), Ben Johnson (2005), Vacation (2005), Red Salute (2006), Janmam (2007), Paradesi (2007), Kichamani M.B.A. (2007), Mission 90 Days (2007), July 4 (2007), Sivaji (2007), Detective (2007), Inspector Garud (2007), Romeoo (2007), Bullet (2008), Twenty:20 (2008), He Who Is Victorious (2008), Parunthu (2008), Cycle (2008), Colors (2009), Madrasapattinam (2010), Loud Speaker (2009), and Ee Pattanathil Bhootham (2009).

HANNA, JAKE Drummer Jake Hanna, who was best known for playing with the Merv Griffin television band in the 1960s and early 1970s, died of complications from bone marrow disease in a Los Angeles hospital on February 12, 2010. He was 78. Hanna was born in Dorchester, Massachusetts, on April 4, 1931. He began playing the drums while in his teens. He served in the Air Force in the early 1950s, and joined Woody Herman’s band later in the decade. Hanna became drummer for Merv Griffin’s television band in the early 1960s, and remained with the show until 1975. He continued to play with various groups during his career,

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including stints with Duke Ellington, Maynard Ferguson, Count Basie, Harry James, and the Marian McPartland Trio. Hanna also led a group with trombon-

Jake Hanna

pa Christianshavn, Matador, Anthonsen, Kirsebaerhaven 89, and Alletiders Julemand. She starred as Karen in the series Morten Korch — Ved stillebaekken from 1999 to 2000.

H ARDING, R ICHMOND British television director Richmond Harding died in England on October 21, 2010. He was 87. Harding was born in Isleworth, London, in 1923. He served in the British military in Burma during World War II. He worked in films from the late 1940s and was an assistant director on Scott of the Antarctic (1948), Passport to Pimlico (1949), Tight Little Island (aka Whisky Galore!) (1949), The Great Game (1953), and Appointment in London (1953). He produced and directed the 1961 television series The World of Tim Frazer, and helmed many of the early episodes of The Avengers, starring Patrick MacNee as John Steed and Honor Blackman as his first female partner, Cathy Gale. Harding also directed episodes of Out of This World, Detective, Z Cars, and Coronation Street in the 1960s.

HANSEN, GYDA Danish actress Gyda Hansen died in Copenhagen, Denmark, on August 20, 2010. She was 72. Hansen was born in Denmark on February 7, 1938. She began her career in film in the early 1960s and was seen in Et Dogn uden Logn (1963), Stov for alle Pengene (1963), Summer in Tyrol (1964), Fem Mand og Rosa (1964), It’s Nifty in the Navy (1965), Gys og Gaeve Tanter (1966), Soskende (1966), I Belong to Me (1967), In the Green of the Woods (1968), Think of a Number (1969), The Goldcabbage Family (1975), That Brief Summer (1976), The Marksman (1977), Krigernes Born (1979), Olsen-banden over alle Bjerge (1981), Koks i Kulissen (1983), The Man Who Wanted to Be Guilty (1990), Carlo & Ester (1994), Groovy Days (1996), Pusher (1996), Off Track (2000), and Above the Street, Below the Water (2009). Hansen also appeared on Danish television in productions of Enhver (1964), Vaegteren (1969), and Rundt pa Gulvet—Tendenser i Dansk Politik (1974). She was also seen in episodes of En by i Provinsen, Huset

HARLEY, GRAHAM Canadian actor Graham Harley died in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, on December 23, 2010. He was 68. Harley was born in England in 1942. He moved to the United States to teach before settling in Canada in the mid–1970s. He was a founder and artistic director of the Phoenix Theatre in Toronto and performed frequently on stage. Harley was seen frequently on television with roles in episodes in such series as Hangin’ In, Diamonds, Check it Out, Street Legal, Beyond Reality, Matrix, RoboCop, The Hardy Boys, Traders, Relic Hunter, The Secret Adventures of Jules Verne, Leap Year, The Zack Files, Monk, Sue Thomas: F.B.Eye, Mutant X, Starhunter in the recurring role of Caravaggio, The Murdoch Mysteries, This Is Wonderland, Slings and Arrows as Cyril from 2003 to 2006, The Trojan Horse, Testees, Being Erica, and Wingin’ It. Harley was also the voice of Jarvis the butler in the 1999 animated version of Marvel’s The Avengers. He was also seen in the tele-films Hot Paint (1993), My Breast (1994), Rich Deceiver (1995), Sugartime (1995), Daydream Believers: The Monkees’ Story (2000) as Davy’s dad, I Was a Rat (2001), Anne Rice’s The Feast of All Saints (2001), Eloise at the Plaza (2003), The Piano Man’s Daughter (2003), Shattered City: The Halifax Ex-

Gyda Hansen

Graham Harley

ist Carl Fontana, and performed frequently with the group Supersax. He appeared in a cameo role in an episode of the television detective series Mike Hammer, Private Eye in 1998.

183 plosion (2003), Crimes of Fashion (2004), Four Minutes (2005), The Wives He Forgot (2006), and Nureyev (2009). Harley also appeared in several films in his career including Perfectly Normal (1991), The Cutting Edge (1992), and First Degree (1996).

2010 • Obituaries

he was an early collector and trader of recordings from the era. He also created his own radio programs, which were both broadcast and released on audio tapes under the banner Radio Rides Again. He served as West Coast editor for Marvel Comics’ Curtis magazine Monsters of the Movies, a short-lived rival to Warren’s Famous Monsters of Filmland, which ran for nine issues, including an annual, from 1973 to 1974. Many of his earlier short stories were reprinted in the 2004 collection Harmon’s Galaxy, and his sci-fi novel, The Contested Earth, which he had originally written in 1959, saw print with several of his short stories in a volume in 2007. He was also an editor and writer for the anthology series It’s That Time Again in the early 2000s, which collected short fiction featuring old-time radio heroes in new adventures. Harmon contributed the tales Tom Mix and the Mystery of the Bodiless Horseman, Sherlock Holmes and the Adventure of the Duplicate Daughter, The Avenger and the Maker of Werewolves, and Jack Armstrong and the Horde of Montezuma.

HARMON, JIM Author Jim Harmon, who was best known for his books on classic radio programs, died of a heart attack in Manhattan, New York, on February 16, 2010. He was 76. Harmon was born in Mount Carmel, Illinois, on April 21, 1933. He began writing science fiction tales in the early 1950s, and many of his stories were published in the pages of such digests as Amazing Stories, Galaxy Science Fiction, The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, and If. His horror novel, The Man Who Made Maniacs, was published by Epic Books in 1961. Represented by Forry Ackerman as his agent, he also penned western and mystery tales, and began writing adult erotica in the early 1960s, sometimes under the names Jamieson Harvey, Judson Grey, Jim Harvey, Jeff King, and Don Sheppard. He penned over 30 such titles, often with Ron Haydock, including Vixen Hollow (1961), The Man Who Made Maniacs (1961), The Celluloid Scandal (1961), …And Sudden Lust (1961), Wanton Witch (1961), Harlot Master (1961), Twilight Girls (1962), The Flesh Peddlers (1962), Abortion Mill (1962), Silent Siren (1962), Twist Session (1962), Passion Strip (1963), Lust for Lace (1963), Sex Burns Like Fire (1964), Sin Unlimited (1964), and Ape Rape (1964). Harmon and Haydock scripted and appeared in Ray Dennis Steckler’s cult film The Lemon Grove Kids Meet the Monsters. He also wrote articles and fiction for Paul Blaisdell, Bob Burns, and Haydock’s magazine Fantastic Monsters of the Movies in the early 1960s. Harmon became best known as a pioneer radio historian with his 1967 volume The Great Radio Heroes. His other books on radio and popular culture include The Great Radio Comedians (1970), Jim Harmon’s Nostalgia Catalogue (1973), The Great Movie Serials (1973) with Don Glut, The Godzilla Book (1986), Radio & TV Premiums: A Guide to the History and Value of Radio and TV Premiums (1997), and Radio Mystery and Adventure and Its Appearances in Film, Television and Other Media (2003). Harmon’s interest in the Golden Age of radio continued throughout his life, and

HARO, VICENTE Veteran Spanish character actor Vicente Haro died in Madrid on April 16, 2010. He was 79. Haro was born in Madrid on November 1, 1930. He began his career on stage in the 1950s, and was a popular performer in films and television in the 1960s and 1970s. Haro’s film credits include Boton de Ancla (1961), Vampiresas 1930 (1962), Llovidos del Cielo (1962), Cerrado por Asesinato (1964), El Salario del Crimen (1964), Relaciones Casi Publicas (1968), Un Adulterio Decente (1969), Experiencia Prematrimonial (1972), Las Colocadas (1972), The Crimes of Petiot (1973), El Burlador de Sevilla (1976), The Anchorite (1976), El Senor esta Servido (1976), Pepito Piscina (1978), El Dia del Presidente (1979), Orquesta Club Virginia (1992), Expreso (1994), Tradicion Familiar — Soliloquios (1994), La Mujer de tu Vida 2: La Mujer Vacia (1994), Earth (1996), El Angel de la Guarda (1996), Corsarios del Chip (1996), El Tiempo de la Felicidad (1997), El Nacimiento de un Imperio (1998), Pepe Guindo (1999), Maestros (2000), The Mischievous Holidays (2001), Clara y Elena (2001), Snow Bordes (2003), 20 Centimeters (2005), and Welcome Home (2006). He also appeared frequently on Spanish television from the early 1960s, appearing in episodes of such series as Equipo de Vuelo, Primera Fila,

Jim Harmon

Vicente Haro

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Tengo un Libro en las Manos, Teatro de Familia, Estudio 3, Los Encuentros, Dichoso Mundo, Y al Final Esperanza, Historias de Hoy, El Tercer Rombo, Novela, Al Filo de lo Imposible, Teatro de Siempre, Pequeno Estudio, Hora Once, Cuentos y Leyendas, Primera Funcion, Los Ladrones van a la Oficina, Pepa y Pepe, Farmacia de Guardia, La Casa de los Lios, Medico de Familia, Raquel Busca su Sitio, El Comisario, Hospital Central, Hermanos & Detectives, and U.C.O. He also starred as Felipe in the series Colegio Mayor from 1994 to 1996, and was Alfonso Medina in Al Salir de Clase from 1997 to 1999. Haro also appeared as Arsenio in Robles, Investigador from 2000 to 2001.

HARRIS, PHIL Phil Harris, the captain of the Cornelia Marie featured on the Discovery Channel’s reality series Deadliest Catch, died of a stroke in an Anchorage, Alaska, hospital on February 9, 2010. He was 53. Harris was born on December 21, 1956. His father was a fisherman, and he began working on fishing boats as a child. He owned and operated the fishing boat

Phil Harris

Cornelia Marie out of Seattle from the mid–1990s. Harris and his sons, Josh and Jake, were featured frequently on the popular reality series Deadliest Catch, about the perilous voyages of a fleet of crab-fishing boats off Alaska’s coast, from 2006. He had suffered a stroke aboard his boat in the Alaskan port at St. Paul Island on January 29, 2010.

HASEGAWA, YUMIKO Japanese actress Yumiko Hasegawa died of metastic lung cancer in a Kanagawa, Japan, hospital on July 27, 2010. She was 85. Hasegawa was born in Tokyo on December 8, 1924. She began her film career in the early 1950s, with roles in Genji Monogatari (1951), Suttobi Kago (1952), Yokubo (1953), The Crescent Moon (1955), Ghost Ship (1957), Daibosatsu Toge (1957), Yureisen: Zempen (1957), Yureisen: Kohen (1957), The Traveling Ruffian (1958), Drenched Swallow Gonpachi (1958), Kaze to Onna to Tabigarasu (1958), Daibosatsu Toge — Dai ni Bu (1958), Daibosatsu Toge — Kanketsu-hen (1959), Arega Minato no hi Da (1961), and Ako Roshi (1961). Hasegawa married actor Eiji Funakoshi in 1958, and she managed an inn in Yugawara, Kanagawa, Japan, after her film career ended in the early 1960s. She was widowed in

Yumiko Hasegawa

2007, and is survived by her son, actor Eiichiro Funakoshiu.

HASKELL, PETER Actor Peter Haskell, who appeared frequently on television from the 1960s, died at his home in Northridge, California, on April 12, 2010. He was 75. Haskell was born in Boston, Massachusetts, on October 15, 1934, the son of geophysicist Norman Haskell. He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Harvard, and spent two years in the U.S. Army from 1954 to 1956. He was soon performing on stage in Boston, Canada, and New York, where he appeared in the short-lived Off-Broadway play The Love Nest. Haskell began his long career on television in an episode of Death Valley Days in 1964, and was featured as Peter Jellicoe in the “Wolf 359” episode of The Outer Limits later in the year. He was also seen in episodes of Dr. Kildare, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., The Fugitive, 12 O’Clock High, Rawhide, Ben Casey, The Green Hornet, Combat!, The Iron Horse, Lassie in the recurring role of Chuck Conroy, Garrison’s Gorillas, Judd for the Defense, The Big Valley, Land of the Giants, Julia, The Interns, McCloud, Longstreet, Mary Tyler Moore, Mission: Impossible, Assignment Vienna, Mannix, Hawaii Five0, The F.B.I., Firehouse, Dr, Simon Locke, The Manhunter, Amy Prentiss, Cannon, The Streets of San Francisco, Khan!, Caribe, and Medical Center. Haskell starred as Kevin Grant in the film industry-based television

Peter Haskell

185 drama Bracken’s World from 1969 to 1970. He was Hollis Kirkland III in the daytime soap opera Ryan’s Hope from 1982 to 1983, and was Lloyd Kendall in Search for Tomorrow from 1983 to 1985. He was also seen in the tele-films The Ballad of Andy Crocker (1969), Love Hate Love (1971), The Eyes of Charles Sand (1972), the 1972 Hallmark Hall of Fame production of The Man Who Came to Dinner, The Phantom of Hollywood (1974), The Cloning of Clifford Swimmer (1974), The Suicide Club (1974), Risko (1976), Rich Man, Poor Man — Book II (1976), The Night They Took Miss Beautiful (1977), Superdome (1978), The Jordan Chance (1978), Mandrake (1979), Disney’s Shadow of Fear (1979), The Cracker Factory (1979), The Fantastic Seven (1979), Maid for Each Other (1992), A Murderous Affair: The Carolyn Warmus Story (1992), Once You Meet a Stranger (1996), and Sex and Lies in Sin City (2008). His other television credits include episodes of The Bionic Woman, Charlie’s Angels, Fantasy Island, This Is the Life, The Duke, B.J. and the Bear, Shirley, Barnaby Jones, Insight, The Love Boat, Hart to Hart, Vega$, The Fall Guy, Code Red, Father Murphy, The A-Team, Rituals, Blacke’s Magic, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Too Close for Comfort, MacGyver, Hunter, The Colbys, The Law and Harry McGraw, Murder, She Wrote, Jake and the Fatman, Christine Cromwell, Booker, Columbo, Babes, Matlock, Room for Two, Dark Justice, Danger Theatre, Diagnosis Murder, Frasier, Philly, JAG, The Closer, Cold Case, and ER. Haskell appeared in a handful of feature films during his career including Christina (1974), The Legend of Earl Durand (1974), 40 Days of Musa Dagh (1982), and Riding the Edge (1989). He starred as Mr. Sullivan in the 1990 horror film Child’s Play 2 and the 1991 sequel Child’s Play 3, and was Rooney in the 1993 sci-fi film Robot Wars.

2010 • Obituaries

Das Lied vom Trompeter (1964), Mohr und die Raben von London (1968), Die Hosen des Ritters Bredow (1973), Scenes of Fires (1978), Achilles Heel (1978), Bei Mir Liegen Sie Richtig (1990), Sun Alley (1999), NVA (2005), Im Schwitzkasten (2005), and Dinosaurier (2009). Haussmann also performed frequently on Germany television in such productions as Drei Kriege (1963), Keine Hochzeit Ohne Ernst (1976), Das Unsichtbare Visier (1977), Scharnhorst (1978), Hunted (1979), Abschied vom Frieden (1979), Martin Luther (1983), Die Lieben Luder (1983), Aussenseiter (1985), Sachsens Glanz und Preussens Gloria: Bruhl (1985), Die Glaserne Fackel (1989), Pension Corona (1990), Birkenhof & Lerchenau (1994), Amerika (1996), Die Konkurrentin (1997), Deutschlandspiel (2000), Liebe Pur (2000), and John Gabriel Borkman (2000). His other television credits include episodes of Polizeiruf 110, Abenteuer Airport as Carsten Wolf, Praxis Bulowbogen, Harry & Sunny, Adelheid und ihre Morder, Im Names des Gesetzes, Unser Charly, In Aller Freundschaft, Abschnitt 40, and The Last Cop.

HAVOC, JUNE Actress June Havoc, who began her career as a child vaudeville star, died at her home in Stamford, Connecticut, on March 28, 2010. She was 97. She was born Ellen Evangeline Hovick in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, on November 8, 1912. She and her older sister, Louise, began performing on the vaudeville circuit at an early age, pushed by their overbearing mother, Rose Thompson Hovick. Havoc was originally billed as Baby June, and became a singing and dancing sensation on the vaudeville stage.

HAUSSMANN, EZARD German actor Ezard Haussmann died in Berlin, Germany, on November 6, 2010. He was 75. Haussmann was born in Potsdam, Germany, on February 10, 1935. He began working on stage with the State Theater in Detmold, Germany, in the 1950s, and studied acting in Berlin. He became one of the leading theatrical performers on the Berlin stage. He was featured in several films during his long career including Eine alte Liebe (1959), Five Cartridges (1960), June Havoc (as Baby June)

Ezard Haussmann

She appeared in Hal Roach film shorts with Harold Lloyd, and headlined her own act as Dainty June and Her Newsboys. She eloped with one of her chorus dancers in her teens and abandoned the vaudeville stage. Her sister had become the famed burlesque stripper Gypsy Rose Lee, and the two girls’ early life was loosely recounted in Louise’s memoirs. The hit Broadway musical, Gypsy, and subsequent film soon followed, though June felt she was unfairly treated by her depiction. Her early marriage to Bobby Reed did not last long, but they continued to work together on the dance marathon circuit during the Great Depression. She also began working as a model in New York, and performed

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on the local stage. She made her Broadway debut in a small role in the short-lived musical Forbidden Melody in 1936. She starred with Van Johnson and Gene Kelly in the Broadway hit Pal Joey in 1940, and soon had a film contract with RKO. She continued to work in films over the next decade, usually in supporting roles. She was seen in Four Jacks and a Jill (1942), Sing Your Worries Away (1942), Powder Town (1942), My Sister Eileen (1942), No Time for Love (1943), Hello Frisco, Hello (1943), Hi Diddle Diddle (1943), Timber Queen (1944), Casanova in Burlesque (1944), Brewster’s Millions (1945), Gentleman’s Agreement (1947) as Gregory Peck’s secretary, Intrigue (1947) with George Raft, The Iron Curtain (1948), When My Baby Smiles at Me (1948), Red, Hot and Blue (1949), Chicago Deadline (1949), The Story of Molly X (1949), Mother Didn’t Tell Me (1950), Once a Thief (1950), Follow the Sun (1951), Lady Possessed (1952), and Three for Jamie Dawn (1956). She also remained active on stage, replacing Ethel Merman in the 1944 Broadway production of Sadie Thompson, and starring in the 1945 drama The Ryan Girl. Havoc also appeared frequently on television from the early 1950s with roles in such series as The Milton Berle Show, The Fred Waring Show, Four Star Revue, The Colgate Comedy Hour, The NBC Comedy Hour, Cavalcade of Stars, Somerset Maugham TV Theatre, Cameo Theatre, Celanese Theatre, Pulitzer Prize Playhouse, Hollywood Opening Night, Medallion Theatre, General Electric Theater, Fireside Theatre, The Errol Flynn Theatre, Willy as Wilma “Willy” Dodger, Robert Montgomery Presents, Lux Video Theatre, Producers’ Showcase, Studio One, Panic!, Kraft Television Theatre, The United States Steel Hour, The Untouchables, Burke’s Law, and The Outer Limits. Havoc received a Tony Award nomination for directing the 1963 Broadway play Marathon 33, based on her memoir on the era of dance marathons. She also hosted her own television series, The June Havoc Show, in 1964, and returned to Broadway in a revival of Dinner at Eight in 1966. She was featured in the tele-films The Boy Who Stole the Elephant (1970) and Nightside (1973), and appeared in episodes of McMillan & Wife, The Paper Chase, Search for Tomorrow, General Hospital, and Murder, She Wrote. She was also seen in the occasional film including The Private Files of J. Edgar Hoover (1977) as Hoover’s mother, Can’t Stop the Music

June Havoc

(1980), and the horror film A Return to Salem’s Lot (1987) as Aunt Clara. She made her final Broadway appearance in 1982, taking over the role of Miss Hannigan in the original production of Annie. She toured with the stage show An Unexpected Evening with June Havoc in the early 1980s, and starred in the 1995 Off Broadway comedy The Old Lady’s Guide to Survival. Havoc married aspiring writer Donald Stanley Gibbs after her teenage elopement, but they divorced before she went to Hollywood in the early 1940s. She was married to radio and television producer William Spier from 1947 until his death in 1973. She had one child, a daughter, who appeared in several films in the 1950s under the name April Kent including The Incredible Shrinking Man, and died in 1998. Havoc wrote a memoir, Early Havoc, in 1959, and a follow-up, More Havoc, in 1980.

H AWKINS, D ALE Rockabilly singer Dale Hawkins, who was best known for his 1957 hit “SusieQ,” died of colon cancer in a Little Rock, Arkansas, hospital on February 13, 2010. He was 73. Hawkins was born in Goldmine, Louisiana, on August 22, 1936. He signed with Chess Records in 1956, and also recorded the singles “My Babe,” “La-Do-Dada,” and “Tornado,” though none had the success of “Susie-Q.”

Dale Hawkins

He became a record producer in the 1960s, overseeing the Five Americans’ “Western Union” and John Fred & the Playboy Band’s “Judy in Disguise (With Glasses). He overcame a battle with drug addiction, and left music for awhile to tour as a motivational speaker. He returned to open a recording studio in Little Rock in the mid–1980s, and soon began performing again. He released the album Wildcat Trainer in 1999.

HAWKINS, WALTER Gospel singer Walter Hawkins died of pancreatic cancer at his home in Ripon, California, on July 11, 2010. He was 61. Hawkins was born in Oakland, California, on May 18, 1949. He began singing gospel as a child, and performed with his brother’s Edwin Hawkins Singers on such hits as “Oh Happy Day.” Walter left the Edwin Hawkins Singers in the early 1970s to create the Love Center Church in Oakland, California. He and the choir had numerous hits and earned a Grammy Award for their rendition

187 of “The Lord’s Prayer” in 1980. Hawkins also had success with his Love Alive series of recordings from the 1980s through his death.

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Checkmate, Laramie, Ben Casey, Rawhide, The Defenders, Breaking Point, The Great Adventure, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, and The High Chaparral. He also scripted several films including Reprisal! (1956), No Time to Be Young (1957), the Three Stooges comedy Have Rocket—Will Travel (1959), and Hey Boy! Hey Girl! (1959). He shared an Academy Award nomination for writing the 1964 film One Potato, Two Potato. He also scripted over a dozen episodes of the television series Daniel Boone before retiring in the late 1960s.

HAYWARD, RICHIE Rock drummer Richie Hayward, who was a founding member of the Little Feat band, died of complications from liver cancer and respiratory problems in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, on August 12, 2010. He was 64. Hayward was born in Clear Lake, Iowa, on February 6, 1946. He moved to Southern California in the mid–1960s, where Walter Hawkins

HAYES, LUCKY Actress Lucky Hayes died in Scottsdale, Arizona, on April 9, 2010. She was 72. Hayes was born in Houston, Texas, on October 27, 1937. She began her acting career after raising a family in the 1970s. She was featured in the films Speedtrap (1977) and Legend of the Wild (1981). She also appeared

Richie Hayward

Lucky Hayes

on television in an episode of The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams, and in several tele-films including Young Pioneers (1976), The Oregon Trail (1976), Shattered Innocence (1988), The Gifted One (1989), and The Truth About Jane (2000). Hayes was a leader in the Arizona branch of the Screen Actors Guild from the early 1990s.

HAYES, RAPHAEL Film and television writer Raphael Hayes died in Arlington, Virginia, on August 14, 2010. He was 95. Hayes was born on March 2, 1915. He began writing for television in the early 1950s and penned episodes of such series as Fireside Theatre, Cameo Theatre, The Adventures of Ellery Queen, Crime Photographer, Out There, Lights Out, Danger Lux Video Theatre, The U.S. Steel Hour, Suspense, The Kate Smith Hour, Studio One, Steve Canyon, Sugarfoot, Zane Grey Theater, Pony Express, Big Story, Deadline, The Alaskans,

he was a member of the bands The Fraternity of Man and The Factory. He played with vocalist and guitarist Lowell George in the latter group, and they were featured as an old–West version of the Beatles, the Bedbugs, in a 1967 episode of the western sit-com F Troop. Hayward reunited with George in 1969 in Little Feat, which also included keyboardist Bill Payne and bassist Roy Estrada. The band had several line-up changes before scoring major hits with the albums Dixie Chicken (1973) and Feats Don’t Fail Me Now (1974). Hayward remained with the group until Lowell George’s death in 1979, and completed the album Down on the Farm. He continued to record and perform with numerous artists including Robert Plant, Warren Zevon, Taj Mahal, Bob Seger, and Carly Simon. Little Feat reformed in 1987 with Craig Fuller as lead vocalist, with Hayward back on drums, and scored a major hit with the album Let It Roll. Fuller left in 1993, and the band continued with Shaun Murphy fronting the group for the 1995 album Ain’t Had Enough Fun. Hayward remained a fixture with Little Feat until he was sidelined with liver disease in August of 2009.

HE PING PING Chinese primordial dwarf He Ping Ping, who was recognized by the Guinness Book of World Records as the world’s shortest man at 2'5", died of heart complications in a Rome, Italy, hospital

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on March 15, 2010. He was 21. He was born in Wulanchabu, in northern China’s Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, on July 13, 1988. He was diagnosed with the bone deformity osteogenesis imperfecta, a form of primordial dwarfism, as a child. He was recognized by Guinness as the World’s Shortest Man after appearing on a television program in Tokyo, Japan, in January of 2007. He met Bao Xishun, the world’s tallest man, in

and the Marigolds. His brother was killed in a knife fight outside a Nashville nightclub on November 23, 1963. Bobby went on to write the song “Sunny,” which was a major hit for him in the mid–1960s and was later recorded by such artists as Frank Sinatra, Stevie Wonder, James Brown, Cher, Wilson Pickett, Dusty Springfield, and many others. Hebb also had minor hits with the songs “A Satisfied Mind” and “Love Me,” and penned Lou Rawls’ 1971 hit “A Natural Man.” He recorded “Love Games” in 1970, and returned to the studio 35 years later for 2005’s “That’s All I Wanna Know.”

HENCZ, JAN Polish actor Jan Hencz died in Lodz, Poland, on September 25, 2010. He was 64. Hencz was born in Lodz on August 13, 1946. He trained in theater in Krakow, and made his stage debut in the early 1970s. He began his film career in the early 1980s, with such credits as Hit the Bank (1981), Austeria (1982),

He Ping Ping

a media event the following July. He was featured on the British television documentary The World’s Smallest Man and Me with Mark Dolan on May of 2008. He appeared in London with Svetlana Pankratova, the world’s longest-legged woman, in September of 2008, to publicize the release of the 2009 edition of the Guinness Book of World Records. He was in Rome filming an episode of The Record Show when he was stricken with chest pains. He was featured in an episode of television reality series The Amazing Race shortly after his death.

HEBB, BOBBY Singer and songwriter Bobby Hebb, who wrote and recorded the 1960s hit “Sunny,” died of lung cancer in a Nashville, Tennessee, hospital on August 3, 2010. He was 72. Hebb was born in Nashville on July 26, 1938. He began performing with his older brother Harold when they were children. He later played with Roy Acuff ’s band and Johnny Bragg

Bobby Hebb

Jan Hencz

Alabama (1985), Cudowne Dziecko (1987), And the Violins Stopped Playing (1988), Patarej (1988), To Kill at the End (1990), Flying Machines Against Mr. Motor Car (1991), The Junction (1999), Inland Empire (2006), The Little Moscow (2008), Little Rose (2010), and Fenomen (2010). He appeared frequently on Polish television in recent years, starring as the Judge in Magda M. from 2005 to 2007 and as Fryderyk Struzik in Barwy Szczescia in 2007.

HERZOG, ARTHUR, III Writer Arthur Herzog, III, who was best known for his killer bee thriller The Swarm, died of complications of a stroke in Southampton, New York, on May 26, 2010. He was 83. Herzog was born in Manhattan, New York, on April 6, 1927, the son of songwriter Arthur Herzog, Jr., who cowrote the song “God Bless the Child” with Billie Holiday. The younger Herzog attended Stanford and Columbia, where he earned a master’s degree in English literature. He began writing articles for various magazines, and was noted for 1966 book The War-Peace Establishment concerning nuclear disarmament. His best known novel was 1974’s The Swarm, about a killer bee invasion of the United States. An all-star cast that included Henry Fonda, Michael Caine, and Fred MacMurray populated the 1978 film version. Herzog’s other

189 works include the sci-fi thriller IQ 83 (1978), the biography Vesco (1987), and the true crime book A Murder in Our Town (2007).

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man, Quantum Leap, Burke’s Law, Matlock, Diagnosis Murder, Deadly Games, Weird Science, Beverly Hills, 90210, and Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Hibler also directed the 2002 tele-film A Town Without Pity.

H ICKENLOOPER, GEORGE Film director George Hickenlooper, who earned an Emmy Award for 1991’s Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker’s Apocalypse, about the making of Francis Ford Coppola’s Apocalypse Now, died in his sleep of a heart attack in Denver, Colorado, on October 29, 2010. He was 47. Hickenlooper was born in St. Louis, Missouri, on May 25, 1963. He earned a degree in history and film studies from Yale University in 1986, and worked as an intern for Roger Corman. He made his directorial debut with the 1988 documentary Art, Acting, and the Suicide Chair: Dennis Hopper. He went on to direct the film-themed Arthur Herzog, III

HIBLER, CHRISTOPHER Film and television director Christopher Hibler died in Los Angeles on December 8, 2010. He was 68. Hibler was born in Los Angeles on August 2, 1942, the son of Disney director Winston Hibler. Christopher followed in his father’s footsteps when he was hired by Disney Studios in the 1960s. He served as an assistant director on such productions as The Horse in the Gray Flannel Suit (1968), The Love Bug (1968), Rascal (1969), Secrets of the Pirate’s Inn (1969), The Computer Wore Tennis Shoes (1969), The Boatniks (1970), The Million Dollar Duck (1971), Bedknobs and Broomsticks (1971), Now You See Him, Now You Don’t (1972), Snowball Express (1972), and Charlie and The Angel (1973). Hibler was associate producer and second unit director for The Castaway Cowboy (1974) and Return of the Big Cat (1974). He was also a producer for the films Gus (1976) and Hot Lead and Cold Feet (1978). He served as assistant director of the tele-films Evita Peron (1981) and World War III (1982), and episodes of The Greatest American Hero. Hibler was a prolific television director from the mid–1980s, helming episodes of Cover Up, Moonlighting, Remington Steele, A Different World, Max Monroe, Father Dowling Mysteries, Sisters, Tequila and Bonetti, Jake and the Fat-

Christopher Hibler

George Hickenlooper

documentaries Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker’s Apocalypse (1991) and Picture This: The Times of Peter Bogdanovich in Archer City, Texas (1991). He made his feature film debut with the Civil War era supernatural thriller The Killing Box (aka Ghost Brigade) starring Martin Sheen and Corbin Bernsen. He also helmed the 1994 short film Some Folks Call It a Sling Blade, starring Billy Bob Thornton, who adapted it for the feature, Sling Blade, two years later. He directed the dramas Dogtown (1997) and The Man from Elysian Fields (2001), and Factory Girl (2006), starring Sienna Miller as ill-fated Andy Warhol starlet Edie Sedgwick. He also helmed the documentaries Crosstown Traffic (1995), The Low Life (1995), Persons Unknown (1996), The Big Brass Ring (1997), Monte Hellman: American Auteur (1997), Mayor of Sunset Strip (2003), Bizarre Love Triangle (2005), Speechless (2008), Out in the City (2009), and “Hick” Town (2009). His final film was 2010’s Casino Jack, starring Kevin Spacey as disgraced lobbyist Jack Abramoff.

H ICKLENTON , JOHN British comic artist John Hicklenton, who was best known for his work on the Judge Dredd series, died of complications from multiple sclerosis at an assisted suicide clinic in Schwerzenbach, Switzerland, on March 19, 2010. He was 42. Hicklenton was born in Brighton, East Sussex, England, on May 8, 1967. He began working with Pat Mills on

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Judge Dredd and Nemesis the Warlock in the comic magazine 2000 AD in the late 1980s. He also drew the ZombieWorld comic for Dark Horse under the name John Deadstock. Hicklenton was diagnosed with multiple

El Hijo de Cien Caras

John Hicklenton

sclerosis in 2000, and a documentary about his battle with the disease, Here’s Johnny, debuted in 2008. His final graphic novel, 100 Months, was published in 2010.

HIGH, MAURY Wrestler Maury High, who was best known as Rocket Monroe, younger brother of Sputnik Monroe, in tag teams in the late 1960s, died of a blood infection at his home on June 7, 2010. He was 69. High was born in Memphis, Tennessee, in 1941. He began his career in wrestling under the name Rocky Montez in 1960, and was soon Arkansas State champion. Several years later he became the second wrestler to compete as Sputnik Monroe’s “brother,” Rocket,

a mask as El Hijo de Cien Caras, was shot to death with a female companion while sitting in a car in Coyoacan, Mexico City, on November 29, 2010. He was 32. Jimenez was born in Jalisco, Guadalajara, Mexico, on February 24, 1978. The younger brother of wrestler Adolfo Tapia, the first La Parka, began wrestling in Mexico as the masked Suplex in 2001. He began competing as El Hijo de Cien Caras (“the son of Cien Caras”) in 2005, after purchasing the rights to the name from the original Cien Caras despite not being related. He soon teamed with Cien Caras, Jr., who was also no relation, as Los Junior Dinamitas, and they made a successful tag team. They wrestled with the International Wrestling Revolution Group (IWRG) from 2007, where they frequently teamed with Mascara Ano 2000 Jr. and El Hijo de Masscara Ano 2000 (who were both, actually, nephews of Cien Caras). Jimenez continued to team frequently with Mascara Ano 2000 Jr., holding tag team championships until shortly before his death.

HINES, MAURICE, SR. Drummer Maurice Hines, Sr., who toured with his tap-dancing sons Maurice Jr. and Gregory as Hines, Hines and Dad, died in a hospice-care facility in Las Vegas on July 27, 2010. He was 88. Hines was born in North Carolina on February 9, 1922. He served in the Merchant Marine during World War II, and settled in Harlem after the war. His sons began performing as the Hines Kids at Harlem’s

Maury High

following Bill Fletcher. Sputnik and Rocket were a leading tag team in the late 1960s, holding championships in Florida, Georgia, and Mississippi. He later teamed with Gene Dundee, who wrestled as Flash Monroe, in the Gulf Coast promotion in the late 1960s and early 1970s. He also reunited with Sputnik and Norvell Austin in the early 1970s.

EL HIJO DE CIEN CARAS Mexican wrestler Ignacio “Tacho” Jimenez Ibarra, who competed under

Maurice Hines, Sr.

191

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Apollo Theater in the 1950s. When they decided to sing as well as dance in their act, they added their father as Hines, Hines and Dad in 1963. The trio performed in nightclubs in New York and Las Vegas, and were frequently featured on such television variety shows as The Hollywood Palace, The Pearl Bailey Show, The Beautiful Phyllis Diller Show, and The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson. After the group split in 1973, the elder Hines ran a gourmet restaurant in Las Vegas’ Thunderbird Hotel. He served as a consultant on Francis Ford Coppola’s 1984 film The Cotton Club, which also featured his sons. Gregory Hines died in 2003, and Maurice Jr. continues to perform and choreograph on Broadway.

HITO, MR. Japanese wrestler Katsuji Adachi, who was best known in the ring as Mr. Hito, died of complications from diabetes in Osaka, Japan, on April 20, 2010. He was 67. Adachi was born in Osaka on April 25, 1942. He began wrestling in Japan in the mid–1950s while still in his teens, and was a leading competitor with the Japan Wrestling Association in the

Steven Hodgson

Vantage Point (2008), The Uninvited (2009), Dr. Dolittle: Million Dollar Mutts (2009), Case 39 (2009), Hot Tub Time Machine (2010), Charlie St. Cloud (2010), Frankie and Alice (2010), and Death Race: Frankenstein Lives (2011). He also worked on the television productions The Magician’s House (2000), The Collector (2005), Impact (2008), The L Word (2009), and The Lost Future (2010). He was working on the forthcoming series Camelot at the time of his death.

HOEHN, TOMMY Musician and songwriter Tommy Hoehn died of cancer in Memphis, Tennessee, on June 24, 2010. He was 57. Hoehn was the son of a leading Memphis businessman abandoned the family auto dealership to pursue a career in music in the 1960s. He recorded the single “Blow Yourself Up” in 1975, and released the albums Spacebreak (1977), Losing You

Mr. Hito

1960s. He came to the United States where he competed as Tokyo Joe in a tag team with Kung Fu Lee in the NWA Central States region in 1973. He wrestled frequently with Stampede Wrestling in Canada as Mr. Hito, where he held the tag titles several times with such partners as Gil Hayes, Michel Martel, and Mr. Sakurada. He and Sakurada were also tag champions in Florida’s Championship Wrestling and Texas’ World Class Wrestling in 1979 and 1980. He held several singles titles with Stampede before retiring in 1986.

HODGSON, STEVEN Special effects supervisor Steven Hodgson died in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, on June 16, 2010 on the set of the television series Camelot after a long battle with cancer. He was 50. Hodgson was born in Bellshill, Scotland, on October 6, 1959. He began working in films and television as a visual effects supervisor in the late 1990s. He was based primarily out of Vancouver for his work on such films as Air Bud 3 (2000), MVP: Valuable Primate (2000), MVP: Most Vertical Primate (2001), Air Bud: Seventh Inning Fetch (2002), Devour (2005), Firewall (2006), Shattered (2007), Married Life (2007),

Tommy Hoehn

to Sleep (1978), and I Do Love the Light (1981). He sang background with Big Star’s Third/Sister Lovers album, and performed with band founders Alex Chilton and Chris Bell, co-writing the song “Cuba” with Bell. His recordings received more notoriety in Europe than they did locally, promoting Hoehn to near cult status overseas. He was largely inactive musically during the 1980s while living in Nashville, but began recording again after returning to Memphis in the mid–1990s. He released several albums on the Frankenstein label includ-

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ing Of Moons & Fools (1997), Hailstone Holiday (1997), Turning Dance (1997), and Blue Orange (2002) with Val Duren.

HOFMANN, PETER German operatic tenor Peter Hofmann died of complications from Parkinson’s disease in a Selb, Bavaria, Germany, hospital on November 30, 2010. He was 66. Hoffman was born in Marienbad, Germany (now Marianske Lazne, Czech Republic), on August 22, 1944. He began singing in a rock band in the 1960s before training for opera. He made his operatic debut in Lubeck in 1972, and performed frequently at the Bayreuth Festival from 1976. James P. Hogan

Martian Knightlife (2001), The Anguished Dawn (2003), Mission to Minerva (2005), The Two Moons (2006), The Two Worlds (2006), Echoes of an Alien Sky (2007), Moon Flower (2008), and Migration (2010).

HOLCH, ARTHUR Documentary filmmaker Arthur Holch died of heart failure in a Greenwich, Connecticut, hospital on September 23, 2010. He was 86. Holch was born in Omaha, Nebraska, on March 13, 1924. He served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War, and began working as a news reporter after his Peter Hofmann

He was best known for his roles in the works of Wagner, starring in productions of Siegmund in Der Ring des Nibelungen and in the title role in Lohengrin. He performed at venues throughout Europe and the United States, including the Metropolitan Opera from 1980 until 1989. He also starred in a Hamburg production of the musical The Phantom of the Opera from 1990 to 1991. Hofmann retired from performing in 1999.

HOGAN , J AMES P. British science fiction author James P. Hogan died at his home in Ireland on July 12, 2010. He was 69. Hogan was born in London on June 27, 1941, and trained as engineer in his teens. He worked in sales and engineering for several companies in Europe before moving to Massachusetts with Digital Equipment Corporation in 1977. He published his first novel, Inherit the Stars, later that year, and left DEC to work as a full-time writer in 1979. He was noted for incorporating hard science in his fiction, which often took on an anti-authoritarian or anarchist point of view. His early novels include The Gentle Giants of Ganymede (1978), The Genesis Machine (1978), The Two Faces of Tomorrow (1979), Thrice Upon a Time (1980), Giants’ Star (1981), The Minervan Experiment (1981), Voyage from Yesteryear (1982), Code of the Lifemaker (1983), The Proteus Operation (1985), Endgame Enigma (1987), The Mirror Maze (1989), The Infinity Gambit (1991), Entroverse (1991), The Multiplex Man (1992), Realtime Interrupt (1995), The Immortality Option (1995), Paths to Otherwhere (1996), Bug Park (1997), Star Child (1998), Cradle of Saturn (1999), Outward Bound (1999), The Legend That Was Earth (2000),

Arthur Holch

discharge. He worked for CBS radio and NBC television in the 1950s before forming Round Hill Productions. He scripted the Emmy-nominated documentary Walk in My Shoes which aired on ABC in 1961. He also produced the documentaries The Beautiful Blue and Red Danube (1967), Chile: Experiment in Red (1972), Cuba: The Castro Generation (1977), Warlords: Rommel —The Strange Death of the Desert Fox (1981), and The Warlords — Hitler’s Master Race —The Mad Dream of the S.S. (1981). He earned an Emmy for the 1992 HBO documentary Heil Hitler! Confessions of a Hitler Youth.

HOLCOMBE, BILL Composer Wilford “Bill” L. Holcombe, Jr., who scored the 1960s horror films Horror of Party Beach and Curse of the Living Corpse, died in Trenton, New Jersey, on April 25, 2010. He was

193 85. Holcombe was born in Trenton, New Jersey, on November 9, 1924. He studied the flute at New York’s Juilliard School, and earned a degree in musicology from the University of Pennsylvania. He worked as a composer and arranger for such artists as Tommy

Bill Holcombe

Dorsey, Tex Beneke, and Peter Nero, and with numerous symphony orchestras around the world. He composed the scores for several low-budget films in the 1960s including Wild Is My Love (1963), Violent Midnight (1963), Curse of the Living Corpse (1964), and The Horror of Party Beach (1964), for which he also wrote the songs “Joy Ride,” “You Are Not a Summer Love,” and “The Zombie Stomp.” He founded Musicians Publications, a leading distributor of sheet music, in the mid–1970s.

HOPPER, D ENNIS Actor Dennis Hopper, who directed and starred in the 1969 counterculture anthem Easy Rider in 1969 and became a respected character actor later in his career, died of complications from prostate cancer at his home in Venice, California, on May 29, 2010. He was 74. Hopper was born in Dodge City, Kansas, on May 17, 1936. He moved to San Diego, California, with his family in the late 1940s. He began studying at the local Old Globe Theater while attending high school. He soon signed with Warner Brothers, and was featured in a small role in the 1955 youth classic Rebel Without a Cause (1955) with James Dean. He appeared in the film I Died a Thousand Times (1955) and starred as Jordan Benedict III, the son of Rock Hudson’s wealthy rancher, in 1956’s Giant. Hopper was outlaw Billy Clanton in Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957), and was Napoleon Bonaparte in 1957’s The Story of Mankind. He was also seen in the films From Hell to Texas (1958), The Young Land (1959), and Key Witness (1960). Hopper starred as Johnny Drake in Curtis Harrington’s 1961 cult psychological horror film Night Tide. He appeared frequently on television from the 1950s, with roles in such series as Cavalcade of America, The Public Defender, Medic, The Loretta Young Show, Kings Row, Screen Directors Playhouse, The Kaiser Aluminum Hour, Cheyenne, Conflict, Sugarfoot, Studio One, Pursuit, Zane Grey Theater, The Rifleman, The Lineup, The Betty Hutton Show, The Mil-

2010 • Obituaries

lionaire, The Barbara Stanwyck Show, Naked City, 87th Precinct, The Investigators, General Electric Theater, Surfside 6, The Twilight Zone, The Dakotas, Wagon Train, Espionage, The Defenders, The Greatest Show on Earth, Petticoat Junction, Arrest and Trial, Bonanza, The Lieutenant, Gunsmoke, Convoy, The Legend of Jesse James, The Time Tunnel, Combat!, The Guns of Will Sonnett, and The Big Valley. He went to New York in the early 1960s, where he studied under Lee Strasberg. A friend of pop artist Andy Warhol, Hopper appeared in several of his off beat films including Tarzan and Jane Regained … Sort of (1964) and The Thirteen Most Beautiful Boys (1964). He returned to Hollywood to appear in the 1965 western The Sons of Katie Elder with John Wayne, and co-starred in the sci-fi/horror Queen of Blood (1966). He was featured in Roger Corman’s cult drug classic The Trip with Peter Fonda in 1967, and was seen in the films Cool Hand Luke (1967) with Paul Newman, The Glory Stompers (1968), Hang ’Em High (1968) with Clint Eastwood, Panic in the City (1968), and True Grit (1969) with John Wayne. Hopper had become close friends with Peter Fonda, and they teamed with Terry Southern to script Easy Rider (1969), about two counterculture bikers who go on a road trip from Los Angeles to New Orleans in search of America (and good drugs). Hopper also directed, and costarred with Fonda and Jack Nicholson. He shared an Academy Award nomination for co-writing the screenplay. His next project was 1971’s The Last Movie, a hallucinogenic epic shot with a band of hippies in Peru about the making of a film. It was panned by critics and proved a box-office flop. Hopper’s own increasing drug use made it difficult for him to find work in Hollywood. He was featured in Orson Welles’ unfinished 1972 film The Other Side of the Wind, and in Crush Proof (1972) and Kid Blue (1973). He starred in the title role of the Australian western crime drama Mad Dog Morgan (1976), and was 1st Sgt. Jack Falen in Henry Jaglom’s Tracks (1977). Hopper was featured in several European films toward the end of the decade including The American Friend (1977), The Sorceror’s Apprentice (1977), Flesh Color (1978), Last In, First Out (1978), and Bloodbath (1979). He returned to prominence as a manic photojournalist in Francis Ford Coppola’s Vietnam War magnum opus Apocalypse Now. Hopper di-

Dennis Hopper (from Easy Rider)

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rected and starred in the 1981 drama Out of the Blue, and was Rev. Tom Hartley in the 1981 fantasy thriller Reborn. He was also seen in the films King of the Mountain (1981), Neil Young’s Human Highway (1982), Coppola’s Rumble Fish (1983), Sam Peckinpah’s The Osterman Weekend (1983), the German punk rock film White Star (1983), Jungle Warriors (1984), and The Inside Man (1984). Hopper entered a drug rehabilitation program in 1983, and continued his film career with roles in My Science Project (1985), O.C. and Stiggs (1985), A Hero of Our Time (1985), Riders of the Storm (1986), and the 1986 sequel The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 as Lt. Lefty Enright. He earned acclaim for his performance as a drug dealer in the 1986 slacker crime drama River’s Edge and as the drug-addicted obscenity spouting Frank Black in David Lynch’s off-beat thriller Blue Velvet (1986). He was nominated for an Academy Award for his role as alcoholic former small-town basketball star Wilbur “Shooter” Flatch in 1986’s Hoosiers. He provided the voice of The Storyteller in the late 1980s animated series of Rabbit Ears children’s films based upon the works of Hans Christian Andersen, and hosted an episode of Saturday Night Live in 1987. He returned to directing with the 1988 cop drama Colors starring Sean Penn and Robert Duvall. Hopper continued to appear in onscreen in character roles in such films as The Pickup Artist (1987), Straight to Hell (1987), Black Widow (1987), Running Out of Luck (1987), Chattahoochee (1989), Blood Red (1989), Flashback (1990), Catchfire (1990) which he also directed under the pseudonym Alan Smithee, Eye of the Storm (1991), The Indian Runner (1991), Sunset Heat (1992), Red Rock West (1993), the 1993 screen adaptation of the video game Super Mario Bros. as the villainous King Koopa, and Boiling Point (1993). He shared a memorable scene opposite Christopher Walken in the crime drama True Romance (1993), and was crazed bomber Howard Payne in the 1994 action thriller Speed with Keanu Reeves and Sandra Bullock. Hopper’s other films include Chasers (1994) which he also directed, the off-beat Search and Destroy (1995), Kevin Costner’s soggy post-apocalyptical saga Waterworld (1995) as the villainous Deacon, The Last Days of Frankie the Fly (1996), Basquiat (1996), Space Truckers (1996), Carried Away (1996), Road Ends (1997), The Blackout (1997), The Good Life (1997), Lured Innocence (1999), Meet the Deedles (1998), Top of the World (1998), Bad City Blues (1999), The Venice Project (1999), Jesus’ Son (1999), Straight Shooter (1999), Ed TV (1999), The Prophet’s Game (1999), Held for Ransom (2000), Luck of the Draw (2000), The Spreading Ground (2000), Michael Angel (2000), L.A.P.D.: To Protect and to Serve (2001), Knockaround Guys (2001), Choke (2001), Ticker (2001), The Piano Player (2002), Leo (2002), Unspeakable (2002), The Night We Called It a Day (2003) as Frank Sinatra, Out of Season (2004), The Keeper (2004), Legacy (2004), Hoboken Hollow (2005), George A. Romero’s Land of the Dead (2005) as Kaufman, The Crow: Wicked Prayer (2005), Americano (2005), House of 9 (2005), Memory (2006), 10th & Wolf (2006), An American Carol (2008), Palermo Shooting (2008), Swing Vote (2008), Eleg y (2008), Sleepwalking (2008), and Hell Ride (2008). Hopper was also featured on televi-

Dennis Hopper

sion in such tele-films and mini-series as Wild Times (1980) as Doc Holliday, Stark (1985) and the sequel Stark: Mirror Image (1986) as Lt. Ron Bliss, Doublecrossed (1991), Paris Trout (1991) earning an Emmy Award nomination for his performance in the title role, the crime drama Nails (1992) as Harry “Nails” Niles, The Heart of Justice (1992), the supernatural thriller Witch Hunt (1994) as private detective H. Phillip Lovecraft, Samson and Delilah (1996) as General Tariq, the mythological adventure Jason and the Argonauts (2000) as Pelias, Firestarter 2: Rekindled (2002), and The Last Ride (2004). He starred as the evil Mr. Smith in the short-lived sci-fi television series Flatland in 2002, and was Victor Drazen, a former Balkan warlord whose machinations were the catalyst behind the action in the first season of 24 in 2002. He also guest starred in episodes of Las Vegas and Entourage, and was Col. Eli McNulty in the military action drama E-Ring from 2005 to 2006. He starred as Ben Cendars in the Starz drama series Crash from 2008 to 2009. The often-wed Hopper was married to actress Brooke Hayward, daughter of theatrical producer Leland Hayward and actress Margaret Sullavan, from 1961 to 1969. His marriage to The Mamas & the Papas singer Michelle Phillips lasted a little over a week in November of 1970. He was married to actress Daria Halprin from 1972 to 1976 and to actress Katherine LaNasa from 1989 to 1992. He married actress Victoria Duffy in 1996, and was in the process of a divorce at the time of his death. Hopper had been diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer in the fall of 2009. He made his last public appearance when he attended the addition of his star to the Hollywood Walk of Fame in March of 2010.

H ORKAY, J ANOS Hungarian actor Janos Horkay died in Hungary on June 19, 2010. He was 86. Horkay was born in Keszthely, Hungary, on April 11, 1924. He appeared in numerous films from the early 1950s including Goose Boy (1950), Two Confessions (1957), Pillar of Salt (1958), Three Stars (1960), Young Noszty and Mary Toth (1960), Twenty Hours (1965), Bondage (1968), The Girl Who Liked Purple Flowers (1973), Het Tonna Dollar (1974), Duborgo Csend (1978), Tunder Lala (1981), Harom Szabolegenyek (1982), and Csere Rudi (1988). He was also featured in numerous

195 television productions including Rab Raby (1964), A Palacsintas Kiraly (1973), Bach Arnstadtban (1975),

Janos Horkay

Gyalogbeka (1985), Einstein (1985), Devictus Vincit (1994), and Abel Amerikaban (1998). He also starred as Uncle Janos in the series Szomszedok from 1987 to 1997.

HORKHEIMER, JACK Astronomer Jack Horkheimer, who hosted the PBS astronomy program Jack Horkheimer: Star Gazer from the mid–1970s, died of a respiratory ailment in Miami, Florida, on August 20, 2010. He was 72. Horkheimer was born on June 11, 1938. The director of Miami’s Space Transit Planetarium, his five-minute astronomy show began as Jack Horkheimer: Star Hustler on PBS stations in Florida in 1976. The weekly program went national in 1985,

2010 • Obituaries

chorus girl at New York’s Cotton Club at the age of 16, and was soon touring the country with Noble Sissle’s orchestra under the name Helena Horne. She briefly left the stage in 1937 to marry Louis Jones, and they had two children before separating in 1940. Horne made her film debut in the all-black feature The Duke Is Tops (aka The Bronze Venus) in 1938, and was featured on Broadway in the revue Blackbirds of 1939. She toured with Charlie Barnet’s orchestra from the early 1940s, becoming one of the first black vocalists to perform with a leading white band. She recorded the popular songs “Good for Nothing Joe” and “Haunted Town” with Barnet. She was soon a leading nightclub and radio performer in New York. Horne was offered a contract with MGM in 1942 after appearing at Hollywood’s Little Troc nightclub. She was featured in a small role in Cole Porter’s Panama Hattie in 1942, and starred as Georgia Brown in the all black musical Cabin in the Sky (1943). Horne was Selina Rogers in the 1943 drama Stormy Weather, and her rendition of the title song became her theme. She was primarily featured as a singer in such films as Thousands Cheer (1943), I Dood It (1943), Swing Fever (1943), the short Boogie-Woogie Dream (1944), Broadway Rhythm (1944), Two Girls and a Sailor (1944), Ziegfeld Follies (1945), Till the Clouds Roll By (1946), Words and Music (1948), and Duchess of Idaho (1950). Most of her musical numbers were filmed as stand-alone segments, so they could be easily edited out of the film for release in some areas in the South, where black artists were still unappreciated. Horne was largely disenchanted with Hollywood by the 1950s, and concentrated primarily on her career as a nightclub performer. Her leftist politics and friendship with such figures as Paul Robeson and W.E.B. DuBois also affected her ability to get work on screen during the era of McCarthyism and the Blacklist. She was also very active in the early years of the civil rights movement. She had a small role in the 1956 film Meet Me in Las Vegas, and earned a Tony Award nomination for her role in the 1957 Calypso musical Jamaica. She performed frequently on television from the early 1950s, and was seen in such series as The Colgate Comedy Hour, Your Show of Shows, The Frank Sinatra Show, The Ed Sullivan Show, The Steve Allen Show, The Jack Paar Show, The Judy Garland Show, The Bell Telephone Hour, The

Jack Horkheimer

and Horkheimer helped popularize naked-eye astronomy by instructing viewers where to look in the night skies for celestial events. The program became Jack Horkheimer: Star Gazer in 1997. He was also featured in the 1978 pseudo-documentary The Force Beyond.

HORNE, LENA Actress and singer Lena Horne, who was the first black artist to sign a long-term contract with a leading film studio in the 1940s, died in a New York City hospital on May 9, 2010. She was 92. She was born Lena Calhoun Horney in Brooklyn, New York, on June 30, 1917. She began her career as a

Lena Horne

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Mike Douglas Show, The Perry Como Show, The Andy Williams Show, The Merv Griffin Show, The Hollywood Palace, The Dean Martin Show, The London Palladium Show, Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In, The Englebert Humberdinck Show, The Kraft Music Hall, Sesame Street, The Flip Wilson Show, The Muppet Show, and The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson. She co-starred with Richard Widmark in the 1969 western film Death of a Gunfighter, and appeared in cameo roles in the television sitcoms Sanford and Son, The Cosby Show, and A Different World. She also headlined several television specials, including duets with Harry Belafonte and Tony Bennett. She starred as Glinda the Good Witch in the 1978 film adaptation of the hit Broadway musical The Wiz. She returned to Broadway in 1981 with the onewoman show Lena Horne: The Lady and Her Music, which earned a special Tony Award and two Grammys. She was a recipient of the Kennedy Center Honors in 1984, and was featured in the 1985 television documentary Brown Sugar. She received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1989, and was a co-host and narrator for the 1994 musical compilation film That’s Entertainment III. Horne largely retired from performing and recording after the release of her 1998 album Being Myself.

HOWARD, JOYCE British actress Joyce Howard, who was James Mason’s leading lady in such 1940s thrillers as The Night Has Eyes and They Met in the Dark, died in Santa Monica, California, on November 23, 2010. She was 88. Howard was born in London on February 28, 1922. She trained at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts while in her teens and began her acting career on stage in the late 1930s. She made her film debut in Anthony Asquith’s A Voice in the Night in 1941. She starred in a handful of films during the 1940s including Love on the Dole (1941), The Common Touch (1941), Back-Room Boy (1942), The Night Has Eyes (aka Terror House) (1942), Talk About Jacqueline (1942), The Gentle Sex (1943), They Met in the Dark (1943), They Knew Mr. Knight (1946), Woman to Woman (1946), Appointment with Crime (1946), Mrs. Fitzherbert (1947), and Shadow of the Past (1950). Howard married actor Basil Sydney in the 1940s, and largely retired from the screen by the end of the decade.

Joyce Howard

She made occasional appearances on British television in productions of Guest in the House (1957) for ITV Television Playhouse, Hot Summer Night (1959) for Armchair Theatre, In Trial, and The Young Generation. She also wrote the play Broken Silence, and the novels Two Persons Singular and A Private View. Divorced from Sydney, she remarried and came to the United States in the early 1960s. She resumed working in films as a story analyst, and became executive assistant to Paramount executives Peter Bart and Bob Evans. Howard became an executive story editor for Paramount TV, overseeing property acquisition and development.

H OWELL, Y VONNE Silent screen actress Yvonne Howell Stevens died of heart failure in Hollywood on May 27, 2010. She was 104. She was born Julia Rose Shevlin in Chicago, Illinois, on July 31, 1905, the daughter of silent star and producer Alice Howell. Yvonne appeared onscreen as a Mack Sennett Bathing Beauty in the 1920s, and was featured in several films including Harem Follies (1924), Fashions for Women

Yvonne Howell

(1927), the western Somewhere in Sonora (1927) with Ken Maynard, Great Mail Robbery (1927), Hop Off (1928), Take Me Home (1928), and Working Girls (1931). She met cameraman George Stevens in 1928 and they married two years later. Stevens became a leading film director in Hollywood, earning two Academy Awards. The couple had three sons and a daughter before divorcing in the late 1940s. Stevens died in 1975. Yvonne served as a nurse’s aide at Army hospitals in Southern California during World War II. Her oldest son, George Stevens Jr., is founding director of the American Film Institute and co-founder and producer of the Kennedy Center Honors.

HOY, ROBERT Film and television stuntman and actor Robert F. Hoy died of cancer in a Los Angeles hospital on February 8, 2010. He was 82. Hoy was born in New York on April 3, 1927. He began his career in films in the early 1950s, working as a stuntman and appearing in small roles. Hoy’s numerous film credits include Ambush (1950), Wings of the Hawk (1953), War Arrow (1953), The Lawless Breed (1953), The Man from the Alamo (1953), Border River (1954), Taza, Son of Cochise (1954), The Black Shield of

197

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Farnsworth (1954), A Star Is Born (1954), Four Guns to the Border (1954), Saskatchewan (1954). River of No Return (1954), Destry (1954) as Audie Murphy’s stunt double, The Silver Chalice (1954), To Hell and Back (1955), The Long Gray Line (1955), Revenge of the Creature (1955), One Desire (1955), To Hell and Back (1955), Kiss of Fire (1955), Raw Edge (1956), Away All Boats (1956), The Mole People (1956), Behind the High Wall (1956), Walk the Proud Land (1956), Battle Hymn (1957), Four Girls in Town (1957), Gun for a Coward (1957), Tammy and the Bachelor (1957), Man of a Thousand Faces (1957), Lafayette Escadrille (1958), Live Fast, Die Young (1958), No Time for Sergeants (1958), Twilight for the Gods (1958), The Defiant Ones (1958) as Tony Curtis’ stunt double, North by Northwest (1959), Operation Petticoat (1959), Spartacus (1960), The Spiral Road (1962), The Ugly American (1963), It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World (1963), Quick Before It Melts (1964), Shenandoah (1965), The Great Race (1965), The Slender Thread (1965), Harlow (1965), Tickle Me (1965), Assault on a Queen (1966), Nevada Smith (1966), What Did You Do in the War, Daddy? (1966), First to Fight (1967), Tobruk (1967), Rogues’ Gallery (1968), 5 Card Stud (1968), The Love Bug (1968), Che! (1969), Scream Blacula Scream (1973), The Don Is Dead (1973), Bank Shot (1974), Bite the Bullet! (1975), The Master Gunfighter (1975), The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976). The Enforcer (1976), The Gauntlet (1977), Bronco Billy (1980), Seems Like Old Times (1980), The Legend of the Lone Ranger (1981), Fighting Back (1982), They Call Me Bruce? (1982), Jimmy the Kid (1982), Legal Eagles (1986), Choke Canyon (1986), A Fine Mess (1986), Deadly Stranger (1988), W.B., Blue and the Bean (1989), Heaven Sent (1994), and Big Chuck, Little Chuck (2004). Hoy also worked frequently in television from the early 1950s, with roles in such series as Sea Hunt, Death Valley Days, Have Gun —Will Travel, Steve Canyon, December Bride, Texas John Slaughter, Elfego Baca, U.S. Marshal, Law of the Plainsman, Laramie, Johnny Ringo, M Squad, Zane Grey Theater, Wanted: Dead or Alive, Peter Gunn, The Tall Man, Dante, Bat Masterson, The Dick Powell Show, The Jack Benny Program, The Untouchables, The Rifleman, Branded, Combat!, The Virginian, Shane, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Felony Squad, The Green Hornet, Laredo, Star Trek, Bo-

HUG, JULIEN Julien Hug, who was an unsuccessful contestant on the ABC reality television show The Bachelorette in 2009, was found dead in a remote area of the San Bernardino National Forest near Pinyon Pines, California, on November 3, 2010. He was 35. Hug, a San Diego resident, had reportedly been suf-

Robert Hoy

Julien Hug

nanza, The Iron Horse, The Guns of Will Sonnett, The Outcasts, The Mod Squad, Night Gallery, Bearcats!, The F.B.I., Cade’s County, Hec Ramsey, Mission: Impossible, Search, Kung Fu, Barnaby Jones, Love, American Style, The Magician, The Cowboys, Lotsa Luck, Mannix, The Streets of San Francisco, Barbary Coast, Matt Helm, The Rockford Files, Cannon, Bronk, City of Angels, The Blue Knight, The Quest, Bert D’Angelo/Superstar, McMillan & Wife, Future Cop, The Six Million Dollar Man, Fantasy Island, Switch, Sword of Justice, Wonder Woman, Salvage-1, B.J. and the Bear, The Dukes of Hazzard, 240Robert, Hawaii Five-0, Vega$, Quincy, Little House on the Prairie, Dallas in the recurring role of Detective Howard, Father Murphy, The Master, Simon & Simon, The Fall Guy, Crazy Like a Fox, Airwolf, Magnum, P.I., Dirty Dozen: The Series, Beauty and the Beast, Our House in the recurring role of Cliff, The Young Riders, Zorro, and Walker, Texas Ranger. Hoy starred as Joe Butler in the western series The High Chaparral from 1967 to 1971. His other television credits include the tele-films The Over-the-Hill Gang (1969), Earth II (1971), A Man for Hanging (1973), A Cry in the Wilderness (1974), Helter Skelter (1976), Flight to Holocaust (1977), The Other Side of Hell (1978), Desperate Women (1978), Steel Cowboys (1978), Alcatraz: The Whole Shocking Story (1980), Kenny Rogers as The Gambler: The Adventure Continues (1983), Last of the Great Survivors (1984), North and South (1985), Promises to Keep (1985), Assassin (1986), Houston: The Legend of Texas (1986), Desperado (1987), The Return of the Six-Million Dollar Man and the Bionic Woman (1987), Bonanza: The Next Generation (1988), and Detective (2005). Hoy was a founding member of The Stuntman’s Association of Motion Pictures in 1961, and was recognized with their Lifetime Achievement Award in August of 2009. He was also presented with the Golden Boot Award for his contributions to western films and television in his hospital room shortly before his death.

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fering from depression, and had last contacted his family two days earlier. He died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound. Hug was one of the aspiring bachelors on The Bachelorette television program in May of 2009, and was rejected by Jillian Harris in the second episode. His family owned several leading restaurants in San Diego and Rancho Santa Fe, where Julien served as host of Mille Fleurs.

HUGHES, MATT Matt Hughes, the star of television’s Storm Chasers on the Discovery Channel, died in a Wichita, Kansas, hospital on May 26, 2010, of injuries he received several days earlier while attempting suicide by hanging. He had reportedly been

Matt Hughes

suffering from depression. He was 30. Hughes was a meteorologist for Wichita’s ABC affiliate KAKE-TV, and a tornado chaser for the Discovery Channel series Storm Chasers. His final episode aired in November of 2010.

numerous film and television productions over the next three decades. His film credits include Head (1968) starring the Monkees, Model Shop (1969), The April Fools (1969), Number One (1969), The Phynx (1970), R.P.M. (1970), Cover Me Babe (1970), Fools (1970), Bless the Beasts and Children (1971), Two Is a Happy Number (1972), Lapin 360 (1972), Trouble Man (1972), They Only Kills Their Masters (1972), The Spook Who Sat By the Door (1973), Bug (1975), Murph the Surf (1975), Ode to Billy Joe (1976), The Manitou (1978), Gorp (1980), The Mountain Men (1980), The Octagon (1980), Pandemonium (1980), and Primo (2008). He also photographed the tele-films The Forgotten Man (1971), A Tattered Web (1971), Thief (1971), Earth II (1971), The Night Stalker (1972), Climb an Angry Mountain (1972), Shirts/Skins (1973), Mrs. Sundance (1974), The Morning After (1974), Death Stalk (1975), Journey from Darkness (1975), The Last Survivors (1975), Sky Heist (1975), A Love Affair: The Eleanor and Lou Gehrig Story (1978), The Awakening Land (1978), The Bastard (1978), The Word (1978), Terror Out of the Sky (1978), Silent Victory: The Kitty O’Neil Story (1979), Jennifer: A Woman’s Story (1979), The Cracker Factory (1979), Fun and Games (1980), The Night the City Screamed (1980), When the Circus Came to Town (1981), Dial M for Murder (1981), Advice to the Lovelorn (1981), The Rules of Marriage (1982), Will There Really Be a Morning? (1983), Chiefs (1983), High Desert Kill (1989), and Parent Trap: Hawaiian Honeymoon (1989). His other television credits include episodes of the series Shaft, The Streets of San Francisco, Tales of the Unexpected, Matt Houston, Hotel, Hart to Hart, The Master, and Dynasty.

HUGO, MICHEL Franco-American cinematographer Michel Hugo died of lung cancer in Las Vegas, Nevada, on October 12, 2010. He was 79. Hugo was born in France in 1930. He worked with the camera department with the French Army in the 1950s, before coming to the United States the following decade. He worked as a cinematographer for the television series Mission: Impossible from 1967. He photographed

HULD, PALLE Danish actor Palle Huld, who achieved fame as a teenager in an around the world jaunt that inspired the popular Belgian comic strip character Tintin, died in Copenhagen, Denmark, on November 26, 2010. He was 98. Huld was born in Denmark on August 2, 1912. He was 15 years old when he accepted a challenge from a Danish newspaper to recreate Phileas Fogg’s journey from Around the World in Eighty Days in honor of the centennial of author Jules Verne in 1928. Unaccompanied, he completed the task by rail and steamship to great acclaim in 44 days, and recounted his adventures in the 1929 book A Boy Scout

Michel Hugo

Palle Huld

199 Around the World. He was widely thought to be the inspiration for Belgian cartoonist Herge’s popular comic character Tintin. Huld began performing onstage as an actor with the Royal Danish Theater in 1934. He was featured in numerous films over the next sixty years including Children of Divorce (1939), Elverhoj (1939), Det Bodes der For (1944), Thorkild Roose (1949), Jan gar til Filmen (1954), Fy og Bi pa Eventyr (1955), The Young Have No time (1956), Eventryrrejsen (1960), Mine Tossede Drenge (1961), Poeten og Lillemor i Forashumor (1961), Circus Buster (1961), Rikki og Maendene (1962), Der Brander en Ild (1962), School for Suicide (1964), Tine (1964), Premiere i Helvede (1964), Kampen om Naesbygard (1964), Three Men in Search of a Troll (1967), Mig og min Lillebror (1967), Det er sa Synd for Farmand (1968), Magic in Town (1968), Jazz All Around (1969), The Man from Swan Farm (1972), The Olsen Gang Sees Red (1976), and Manden som ikke Ville Do (1999). Huld also appeared in television productions of Tony Tegner en Hest (1963), Eurydike (1964), Enhver (1964), Affaeren (1964), En Spurv i Tranedans (1968), Hjemme hos William (1971), Den Stundeslose (1973), Seks Roller Soger en Forfatter (1973), Johansens Sidste Ugudelige Dage (1988), and Kaos i Opangen (1997).

HUME, ALAN British cinematographer Alan Hume died in England on July 13, 2010. He was 85. Hume was born in London on October 16, 1924. He began his career at Denham Film Studios in the early 1940s as a clapper board loader. Hume started out as a clapper board loader at Denham Film Studios during World War II, working on the films Thunder Rock (1942), In Which We Serve (1942), and Spitfire (1942). He soon served as focus puller on the films Yellow Canary (1943), They Came to a City (1944), Tawny Pipit (1944), Oliver Twist (1948), and Poet’s Pub (1949). He continued to work in films as a camera operator throughout the 1950s, with such credits as The Clouded Yellow (1950), Prelude to Fame (1950), Madeleine (1950), Hotel Sahara (1951), The Story of Robin Hood and His Merrie Men (1952), The Adventures of Sadie (1953), Svengali (1954), Dance Little Lady (1954), Wee Geordie (1955), The End of the Affair (1955), Postmark for Danger (1955), Three Men in a Boat (1956), Loser Takes All (1956), The Green Man (1956), The Secret Tent (1956),

Alan Hume

2010 • Obituaries

The Extra Day (1956), The Truth About Women (1957), The Vicious Circle (1957), Chain of Events (1958), Carry on Sergeant (1958), The Duke Wore Jeans (1958), The Silent Enemy (1958), Carry on Teacher (1959), Carry on Nurse (1959), This Other Eden (1959), Please Turn Over (1959), Tarzan the Magnificent (1960), Kidnapped (1960), Carry on Constable (1960), and Watch Your Stern (1960). Hume graduated to director of photography or cinematographer in the early 1960s, working on numerous film and television projects over the next forty years. He filmed numerous Carry On comedies, Edgar Rice Burroughs fantasies, and James Bond spy adventures. His many film credits include Beware of Children (1960), Roommates (1961), Carry on Regardless (1961), In the Doghouse (1961), Carry on Cruising (1962), Twice Round the Daffodils (1962), The Swinging Maiden (1962), Carry on Jack (1963), The Kiss of the Vampire (1963), Carry on Cabby (1963), Nurse on Wheels (1963), Carry on Cleo (1964), Carry on Spying (1964), This Is My Street (1964), The Big Job (1965), Dr. Terror’s House of Horrors (1965), Three Hats for Lisa (1965), Carry on Pimpernel (1966), Finders Keepers (1966), Carry on Screaming! (1966), Carry on Cowboy (1966), Carry on Doctor (1967), Carry on in the Legion (1967), The Violent Enemy (1967), The Bofors Gun (1968), Captain Nemo and the Underwater City (1969), Perfect Friday (1970), Zeppelin (1971), Carry on Henry VIII (1971), The Last Grenade (1970), Carry on Abroad (1972), For the Love of Ada (1972), Bless This House (1972), Carry on Girls (1973), The Legend of Hell House (1973), Father Dear Father (1973), Visions of Eight (1973), Not Now Darling (1973), From Beyond the Grave (1973), The Bunny Caper (1974), The Land That Time Forgot (1975), Confessions of a Pop Performer (1975), Cleopatra Jones and the Casino of Gold (1975), At the Earth’s Core (1976), Shout at the Devil (1976), A Dirty Knight’s Work (1976), The Amsterdam Kill (1977), The People That Time Forgot (1977), Checkered Flag or Crash (1977), The Spy Who Loved Me (1977), Gulliver’s Travels (1977), Wombling Free (1977), Carry on Emmannuelle (1978), The Legacy (1978), Warlords of Atlantis (1978), Bear Island (1979), Birth of the Beatles (1979), Arabian Adventure (1979), Disney’s The Watcher in the Woods (1980), Eye of the Needle (1981), For Your Eyes Only (1981), Caveman (1981), Octopussy (1983), the 1983 Star Wars sequel Return of the Jedi, Supergirl (1984), Runaway Train (1985), Lifeforce (aka Space Vampires) (1985), A View to a Kill (1985), The Second Victory (1986), Hearts of Fire (1987), A Fish Called Wanda (1988), Without a Clue (1988), Shirley Valentine (1989), Stepping Out (1991), Eve of Destruction (1991), Carry on Columbus (1992), and Just Like a Woman (1992). Hume photographed 26 episodes of the cult television series The Avengers in the mid– 1960s, and also film episodes of The Third Man, Father Dear Father, For the Love of Ada, Star Maidens, Shirley’s World, Covington Cross, Acapulco H.E.A.T, Space Precinct, and Tales from the Crypt. He also returned to the Carry On series with the television series Carry on Laughing, What a Carry On, and Laugh with the Carry Ons. Hume also photographed the television productions Mister Jerico (1969), The Adventures of Little Lord Fauntleroy (1982), The Hunchback of Notre Dame

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(1982), John and Yoko: A Love Story (1985), Poor Little Rich Girl: The Barbara Hutton Story (1987), Jack the Ripper (1988), The Tenth Man (1988), Judith Krantz’s “Till We Meet Again” (1989), Secret Weapon (1990), The Return of the Native (1994), Annie: A Royal Adventure! (1995), 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1997), and What’s a Carry On? (1998).

HUMMEL, ANDY Bassist Andy Hummel, who was a founding member of the 1960s rock band Big Star, died of cancer at his home in Fort Worth, Texas, on July 19, 2010. He was 59. He was born in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, on January 26, 1951, and was raised in Memphis, Tennessee. He was the oldest child of Dr. John Hummel and his wife, Barbara Jo Walker, who had been crowned as Miss America in 1947. Andy began playing with several garage bands in the mid– 1960s, and soon began teaming with Chris Bell and

Andy Hummel (2nd from right, with Chris Bell, Jody Stephens and Alex Chilton)

Jody Stephens with the groups Rock City and Icewater. Box Tops singer Alex Chilton came aboard in 1971 and the group became known as Big Star. They recorded their first album, #1 Record, with Stax in 1972, and Hummel left the group after recording the followup album, Radio City (1974). He subsequently moved to Texas where he worked for Lockheed Martin Aeronautical. Hummel declined to participate in the Big Star reformation in 1993, but he frequently appeared at events celebrating the band. He made his final appearances at an event in Austin, Texas, in March of 2010, that was marred by the death of Chilton on opening day.

HUNTER, RUBY Australian Aboriginal singer and actress Ruby Hunter died at her home in Central Victoria, Australia, on February 17, 2010. She was 54. She was born near Murray Bridge, South Australia, to the Ngarrindjeri Aboriginal tribe on October 31, 1955. She began performing while in her teens, and frequently teamed with Archie Roach. They wrote and performed the concert Ruby’s Story, which told her life story through song. She earned awards for her albums Thoughts With (1995) and Feeling Good (2000). She was featured in a small role in the 1988 film Evil Angels, and appeared in an episode of Correlli in 1995. She also appeared in the film One Night the Moon in 2001.

Ruby Hunter

HUTCHINGS, GEOFFREY British actor Geoffrey Hutchings died in a London hospital on July 1, 2010. He was 71. Hutchings was born in Dorchester, Dorset, England, on June 8, 1939. He trained at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art and the Royal Shakespeare Company in the 1960s. He was a familiar face on British television with roles in such series as The Scarlet and the Black, Clayhanger, The Squirrels, Raffles, Strangers, Juliet Bravo, Widows, Charlie, Lytton’s Diary, Hot Metal, Home James!, Bergerac, Saracen, Perfect Scoundrels, Minder, A Year in Provence, Screen One, Cracker, Drop the Dead Donkey, The Famous Five, Accused as Dan Chapman, Peak Practice, Mortimer’s Law, Kavanagh QC, Casualty, Doctors, Holby City, Where the Heart Is, Foyle’s War, Down to Earth, Bad Girls in the recurring role of Bobby Hollamby, The Bill, The Royal, Heartbeat, Funland, Wild at Heart, The Whistleblowers, Sunshine, and Midsomer Murders. Hutchings starred as George Farchild in Brass in 1990, and was Sgt. Lucas in the Maigret series from 1992 to 1993. He was also featured as Malcolm “Sarge” White in the 1998 series Duck Patrol, and was Roger in EastEnders in 2009. He was also featured in the television productions Antony and Cleopatra (1974), Made in Britain (1982), Goodnight, Mister Tom (1998), The Bench (1999), Longitude (2000), Monsignor Renard (2000) as Louis Cavailles, Cor, Blimey! (2000), The Safe House (2002), Derailed (2005), Onassis: The Richest Man in the World (1988),

Geoffrey Hutchings

201

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Traitors (1990), The Gravy Train (1990), Pirate Prince (1991), Heart of Darkness (1993), Degrees of Error (1995) as Professor Marshall, Henry IV (1995), Our Friends in the North (1996) as John Edwards, Witness Against Hitler (1996), Hogfather (2006), Maxwell (2007), and Terry Pratchett’s The Colour of Magic (2008). Hutchings appeared in a handful of films during his career including Clockwise (1986), On the Black Hill (1987), Wish You Were Here (1987), Henry V (1989), White Hunter Black Heart (1990), Topsy-Turvy (1999), Mike Bassett: England Manager (2001), The Affair of the Necklace (2001), It’s All About Love (2003), Cheeky (2003), The Thief Lord (2006), and She, a Chinese (2009). He starred as Mel Harvey in the television series Benidorm from 2008 to 2009.

HUTCHINS, COLLEEN KAY Colleen Kay Hutchins, who was Miss America of 1952, died at her home in Newport Beach, California, on March 24, 2010. She was 83. Hutchins was born in Salt Lake City, Utah, on May 23, 1926. She was Homecoming Queen at Brigham Young University in 1947. She represented the state of Utah in the Miss America pageant in 1952,

Colleen Kay Hutchins

and was crowned the winner. She studied acting at the Pasadena Playhouse and had a small role in a Broadway revue in 1953, but abandoned her career to marry and raise a family. She is survived by her husband and four children, including son Kiki Vandeweghe, former National Basketball Association player and interim coach and general manager of the New Jersey Nets.

IAUKEA, KING CURTIS Hawaiian wrestler Curtis Iaukea, who was frequently billed as King Curtis, died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease in Honolulu, Hawaii, on December 4, 2010. He was 73. Iaukea was born in Hawaii in 1937. He played football while attending college, and was a radio disc jockey in Hawaii known as “Da Bull” in the early 1960s. He was featured as Itchi Kitchi in the 1963 comedy film “The Three Stooges Go Around the World in a Daze.” He also began his career as a professional wrestler, winning numerous single and tag team titles in Hawaii. He also wrestled in the New Zealand, Australia, Japan, the Pacific Northwest, and San Francisco, and teamed with Baron Mikel Scicluna to capture the WWWF (now

King Curtis Iaukea

WWE) tag belts for several months in early 1972. He largely retired from the ring in the mid–1980s to work as a manager. He appeared as a crazed cult leader in the ICW, where his stable included Kevin Sullivan and Mark Lewin. He also briefly managed Kamala and Sika in the WWE in the late 1980s, and was reunited with Sullivan as The Master in his Dungeon of Doom stable in the mid–1990s. His son, Rocky Iaukea, also wrestled, sometimes under the name Abbuda Dein.

IKEBE, RYO Japanese actor Ryo Ikebe, who was a leading star in Japanese cinema from the 1940s through the 2000s, died of sepsis in Tokyo on October 8, 2010. He was 92. Ikebe was born in Tokyo on February 11, 1918. He began working at Toho Studios in the early 1940s with aspirations of being a writer and director. He instead made his debut as an actor in 1941’s Fighting Fish. He spent the next four years serving in the Japanese military, and returned to the screen after World War II. He became one of the leading star’s in Japan’s post-war cinema, appearing in such films as War and Peace (1947), Haru no Kyoen (1947), Apostasy (1948), Blue Mountains (1949), Repatriation (1949), Desertion at Dawn (1950), River Solo Flows (1951), Young People (1952), Ashi ni Sawatta Onna (1952), Botchan (1953), Saraba Rabauru (1954), Geisha Konatsu (1954), The Lone Journey (1955), Early Spring (1956), Madame White Snake (1956), Yukiguni (1957), A Holiday in

Ryo Ikebe

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Tokyo (1958), The Happy Pilgrimage (1958), The College Hero (1958), Theater of Life (1958), An Echo Calls You (1959), Submarine I-57 Will Not Surrender (1959), Anyakoro (1959), Three Dolls from Hong Kong (1959), the Toho sci-fi classic Battle in Outer Space (1959) as Maj. Ichiro Katsumiya, I Bombed Pearl Harbor (1960), Otoko tai Otoko (1960), Structure of Hate (1961), Gorath (1962), 47 Samurai (1962), Attack Squadron! (1963), Radishes and Carrots (1964), Beast Alley ((1965), Brutal Tales of Chivalry (1965), Dragon Tattoo: Full of Blood (1967), Rikugun Choho 33 (1968), Father of the Kamikaze (1974), Executioner (1974), The Executioner II: Karate Inferno (1974), Jun Fukuda’s Wakusei Daisenso (Battle in Outer Space 02) (1977), Tarao Bannai (1978), Kaicho-on (1980), Eki Station (1981), Shosetsu Yoshida Gakko (1983), Izakaya Choji (1983), Mishima (1985), Flakes of Snow (1985), Lost in the Wilderness (1986), See You (1988), and Aoi Sanmyaku ’88 (1988). Ikebe also performed frequently on the Japanese stage and television. He penned his autobiography, A Light Breeze and Sometimes a Whirlwind, in 1991, and wrote essays for various magazines through 2009. His final appearance on screen was in the 2002 television drama series Love on a Summer Day.

IKEDA, SHUNSUKE Japanese actor Shunsuke Ikeda, who starred on television as Ichiro, the human identity of combat android Kikaida 01, in the early 1970s, died of complications from diabetes in Japan on June 11, 2010. He was 69. He was born Norio Ikeda in Tokyo, Japan, on November 11, 1940, the son of swordfight choreographer Tatsuo Ouchi. He trained as an actor at the Bunka-za Theater, and was signed by Toei Studios in 1961. He made his film debut in 1962’s Hibari’s Guitar of Motherly Love, and was featured on television as Akanuma in Special Mobile Investigation Unit in 1963. He continued to work in television, gueststarring in such series as Fastball, Comrades, Story of Coming Wind, Aboard with 27 People, Onihei Hankachi, Zero Fighters: Black Cloud Squadron, Mr. Detective, Lone Wolf, Santaro Fuji, Tokyo Bypass Command, Mito Komon, My Dad Is a Freshman, Heartless License, Run, Secret Samurai, Zatochi, Fight! Dragon, and The Gorilla 7. He became best known for his roles in science fiction series, starring as Monster Attack Team officer

Shunsuke Ikeda

Takeshi Minami in Return of Ultraman from 1971 to 1972, and as Ichiro in Kikaida 01 from 1973 to 1974. He was also featured in episodes of Operation Mystery, Silver Mask, Emergency Command, Secret Task Force: Goranger, Pro Wrestling Star: Aztekaizer, Vigilante Zubat, Condorman: Symbol of Justice, and Starwolf. Ikeda also worked as a model and commercial spokesman. He became a popular guest at nostalgia festivals in Japan and Hawaii in the 2000s, and reprised his earlier role in the 2006 theatrical film Ultraman Moebius and the Ultra Brothers. He was also featured in a small role in the 2009 horror film The Oni-Gara.

IKEUCHI , JUNKO Japanese actress Junko Ikeuchi, who was leading lady for the Starman/Super Giant science fiction films from Japan in the mid– 1960s, died of lung cancer in a Tokyo hospital on September 26, 2010. She was 76. She was born Sumiko Nakazawa in Tokyo on November 4, 1933. She began her film career with Shintoho Pictures Co. in the mid–1950s, debuting in 1955’s The Crown Prince’s

Junko Ikeuchi

Bride. She was best known as Ken Utsui’s leading lady in the Super Giant/Starman series of short science fiction films in the late 1950s, which were later spliced together and dubbed by Walter Manley Enterprises for television release in the United States as Attack from Space (1965), Atomic Rulers of the World (1965), Invaders from Space (1965), and Evil Brain from Outer Space (1965). She was also seen in the films The Ghost of Yotsuya (1959), Black Breasts (1960), Sexy Line (1961), Procurer of Hell (1961), Till Tomorrow Comes (1962), Doburoku no Tatsu (1962), 47 Samurai (1962), Born in Sin (1962), Sensation Seekers (1963), The Miad Story (1963), Hiken (1963), A Company President’s Gentleman’s Story (1964), Ghost Story of Funny Act in Front of Train Station (1964), Sweet Sweat (1964), Comedy-Finance in Front of the Train (1965), Yotsuya Ghost Story (1965), Typhoon Pomegranate (1967), Kigeki ekimae Sanbashi (1969), Futari no Koibito (1969), Shinsengumi: Assassins of Honor (1969), Tora-san’s Love Call (1971), and Rainbow Bridge (1993). She was a popular performer on Japanese television in recent years, with roles in such productions as Shigotonin vs Shigotonin (1989), Hatsu Tsubomi (2003), Shiroi Kyoto (2003), Kaseifu ha Mita!

203 24 (2006), Gogai! Jiken Kisha Misaki (2006), and W no Higeki (2010).

IMI, TONY British cinematographer Tony Imi died in England on March 8, 2010. He was 72. Imi was born in London on March 27, 1937. He began working in television as a camera operator in the early 1960s on such series as The Indian Tales of Rudyard Kipling, Adam Adamant Lives!, Doctor Who, The Wednesday Play, and the BBC Play of the Month. He teamed with Ken Hodges as cinematographer for the 1968 drama Inadmissible Evidence, and photographed the documentary art film The Body (1970) and the juvenile sci-fi production Junket 89. He continued to work frequently in film and television over the next forty years. His film credits include Universal Soldier (1971), The Raging Moon (1971), Dulcima (1971), the Rudolph Nureyev documentary I Am a Dancer (1972), The Love Ban (1973), The Zoo Robbery (1973), Percy’s Progress (1974), Robin Hood Junior (1975), The Firefighters (1975), The Likely Lads (1976), The Slipper and the Rose (1976), That’s Carry On (1977), International Velvet (1978), Brass Target (1978), ffolkes (1979), Breakthrough (1979), The Sea Wolves (1980), Night Crossing (1981), Nate and Hayes (1983), Not Quite Paradise (1985), Enemy Mine (1985), Empire State (1997), American Roulette (1988), Buster (1988), Options (1989), Wired (1989), Fire Birds (1990), Shopping (1994), Downtime (1997), Aimee & Jaguar (1999), Splat! (1999), Lighthouse (1999), Rancid Aluminum (2000), The Testimony of Taliesin Jones (2000), Goodbye Charlie Bright (2001), Silent Cry (2002), Chaos and Cadavers (2003), Lighthouse Hill (2004), School for Seduction (2004), and Three (2005). Imi’s numerous television credits include Elephant Boy (1973), Edward the Seventh (1975), The Professionals (1978), Death Penalty (1980), A Tale of Two Cities (1980), For Ladies Only (1981), My Body, My Child (1982), Inside the Third Reich (1982), Dreams Don’t Die (1982), Little Gloria… Happy at Last (1982), The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby (1982), Princess Daisy (1983), Pope John Paul II (1984), Sakharov (1984), A Christmas Carol (1984), Reunion at Fairborough (1985), The Last Days of Frank and Jesse James (1986), Oceans of Fire (1986), The Return of Sherlock Holmes (1987), Queenie (1987), Babycakes (1989), The Old Man

Tony Imi

2010 • Obituaries

and the Sea (1990), Coins in the Fountain (1990), Fourth Story (1991), The Last to Go (1991), Our Sons (1991), Carolina Skeletons (1991), Against Her Will: And Incident in Baltimore (1992), Child of Rage (1992), Poisoned by Love: The Kern County Murders (1993), For the Love of My Child: The Anissa Ayala Story (1993), Scarlett (1994), The Sunshine Boys (1995), The Haunting of Helen Walker (1995), Dalva (1996), The Abduction (1996), Her Desperate Choice (1996), Only Love (1998), Victoria and Albert (2001), The Blackwater Lightship (2004), Candles on Bay Street (2006), The Shell Seekers (2006), and Starting Over (2007). Imi also worked in the 2008 television series Four Seasons, and was cinematographer for the 2010 film Perfect Life.

INFANTI, ANGELO Italian actor Angelo Infanti died of a heart attack in a Tivoli, Italy, hospital on October 12, 2010. He was 71. Infanti was born in Zagarolo, Italy, on February 16, 1939. He began appearing in films in the early 1960s, with roles in Io Bacio … tu Baci (1961), The Love Factory (1965), La Ragazzola (1965), the spaghetti western Four Dollars for Vengeance (1966), New York Calling Superdragon (1966), Ischia Love Operation (1966), Tiffany Memorandum (1967),

Angelo Infanti

Pistoleros (1967), Gungala, the Black Panther Girl (1968), Only the Cool (1970), Claude Chabrol’s The Breach (1970), the British thriller Fragment of Fear (1970), the western A Man Called Sledge (1970) with James Garner, A Girl in Australia (1971), Judge Roy Bean (1971), Le Mans (1971) with Steve McQueen, and Questa Specie d’Amore (1972). He was featured as Lucky Luciano in the 1972 crime drama The Valachi Papers with Charles Bronson, and was Fabrizio, the turncoat Sicilian bodyguard who orchestrated the murder of Michael Corleone’s wife Apollonia in The Godfather (1972). Infanti was also seen in the films The Girl in 2A (1973), The Knock Out Cop (1973), And Now My Love (1974), Black Emanuelle (1975), As of Tomorrow (1976), The Black Corsair (1976), Poliziotto Sprint (1977), The Squeeze (1978), Piedone d’Egitto (1980), Savage Breed (1980), Carlo Verdone’s Bianco, Rosso e Verdone (1981), In Viaggio don Papa (1982), The Dirty Seven (1982), Borotalco (1982), Attila Flagelo di Dio (1982), Storia di Piera (1983), The Black Stallion Returns (1983), The As-

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sisi Underground (1985), A Thorn in the Heart (1986), Blood Ties (1986), The Inquiry (1986), Below Zero (1987), Money (1991), Alto Rischio (1993), La Scorta (1993), La Vengeance d’Une Blonde (1994), Carogne (1995), Diapason (2001), The Next (2003), The Cruelest Day (2003), Silenzio (2006), Il Punto Rosso (2006), Senza Ombra di Dubbio (2008), Il Seme della Discordia (2008), Ex (2009), and Backward (2010). He also appeared frequently on television from the late 1960s, with roles in such productions as La Felicita (1969), The Count of Monte Cristo (1975), The Scarlet and the Black (1983), The Octopus (1984), Uomo contro Uomo (1987), A Season of Giants (1991), La Scalata (1993), Maximum Exposure (1993), Donna (1995), Femme de Passions (1995), David (1997), Vite Blindate (1998), Fallen Angel (1999), A Casa di Anna (2004), Father Hope (2005), and La Ragazze di San Frediano (2007). He was also featured in an episode of the British science fiction series Doomwatch in 1972, and was Franco Leonetti in the 2007 Italian series Gente di Mare. Infanti made one of his final film appearances in the 2010 romantic comedy Letters to Juliet starring Amanda Seyfried and Vanessa Redgrave.

INGLIS, MARGARET South African actress Margaret Inglis died at her home in South Africa on April 16, 2010. She was 97. Inglis teamed with Nan Munro to form the semi-professional touring troupe, the Munro-Inglis Company, in 1943. She remained a

Margaret Inglis

Hisashi Inoue

jima (The Madcap Island ), which aired from 1964 to 1969. He wrote numerous productions for Toei Animation including Fables from Hans Christian Andersen (1968), The Wonderful World of Puss ’n Boots (1969), and Akko’s Secret (1969). Many of his stories and plays were adapted for film including Aoba Shigereru (1974), Nihonjin no Heso (1977), Kinema no Tenchi (1986), DonMatsugoro no Daiboken (1988), and The Face of Jizo (2004). Inoue also wrote the 1972 novel Tegusari Shinju (Handcuffed Double Suicide), and the 1981 science fiction Kirikirijin (The People of Kirikiri). He formed his own theatrical troupe, Komatsuza, to perform his plays, in 1984. These included the 1988 historical comic trilogy Kirameku Seiza, Yami ni Saku Hana, and Yuki ya Kon Kon.

INOUE, UMETSUGU Japanese film director Umetsugu Inoue, who helmed over 100 Japanese action films and Hong Kong musicals, died of a cerebral hemorrhage in Tokyo on February 11, 2009. He was 86. Inoue was born in Kyoto, Japan, on May 31, 1923. He began working in films at Shintoho Studio in 1947, and made his directorial debut with Head Cheerleader of Love on 1952. He moved to Nikkatsu Studio several years later, where he directed, and frequently scripted, such films as Mittsu no Kao (aka Three Faces) (1955), Hi no Tori (1956), Nikoyon Monogatari (1956), Shi no Jujiro (1956), The Man Who Causes a Storm (1957), Sho-

leading theatrical actress and director from the 1940s through the 1960s. She was also featured in the 1973 South African horror film House of the Living Dead. Inglis appeared on television in a production of The Little Minister on BBC Play of the Month in 1975, and was Mirella in the 1976 “The Exiles” episode of the British sci-fi series Space: 1999.

INOUE, HISASHI Japanese author and playwright Hisashi Inoue died of lung cancer in Kamakura, Kanagawa, Japan on April 9, 2010. He was 75. Inoue was born in the northern Japanese prefecture of Yamagata on November 16, 1934. He studied at Sophia University and began writing scripts with Tokyo’s Franceza theatrical troupe in the 1950s. He wrote for radio and scripted the television puppet show Hyokkori Hyoutan-

Umetsugu Inoue

205 risha (1957), Washi to Taka (1957), A Friendship That Causes a Storm (1959), Ashita wa Ashita no Kaze ga Fuku (1958), Subarashiki Dansei (1958), Yoru no Kiba (1958), Arashi o Yobu Gakudan (1960), The Poem of the Blue Star (1960), Sho-ri to Haiboku (1960), and Six Suspects (1960). Inoue left Nikkatsu to direct freelance in the early 1960s, with such credits as Gonin no Totsugeki Tai (1961), The Man from the East (1961), Closing Time (1962), Hell’s Kitchen (1962), Hoseki Dorobo (1962), Black Lizard (1962), Duel of the Underworld (1963), Bury Me Deep (1963), The Third Shadow (1963), The Night I Want to Dance (1963), Yakuza no Kunsho (1963), Ankokugai Odori (1964), Modae (1964), Operation Lipstick (1965), Kuroi Yuwaku (1965), Yoru no Nettaig yo (1965), Koi to Namida no Taiyo (1966), and Gekijo no Chibusa (1967). Inoue also began helming musicals in Hong Kong for the Shaw Brothers from 1967, directing the films Hong Kong Nocturne (1967), King Drummer (1967), The Brain-Stealers (1968), Hong Kong Rhapsody (1968), Kushiro no Yoru (1968), Long Live Youth! (1969), The Millionaire Chase (1969), Apartment for Ladies (1970), The Five Million Dollar Legacy (1970), The Performers (1970), Whose Baby Is in the Classroom? (1970), Young Lovers (1970), The Yellow Muffler (1971), Lilly, My Darling Witch (1971), Sunset (1971), We Love Millionaires (1971), and The Venus Tear Diamond (1971). He worked largely in television from the mid–1970s, but continued to direct the occasional feature including Ikare Doku Hebi: Moku Gekisha o Kese (1976), Utareru Mae ni Ute! (1976), Aitsu to Lullaby (1983), Man Who Causes a Storm (1983), and Code Name Black Cat (1987).

IRRAZABA, PAZ Chilean actress Paz Irrazaba died in Santiago, Chile, on April 11, 2010. She was 78. Irrazaba was born in Santiago on May 16, 1931. She ap-

2010 • Obituaries

Blanaid Irvine

hall School of Music and Drama in London in the late 1940s, and began her career on stage in Belfast with Hubert Wilmot’s Arts Studio Theatre in the early 1950s. She was soon appearing on stage with the Dublin’s Gate Theatre and the Globe Theatre in London. Irvine scripted several Irish films in the late 1950s including Sally’s Irish Rogue (1958), This Other Eden (1959), and Broth of a Boy (1959). She appeared onscreen in a small role in the 1964 adaptation of W. Somerset Maugham’s Of Human Bondage, and starred as Lady Agnes in the television mini-series Island of the Great Yellow Ox in 1972. She remained a leading performer on the Irish stage over the next decade. She also appeared on television in episodes of The Irish R.M. and Father Ted, and was seen in the 1994 film Ailsa.

ISAACS, GREGORY Jamaican reggae singer Gregory Isaacs died of lung cancer at his home in London, England, on October 25, 2010. He was 59. Isaacs was born in Kingston, Jamaica, on July 15, 1951. He was

Paz Irrazaba

peared in numerous television series from the early 1970s including La Sal del Desierto, La Colorina, La Madrastra, Morir de Amor, Mi Nombre di Lara, Sor Teresa de los Andes, Rompecorazon, and Oro Verde.

IRVINE, BLANAID Irish actress Blanaid Irvine died in Dublin, Ireland, on January 17, 2010. She was 87. Irvine was born in Moneyglass, Antrim, Northern Ireland, on March 26, 1922. She studied at the Guild-

Gregory Isaacs

a leading reggae singer from the 1970s who became known as Cool Ruler. He had a hit with 1982’s “Night Nurse,” and worked with such artists as Freddie McGregor, Sugar Minott, King Tubby, and Errol Holt. His career was marred by drug abuse problems and over 50 arrests in Jamaica. He continued to perform and record, releasing his final album, Brand New Me, in 2008.

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ISLEY, M ARVIN Marvin Isley, who played bass guitar with his family in the Isley Brothers, died of complications from diabetes in a Chicago hospital on June 6, 2010. He was 56. Isley was born in Englewood, New Jersey, on August 18, 1953. His older brothers O’Kelly, Rudolph, Ronald, and Vernon formed a singing group in the mid–1950s, which continued de-

finance student at Kent State University before posing for Playboy in 1989. The lovely redhead was also a finalist for Playboy’s 35th Anniversary pictorial, and was pictured in several Playboy Special Editions. She had been arrested several times for theft and drug and alcohol related charges from the mid–2005s.

JACKSON, JILL Jill Jackson, the pioneering female sportscaster turned Hollywood gossip columnist, died at the Beverly Hills Rehabilitation Center on September 8, 2010. She was 97. She was born Alice Schwartz in Independence, Missouri, on July 25, 1913.

Marvin Isley

spite Vernon’s death when he was struck by a car in 1955. Marvin teamed with brother Ernie and brotherin-law Chris Jasper as a trio in the late 1960s. They soon joined with their older siblings as instrumentalists for the Isley Brothers. The played on the band’s 1973 hit album 3 + 3. They remained together until 1984, when they split into two groups. with Marvin and his original trio becoming Isley-Jasper-Isley. They released several albums and had a hit with the song “Caravan of Love.” He and Ernie reteamed with Ronald as the Isley Brothers in 1991, and continued to perform until developing diabetes in 1997. He and his brothers were inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 1992.

She began her career as a sportscaster on New Orleans radio. She moved to Hollywood in 1960, where she produced a popular gossip column for many years. Jackson was also featured in small roles in several films including Tammy and the Doctor (1963), I’d Rather Be Rich (1964), Madame X (1966), and Airport (1970). She was also seen on television in episodes of The Christophers, The Jack Benny Program, and The Dick Powell Theatre.

JACKSON, JENNIFER LYN Jennifer Lyn Jackson, who was the Playboy Playmate of the Month for April of 1989, was found dead of an apparent drug overdose at her home in Westlake, Ohio, on January 22, 2010. She was 40. Jackson was born in Cleveland, Ohio, on March 21, 1969. She was a business and

JACOBY , C OLEMAN Television comedy writer Coleman Jacoby died of pancreatic cancer in East Meadow, New York, on October 20, 2010. He was 95. He was born Coleman Jacobs in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on April 16, 1915. He went to New York in his teens where he began writing jokes for stand-up

Jennifer Lyn Jackson

Coleman Jacoby

Jill Jackson

207 comics. He was soon writing for such comedians as Bob Hope and Fred Allen on the radio. He moved to television with Sid Caesar’s Your Show of Shows. He teamed with Arnie Rosen in 1950 to write for Jackie Gleason’s Cavalcade of Stars. They created many of Gleason’s popular characters and introduced him to comic Art Carney. Jacoby and Rosen also wrote numerous episodes of Phil Silvers’ You’ll Never Get Rich featuring the character Sergeant Bilko. They wrote for The Garry Moore Show and The Alan King Show before parting ways in 1967. Jacoby and his second wife, dancer Gaby Monet, formed Jacoby-Monet Productions to make television specials, and he penned the 1979 telefilm The Halloween That Almost Wasn’t.

2010 • Obituaries (1997), and The Crooked E: The Unshredded Truth About Enron (2003).

JANIS, DOROTHY Dorothy Janis, one of the last surviving stars of the silent film era, died in Phoenix, Arizona, on March 10, 2010. She was 100. Janis was born in Dallas, Texas, on February 19, 1910. She began her film career in the late 1920s, when her exotic beauty caught the notice of Fox executives while she was visiting her cousin on the film lot. She was featured as Indian maiden Sings-in-the-Clouds in the 1928 silent western Kit Carson and was Thurya in the desert adventure Fleetwing in 1928. She starred opposite early cowboy star Tim McCoy in 1929’s The Overland Telegraph. Janis was best known for her role as the sultry

JAMISON, PETER Production designer Peter M. Jamison died of complications from heart disease in Venice, California, on October 15, 2010. He was 66. Jamison was born in Oregon in 1944. He began working in films as an assistant to production designer Jack Fisk on the 1974 film Phantom of the Paradise. He served as art director for Roger Corman’s 1974 cult classic Big Bad Mama, and worked as art director or production designer for numerous films over the next three decades. Jamison’s film credits include Crazy Mama (1975), Darktown Strutters (1975), Eat My Dust (1976), Moonshine County Express (1977), Death Game (1977), I Wanna Hold Your Hand (1978), The Evil (1978), Chilly Scenes of Winter (1979), Used Cars (1980), The Big Red One (1980), All Night Long (1981), Continental Divide (1981), Missing (1982), Halloween III: Season of the Witch (1982), Mike’s Murder (1984), Swing Shift (1984), Best Defense (1984), At Close Range (1986), Violets Are Blue… (1986), Howard the Duck (1976), Tin Men (1987), Far North (1988), Weekend at Bernie’s (1989), RoboCop 2 (1990), Point Break (1991), Body Snatchers (1993), The Beverly Hillbillies (1993), Exit to Eden (1994), Empire Records (1995), Black Sheep (1996), House Arrest (1996), Senseless (1998), The Rage: Carrie 2 (1999), Bait (2000), Mulholland Dr. (2001), Cowboy Up (2001), Kaante (2002), Jeepers Creepers II (2003), and The Darwin Awards (2006). Jamison was also productions designer on the tele-films The Tenth Month (1979), Cold Sassy Tree (1989), Sudie and Simpson (1990), Wild Texas Wind (1991), Tidal Wave: No Escape

JARVIS, FRANK British actor Frank Jarvis died in London on September 15, 2010. He was 69. Jarvis was born in Stockton-on-Tees, England, on May 13,

Peter Jamison

Frank Jarvis

Dorothy Janis

South Sea Islander, Tito, in MGM’s The Pagan opposite Ramon Novarro in 1929. She made her only talkie with 1930’s Lummox in a supporting role. She filmed The White Captive for Universal on location in Southeast Asia in 1930, but the film was never released. She subsequently met bandleader Wayne King, and they married in 1932. Janis retired from the screen and the couple had two children before King’s death in July of 1985.

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1941. He began performing in plays as a child and studied at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in the late 1950s. He appeared frequently on British television from the early 1960s, with roles in such series as The Human Jungle, Love Story, The Saint, First Night, The Plane Makers, ITV Play of the Week, Londoners, Adam Adamant Lives!, Z Cars, Freewheelers, The Wednesday Play, Galton and Simpson Comedy, Detective, Happy Ever After, The Doctors, Manhunt, Diamond Crack Diamond, Budgie, Softly Softly, Callan, New Scotland Yard, Special Branch, And Mother Makes Three, A Pin to See the Peepshow, The Brothers, And Other Makes Five, Spring and Autumn, Late Call, Dixon of Dock Green, The Sweeney, Sadie, It’s Cold Outside, Doctor on the Go, Poldark, Holding On, 1976’s Warship as MAA Burnett, A Roof Over My Head, Target, several episodes of Doctor Who including 1978’s “The Power of Kroll” as Skart, Graham’s Gang, My Son, My Son, The Professionals, Secret Army, Escape, A Spy at Evening, Juliet Bravo, The Fourth Arm, The Nation’s Health, One by One, Hideaway, The Bill, Lovejoy, Bodyguards, Madson, and Catterick. He was also featured in television productions of The Knowledge (1979), Dangerous Davies: The Last Detective (1981), Jenny’s War (1985), Jack the Ripper (1988), and Lady Audley’s Secret (2000). Jarvis was also seen onscreen in the films Mix Me a Person (1962), That Kind of Girl (1963), Rotten to the Core (1965), The Italian Job (1969), Nobody Ordered Love (1972), Out of Season (1975), A Bridge Too Far (1977), A Horse Called Jester (1979), The Second Victory (1986), A Star Too Far (1993), The Tea Party (2002), Ages of Hunting (2003), Let Go (2004), Welsh Whelks (2006), The Penalty King (2006), and Looking Out for George (2007).

gether, with Jayne writing many of the songs. The quartet became best known as The Andy Griffith Show’s Darling Family, led by patriarch and jug player Briscoe Darling, played by Denver Pyle, and accompanied by their sister Charlene Darling, played by Maggie Peterson. Jayne was featured in a half-dozen episodes in the 1960s, and reprised his role as Mitch Darling in the 1986 reunion tele-film Return to Mayberry. Jayne was also featured as a performer on such television variety shows as The Judy Garland Show, The Ed Sullivan Show, The Tonight Show, Playboy After Dark, Shindig, Hullabaloo, The Merv Griffin Show, and The Smothers Brothers Show. Jayne was also an author, whose 1970 novel Old Fish Hawk, was adapted for a 1979 film starring Will Sampson. His last book, Fiddler’s Ghost, was published in 2007.

JAYWANT , NAILINI Indian actress Nailini Jaywant died at her home in Mumbai, India, on December 24, 2010. She was 84. Jaywant was born in Bombay (now Mumbai), India, in 1926. She made her film debut in the early 1940s with Mehboob Khan’s Bahen (My Sister) (1941). She was also seen in the films Radhika (1941), Nirdosh (1941), Thank You (1943), and the love-triangle Anokha Pyar (1948). Jaywant was married to director Virendra Desai in the 1940s, and later wed actor Prabhu Dayal, whom she appeared with in several films. Her other film credits include Sangram (1950), Samadhi (1950), The Eyes (1950), Naujawan (1951), Jadoo (1951), The Mermaid (1952), Shikast (1953), Rahi (1953), Nastik (1954), Baap Beti (1954), Railway Platform (1955), Munimji (1955), Justice (1956), Fifty Fifty (1956), Aawaz (1956), Sheroo (1957),

JAYNE, MITCH Mitch Jayne, bass player for The Dillards featured as a member of the fictional hillbilly Darling Family band on The Andy Griffith Show in the 1950s, died of cancer on August 2, 2010. He was 80. Jayne was born in Hammond, Indiana, on July 5, 1930. Jayne was the host of the bluegrass radio show Hickory Hollow in Salem, Missouri, in the late 1950s, when he met Doug and Rodney Dillard, then performing as the Ozark Mountain Boys. The brothers and bandmate Dean Webb asked Jayne to join them as bass player and emcee. They recorded fifteen albums to-

Nailini Jaywant

the Invisible Man sci-fi film Mr. X (1957), Life Sentence (1958), Amar Rahe Yeh Pyaar (1963), and Bombay Race Course (1965). She largely retired from the screen in the 1960s, but returned to the screen two decades later in Bandish (1980) and Nastik (1983). Jaywant lived largely as a recluse in a small bungalow in Mumbai in her later years.

Mitch Jayne

JEFFERIES, JOHN Art director and production designer John Jefferies, Sr., died of complications from lung cancer in Sherman Oaks, California, on March 25, 2010. He was 74. Jefferies was born in Rich-

209 mond, Virginia, on February 8, 1936. He served in the U.S. Air Force before moving to the West coast to join his brothers, Matthew and Philip, as art directors in the film industry. John began his career as a set designer for 1963’s The Chase. He also worked on the films Cat Ballou (1965), The Happiest Millionaire (1967), Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner (1967), Funny Girl (1968), and Hello, Dolly! (1969). He worked with his brothers on the original Star Trek series in the 1960s, and did the final construction design for the USS Enterprise. John also was a production designer for the series Love, American Style, Black Sheep Squadron, Operation Petticoat, B.J.

John Jefferies

and the Bear, The Greatest American Hero, Misfits of Science, Matlock, and JAG. His other credits include the tele-films The New Maverick (1978), The Jordan Chance (1978), The Night Rider (1979), Death of a Centerfold: The Dorothy Stratten Story (1981), Midnight Offerings (1981), Flight 90 (1984), Malice in Wonderland (1985), and Island Sons (1987). Jefferies’ other film credits include The Gypsy Warriors (1978), BASEketball (1998), I Still Know What You Did Last Summer (1998), Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (1999), Black Knight (2001), and Just Visiting (2001).

JEFFRIES, LIONEL British character actor Lionel Jeffries, who frequently lent a comic presence to film and television productions during his long career, died in a nursing home in Poole, Dorset, England, on February 19, 2010. He was 83. Jeffries was born in Forest Hill, London, England, on June 10, 1926. He served with the British Light Infantry in Burma towards the end of World War II, and was awarded the Burma Star for his service. He studied at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art after his military service, and performed in repertory. He made his London stage debut in a production of Carrington V.C. in 1949, and was featured in the plays Blood Wedding (1952), Brouhaha (1952), and The Enchanted (1952). Jeffries made his film debut in a small role in Alfred Hitchcock’s thriller Stage Fright in 1950. Bald, and frequently mustachioed, Jeffries became a familiar face in films and television over the next three decades. His numerous film credits include Will Any Gentleman…? (1953), The Black Rider (1954), Windfall (1955), The Colditz Story (1955), the Hammer

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sci-fi classic The Creeping Unknown (aka The Quatermass Xperiment) (1955), No Smoking (1955), All for Mary (1955), Jumping for Joy (1956), Bhowani Junction (1956), The Baby and the Battleship (1956), Eyewitness (1956), Lust for Life (1956), Up in the Wind (1956), High Terrace (1956), The Man in the Sky (1957), Doctor at Large (1957), Hour of Decision (1957), The Vicious Circle (1957), Barnacle Bill (1957), Blue Murder at St. Trinian’s (1957), Girls at Sea (1958), Dunkirk (1958), Up the Creek (1958), The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958) with Peter Cushing, Law and Disorder (1958), Orders to Kill (1958), Behind the Mask (1958), Further Up the Creek (1958), Nowhere to Go (1958), Life Is a Circus (1958) as a Genie in the last film outing for the legendary comedy team, the Crazy Gang, Please Turn Over (1959), Idol on Parade (1959), The Nun’s Story (1959), Bobbikins (1959), Two Way Stretch (1960), Jazz Boat (1960), Let’s Get Married (1960), The Trial of Oscar Wilde (1960) as the Marquis of Queensbury, Tarzan the Magnificent (1960) with Gordon Scott, Fanny (1961), The Hellions (1961), The Notorious Landlady (1961), Mrs. Gibbons’ Boys (1961), Operation Snatch (1962), Kill or Cure (1962), The Crimson Blade (1963), The Wrong Arm of the Law (1963), Call Me Bwana (1963) with Bob Hope, The Long Ships (1964), and Murder Ahoy (1964) with Margaret Rutherford as Agatha Christie’s spinster detective Miss Marple. Jeffries starred as scientist Joseph Cavor, whose gravity-repelling element Cavorite launched Edward Judd, Martha Hyer, and himself to the moon in the 1964 film adaptation of H.G. Wells’ First Men in the Moon, with special effects from Ray Harryhausen. He continued to appear in such films as The Truth About Spring (1965) with Hayley Mills, You Must Be Joking! (1965), The Secret of My Success (1965), The Spy with the Cold Nose (1966), Arrivederci, Baby! (1966), Oh Dad, Poor Dad, Mama’s Hung You in the Closet and I’m Feeling So Sad (1967), and Those Fantastic Flying Fools (aka Rocket to the Moon) (1967). Jeffries was featured as King Pellinore in the 1967 film version of the hit Broadway musical Camelot, with Richard Harris as King Arthur, and was Grandpa Potts in the 1968 adaptation of Ian Fleming’s classic fantasy Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. He played the father of Dick Van Dyke’s character, eccentric inventor Caracatus Potts, despite being several months younger than his onscreen

Lionel Jeffries

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son. He continued his film career in The 13 Chairs (aka 12 + 2) (1969), Twinky (1970), Sudden Terror (aka Eyewitness) (1970), and the psycho-thriller Who Slew Auntie Roo? (1971) with Shelley Winters. He made his directorial debut with the 1970 children’s adventure film The Railway Children, which he also scripted. He directed several more fantasy films including Antonia Barber’s ghost story The Amazing Mr. Bluden (1972), Baxter! (1973), 1977’s Wombling Free, the film version of the popular animated television series adapted from Elisabeth Beresford’s tales of short and furry critters who sang, danced and picked up litter, and The Water Babies (1978). He also continued to appear onscreen in such features as What Changed Charley Farthing? (1974), Royal Flash (1975) with Malcolm McDowell as Captain Harry Flashman, The Prisoner of Zenda (1979), Better Late Than Never (1982), and A Chorus of Disapproval (1988). Jeffries also appeared frequently on British television from the early 1950s, with roles in such series as BBC Sunday-Night Theatre, London Playhouse, ITV Television Playhouse, Assignment Foreign Legion, The Adventures of Robin Hood, Tales from Dickens, Dick and the Duchess, The Four Just Men, Rendezvous, Room at the Bottom, the short-lived Shillingbury Tales as Major Langton, 1982’s Father Charlie in the title role, All for Love, the 1983 comedy series Tom, Dick and Harriet as Thomas Maddison, Minder, The Comic Strip Presents…, The Collectors, C.A.T.S. Eyes, Inspector Morse, Boon, Rich Tea and Sympathy as Grandpa Rudge, The Mixer, Casualty, Lovejoy, the children’s series Woof! as Grandad in 1993, Performance, Holby City, The Canterbury Tales, and the sci-fi series Lexx. He was also featured on television in productions of Cream in My Coffee (1980) with Peggy Ashcroft, Ending Up (1989), First and Last (1989), Roald Dahl’s Danny the Champion of the World (1989), Jekyll & Hyde (1990) as Jekyll’s father with Michael Caine in the title roles, and Heaven on Earth (1998). He also continued his career on the West End stage with roles in Hello, Dolly! (1984) as Horace Vandergelder, Rookery Nook (1986) and The Wild Duck (1990).

JENSEN , G AIL Actress Gail Jensen died of complications from a fall in a Fresno, California, hospital on April 23, 2010. She was 60. Jensen was born

in Sanger, California, on October 5, 1949. She appeared on television from the early 1970s, in episodes of McCloud, The Amazing Spider-Man, and The Fall Guy. She also composed the theme music for The Fall Guy in the early 1980s. Jensen appeared in the 1980 slasher film Don’t Answer the Phone! and the 1982 telefilm Massarati and the Brain. She was married to actor David Carradine from 1988 to 1997. She was associate producer for his films Future Force (1989) and Future Zone (1990), and was featured in the latter film.

JIA HONGSHENG Chinese actor Jia Hongsheng died of injuries he received after jumping from an apartment building in the Chaoyang District of Beijing, China, on July 5, 2010. He was 43. He was born Jilin Sipin near Beijing on March 19, 1967, the son of retired stage actors. Jia began his acting career in the late 1980s after graduating from Beijing’s Central Academy of Drama. He was soon starring in such films as The Case of the Silver Snake (1988), Samsara (1988), Good Morning, Beijing! (1991), A Woman from North

Jia Hongsheng

Shaanxi (1993), Hei huo, Zhao Meng yu (1993), Suicides (1994), Weekend Lover (1995), and Frozen (1997). Problems with drug abuse and a short stay in a mental institution largely ended his career in the mid–1990s. He returned to the screen in the film Suzhou River in 2000. He also starred as himself in the 2001 drama Quitting, which depicted his struggle to overcome drug and alcohol addiction.

JOGI, SANTHOSH Indian actor Santhosh Jogi was found dead at a friend’s apartment in Thrissur, India, on April 13, 2010, having hung himself from a ceiling fan. He was 35. Jogi was born in Eravimangalam, India, in 1974. He began his career as a singer and performer on the local stage. He made his film debut in the 2004 Malayalam movie Two Wheeler. His other film credits include Rajamanikyam (2005), Achanurangatha Veedu (2006), Keerthi Chakra (2006), Big B (2007), Mulla (2008), and Malabar Wedding (2008). (See photograph on page 211.)

Gail Jensen

JOHN, TAYLOR Actor and singer Taylor John, who performed in the Broadway musical Les Miserables, died of a seizure brought on by an accidental

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Bully, died after a long illness in a Los Angeles hospital on August 7, 2010. He was 43. Johns was born in Roseville, California, on August 23, 1966. His grandfather was Steve Cochran, a leading actor from the late 1940s. Johns began working in films in the late 1980s colorizing black and white classics. He joined The Ren & Stimpy Show as a production coordinator in the early 1990s. He was also a production manager for the 1993 animated film We’re Back! A Dinosaur’s Story, and was a voice casting manager for the Spawn series. He worked with creator Matt Groening as a co-producer for the cartoon series Futurama from 1999 to 2003, and produced the 1999 animated tele-film Olive, the Other Reindeer. Johns served as co-executive producer for the 2006 film The Ant Bully. Santhosh Jogi

overdose of prescription drugs, in a Skokie, Illinois, hospital on March 9, 2010. He was 28. John was born in New York City on November 25, 1981. He began performing on stage as a child, Appearing as Gavroche in the national touring company of Les Miserables. He also performed the role on Broadway in the early 1990s.

Taylor John

JOHNS, ALEX Alex Johns, who co-produced the popular animated television series Futurama and was a producer for the 2006 animated feature The Ant

Alex Johns

JOHNSON , BERNARD “B UNCHY” New Orleans musician and actor Bernard “Bunchy” Johnson died of a heart attack on March 21, 2010. He was 57. Johnson was born in New Orleans on September 30, 1952. He played drums with numerous local acts and toured with such artists as Billy Preston, Johnnie Taylor, and Will Porter. He was featured in the

Bernard “Bunchy” Johnson

Off-Broadway musical Staggerlee in 1987, and appeared in several films including Manhunter (1986), The Lunch Date (1989), Da Game of Life (1998), Monsters Ball (2001) as Deputy Jones, A Love Song for Bobby Long (2004), My Soul For (2008), and The Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call — New Orleans (2009). He was also seen in the 2001 tele-film The Ponder Heart, and episodes of Miracle Run and K-Ville. Johnson had recently completed filming scenes for the HBO series Treme before his death.

JOHNSON, CASEY Socialite and heiress Casey Johnson was found dead at a friend’s home in Los Angeles on January 4, 2010. She had not been heard from since early in the morning of December 29, 2009. She was 30. She was born Sale Trotter Case Johnson in New York City on September 24, 1979, the daughter of Johnson & Johnson heir and New York Jets owner Robert Wood Johnson IV and model Nancy Sale Frey. Casey was diagnosed with diabetes as a child and she and her father were both active with the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. They also co-wrote the

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book Managing Your Child’s Diabetes in 1993. She was featured in a small role in Sharon Stone’s 1999 film Gloria, and the 2002 fashion documentary It Girls. Johnson declined an invitation to co-star with childhood friend Paris Hilton on the television reality show The Simple Life, with Nicole Richie instead becoming Hilton’s cohort in rural comedy. Johnson was also featured as socialite Mimi von Lusting in the unaired television comedy The Tinsley Bumble Show. She adopted

the Middle, Monk, ER, Without a Trace, Girlfriends, Criminal Minds, Huff, Day Break in the recurring role of Neesha, Cold Case, Brothers, Big Love, ’Til Death, and The Middle. She starred as Tanika in the shortlived drama series LAX in 2004, and was Agent Liz Ray in the 2009 series Life. She also appeared in the telefilms Subs (2007), Hackett (2008), Ernesto (2008), and Dan’s Detour of Life (2008). Johnson was also seen in a handful of films over the past decade including Sticky Fingers (2003), Miracle Mile (2004), A One Time Thing (2004), Down Dog (2005), Stress, Orgasms, and Salvation (2005), The Ring Two (2005), Love for Rent (2005), Wake (2009), Jelly (2001), Nurses Who Kill (2010), Walk a Mile in My Pradas (2010), and The Chicago 8 (2011). She also produced the 2007 short-film First.

JOHNSON , CHRISTINE Singer Christine Johnson, who starred as Nettie Fowler in the original Broadway musical Carousel in 1945, died at her home in Owenboro, Kentucky, on June 6, 2010. She was 98. She was born in Hopkinsville, Kentucky, on September 8, 1911. She trained as a singer and moved to New

Casey Johnson

a Kazakhistan orphan, Ava Monroe, in 2007. She had a series of volatile romances with both men and women and lost the financial support of her family when she refused to seek treatment for substance abuse. She was arrested on charges of stealing personal items from a romantic rival in November of 2009. Johnson announced her engagement to television reality star Tila Tequila soon after.

JOHNSON, CHANE’T Actress Chane’t Johnson died of a heart attack in Hollywood on December 2, 2010. She was 34. She was born A’Drewana Chane’t Johnson in Dallas, Texas, on August 21, 1976. She earned a master’s degree in theater arts from the University of California in San Diego in 2001. She was soon appearing on stage, film and television. She was featured in episodes of The Division, The District, The Guardian, Boomtown, Boston Public, Angel, Malcolm in

Chane’t Johnson

Christine Johnson

York in 1937. She made her debut with the Metropolitan Opera in 1943. She created the role of Nettie in Rodgers and Hammerstein’s musical Carousel and sang the song “You’ll Walk Alone.” She retired from the stage several years later to marry and raise a family.

JOHNSON , G ENERAL General Norman Johnson died of complications from lung cancer in Atlanta, Georgia, on October 13, 2010. He was 69. Johnson was born in Norfolk, Virginia, On May 23, 1941. He began singing in church choir as a child, and formed the group the Humdingers at the age of 12. The group became known as the Showmen by 1961, when they recorded the single “It Will Stand.” They continued to perform and record until splitting in 1968. Johnson and band member Danny Woods soon teamed with Harrison Kennedy and Eddie Curtis to form the Chairmen of the Board, and had a major hit with their 1970 debut song “Give Me Just a Little More Time.” They also had hits with “(You’ve Got Me) Dangling on a String” and “Everything’s Tuesday.” Johnson also became a leading songwriter with such hits as “Pay the Piper,” “Patches,” “One Monkey Don’t Stop No Show,”

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and “Bring the Boys Home.” Johnson and Woods became the Chairmen later in the decade, and Johnson

L.A. Johnson General Johnson

recorded a solo album in 1979. He and Wood made frequent performances together in the 1980s, and recorded the 1993 album What Does Around Comes Around.

JOHNSON, JASON Aspiring actor Jason Johnson died after a long battle with cancer in Ventura, California, on April 29, 2010. He was 40. Johnson was born in Denver, Colorado, on October 15, 1969, and moved to Ventura with his family as a child. He made

Jason Johnson

Pictures Production Company and worked on such projects as Martin Scorsese’s The Last Waltz (1978), Bob Dylan’s Renoldo and Clara (1978), Rust Never Sleeps (1979), Joni Mitchell’s Shadows and Light (1980), Human Highway (1982), Year of the Horse (1997), Neil Young: Silver and Gold (2000), Greendale (2003), and Neil Young Trunk Show (2009). Johnson’s most recent collaboration was the Grammy nominated Neil Young Archives: Volume 1 in 2010.

JOHNSON, L AMONT Lamont Johnson, an actor turned Emmy Award–winning television director, died of congestive heart failure at his home in Monterey, California, on October 24, 2010. He was 88. Johnson was born in Stockton, California, on September 30, 1922. He attended UCLA in the early 1940s, and trained in drama at Pasadena City College. He performed with the USO entertaining troops during World War II when a hip injury left him ineligible for active duty. Hd also performed on stage, and his booming voice led to a starring role as Tarzan in the early 1950’s radio series. He also began appearing in films, with small roles in Up Front (1951), Retreat, Hell! (1952), Sally and Saint Anne (1952), The Glory Brigade (1953), The Human Jungle (1954), Please Murder Me (1956), The Brothers Rico (1957), and Jet Pilot (1957). He was also seen on television in episodes of The Lone Wolf, The Loretta Young Show, Justice, Schlitz Playhouse, Climax!,

his film debut as a zombie in Disney’s 2003 comedy horror film The Haunted Mansion starring Eddie Murphy. Johnson was also a zombie in the 2004 remake Dawn of the Dead, and was featured in the 2006 independent horror film The Gravedancers.

JOHNSON , L.A. Filmmaker Larry “L.A.” Johnson died in Redwood City, California, on January 21, 2010. He was 62. Johnson was born in Fort Benning, Georgia, on June 11, 1947. He began working in films in the late 1960s and earned an Academy Award nomination for sound editing for the 1970 music documentary Woodstock. Johnson met musician Neil Young while filming the concert and the two worked together frequently on film and multimedia projects over the next forty years. He became part of Young’s Shakey

Lamont Johnson

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Norby, The Millionaire, Hallmark Hall of Fame in productions of Aesop and Rhodope (1953), Moby Dick (1954), and The Promise (1955), Stage 7, The Ford Television Theatre, Treasury Men in Action, Goodyear Playhouse, Cavalcade of America, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, TV Reader’s Digest, Matinee Theatre, Crusader, Steve Canyon, Alcoa Theatre, Angel, Profiles in Courage, Blue Light, The Big Valley, Felony Squad, and Gunsmoke. Johnson also segued into directing in the mid–1950s, helming episodes of Matinee Theatre, Decision, Steve Canyon, Have Gun —Will Travel, Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse, Johnny Ringo, Five Fingers, Mr. Lucky, Peter Gunn, Naked City, Angel, The Detectives Starring Robert Taylor, The Rifleman, The Americans, The Law and Mr. Jones, Bus Stop, Sam Benedict, and Dr. Kildare. Johnson worked frequently on Rod Serling’s Twilight Zone in the early 1960s, directing the episodes “The Shelter,” “Five Characters in Search of an Exit,” “Nothing in the Dark,” “One More Pallbearer, “Kick the Can,” “Four O’Clock,” “Hocus-Pocus and Frisby,” and “Passage on the Lady Anne.” He also helmed episodes of The Richard Boone Show, Destry, The Defenders, The Doctors and the Nurses, Slattery’s People, Profiles in Courage, The Trials of O’Brien, Coronet Blue, Cimarron Strip, The Danny Thomas Hour, The Name of the Game, Judd for the Defense, The Bold Ones: The Protectors, Insight, CBS Afternoon Playhouse, and Faerie Tale Theatre 1983 production of Jack and the Beanstalk. He was also an early director of tele-films, with such credits as A Covenant with Death (1967), Kona Coast (1968), Call to Danger (1968), My Sweet Charlie (1970) which earned him his first Emmy Award nomination, Birdbath (1971), You’ll Like My Mother (1972), That Certain Summer (1972), The Execution of Private Slovik (1974) which he also scripted, Fear on Trial (1975), Paul’s Case (1980), Off the Minnesota Strip (1980), Crisis at Central High (1981), Escape from Iran: The Canadian Caper (1981), Wallenberg: A Hero’s Story (1985) which garnered him an Emmy Award, Unnatural Causes (1986), Gore Vidal’s Lincoln (1988) which earned him another Emmy, The Kennedys of Massachusetts (1990, Voices Within: The Lives of Truddi Chase (1990), Crash Landing: The Rescue of Flight 232 (1992), The Broken Chain (1993), The Man Next Door (1996), and All the Winters That Have Been (1997). Johnson also directed a handful of feature films during his career including The McKenzie Break (1970), A Gunfight (1971) with Kirk Douglas and Johnny Cash, the sci-spy thriller The Groundstar Conspiracy (1972), The Last American Hero (1973), Visit to a Chief ’s Son (1974) Lipstick (1976), One on One (1977) also appearing onscreen as Barry Brunz, Somebody Killed Her Husband (1978), Cattle Annie and Little Britches (1981), and the sci-fi actioner Spacehunter: Adventures in the Forbidden Zone (1983).

JOHNSON , MONICA Film and television writer Monica Johnson, who worked on several films with Albert Brooks, died of esophageal cancer in a Los Angeles hospital on November 1, 2010. She was 64. Johnson was born in Colorado on February 21, 1946, and was raised in El Centro, California. Her brother, Jerry Belson, was a leading television writer and pro-

Monica Johnson

ducer, and Monica began her career typing scripts for his series The Odd Couple. Belson was instrumental in Monica writing a script for Mary Tyler Moore. She went on write for such series as The Paul Lynde Show, Paul Sand in Friends and Lovers, and Laverne & Shirley. She also scripted the tele-films The Cheerleaders (1976) and The Plant Family (1978), and co-wrote the films Americathon (1979) and Jekyll and Hyde … Together Again (1982) directed by her brother. She began working with Albert Brooks on the 1979 comedy Real Life, his directorial debut, and continued their collaboration on the films Modern Romance (1981), Lost in America (1985), The Scout (1994), Mother (1996), and The Muse (1999). She was also a writer and story editor for televisions It’s Garry Shandling’s Show in 1990, and was writer and supervising producer for Good Sports in 1991.

JONES, HANK Jazz pianist Hank Jones died in a hospice in the Bronx, New York, on May 16, 2010. He was 91. Jones was born in Vicksburg, Mississippi, on July 31, 1918, and was raised in Pontiac, Michigan. He studied the piano from an early age and was performing professionally by the age of 13. He played with regional bands before joining Hot Lips Page’s band in New York in 1944. He was soon performing with such artists as Billy Eckstine and Coleman Hawks. He became Ella Fitzgerald’s accompanist in 1947, and remained with her until 1953. He also began a long-

Hank Jones

215 standing association with Benny Goodman’s band and joined CBS as a staff musician in 1959. He was the piano accompaniment to Marilyn Monroe’s rendition of “Happy Birthday” to President John Kennedy in Madison Square Garden in May of 1962. He continued with the music department at CBS until the mid– 1970s, and teamed with bassist Ron Carter and drummer Tony Williams to form the Great Jazz Trio in 1976. He served as musical director and pianist for the Broadway revue Ain’t Misbehavin’ from 1978, and he recorded numerous albums with his frequently changing trio for over 20 years. He was given a Grammy Award for lifetime achievement in 2009.

JONES, MARK British actor Mark Jones died in Shropshire, England, on January 14, 2010. He was 70. Jones was born in England on April 22, 1939. He appeared frequently on the British stage, screen, and television from the 1960s. His film credits include Marat/Sade (1967) as Mother, Tell Me Lives (1968), Connecting Rooms (1970), Layout for 5 Models (1972), Under Milk Wood (1972), Keep It Up, Jack (1973), The Sexplorer (aka Girl from Starship Venus) (1975), Secrets of a Superstud (1976), The Medusa Touch (1978), Can I

2010 • Obituaries

JONES, MARVIN Marvin Jones, a child actor from the 1930s, died in San Antonio, Texas, on July 30, 2010. He was 88. Jones was born in Los Angeles on March 21, 1922. His sister Marcia Mae Jones was a child star, and siblings Margaret and Macon also appeared in films as children. Marvin appeared in small roles in the films Mothers Cry (1930), My American Wife (1936),

Marvin Jones

Vivacious Lady (1938), Sweethearts (1938), Let’s Go Collegiate (1941), Wake Island (1942), and Thunder Birds (1942). He served in the U.S. Coast Guard during World War II. Jones briefly resumed his film career after his discharge in 1946, with small roles in Undercover Maisie (1947), The Reformer and the Redhead (1950), Where Danger Lives (1950), Force of Arms (1951), Jumping Jacks (1952), Fearless Fagan (1952), and Angel Face (1952). He left films in the early 1950s, and later worked in insurance, publishing, and hotel management before retiring to San Antonio in 1997.

Mark Jones

Come Too? (1979), Bear Island (1979), the Stars Wars sequel The Empire Strikes Back (1980) as an Imperial officer, 4D Special Agents (1981), Don’t Open Till Christmas (1984), and Invitation to the Wedding (1985). Jones was seen on television in episodes of Theatre 625, ITV Playhouse, Judge Dee, Tom Grattan’s War, Confession, Biography, The Adventurer, New Scotland Yard, Van der Valk, The Protectors, Crown Court, Doctor Who as Arnold Keeler in the 1976 serial The Seeds of Doom, The New Avengers, Z Cars, The Onedin Line, Target, Secret Army, Tales of the Unexpected, Escape, Lady Killers, Blott on the Landscape, Dempsey and Makepeace, Call Me Mister, Casualty, The Comic Strip Presents…, and Red Dwarf. Jones starred as Etienne Lantier in the series Germinal in 1970, and was Michael Armstong in A Family at War from 1970 to 1972. He also starred as Ray Mason in the 1980 adventure series Buccaneer. His other television credits include productions of A.D.A.M. (1973), The Knowledge (1979), and Pride of Our Alley (1983).

JORDAN, AMI Ami Jordan, who was featured in adult films, died of an accidental drug overdose in Decatur, Tennessee, on June 11, 2010. She was 19. She was born in Decatur on August 8, 1990. She began

Ami Jordan

working in adult films in 2008. Her credits include Who’s That Girl 8 (2009), The Naughty Cheerleaders Club 2 (2009), Naughty Book Worms 15 (2009), Bounce

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2 (2009), 100% Natural 18 (2009), and Boobaholics Anonymous 5 (2009).

JUHLIN, BENNY Danish actor Benny Juhlin died in Denmark on January 7, 2010. He was 84. Juhlin was born in Copenhagen, Denmark, on September 9, 1925. He was featured in the 1946 film I Love Another before training for an acting career at the Royal

Benny Juhlin

Theatre in the early 1950s. He appeared frequently on stage, screen, and television over the next 50 years. Juhlin’s film credits include Far til Fire i Byen (1956), Tag til Marked i Fjordby (1957), the cult monster movie classic Reptilicus (1961) as a Danish soldier, I, a Lover (1966), Nu Stiger Den (1966), People Meet and Sweet Music Fills the Heart (1967), Det var en Lordag Aften (1968), Magic in Town (1968), Take a Little Sunshine (1969), Between the Sheets (1973), Mirror, Mirror (1978), and Birds of Passage (2001). He was also featured on television in episodes of En by i Provinsen, The Village, and At the Faber.

Yossa (1961), “Ei se Mitaan!” Sanoi Eemeli (1962), Day of Wind (1962), Villin Pohjolan Kulta (1963), Kahdeksas Veljes (1971), Tuntematon Ystava (1978), Screws on the Loose (1989), Vaapeli Kormy —Taisteluni (1994), and Vaapeli Kormy ja Kahtesti Laukeava (1997). Juurela was a familiar face on Finnish television from the early 1960s, appearing in such programs as Sellaista Rakkautta (1963), Teatterituokio (1963), Jaakaappivarkaat (1963), Joululegenda (1963), Maan Parhaat (1963), Kahden Kiukku (1963), Puoluesihteeri (1963), Tanneriana (1963), Gustaf III (1964), Veljen Varjo (1964), Meidan Herramme Muurahaisia (1964), Mikumardissa on Kesa (1964), Anna Christie (1964), Miten Haluatte (1964), Eversti Chabert (1964), Lemmen ja Sattuman Leikki (1964), Ruma Elsa (1965), Cul-de-Sac (1965), Lahimmainen (1965), Purasen Haat (1965), Viipurilaisen Iltapaiva (1965), Pikakaynti (1965), Apulaisjohtaja (1965), Ruohojen Harppu (1965), Huone Vuokrattavana (1965), Pilkahdus Merta (1965), Osteri ja Helmi (1965), Lapikaytava (1965), Loistokaupunki (1966), Etienne (1966), Kilpakosijat (1966), Autojen Hautausmaa (1966), Juudas (1966), Ihmisvihaaja (1966), Jatkoaika (1967) Saituri (1967), Poistui Kotoaan (1967), Paiva Lepokodissa (1967), Paha Kulkee (1967), Rikos ja Rangaistus (1967), Vaimoni Kummittelee (1968), Murheenlaakso (1968), Hanski (1969), Tirlittan (1969), Ilokylan Hammaslaakariseikkailu (1970), Mustapartainen Mies (1990), Oho, Sano Brysseli (1994), Totta Mooses! (1995), Team Ahma (1998), Putkinotko (1998), Elama on Naytelma (1999), and Hovimaki (1999). He made his final screen appearance in the 2007 television production Hopeanuolet.

JUURELA, KAARLO Finnish actor and singer Kaarlo Juurela died of a heart attack while vacationing in Thailand on February 2, 2010. He was 80. Juurela was born in Mustasaari, Finland, on March 30, 1929. He was a popular comic actor on stage, film and television from the late 1950s. He was featured in the films Red Line (1959), Justus Jarjestaa Kaiken (1960), Hetkia

K ABEL, H EIDI German actress and singer Heidi Kabel died in Hamburg, Germany, on June 15, 2010. She was 95. Kabel was born in Hamburg on August 27, 1914. She began her professional career as a singer and stage performer in the early 1930s. She married theatrical director Hans Mahler in 1937, and the two worked frequently together with the Ohnsorg Theatre until his death in 1970. She was featured in several films during her career including Das Madchen mit den Katzenaugen (1958), Wenn die Heide Bluht (1960), Otto und die Nackte Welle (1968), Shock Treatment (1969), Klein Erna auf dem Jungfernstieg (1969), Twenty Girls and the Teachers (1971), The Heath Is Green (1972), and

Kaarlo Juurela

Heidi Kabel

217 Hands Off Mississippi (2007). Kabel was seen in numerous television productions including Das Herrschaftskind (1959), Ein Mann mit Charakter (1961), Vater Philipp (1963), Das Schlechte Gewissen (1965), Peter Pink (1967), Verteufelte Zeiten (1968), Die Lieben Verwandten (1968), Schneider Norig (1969), Ein Mann mit Charakter (1969), Der Moblierte Herr (1971), Zwei Engel (1972), Rund um Kap Horn (1973), Fur die Katz (1974), Die Chefin (1976), Die Venus von Muggensack (1977), Kollege Generaldirektor (1971), Der Lorbeerkranz (1983), Der Sonne Entgegen (1985) as Meckelfeld’s Mother-inLaw, Tante Tilly (1986), Wenn du Geld Hast (1988), Ein Mann Ist Kein Mann (1989), Mutter und Sohne (1992), Theaterdonner (1995), and Frau Sperlings Raritatenladen (1997). She starred as Heidi Kaslinger in the 1990 series Heidi und Erni, and guested in episodes of Tatort and Heimatgeschichten.

KACZYNSKI, LECH Lech Kaczynski, a former child actor to become the President of Poland, died along with other Polish dignitaries when their plane crashed while trying to land in heavy fog at the Smolensk, Russia, airport on April 10, 2010. He was 60. Kaczynski was born in Warsaw, Poland, on June 18, 1949. He and his twin brother, Jaroslaw, starred in the 1962 film The Two Who Stole the Moon. He studied labor law and became a leading advisor to the prodemocracy Solidarity movement and its found Lech Walesa. Kaczynski was elected to the Polish senate in 1989, and served in several governments over the next

Lech Kaczynski

decade. He was elected Mayor of Warsaw in November of 2002, and became Poland’s president after elections in October of 2005. His twin, Jaroslaw, took the position of Prime Minister the following year. Kaczynski remained head of state until his death in the plane crash that killed 96 people including his wife, members of his government, and other leading military and political figures while on route from Warsaw for a ceremony commemorating the Katyn massacre.

KALLAI , FERENC Hungarian actor Ferenc Kallai died of complications from diabetes in Hungary of July 11, 2010. He was 84. Kallai was born in Gyoma, Hungary, on October 4, 1925. He trained for the stage and made his debut in the mid–1940s. He became a

2010 • Obituaries

Ferenc Kallai

leading film star in the early 1950s, appearing in Elso Facskek (1952), Under the City (1953), Az Elet Hidja (1956), Dani (1957), Pillars of Salt (1958), La Belle et le Tzigane (1959), Three Stars (1960), Katonazene (1961), The Obsessed Ones (1962), Why Hungarian Films Are Bad (1964), Red Letter Days (1967), Three Nights of Love (1967), Sparrows Are Birds Too (1968), Elsietett Hazassag (1968), The Witness (1969), Do You Know SundayMonday (1969), Az Alvilag Professzora (1969), A Crazy Night (1970), Trip Around My Cranium (1980), Temperate Zone (1970), Breakout (1971), Hekus Lettem (1972), Riddance (1973), A Pendragon Legenda (1974), Tuzgombok (1975), Mrs. Derry Where Are You? (1975), Bread and Cigarettes (1975), The Phantom on Horseback (1976), A Piano in Mid Air (1976), Labyrinth (1976), On the Sideline (1976), The Sword (1977), Housewarming (1983), A Voros Grofno (1985), Season of Monsters (1987), A Legenyanya (1989), Megint Tanu (1995), Let’s Love One Another (1996), A Miniszter Felrelep (1997), Professor Albeit (1998), 6:3, Pay It Again Tutti (1999), Werckmeister Harmonies (2000), Glass Tiger (2001), Smouldering Cigarette (2001), Rose’s Songs (2003), Four Seasons in Space (2005), Rokonok (2006), and Noah’s Ark (2007). Kallai also appeared frequently on Hungarian television from the 1960s, with roles in such productions as Tuskevar (1967), Halasz Doktor (1968), Eg y Ore Mulva Itt Vog yok (1971), Az 1001. Kilometer (1972), Volpone (1974), Rejtekhely (1978), Vendegseg (1980), Bolondok Balja (1984), Kulonos Hazassag (1984), Bank Ban (1987), Nyolc Evszak (1987), Eszmelet (1989), Devictus Vincit (1994), Hello Doki (1996), Zsaruver es Csigaver: A Kiralyne Nyakeke (2001), Mikor Siel az Oroszland? (2001), and Micimacko (2005) as the voice of Winnie the Pooh.

K ALOUTA, A NNA Greek actress Anna Kalouta died in Greece on April 17, 2010. She was 91. Kalouta was born in Athens, Greece, on September 29, 1918. She and her sister, Maria, began performing on stage as children. Anna also appeared in a handful of films throughout her long career including Doktor Epameinondas (1937), When the Husband Travels (1938), Kapetan Skorpios (1943), Apaches of Athens (1950), Ekeines pou den Prepei n’ Agapoun (1951), Tsiganiko Aima (1956), Prepei na zisis Timia (1962), O Emiris kai

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o Kakomoiris (1964), Kai oi… 14 itan Yperohoi! (1965), Kalos ilthe to Dollario (1967), I Smyrnia (1969), Eleft-

Nefarious (2008), Prima Primavera (2009), The Blue Horse (2009), Budapest (2009), and Spanish Walk (2010). He was also seen on Dutch television in productions of Baantjer (1997), Saint Amour (2001), All Stars — De Serie (1999), HannaHannaH (2007), and Voetbalvrouwen (2008).

K ANYON , C HRIS Christopher Klucsarits, who wrestled in World Championship Wrestling (WCW) as Mortis and Kanyon, was found dead from a drug overdose in an apparent suicide at his apartment in Sunnyside, Queens, New York, on April 2, 2010. He was 40. Klucsarits was born in Sunnyside on January 4, 1970. He began training as a wrestler in the early 1990s, and made his debut with the WCW in 1995 as the tag team Men at Work with Mark Starr. He donned a mask to become the monster villain Mortis in 1997, where he was managed by James Vandenberg Anna Kalouta

herios Venizelos: 1910 –1927 (1980), O Zigolo tis Athinas (1982), Meidiaste, sas Parakalo (1988), and O Kontos kai oi Mnistires (1988).

KAMERLING, A NTONIE Dutch actor Antonie Kamerling committed suicide in Zevenhoven, Netherlands, on October 6, 2010. He was 44. Kamerling was born in Arnhem, Netherlands, on August 25, 1966. He was studying law when he was cast as Peter Kelder in the Dutch television soap opera Good Times, Bad Times in 1990. He made his film debut in 1993’s De Kleine Blonde Dood. He continued his film career in Suite 16 (1994), KOEKOEK! (1995), Darling (1995), De Orde Der Dingen (1996), Lisa (1996), and Hot Dogs (1997). He starred in the 1997 film All Star, and performed the theme song which became a major hit in the Netherlands. He was also seen in the films Het 14e Kippetje (1998), Left Luggage (1998), Sentimental Education (1998), The Runner (2000), I Love You Too (2001), Soul Assassin (2001), Love Trap (2004), and Mindhunters (2004). Kamerling was featured as Lieutenant Kessel in the dueling Exorcist prequel films, Renny Harlin’s Exorcist: The Beginning (2004) and Dominion: Prequel to the Exorcist (2005). He continued to star in the films Five Fingers (2006), Horizonica (2006),

Antonie Kamerling

Chris Kanyon

in his feud with Glacier. He abandoned the mask to wrestle as Kanyon the following year, and teamed and feuded with Raven and Perry Saturn. He formed the Jersey Triad with Diamond Dallas Page and Bam Bam Bigelow in 1999, and held the WCW tag belts for several months. He also served as technical advisor on the 1999 tele-film The Jesse Ventura Story and the 2000 feature Ready to Rumble, where he was also Oliver Platt’s stunt double. He continued to wrestle with WCW, feuding with Page, Buff Bagwell, and Ernest “the Cat” Miller until the company was purchased by the World Wrestling Federation (WWF/WWE) in 2001. He subsequently worked in the WWE, and briefly teamed with Page to hold tag titles, during the WCW Invasion storyline. He was plagued by injuries over the next several years and was released from the WWE in February of 2004. He continued to compete on the independent circuit with short runs in Total Nonstop Action (TNA) and Pro Wrestling Guerrilla. He reportedly had been suffering from bipolar depression before his death.

KAPISODA, FILIP Montenegrin model and television reality show personality Filip Kapisoda was found dead at the Belgrade, Serbia, apartment of his girlfriend, pop singer Kseniji Pajcin, on March 16, 2010. He was 22. He and Pajcin both had gunshot wounds to the head, in what is believed to have been a murder-

219 suicide with Kapisoda as the assailant. He was born in Cetinje, Montenegro, on April 3, 1987. He was a lead-

Filip Kapisoda

ing male model and participated in the Serbian version of Big Brother, Veliki Brat VIP All Stars, placing third in the contest in 2009.

KAPOR, LJUBO Croatian actor Ljubo Kapor died of cancer in Zagreb, Croatia, on March 13, 2010. He was 77. Kapor was born on Korcula, Croatia, on September 21, 1932. He began his career in the late 1950s, appearing in such productions as Svemirska Patrola (1958), Vucjak (1961), Cuvaj se Senjske Ruke (1964), Tvrdica (1967), Lenjin u Africi (1973), Psihopati (1974), Bombaski Proces (1978), Kraljevo (1981), Poglavlje iz Zivota Augusta Senoe (1981), Pet Mrtvih Adresa (1984), Evo ti ga, Mister Flips! (1984), Bunda (1987), Proljece Janka Potlaceka (1988), Obecana Zemlja (2002), Novo Doba (2002), U Sjeni Green Hilla (2002), and Ne Pitaj Kako! (2006). His other television credits include such series as Prosjaci i Sinovi, Ca smo na Ovom Svitu…, U Registraturi, Macak pod Sljemom, Velo Misto, Nepokoreni Grad, Ptice Nebeske, Operacija Kajman, Odmori se, Zasluzio si, Stipe u Gostima, and Mamutica. Kapor was also seen in numerous films during his career including Monday or Tuesday (1966), Ljubav i Poneka Psovka (1969), Lov na Jelene (1972), Court Martial (1978), That’s the Way the Cookie Crumbles (1979), Ambasador

Ljubo Kapor

2010 • Obituaries

(1984), Dreaming the Rose (1986), Obecana Zemlja (1986), My Uncle’s Legacy (1988), Luka (1992), Papa Sixto V (1992), Zagreb: Open City (1992), Gospa (1995), Sedma Kronika (1996), Christmas in Vienna (1997), The Third Woman (1997), Rusko Meso (1997), When the Dead Start Singing (1999), Marshal Tito’s Spirit (1999), Cetverored (1999), Ko ziv ko Mrtav (2005), and Kenjac (aka Donkey) (2009). He was also a voice actor in the animated films The Elm Chanted Forest (1986) and The Magician’s Hat (1990). Kapor starred as Djuro Pletikosa in the television series Luda Kuca from 2005 until his death.

K ARRAS , ATHAN Greek actor and dancer Athan Karras, who helped popularize Greek dancing in the United States, died of complications from coronary bypass surgery in a Tarzana, California, hospital on February 12, 2010. He was 82. Karras was born in Thessaloniki, Greece, on September 27, 1927, and came to the United States in the late 1930s. He served in the U.S. Coast Guard, and studied theater and dance at New York University. He performed with the Greek National Theater, and was a leading exemplar of Greek folk dancing. Karras choreographed and starred in the

Athan Karras

1957 drama film Dark Odyssey, and was also seen on television in episodes of such series as The Dick Powell Show, The Lloyd Bridges Show, Death Valley Days, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, Combat!, T.H.E. Cat, Run for Your Life, Garrison’s Gorillas, Knots Landing, General Hospital, and The Young and the Restless. He was also featured in the 1981 tele-film The Stark Maker, and appeared in the films Crime Killer (1985) and Nomads (1986). Karras operated the Intersection, a nightclub in Silver Lake, near Los Angeles, which featured Greek folk dancing from the mid–1960s through the mid– 1980s. He also toured the country, presenting folk festivals and conducting seminars at colleges and universities including UC Berkeley, UCLA, and Loyola Marymount University.

KASTNER, ELLIOTT Film producer Elliott Kastner died of cancer in London, England, on June 30, 2010. He was 80. Kastner was born on New York City on January 7, 1930. He began his career as a talent agent at Music Corporation of America (MCA), and began

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producing films in the mid–1960s. His first film credit was 1965’s Bus Riley’s Back in Town. He subsequently teamed with Jerry Gershwin to form Winkast Film Productions Ltd. in England, where he produced the 1966 film version of Ross Macdonald’s private eye novel Harper, starring Paul Newman. He and Gershwin also produced the films Kaleidoscope (1966) starring Warren Beatty, The Bobo (1967), Sol Madrid (1968), Sweet November (1968), and Night of the Following Day (1968) starring Marlon Brando, and the 1970 horror film The Devil’s Widow with Ava Gardner. They also produced several popular film adaptations of Alistair MacLean thrillers including Where Eagles Dare (1968), When Eight Bells Toll (1971), and Breakheart Pass (1975). Kastner also teamed with Alan Ladd Jr. and Jay Kanter to

KATES, BERNARD Character actor Bernard Kates died of complications from sepsis and pneumonia at a Lake Havasu City, Arizona, hospital on February 2, 2010. He was 87. Kates was born in Boston, Massachusetts, on December 26, 1922. He studied acting in New York and began his career on radio. He served in the military during World War II, and resumed acting after his discharge. He performed on the New York stage, including roles in such Broadway productions as At War with the Army and The Disenchanted. He was featured on television in a production of The Magic Cottage in 1949. Kates was seen in episodes of numerous other television series including Suspense, Starlight Theatre, The Philco Television Playhouse, Captain Video and His Video Rangers, The Kaiser Aluminum Hour, Decoy, Naked City, Mr. Lucky, Johnny Staccato, Sea Hunt, Playhouse 90, One Step Beyond, King of Diamonds, Charlie Angelo, The Untouchables, The Asphalt Jungle in the recurring role of Lalley, Angel, Michael Shayne, Two Faces West, Cain’s Hundred, Hennesey, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Bus Stop, Ben Casey, Sam Benedict, Don’t Call Me Charlie, The Dick Powell Show, Glynis, Dr. Kildare, The Outer Limits, Kraft Suspense Theatre, The Greatest Show on Earth, Combat!, The Fugitive, and Hawk. He was featured as Ben Scott in the daytime soap opera The Guiding Light from 1965 to 1968, and was Arthur Saxton in the soap Where the Heart Is from 1969 to 1971. He was featured in the 1990 tele-film Angel of Death, and appeared in episodes

Elliott Kastner

produce films in the early 1970s. Kastner’s many film credits include Laughter in the Dark (1969), The Walking Stick (1970), Iris Murdoch’s A Severed Head (1970), Villain (1971), the supernatural thriller The Nightcomers (1971) with Brando, Fear Is the Key (1972), X Y and Zee (1972), Cry for Me, Billy (1972), Jeremy (1973), and 11 Harrowhouse (1973). He also produced the 1973 film The Long Goodbye, featuring Elliott Gould as Raymond Chandler’s iconic private eye Philip Marlowe. Kastner later produced two more Marlowe films, Farewell, My Lovely (1975) and The Big Sleep (1978), starring Robert Mitchum. His other films include Dogpund Shuffle (1975), Rancho Deluxe (1975), Russian Roulette (1975), 92 in the Shade (1975), The Missouri Breaks (1976), Swashbuckler (1996), The Stick-Up (1977), Black Joy (1977), A Little Night Music (1977), Equus (1977), Absolution (1978), ffolkes (1979), the 1979 tele-film Mr. Horn, Goldengirl (1979), Yesterday’s Hero (1979), The First Deadly Sin (1980) starring Frank Sinatra, Death Valley (1982), Man, Woman and Child (1983), Oxford Blues (1984), Garbo Talks (1984), Nomads (1986), Heat (1986), Angel Heart (1987), White of the Eye (1987), Zombie High (1987), Zits (1988), Never on Tuesday (1988), A Chorus of Disapproval (1988), Jack’s Back (1988), the 1988 remake of The Blob, Homeboy (1988), The Last Party (1993), Frank & Jesse (1995), Love Is All There Is (1996), Sweet November (2001), and Opa! (2005).

Bernard Kates

Gabriel’s Fire, Star Trek: The Next Generation as Dr. Sigmund Freud in the 1993 episode “Phantasms,” NYPD Blue, Picket Fences, and 3rd Rock from the Sun. Kates was seen in a handful of feature films during his career including You’re in the Navy Now (1951), Twelve Hours to Kill (1960), Judgment at Nuremberg (1961), The Super Cops (1974), The Babe (1992), Seed People (1992), The Phantom (1996) as Falkmoore the Butler, and Robo Warriors (1996). Kates was also active on the local stage in California, appearing in several productions at the Pacific Conservatory of the Performing Arts from the 1980s.

K AUFFMANN, GOTZ Austrian actor Gotz Kauffmann died after a long illness in Vienna, Austria,

221 on January 26, 2010. He was 61. Kauffmann was born in Vienna on January 15, 1949. He trained as an actor from the late 1960s, and appeared on stage and television from the early 1970s. He was featured in episodes of Tatort, Alpensaga, and Kottan Ermittelt. He starred as Kurt Blahovec in the series Ein Echtet Wiener geht Nicht Unter from 1975 to 1980, and was Harry Meiusel

Gotz Kauffmann

in Mozart and Meisel in 1987. He starred as Rudi Gneisser in Kaisermuhlen Blues from 1992 to 2002, and was Franz Zotter in Dolce Vita & Co. from 2001 to 2002. He was also seen in several films including Tales from the Vienna Woods (1979), Non-Stop Trouble with My Double (1984), Verlassen Sie Bitte Ihren Mann! (1993), “El Chicko”— der Verdacht (1995), Deadly Love (1995), Der See (1996), and Ene Mene Muh — Und Tot Bist Du (2001).

KAVADIA, TASSO Greek actress Tasso Kavadia died in Athens, Greece, on December 18, 2010. She was 89. Kavadia was born in Patra, Greece, on January 10, 1921. She trained as an actress, and appeared frequently on stage, screen and television from the early 1950s. She was often cast in villainous roles and was seen in the films Windfall in Athens (1954), Condemned Even by Her Own Son (1955), Stella (1955), Vacations in Aegina (1958), The Big Trick (1960), The Underdog (1960), Our Last Spring (1960), Phaedra (1961), A Great

Tasso Kavadia

2010 • Obituaries

Love (1964), Angels Without Wings (1965), I de Gyni na Fovitai ton Andra (1965), Aharisti (1966), Koinonia, ora Miden (1966), Stefania (1966), Olga My Love (1968). Kapetan Fandis Bastouni (1968), Wake Up Vasili (1969), Mia Trelli … Trelli … Sarantara (1970), The Unvanquished (1971), I Amartia tis Omorfias (1972), Anazitisis… (1972), O Gios Mou, o Stefanos (1975), Memories of a Sunday (1975), Horis Prova (1985), Donusa (1992), Nights, Gambled Away (1997), Patagonia (1998), Female Company (1999), Beware of Greeks Bearing Guns (2000), Alexander and Aishe (2002), and The Will of Father Jean Meslier (2009). Kavadia also appeared on television in productions of Apo tin alli Ohthi (1973), Gigas Motel (1993), Eroica (1999), Pappoudes en Drasei (2000) as Evangelia, and Gia Mia Gynaika ki ena Aftokinito (2001). She also worked as a journalist for radio, television and newspapers in the 1950s and 1960s.

KAWAMOTO, KIHACHIRO Japanese animator and filmmaker Kihachiro Kawamoto died in Tokyo on August 23, 2010. He was 85. Kawamoto was born in Tokyo on January 11, 1925. He began working in films in post-war Japan in 1946 as an assistant to production designer So Matsuyama at Toho Studio. He teamed with Tadasu Iizawa to illustrate children’s books in 1950, and began training in stop motion animation.

Kihachiro Kawamoto

He worked with puppet animator Tadahito Mochinaga in the 1950s, and co-founded Shiba Productions in 1958. He became noted for his stop motion animated short films including Hanaori: Breaking of Branches Is Forbidden (1968), Anthropo-Cynical Farce (1970), Oni (1972), The Trip (1973), A Poet’s Life (1974), Dojoji Temple (1976), House of Flame (1979), Rennyo and His Mother (1981), Self Portrait (1988), Briar-Rose or the Sleeping Beauty (1990), Winter Days (2003), and The Book of the Dead (2005).

KEAN , EDWARD Television writer Edward Kean, who was a leading creative force behind The Howdy Doody Show in the late 1940s, died of complications from emphysema in a West Bloomfield Township, Michigan, health care facility on August 13, 2010. He was 85. Kean was born in Manhattan, New York, on October 28, 1924. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II, and earned degrees from Columbia

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and Cornell. He began working with Buffalo Bob Smith in radio in 1947, and soon created the NBC children’s television program Puppet Playhouse. The show evolved into The Howdy Doody Show in 1948, and became one of the most popular children’s programs in television history. Kean was principal writer for the series, penning the lyrics for the opening theme “It’s

Voltron. He also wrote an episode of the television anthology horror series Tales from the Darkside in 1987, and created the French-U.S. animated co-production Denver, the Last Dinosaur in 1988. He teamed with Brian Lacey to form Zodiac Entertainment in 1989, and created and produced such animated series as Widget, the World Watcher, The Mr. Bogus Show, and Twinkle, the Dream Being. He also produced the 2005 animated holiday special Nine Dog Christmas. He was developing the animated action series Z-Force (Zodiac Force), at the time of his death.

KEIM, BETTY LOU Actress Betty Lou Keim died of lung cancer at her home in Chatsworth, California, on January 27, 2010. She was 71. Keim was born in Malden, Massachusetts, on September 27, 1938. She made her Broadway debut in the 1947 play Strange Fruit, and was also featured in Broadway productions of Crime and Punishment (1949), Texas, Li’l Darlin’ (1953), and A Roomful of Roses (1955). She was seen in the 1949 short film Doorway to Death, and made her feature debut in These Wilder Years (1956) with Barbara Stanwyck. She starred as Ginger Roger’s difficult Edward Kean

Howdy Doody Time,” and creating the characters Clarabell the Clown, Princess Summerfall Winterspring, and Flub-a-Dub. Kean also coined the word “kowabunga” as a greeting for the character Chief Thunderthud, which became a popular expression for surfers, the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, and Bart Simpson. He left television in 1955 to work in public relations. He later returned to entertainment as a lounge pianist in hotels in Miami and Detroit.

KEEFE, PETER Animation producer Peter Keefe, who created the U.S. version of the animated series Voltron: Defender of the Universe, died of throat cancer in Rochester, New York, on May 27, 2010. He was 57. Keefe was born in Rochester on November 6, 1952. He began his career in St. Louis, Missouri, as an on-air film critic for the local PBS outlet. He began working in animation in the mid–1980s, adapting the Japanese anime series Go Lion and Dierugger for the United States audiences as popular syndicated series

Peter Keefe

Betty Lou Keim

daughter Dodie in 1956’s Teenage Rebel, and was Frank Sinatra’s rebellious niece Dawn Hirsh in Some Came Running (1958). She also had a small role in the 1957 film The Wayward Bus. Keim appeared frequently on television during the 1950s, and starred as Peggy Allison in the series My Son Jeep in 1953. She was also seen in such series as Armstrong Circle Theatre, Lights Out, Hallmark Hall of Fame, The Philco Television Playhouse, The Alcoa Hour, Goodyear Television Playhouse, Robert Montgomery Presents, The United States Steel Hour, Matinee Theatre, Yancy Derringer, General Electric Theatre, and Riverboat. She co-starred as Fran McCord in the western television series The Deputy from 1959 to 1960. Keim married actor Warren Berlinger in 1959 and abandoned her career to raise a family.

KEITH, LARRY Larry Keith, who appeared as Nick Davis on the daytime soap opera All My Children for over two decades, died of cancer on July 18, 2010. He was 79. Keith was born in New York City on March 1, 1931. He began his career on stage, and had small roles in such Broadway musicals as My Fair Lady,

223

2010 • Obituaries

High Spirits, and I Had a Ball in the late 1950s and early 1960s. He was featured in a production of An Enemy of the People for NET Playhouse in 1966. Keith was featured as Lefty Burns in the soap opera Another World in the late 1960s. He joined All My Children with its premiere in January of 1970, and earned two Daytime Emmy nominations before leaving in 1978. He continued to make guest appearances on the soap

Gerard Kelly

and in the films Take It or Leave It (1981), Blind Date (1984), Ae Fond Kiss (2004), and The Barn (2004).

Larry Keith

through his final cameo appearance in 2005. Keith starred as Fred Baxter in the comedy/talk show series The Baxters in 1979, and was featured in television productions of Make Believe Marriage (1979) for ABC Afterschool Specials, The Wave (1981), Kennedy (1983) as Stanley Levison, Kane & Abel (1985), The Littlest Victims (1989), Nothing Upstairs (1990), and Against Her Will: An Incident in Baltimore (1992). His other television credits include episodes of Tales of the Unexpected, Stingray, The Equalizer, Kate & Allie, The American Experience, and Law & Order. He also appeared as Isidor Straus in the Broadway musical Titanic in the late 1990s, and was Herr Schultz in the revival of Cabaret in the early 2000s. He was featured as Mr. Stopnick in the Broadway musical drama Caroline, or Change in 2004. Keith appeared in the recurring role of Dr. Karl Brandt in the cable series Damages in 2010.

KELLY, GERARD Scottish comic actor Gerard Kelly died of a brain aneurysm in a London hospital on October 28, 2010. He was 51. Kelly was born in Glasgow, Scotland, on May 27, 1959. He was a popular comic performer on the Glasgow stage and appeared frequently on television from the late 1970s. He was seen in episodes of The Camerons (1979) as Andrew Cameron, Play for Today, God’s Wonderful Railway, the 1980 Hammer House of Horror segment The Thirteenth Reunion, Shoestring, Going Out, Juliet Bravo in the recurring of PC David Gallagher, Nanny, Play for Tomorrow, The Young Ones, Metal Mickey, Murder Not Proven?, Victoria Wood: As Seen on TV, The Comic Strip Presents, City Lights as Willie Melvin from 1984 to 1991, Rab C. Nesbitt, EastEnders, Dalziel and Pascoe, Hamish Macbeth, Brookside, Taggart, Casualty, and Extras. He was also seen in television productions of The Holy City (1986), Brat Farrar (1986), and No Holds Bard (2009),

KENNEDY, PEGGY Television casting director Peggy Kennedy died of cancer in Los Angeles on December 3, 2010. She was 65. She began her career as an associate with Pagano-Manwiller Casting in 1995. She was a casting associate or director on the series L.A.

Peggy Kennedy

Law, The Jeff Foxworthy Show, Chicago Hope, Level 9, and Wolf Lake. Kennedy earned an Emmy Award in 2004 for her work on the action series 24. She was involved in casting the series Human Target at the time of her death.

KENWORTHY, PAUL Cinematographer N. Paul Kenworthy, Jr., who was best known for his work on the Disney True-Life Adventures documentaries in the 1950s, died in Ventura, California, on October 15, 2010. He was 85. Kenworthy was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on February 14, 1925. He served in the U.S. Army in Europe during World War II. After his discharge he attended Cornell University, and studied cinematography at UCLA, where he earned a master’s degree. His master’s thesis evolved into the Academy Award–winning nature documentary The Living Desert (1953). He was also cinematographer for the Oscarwinning follow-up, The Vanishing Prairie (1954), and directed and photographed the 1957 film Perri, about

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a female squirrel. He also worked on the Disney television productions of Adventure in Wildwood Heart and Rusty and the Falcon in the 1950s. Kenworthy was instrumental in developing the snorkel camera with Bob Nettman, which was utilized in such films as The Neptune Factory (1973), Tilt (1979), One from the Heart

Paul Kenworthy

(1982), and Jaws 3-D (1983). Kenworthy received an Academy of Motion Pictures Technical Award in 1977, and an Outstanding Achievement Award from the American Society of Cinematographers in 1994. He was honored as a Disney Legend in 1998, and received the Academy of Motion Pictures John A. Bonner Medal of Commendation in 2001.

KENYON, SANDY Veteran character actor Sandy Kenyon died at his home in Los Angeles, California, on February 20, 2010. He was 87. He was born Sanford Klein in the Bronx, New York, on August 5, 1922. He served in the Army Air Corps as a pilot during World War II. He returned to New York after the war to pursue a career as an actor. After several years on the New York stage, he moved to Los Angeles to further his career. He was a familiar face on television from the early 1950s, appearing in episodes of The Doctor and Producers’ Showcase. He starred as Des Smith in the television adventure series Crunch and Des with Forrest Tucker from 1955 to 1956. His numerous tele-

Sandy Kenyon

vision credits also include episodes of The Phil Silvers Show, Northwest Passage, Yancy Derringer, Steve Canyon, Rawhide, Richard Diamond, Private Detective, Colt .45, The Thin Man, One Step Beyond, Alcoa Theatre, Playhouse 90, Tightrope, The Rifleman, Peter Gunn, The Chevy Mystery Show, The Riverboat as Abraham Lincoln, The Americans, The Gunslinger, The Tall Man, Cain’s Hundred, Boris Karloff ’s Thriller, Dr. Kildare, Room for One More, Checkmate, The Wide Country, Twilight Zone, Have Gun —Will Travel, The Great Adventure, and The Eleventh Hour. He was featured as Shep Baggott in the western series The Travels of Jaimie McPheeters from 1963 to 1964. He was also seen in episodes of The Outer Limits, Profiles in Courage, The Fugitive, The Wild Wild West, Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C., Convoy, The Dick Van Dyke Show, A Man Called Shenandoah, The Donna Reed Show, Gidget, Love on a Rooftop, I Spy, The Invaders, The Andy Griffith Show, Gunsmoke, Judd for the Defense, That Girl, The Virginian, Bonanza, The Name of the Game, The Bold Ones: The New Doctors, The Most Deadly Game, Bracken’s World, Ironside, Hogan’s Heroes, The Partridge Family, The Mod Squad, Me and the Chimp, The Doris Day Show, Insight, Kung Fu, The New Dick Van Dyke, The Streets of San Francisco, The Delphi Bureau, Mannix, Columbo, Cannon, Dusty’s Trail, Apple’s Way, Adam-12, The Rookies, Barbary Coast, Happy Days, Maude, Barnaby Jones, The Rockford Files, M*A*S*H, Wonderbug, Hallmark Hall of Fame, The Bionic Woman, Police Woman, What’s Happening!!, The Waltons, All in the Family, Lou Grant, Eight Is Enough, Meeting of Minds, Quincy, Hart to Hart, Airwolf, Knot’s Landing in the recurring role of Reverend Kathrun from 1984 to 1985, Crazy Like a Fox, Designing Women, and Good Grief. He also directed an episode of the sit-com One Day at a Time in 1976. Kenyon was also featured in the telefilms Something for Lonely Man (1968), Travis Logan, D.A. (1971), A Case of Rape (1974), and Honky Tonk (1974). He was the voice of Jon Arbuckle in the 1982 animated tele-film Here Comes Garfield, and was also a voice actor in 1985’s The Romance of Betty Boop. He was also featured in the 1988 mini-series War and Remembrance. Kenyon appeared in a handful of films during his career including Al Capone (1959) as Bones Corelli, Nevada Smith (1966), Easy Come, Easy Go (1967), Sweet Kill (1973), Tom Sawyer (1973), Breezy (1973), Rancho Deluxe (1975), MacArthur (1977) as Lt. Gen. Jonathan Wainwright, Lifepod (1980), When Time Ran Out… (1980), The Loch Ness Horror (1981), Larry Buchanan’s Down on Us (aka Beyond the Doors) (1984) as assassin Alex Stanley, who kills Janis Joplin and Jimi Hendrix for the government, Blame It on the Night (1984), and The Scottish Tale (1996). Kenyon also performed frequently on stage throughout his career, and was appearing in regional productions in the Los Angeles area until shortly before his death.

KERSHNER, IRVIN Film director Irvin Kershner, who was best known for helming The Empire Strikes Back (1980), the first sequel to George Lucas’ Star Wars, died of lung cancer at his home in Los Angeles on November 29, 2010. He was 87. Kershner was

225 born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on April 29, 1923. He served as a flight engineer on B-24 bombers for the U.S. Army Air Force during World War II. He trained in photography and films after the war, and was directing and filming documentaries overseas for the United States Information Agency by the 1950s. He was instrumental in creating the television documentary series Confidential File, which aired from 1953 to 1955. He made his featured debut as director and writer of the 1958 Roger Corman crime drama Stakeout on Dope Street, which he followed with The Young Captives (1959) and The Hoodlum Priest (1961). He directed frequently for television in the early 1960s for episodes of such series as The Rebel, Cain’s Hundred, Ben Casey, Naked City, and Kraft Suspense Theatre. He also helmed such acclaimed films as Face in the Rain (1963), The Luck of Ginger Coffey (1964) starring Robert Shaw and

Irvin Kershner (holding Yoda’s head)

Mary Ure, A Fine Madness (1964) starring Sean Connery as a slightly-mad poet, The Flim-Flam Man starring George C. Scott as a charming rogue, Loving (1970), Up the Sandbox (1972) starring Barbra Streisand, and S*P*Y*S (1974). He also directed the 1976 sequel The Return of a Man Called Horse starring Richard Harris, the tele-film Raid on Entebbe (1976), and the psychological slasher film Eyes of Laura Mars (1978) starring Faye Dunaway. He was selected by George Lucas to direct the sequel for the 1977 mega-hit Star Wars, and The Empire Strikes Back (1980) and found both commercial and critical success. Kershner helmed Sean Connery’s return to the James Bond franchise with 1983’s Never Say Never Again, and directed the “Hell Toupee” episode of Steven Spielberg’s television series Amazing Stories in 1986. He also directed the tele-film Traveling Man (1989) and the 1990 sequel RoboCop 2, and an episode of the undersea sci-fi series SeaQuest DSV in 1993. He served as producer for Paul Chart’s 1997 independent film American Perfekt. Kershner appeared onscreen as Zebedee in Martin Scorsese’s 1988 film The Last Temptation of Christ, and was also featured in the films On Deadly Ground (1994), Angus (1995), Manhood (2003), and Berkeley (2005).

KERST, ALEXANDER Austrian actor Alexander Kerst died in Munich, Germany, on December 9,

2010 • Obituaries

Alexander Kerst

2010. He was 86. Kerst was born in Kralupy u Chomutova, Czechoslovakia, on February 23, 1924. He appeared frequently in films and television from the early 1950s. His film credits include Adventures in Vienna (1952), Brutality (1953), Morgengrauen (1954), Ciske — Ein Kind Braucht Liebe (1955), Suchkind 312 (1955), Corinna Darling (1956), The Star of Africa (1957), Naked in the Night (1958), Stalingrad: Dogs, Do You Want to Live Forever? (1959), Glucke und Liebe in Monaco (1959), My School Chum (1960), Jack und Jenny (1963), The Last Tomahawk (1965), Enter Inspector Maigret (1966), 48 Stunden bis Acapulco (1967), Why the UFOs Steal Our Lettuce (1980), S.A.S. a San Salvador (1983), Marie Ward — Zwischen Galgen und Glorie (1985), and The Holcroft Covenant (1985). Kerst was seen in numerous television productions including Falsch Verbunden (1955), Der Morder Kommt um Elf (1956), Ein Sommernachtstraum (1958), Land, das Meine Sprache Spricht (1959), Der Mann, der Donnerstag War (1960), Fahrten (1960), Die Eiskalte Nacht (1960), Der Hauptmann von Kopenick (1960), Erinnerst du Dich? (1961), Prinze Friedrich von Homburg (1961), Die Marquise von Arcis (1961), Letzter Punkt der Tagesordnung (1962), Die Flucht (1962), Heroische Komodie (1962), Haus der Schonheit (1963), Minna von Barnhelm (1964), In der Sache J. Robert Oppenheimer (1964) as Dr. Edward Teller, Katharina Knie — Ein Seiltanzerstuck (1964), Der Protest (1964), Sechs Stunden Angst (1964), Herodes und Marianne (1965), Mademoiselle Lowenzorn (1965), Sudsee-Affaire (1965), My Ideal Husband (1966), Das Lacheln der Gioconda (1966), Die Rote Rosa (1966), Nobile — Sieben Wochen auf dem Eis (1967), Das Arrangement (1967), Der Heldenmantel (1967), Verrater (1967), Odysseus auf Og ygia (1968), Ein Ehrenwerter Herr (1968), Affare Dreyfuss (1968), Der Dall Liebknecht-Luxemburg (1969), Zehn Kleine Negerlein (1969), Friedrich Ebert und Gustav Stresemann, Schicksalsjahre der Republik (1969), Ceasar and Cleopatra (1969), Das Vermachtnis (1969), Onkel Wanja — Bilder aus dem Landleben (1971), Das Messer (1971), Wie Starb Dag Hammerskjold? (1975), Zahnschmerzen (1975), Der Privatsekretar (1977), Richelieu (1977), Die Erbin (1982), Der Schwarze Bumerang (1982), Mozart (1982), the 1983 mini-series adaptation of Herman Wouk’s The Winds of War as Field Marshal Wilhelm Keitel, Der

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Schatz des Kaisers (1987), Geheime Reichssache (1987), Der Meister des Jungsten Tages (1990), Young Catherine (1991), Ring of Darkness (1992), Clara (1993), Anna — Im Banne des Bosen (1995), Der Fall Lebach (1996), The Sands of Time (1998), Padre Papa (1998), and Silberhochzeit (2006). He starred as Dr. Severin in the television series Gewagtes Spiel from 1964 to 1967, and was featured in episodes of Kommissar Freytag, Das Kriminalmuseum, Tatort, Der Alte, Krimistunde, Detektivburo Roth, Juncal, Roda Roda, Der Erbe der Guldenburgs, Derrick, Hallo, Onkel ADoc!, SOKO 5113, and Rosamunde Pilcher. Kerst starred as Gorm Vandenberg in the 2005 series Die Patriarchin.

KHANDAN, REZA Iranian stage and screen actor Reza Khandan died of cardiac arrest after a long illness with renal disease in Tehran, Iran, on October 3, 2010. He was 77. Khandan was born in Shoushtar, in southern Iran, in 1933. He studied drama at the

Reza Khandan

University of Tehran and began his career in films in the late 1960s. He made his film debut in Gomshodegan (Lost) in 1968. He also appeared in the films Majnoon (1990), Dandan-e-Mar (1990), Safar be Chazabeh (1995), and Two Women (1999). He was also featured in the recent Iranian television series Mokhtarnameh.

KHEIRABADI, HAMIDEH Veteran Iranian actress Hamideh Kheirabadi died at her home in Tehran, Iran, on April 18, 2010. She was 85. Kheirabadi was born in Rasht, Iran, on December 20, 1924. She began her career on stage in the late 1940s, and soon became one of the leading stars of the early Iranian cinema. She was frequently billed as Nadereh, and made her film debut in Patriot in 1953. Her numerous film credits include The Hand of Fate (1959), The Daughters of Eve (1961), The Nouveau Rich (1961), Talker Out of Turn (1961), Fire and Ashes (1961), The Neighborhood Kids (1961), An Angel in My House (1963), Mr. Chameleon (1964), Three Private Detectives (1965), Hossein Kord Shabestari (1966), The Night of the Angels (1968), Reza, the Motorcyclist (1970), Yours Sincerely, Azrael (1970), Hasan Kachal (1970), The Thief and the Cop (1970), Baba Shamal (1971), Kako (1971), Mehdi Meshki va Shalvarak-e Dagh (1972), Shahr-e Aftab (1972),

Hamideh Kheirabadi

Hamsafar (1975), Mamal Amricayi (1975), Shahrag (1975), Honeymoon (1976), The Sunny Night (1977), Mofsedin (1979), Madrak-e Jorm (1985), The Tenants (1986), Hey Joe! (1988), Zard-e Ghanari (1988), Children of Divorce (1989), Shab-e Bist o Nohom (1989), Ali va Ghool-e Jangal (1990), Mother (1991), Tamas-e Sheytani (1992), Maryam and Mitil (1993), Jib-Borha Be Behesht Nemiravand (1993), Redhat and Cousin (1994), Bon Voyage! (1994), A Man, a Bear (1994), Born Loser (1995), Reyhaneh (1995), Ruz-e Vagh’e (1995), and The Lady (1999). She was also featured in such Iranian television series as Patriarch, Sweet and Sour, Green Home, and Godfather.

KIM, TWIST South Korean actor Kim Hanseop, who was known onscreen as Twist Kim, died of a cerebral hemorrhage in Seoul, South Korea, on November 30, 2010. He was 74. He had been an invalid since incurring a head injury in a fall in 2006. Kim began his career onscreen in the early 1960s, and gained his nickname as the first perform the dance “the twist” onscreen in Korea in the 1964 film Barefoot Youth. He was frequently cast in comic supporting roles, and was seen in the films A Man from Tokyo (1962), Pickled Radishes (1964), The Apron (1964), Marines Special Attack Squad (1965), Speak to Me, Yellow River (1965), An Early Rain (1966), Nilniri (1966), Youth College (1966), Miryeon (1967), Full Danger (1967), A Loving

Twist Kim

227 Heart (1969), Housekeeper’s Legacy (1969), Starting from Scratch (1970), The Venus Tear Diamond (1971), Thieves in Love (1971), Friendship (1973), Sunshine on My Face (1973), and No Violence (1975). He performed frequently on South Korean television as a singer, dancer, and comic performer. He returned to the screen in 2000’s Picture Diary, and was featured in the 2005 television series The Barefooted Young.

KIMURA, RUSHER Japanese wrestler Masao “Rusher” Kimura, who was known as the master of the steel cage match, died of complications from pneumonia in Japan on May 24, 2010. He was 68. Kimura was born in Hokkaido, Japan, on June 30, 1941. He began his career in sumo with the Miyaginobeya stable in 1958. He left sumo for professional wrestling in 1964, joining the Japanese Wrestling Association. He moved to Antonio Inoki’s Tokyo Pro in 1966, and became a leading performer with International Wrestling Enterprise (IWE) the following year. He made his U.S. debut in 1968, where he challenged Dory Funk, Jr., for the NWA World Heavyweight Championship several times. He returned to Japan in 1970, where he became

Rusher Kimura

champion of the steel cage matches. He held the IWA tag titles with the Great Kusatsu, and captured the IWA heavyweight title in 1975. He remained with the IWE until the promotion closed in 1981, and was soon headlining as a top villain in New Japan. He made occasional returns to the U.S., and captured the NWA Americas Tag Team Championship in Las Vegas, wrestling as Mr. Toyo, with Go Ryuma in 1982. He was a founding member of the Universal Wrestling Federation in 1984 before moving to the All Japan promotion. He was part a team of villains from the IWE, and frequently feuded with Giant Baba. Kimura later formed a tag team with Baba, which competed often until Giant’s death in 1999. He joined the newly-formed Pro-Wrestling NOAH in 2000, where he retired because of health problems in 2004.

KIMURA, TAKEO Japanese film production designer and art director Takeo Kimura died in Tokyo, Japan, on March 21, 2010. He was 91. Kimura was born in Tokyo on April 1, 1918. He began working in films in the late 1940s, and teamed frequently with film di-

2010 • Obituaries

rector Seijun Suzuki at Nikkatsu Studio. His many film credits include Kenji to Onnakanshu (1949), Koi no Oranda-Zaka (1951), Gan (1953), Aru Onna (1954), Shunkin Monogatari (1954), Tsuki wa Noborinu (1955), Keisatsu Nikki (1955), Ofukuro (1955), The Maid’s Kid (1955), Tsukiyo no Kasa (1955), Zoku Keisatsu Nikki (1955), Iro Zange (1956), The Baby Carriage (1956), Kamisaka Shiro no Hanzai (1956), Kyo no Inochi (1957), Muteki ga Ore o Yondeiru (1960), Yakuza Sensei (1960), Kurenai no Kenju (1961), Arashi o Tsukkiru Jetto-ki (1961), Ue o Muite Aruko (1962), Attack Squadron! (1963), Itsudemo Yume O (1963), The Bastard (1963), Kanto Mushuku (1963), Hana to Doto (1964), Nikutai no Mon (1964), Oretachi no Chi ga Yurusanai (1964), Shunpu den (1965), Akutaroden: Waruihoshi no Shita Demo (1965), White Tiger Tattoo (1965), Tokyo Drifter (1966), Kawachi Karumen (1966), Fighting Eleg y (1966), Crimson Comet (1967), Gangster VIP (1968), Monument to the Girl’s Corps (1968), Stormy Era (1968), The Cleanup (1969), Exiled to Hell (1969), Profile of a Boss’s Son (1970), Swirling Butterflies (1970), Rising Dragon’s Iron Flesh (1970), Furyo Shojo Mako (1971), Shinob Ugawa (1972), Sandakan 8 (1974), Wakga Seishun no Toki (1975), Preparation for the Festival (1975), Cape of North (1976), The Youth Killer (1976), Love and Faith: Lady Ogin (1978), Tempyo no Iraka (1980), Tsigoineruwaizen (1980), Naru Kanaru Soro (1980), Za Uman (1980), Nihon no Atsui Hibi Bosatsu: Shimoyama Jiken (1981), Namidabashi (1983), Seiteki Hanzai (1983), Kapone oi ni Naku (1985), Hinatsuri (1985), To Sleep so As to Dream (1986), Beyond the Shining Sea (1986), The Sea and the Poison (1986), Whooh! Exploration Unit (1986), Shinran: Path to Purity (1987), Tokyo: The Last Megalopolis (1988), Teito Taisen (1989), Circus Boys (1989), Death of a Tea Master (1989), Takeshi: Childhood Days (1990), Jipangu (1990), Hong Kong Paradise (1990), Shikibu Monogatari (1990), Shiny Moss (1992), Ai Ni Tsuite, Tokyo (1992), Yumi no Onna (1993), Waga Jinsei Saiakyu no Toki (1994), Zenshin Shosetsuka (1994), Harukana Jidai no Kaidan O (1995), Fukai Kawa (1995), The Last Bullet (1995), Fuyu no Kappa (1995), Aisuru (1997), Pickpocket (2000), Kurenai no Kenju yo Eien Ni (2000), Closed Ward (2000), Darkness in the Light (2001), Pistol Opera (2001) which he also scripted, The Sea Is Watching (2002), Johatsu Tabinikki (2003),

Takeo Kimura

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The Face of Jizo (2004), Portrait of the Wind (2005), The Youth of Kamiya Etsuko (2006), Faces of a Fig Tree (2006), Don’t Laugh at My Romance (2007), The Clone Returns Home (2008), and Serial Dad (2008). Kimura was 90 years old when he made his directorial debut, helming Yume no Mani Mani (2008) and Ogonka: Hosureba Hana, Shisureba Cho (2009).

KINCAID, DAVID British actor David Kincaid died in England on May 12, 2010. He was 70. The son of poet John Kincaid, he trained as an actor at the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama. He performed on stage with the Royal Shakespeare Company

David Kincaid

and the Nation Theatre. He appeared often on television from the late 1960s, with roles in episodes of such series as Dr. Finlay’s Casebook, Spy Trap, Dixon of Dock Green, Churchill’s People, King of Kensington, Warship, Rooms, The Bill, Doctor Who, Taggart, The New Adventures of Robin Hood, and Baddiel’s Syndrome. He was also seen in television productions of the Shakespeare plays The Taming of the Shrew (1980), Timon of Athens (1981), and Antony and Cleopatra (1981). Kincaid starred in the 1995 short horror film The Black Cat, and had a small role in the 2001 tele-film Back Home.

in Fort Bragg, California, on September 1, 2010. She was 76. She was born Eleanore Cammack King in Los Angeles on August 5, 1934. She was cast as the daughter of Rhett Butler (Clark Gable) and Scarlett O’Hara Butler (Vivien Leigh) in the epic film Gone with the Wind (1939), playing Bonnie Blue at age 5. She was also featured in a small role in the 1939 comedy film Blondie Meets the Boss, and was the voice of the young doe Faline in the Disney animated classic Bambi in 1942. Her film career ended as a child, though she was a popular guest at nostalgia shows in her later years.

KING, KIP Actor and comedian Kip King, an early member of the Los Angeles comedy troupe The Groundings and voice of Tailor Smurf in the popular cartoon series The Smurfs, died after a long illness on July 15, 2010. He was 72. He was born Jerome Kattan in Chicago, Illinois, on August 11, 1937. He began working in television in the mid–1950s, appearing in episodes of such series as Medic, Big Town, The Walter Winchell File, Dragnet, Man with a Camera, The Rifleman, The DuPont Show with June Allyson, M Squad, Bachelor Father, Mister Ed, Going My Way, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, The Eleventh Hour, My Favorite Martian, Amos Burke, Secret Agent, The Beverly Hillbillies, 12 O’Clock High, My Living Doll, My Three Sons, Ben Casey, Mister Roberts, The Smothers Brothers Show, Batman as one of the Joker’s henchmen in a 1966 episode, Captain Nice, Love, American Style, The Partridge Family, Longstreet, and Mannix. King also appeared in small roles in the films Tea and Sympathy

KING, CAMMIE Cammie King, the former child actress who was featured as Bonnie Blue Butler in Gone with the Wind, died of lung cancer at her home Kip King

Cammie King

(1956), Dino (1957), Johnny Trouble (1957), Kiss Them for Me (1957), Peyton Place (1957), The Proper Time (1960), Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1962), Kid Galahad (1962), and Thunder Alley (1967). King joined the legendary comedy troupe The Groundlings in the early 1970s, where he honed his comedic talents. He continued to appear in such films as Westworld (1973) as a technician, Black Starlet (1974), Murph the Surf (1975), and Slumber Party ’57 (1976), and was featured in the tele-films Rosetti and Ryan: Men Who Love Women (1977), More Than Friends (1978), and Handsome Harry’s (1985). He began voicing the role of Tailor Smurf in the popular animated series The Smurfs in the

229 early 1980s, and was also a voice actor for Scooby-Doo and Scrappy-Doo (1979), The Biskitts (1983), and Tom & Jerry Kids Show (1992). His other television credits include episodes of America 2-Night, Barney Miller, Diff ’rent Strokes, Bosom Buddies, One Day at a Time, The Facts of Life, The Jeffersons, Cagney & Lacey, The Fall Guy, Small Wonder, The Bronx Zoo, Out of This World, The Munsters Today, Dragnet, Jack’s Place, High Sierra Search and Rescue, EZ Streets, Saturday Night Live, and Half way Home. King’s later film credits include Student Confidential (1987), Cyber-C.H.I.C. (1989), Breast Men (1997), A Night at the Roxbury (1998), the tele-film Babylon 5: Thirdspace (1998), Perfumed Garden (2000), Corky Romano (2001), Call Me Claus (2001), A Light in the Forest (2002), and Scout’s Honor (2009). King’s survivors include his son, comic actor Chris Kattan, a second generation Groundling and regular on Saturday Night Live.

KINISKI, GENE Canadian wrestler Gene Kiniski, who held numerous championships during his long career, died of cancer in Blaine, Washington, on April 14, 2010. He was 81. Kiniski was born in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, on November 23, 1928. He was a pro football player with Edmonton in the Canadian League before he began wrestling professionally in Arizona in the early 1950s. He teamed with John Tolos to capture the International TV Tag Team belts in Los Angeles in 1955. He also challenged Lou Thesz for the NWA World Championship several times. He also held the NWA World Tag team belts with Lord James Blears in San Francisco, and briefly wrestled under the name Gene Kelly to hold the NWA Texas Heavyweight Championship in 1956. He teamed with Fritz Von Erich to hold the Canadian Open Tag Team Title in Toronto in 1957, and held the British Empire Title in Toronto several times in the late 1950s. He joined the American Wrestling Association (AWA) in 1960, and defeated champion Verne Gagne for the belt the following year. He soon lost a rematch to Gagne, but captured the AWA tag titles with Hard-Boiled Haggerty. He unsuccessfully challenged Buddy Rogers for the NWA World Championship in 1962, and lost a title match to World Wide Wrestling Federation (WWWF) champion Bruno Sammartino in 1964. He defeated

Gene Kiniski

2010 • Obituaries

Lou Thesz for the NWA World Heavyweight Championship in January of 1966, and was challenged for the belt by such wrestlers as Bobo Brazil, Bill Watts, Edouard Carpentier, Dick the Bruiser, Terry Funk, and Dory Funk, Jr. He lost the belt to Dory Funk, Jr., in February of 1969. He remained a leading competitor in Canada and the United States over the next decade. His sons Kelly and Nick Kiniski also became professional wrestlers, and Gene occasionally teamed with them in the early 1980s. He was also featured in several films including Paradise Alley (1978) starring Sylvester Stallone, Terminal City Ricochet (1990), and Double Happiness (1994).

K IRKMAN, R OBIN Robin Kirkman, who achieved cinematic immortality as the associate producer for Robert Clarke’s 1959 cult classic The Hideous Sun Demon, died after a long illness in Clackamas, Oregon, on September 23, 2010. He was 80. Kirkman was born on July 6, 1930. He was a student at the University of Southern California in the late 1950s, where he

Robin Kirkman

met actor Robert Clarke in a screenwriting class. Kirkman teamed with Clarke and Tom Boutross to produce the cult sci-fi classic The Hideous Sun Demon. He helped finance the completion of the film from a family inheritance, and many of the interior scenes were filmed at his home. He also appeared onscreen as a cop run down by a fleeing Robert Clarke.

KITABAYASHI, TANIE Japanese actress Tanie Kitabayashi died of pneumonia in a Tokyo hospital on April 27, 2010. She was 98. She was born Reiko Ando in Tokyo on May 21, 1911. She began her career on stage, and was noted for her portrayal of older women from an early age. She was a founding member of the Mingei Theatre in 1950. She was featured on over 100 films during her long career including Les Miserables: Gods and Demons (1950), Scandal (1950), Shiroi Yajuu (1950), Mesu Inu (1951), Bijo to Touzoku (1952), Gembaku no Ko (1952), Onna no Issho (1953), Yokubo (1953), Shukuzu (1953), Onna Hitori Daichi o Yuku (1953), Okuman Choja (1954), The Valley Between Love and Death (1954), Dorodarake no Seishun (1954), Kakute Yume Ari (1954), The Street Without Sun (1954), Tomoshibi (1954), Zoku Keisatsu Nikki (1955), A Hole of

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230

My Own Making (1955), Okami (1955), Seishun Kaidan (1955), Kokoro (1955), Joyu (1956), Waga Machi (1956), Shiawase wa Doko Ni (1956), Darkness at Noon (1956), Gin Shinju (1956), The Burmese Harp (1956), Bitoku no Yoromeki (1957), Ana (1957), The Temple of the Golden Pavilion (1958), The Chase (1958), Yurakucho de Aimasho (1958), Daughter’s Adventure (1958), Ningen no Kabe (1959), Kagi (1959), Sono Kabe o Kudake (1959), Yoru no Tog yo (1959), Kiku to Isamu (1959), Nianchan (1959), Yakuza Sensei (1960), The Sun’s Burial (1960), Buddha (1961), Midaregami (1961), Matsukawa-Jiken (1961), The Age of Marriage (1961), Ko Jin ko Jitsu (1961), Akai Tsubomi to Shiroi Hana (1962), Foundry Town (1962), Kigeki: Nippon no Oba-Chan (1962), Nippon Konchuki (1963), Nyokei Kazoku (1963), Hiko Shojo (1963), Minna Waga Ko (1963), Aoi Sanmyaku (1963),

Tanie Kitabayashi

The Crest of Man (1964), Murderous Instincts (1964), Echigo Tsutsuishi Oyashirazu (1964), Getsuyobi no Yuka (1964), Kon’nichiwa Akachan (1964), Nippon Dorobo Monogatari (1965), Nihon Retto (1965), Teppo Inu (1965), The Last Lady (1967), Kitaguni no Ryojo (1967), Nikudan (1968), Chikado no Taiyo Made (1968), Dare no Isu? (1968), Heat Wave Island (1969), Senba Zuru (1969), Boku wa Gosai (1970), Oh My Comrade (1970), Terror in the Streets (1970), Apart from Life (1970), Kigeki: Inochi no Nedan (1971), En Toiu Onna (1971), Ogon Batto ga Yattekuru (1972), Umarekawatta Tamegoro (1972), Aa Koe Naki Tomo (1972), The Family (1974), The Possessed (1976), Ningen no Shomei (1977), Nogiku no Haka (1977), Never Give Up (1978), Branch School Diary (1978), Oh! The Nomugi Pass (1979), Kanpaku Sengen (1979), Writhing Tongue (1980), Station (1981), Mayonaka no Shotaijo (1981), Suspicion (1982), Hakujasho (1983), Tora-san’s Song of Love (1983), Amagi Goe (1983), Biruma no Tatekoto (1985), Dangerous Women (1985), Twilight of the Cockroaches (1987), Yamadamura Waltz (1988), Rikyu (1989), Daiyukai (1991), Yomigaeri (2002), and Letter from the Mountain (2002). Kitabayashi was also noted for her role as the voice of grandmother Kanta no Obasan in the 1988 animated film My Neighbor Totoro (Tonari No Totoro).

KO, HSIANG TING Veteran Chinese actor Hsiang Ting Ko, who appeared in more than 100 films

in Hong Kong and Taiwan, died at his home in Taipei, Taiwan, on May 16, 2010. He was 93. Hsiang was born in Suzhou, Jiangsu Province, China, on August 8, 1916. He served in the Chinese military during World War II, and performed with the entertainment corps. He continued to work as an entertainer when he settled in Taiwan in the late 1940s. He was seen in numerous films from the early 1960s, including Those Oyster Girls (1963), Beautiful Duckling (1965), Fire Bulls (1966), Many Enchanting Nights Part I (1966), Orchids and My Love (1966), Lonely Seventeen (1967), The Last Day of Hsianyang (1968), Three Swordsman and the Dragon Door (1968), Qing Long Zhen (1968), Tigress Is Coming (1968), Like Father, Like Son (1968), Jiang Hu Ke (1969), The Avenger (1969), Ren Gui Hu (1969), The Ace of Swordsman (1969), Axing of the Coffin (1969), Black Invitation (1969), Accidental Trio (1969), Joy Anger Sadness Happiness (1970), The Evergreen Mountains (1970), Unforgotten Ones (1970), Home Sweet Home (1970), The Thunderstorm Sword (1970), The Enchanting Ghost (1970), Eighteen Disciples of Buddha (1970), The Bravest Revenge (1970), The Fairy Love (1970), Love Can Forgive and Forget (1971), Esquire Hotel (1971), Redbeard (1971), Happiness and Joy (1971), The Ungrateful One (1971), The Eight Immortals (1971), The Sword (1971), The Decisive Battle (1971), Blood Fingers (1972), Fury of King Boxer (1972), It All Started with a Bed (1972), Execution in Autumn (1972), Gecko Kung Fu (1972), The Dark Alley (1972), Heroine in the Dust (1972), A Girl Fighter (1972), The Tormentor (1973), Na Cha and the Seven Devils (1973), Deadly China Doll (1973), Village on Fire (1973), Shanghai Lil and the Sun Luck Kid (1973), 60 Minutes to Terror (1973), Fist of Shaolin (1973), Hurricane (1973), The Chivalric Guts (1973), The Tournament (1974), The Big Raid (1974), Where the Seagull Flies (1974), Crazy Nuts of Kung Fu (1974), The Marriage (1974), The Little Man, Ah Fook (1974), The Wind of Ghost (1974), The Joy of Life (1974), Nu quan bu Gao (1974), The Dauntless Bumpkin (1974), Big Brother (1974), The Cantonese (1974), Heroes Behind the Enemy Lines (1975), A Cookbook of Birth Control (1975), The Youngest Sister (1975), Gui Ji (1975), Ji Gong Huo Fo (1975), The Unforgettable Lake Dream (1975), Chinese Amazons (1975), The Legend of Mother Goddess (1975), Xiang xia bi ye Sheng (1975), Lady Karate (1976),

Hsiang Ting Ko

231 Morning Date (1976), Everlasting Glory (1976), Boxer Rebellion (1976), Swift Shaolin Boxer (1976), Eight Hundred Heroes (1977), Cloud of Romance (1977), Confused Love (1977), The Sea God and the Ghosts (1977), Huang Bu Jun Hun (1978), Everywhere Birds Are Singing (1978), Lu Dong Bin san xi Bai Mu Dan (1978), Return of the Dead (1979), Gone with Honor (1979), Iron Swallow (1979), He Never Gives Up (1979), Mantis in the Monkey’s Shadow (1979), Deadly Confrontation (1979), My Native Land (1980), Guningtou da Zhan (1980), The Imperious Princess (1980), The Story of a Small Town (1980), Yan er Gui (1980), The Magnificent 72 (1980), The Merry Couple (1981), A Centennial of Railways of ROC (1981), The Crooked Profligates (1982), Godfathers of Fury (1982), The Sexy Lady Driver (1982), Shi ye Yun ye Ming ye (1982), Story of the Heroic Pioneers (1986), Feng Yue (1996), and The Opium War (1997).

KOBAYASHI, KEIJU Japanese character actor Keiju Kobayashi died of heart failure in Tokyo on September 16, 2010. He was 86. Kobayashi was born in Gunma Prefecture, Japan, on November 23, 1923. He began working in films in the early 1940s at Nikkatsu, and remained a popular performer for over sixty years. He was frequently cast in comic roles as an average working man, but also played prime ministers and police detectives in his long career in film and television. His many film credits include Daigoretsu no Kyofu (1942), The Tiger of Malaya (1943), Malaysia (1943), Mado Kara Tobidase (1950), Fukkatsu (1950), A Married Life (1951), Third Class Executives (1952), Dimple of Tokyo (1952), Fufu (1953), Mr. Pu (1953), Adolescence Part II (1953), Operation Kamikaze (1953), TakeChan Shacho (1954), Saturday Angel (1954), Seifuku no Otome Tachi (1955), Kuchizuke (1955), Aoi Hate (1955), Sudden Rain (1956), Night School (1956), Okashi-na Yatsu (1956), Daigaku no Samurai Tachi (1957), Makeraremasen Katsumadewa (1958), A Holiday in Tokyo (1958), The Happy Pilgrimage (1958), Little Peach (1958), Iwashigumo (1958), New Third Grade Executive (1959), Nippon Tanjo (1959), I Bombed Pearl Harbor (1960), Wanton Journey (1960), Master Fencer Sees the World (1960), Happiness of Us Alone (1961), Playboy President (1961), The End of Summer (1961), Sanjuro (1962), The Bridge Between (1962), 47 Samurai (1962),

2010 • Obituaries

Burari Burabura Monogatari (1962), Born in Sin (1962), Attack Squadron! (1963), Shiro to Kuro (1963), The Elegant Life of Mr. Everyman (1963), A Company President’s Gentleman’s Story (1964), Ken (1964), Could I But Live (1964), Dark the Mountain Snow (1965), Samurai (1965), Five Gents Trick Book (1965), Tameki no Taisho (1965), Beast Alley (1965), Five Gents on the Spot (1966), The Daphne (1966), Japan’s Longest Day (1967), Shinsengumi: Assassins of Honor (1969), Bakumatsu (1970), Turning Point of Showa History: The Militarists (1970) as Premier Hideki Tojo, Tidal Wave (1973), Waga Seishun no Toki (1975), Tora-san, the Intellectual (1975), White Love (1979), The Imperial Navy (1981), High Teen Boogie (1982). Chichi to Ko (1983), Okinawa no Shonen (1983), Loving (1983), Godzilla 1985 (1984) as Prime Minister Mitamura, For Business (1986), Tree Without Leaves (1986), Shinshi Domei (1986), A Taxing Woman (1987), Yawara! (1989), Tasmania Story (1990), Whisper of the Heart (1995) as the voice of Shiro Nishi, Aisuru (1997), Ano Natsu no Hi (1999), Kokubetsu (2001), Vengeance for Sale (2001), Denen no Yuutsu (2001), Tegami (2001), Take the “A” Train, Someday (2003), Haha no iru Basho (2005), and Switching — Goodbye Me (2007).

KOENIG, ANDREW Actor Andrew Koenig, who was best known for his recurring role as Richard “Boner” Stabone on the 1980’s sitcom Growing Pains, was found dead of an apparent suicide in Stanley Park, in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, on February 25, 2010. He was 41. He was last seen in Vancou-

Andrew Koenig

Keiju Kobayashi

ver on February 14, and had missed his flight back to the United States two days later. He had reportedly been suffering from depression before his disappearance. Joshua Andrew Koenig was born in Los Angeles, California, on August 17, 1968. His father was actor Walter Koenig, who starred as Pavel Chekov in the original Star Trek series. Andrew appeared in a small role in a 1973 episode of Adam-12 as a child. He was featured as Kirk Cameron’s best friend, “Boner,” in the ABC comedy series Growing Pains from 1985 to 1989. He also guest starred in episodes of My Sister Sam, 21 Jump Street, and My Two Dads. He provided the voices for the characters Ambush and Night Creeper Leader

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for the animated G.I. Joe series in the early 1990s. He was also featured as Tumak in the “Sanctuary” episode of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine in 1993. He worked mainly in independent films from the early 2000’s, and starred as the Joker in the fan-film Batman: Dead End, which debuted at the San Diego Comic-Con International in 2003. Koenig directed the independent shorts Good Boy (2003), Instinct vs. Reason (2004), and Woman in a Green Dress (2004). He also served as editor for the shorts White Space (2005), Gonzo Utopia (2006), Jukebox: From Edison to Ipod (2007), Rock n Roll Made in Mexico: From Evolution to Revolution (2007), Keepsake (2008), Winthrop Rising: A Basketball Story (2009), and Living the Blues: The Story of Canned Heat (2009). He also appeared in the shorts The Theory of Everything (2006), InAlienable (2010), and DaZe: Vol. Too (sic)— NonSeNse (2010).

KOHOUT, SHAYNE Actress Shayne Kohout died suddenly in Atlanta, Georgia, on May 13, 2010. She was 33. Kohout was born in Midland, Texas, on June 9, 1976. She graduated from Texas Tech University, and moved to Atlanta in 2001 to work in theatre. She appeared frequently in local stage productions, and was featured in the films The Axe Man (2006), Manhattan Crack’r (2008), and Ms. Leading (2009). She

Satoshi Kon

helmed the award-winning Millennium Actress in 2001. He also wrote and directed the films Tokyo Godfathers (2003), Paranoia Agent (2004), and Paprika (2006). He was in pre-production on The Dreaming Machine at the time of his death.

KOUTOUKAS, H.M. Absurdist playwright H.M. Koutoukas died of complications from diabetes at his home in Manhattan, New York, on March 5, 2010. He was 72. He was born ‘Haralambos Monroe Koutoukas in Endicott, New York, on June 4, 1937. He moved to Manhattan in the early 1960s to work in theater. He became noted for writing such surreal

Shayne Kahout

was also seen on television in a 2008 episode of Army Wives, and the 2010 tele-film The Wronged Man. Kohout starred as Gaynelle Snow in the film adaptations of the popular children’s books Mandie and the Secret Tunnel (2009) and Mandie and the Cherokee Treasure (2010). She was also featured in the 2010 film Life as We Know It.

KON, SATOSHI Japanese film and anime director Satoshi Kon died in Japan on August 23, 2010. He was 46. Kon was born in Kushiro, Hokkaido, Japan, on October 12, 1963. He graduated from the Musashino College of Arts, and worked as a manga artist and editor for Young Magazine. He began working in films on Katsuhiro Otomo’s World Apartment Horror in 1991. He was also a designer for the 1991 anime Roujin Z. He scripted the Magnetic Rose segment for the 1995 anthology film Memories. Kon made his directorial debut with 1997’s Perfect Blue from Studio Madhouse, and

H.M. Koutoukas

plays as Medea in the Laundromat, Awful People Are Coming Over So We Must Be Pretending to Be Hard at Work and Hope They Will Go Away, Afamis Notes, The Brown Book, Butterfly Encounter, and Turtles Don’t Dream for various off-off Broadway venues. He received an Obie Award in 1966 for the play Assaulting Established Tradition. Koutoukas also ran a theatrical workshop known as the School for Gargoyles and acted in many productions of Charles Ludlam’s Ridiculous Theatrical Company. He was featured in the small role of Walter Lobello in the 1993 film Naked in New York. His most recent production was a 2004 performance of The Ring of Death in Greenwich Village.

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KOUYATE, SOTIGUI West African actor Sotigui Kouyate died on Paris, France, on April 17, 2010. He was 73. Kouyate was born in Bamako, Mali, on July 19, 1936, of Gambian parents of the Mandinka ethnic group. He was adopted and raised in Burkino Faso, where he played soccer with the national team. He began his acting career on stage in the mid–1960s. He formed his own theatrical company in 1966, and produced his own play, The Crocodile’s Lament. He appeared frequently in films from the early 1970s, with roles in FVVA: Femme, Villa, Voiture, Argent (1972), Toula ou Le Genie des Eaux (1974), The Courage of Others (1982), Jours de Tourmentes (1983), Le Medecin de Gafire (1986), Descente aux Enfers (1986), Black Mic Mac (1986), How Good the Whites Are (1988), Eden Miseria (1988), Boulevards d’Afrique (1989), Mamy Wata (1990), L’Africana (1990), Bernardo Bertolucci’s The Sheltering Sky (1990), Golem, l’Esprit de l’Exil (1992), IP5: L’ile aux Pachydermes (1992), Lost in Transit (1993), Rupture(s) (1993), Keita! L’Heritage du Griot (1994) directed by his son Dani Kouyate, Le Maitre des Elephants (1995), Bad Boy (1995), A Cran (1995)